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The Education Apocalypse: How It Happened and How to Survive It

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For decades, the U.S. invested ever-growing fortunes into its antiquated K-12 education system in exchange for steadily worse outcomes. At the same time, Americans spent more than they could afford on higher education, driven by the kind of cheap credit that fueled the housing crisis. The graduates of these systems were left unprepared for a global economy, unable to find For decades, the U.S. invested ever-growing fortunes into its antiquated K-12 education system in exchange for steadily worse outcomes. At the same time, Americans spent more than they could afford on higher education, driven by the kind of cheap credit that fueled the housing crisis. The graduates of these systems were left unprepared for a global economy, unable to find jobs, and on the hook for student loans they could never repay. Economist Herb Stein famously said that something that can’t go on forever, won’t. In the case of American education, it couldn’t—and it didn’t. In The Education Apocalypse, Glenn Harlan Reynolds explains how American education as we knew it collapsed – and how we can all benefit from unprecedented power and freedom in the aftermath. From the advent of online education to the rebirth of forgotten alternatives like apprenticeships, Reynolds shows students, parents, and educators how—beyond merely surviving the fallout—they can rethink and rebuild American education from the ground up.


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For decades, the U.S. invested ever-growing fortunes into its antiquated K-12 education system in exchange for steadily worse outcomes. At the same time, Americans spent more than they could afford on higher education, driven by the kind of cheap credit that fueled the housing crisis. The graduates of these systems were left unprepared for a global economy, unable to find For decades, the U.S. invested ever-growing fortunes into its antiquated K-12 education system in exchange for steadily worse outcomes. At the same time, Americans spent more than they could afford on higher education, driven by the kind of cheap credit that fueled the housing crisis. The graduates of these systems were left unprepared for a global economy, unable to find jobs, and on the hook for student loans they could never repay. Economist Herb Stein famously said that something that can’t go on forever, won’t. In the case of American education, it couldn’t—and it didn’t. In The Education Apocalypse, Glenn Harlan Reynolds explains how American education as we knew it collapsed – and how we can all benefit from unprecedented power and freedom in the aftermath. From the advent of online education to the rebirth of forgotten alternatives like apprenticeships, Reynolds shows students, parents, and educators how—beyond merely surviving the fallout—they can rethink and rebuild American education from the ground up.

38 review for The Education Apocalypse: How It Happened and How to Survive It

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tedd Sperling

    What’s wrong with education? This will illustrate the problems. Provides a good introduction and background into the history, mistakes, and efforts of educational industry to create a system that fails to educate. Presents the far too many uncessary and complicated issues that adds more than sufficent weigth to crush both students and the system alike. In short, the end of education. What’s next? I was hoping for answers.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Sipper

    Glenn Harlan Reynolds offers a short but informative look at the current state of higher education, and to a lesser degree, K-12 education. American colleges and universities have become dysfunctional, and the reason for this is money. Because of government largesse with regard to student loans, colleges and universities are taking advantage of students by charging sky high tuition rates. This money is being pocketed mostly by administrators, although faculties are benefiting some. The situation Glenn Harlan Reynolds offers a short but informative look at the current state of higher education, and to a lesser degree, K-12 education. American colleges and universities have become dysfunctional, and the reason for this is money. Because of government largesse with regard to student loans, colleges and universities are taking advantage of students by charging sky high tuition rates. This money is being pocketed mostly by administrators, although faculties are benefiting some. The situation with administrators is so out of control that the number of administrators and administrative staffers employed has increased 85 percent and 240 percent, respectively, according to the author. As a result, Mr. Reynolds suggests that the bubble will eventually burst in higher education as it did in housing, and in fact, is already beginning to do so. According to the author, people are starting to realize that the financial return on a degree is no longer guaranteed. Poor job prospects and being saddled with student loan debt are two reasons why some are beginning to rethink college. Mr. Reynolds puts forth a prediction about what the future may hold. He believes that the colleges and universities that survive the bubble burst will move away from the traditional model of college and begin using a system that is faster, cheaper, and more focused on what students need. Mr. Reynolds assumes that this will also take place with K-12 education, which is set to implode according to his way of thinking. Essentially, taxpayers are getting tired of having their money go to the failing public schools of America. When things reach critical mass, taxpayers will rebel and public schools, the way we know them, will become a thing of the past. I don't doubt there needs to be a change in the way schools are funded. My problem with this book is the predictions made by the author. While some of the alternatives sound good, they will probably lead to an even larger gap between the haves and have nots.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nathanael

  4. 4 out of 5

    Philip Green

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    Jim Sanders

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    Carl

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    Michael

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    Bayo Dele

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    Mean Nostalgist

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hal

  11. 5 out of 5

    James T. Pipers

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    David Besly

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    Robert Terry

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    Tom

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    Powderburns

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    Sommer Wilder

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth F

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    Tyler

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    Cecilia Rios

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    Susan Bell

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    Bill

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    Alexandra

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    Tom Callaghan

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    John Watson

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    Bill Casey

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    Ricarda Krenn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Knutson

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    J. Boo

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    Bruce

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    Kelly

  31. 4 out of 5

    Mehul Bhagat

  32. 5 out of 5

    Fivewincs

  33. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Bookreedur

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    Mentemanuque

  35. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Serdy

  36. 4 out of 5

    Brewminator

  37. 5 out of 5

    Marcella

  38. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

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