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Oversubscribed: How to Get People Lining Up to Do Business with You

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Don't fight for customers, let them fight over you! Have you ever queued for a restaurant? Pre-ordered something months in advance? Fought for tickets that sell out in a day? Had a hairdresser with a six-month waiting list? There are people who don't chase clients, clients chase them. In a world of endless choices, why does this happen? Why do people queue up? Why do they Don't fight for customers, let them fight over you! Have you ever queued for a restaurant? Pre-ordered something months in advance? Fought for tickets that sell out in a day? Had a hairdresser with a six-month waiting list? There are people who don't chase clients, clients chase them. In a world of endless choices, why does this happen? Why do people queue up? Why do they pay more? Why will they book months in advance? Why are these people and products in such high demand? And how can you get a slice of that action? In Oversubscribed, entrepreneur and bestselling author Daniel Priestley explains why…and, most importantly, how. This book is a recipe for ensuring demand outstrips supply for your product or service, and you have scores of customers lining up to give you money. Oversubscribed: Shows leaders, marketers, and entrepreneurs how they can get customers queuing up to use their services and products while competitors are forced to fight for business Explains how to become oversubscribed, even in a crowded marketplace Is full of practical tips alongside inspiring examples to alter our mindsets and get us bursting with ideas Is written by a successful entrepreneur who's used these ideas to excel in the ventures he has launched


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Don't fight for customers, let them fight over you! Have you ever queued for a restaurant? Pre-ordered something months in advance? Fought for tickets that sell out in a day? Had a hairdresser with a six-month waiting list? There are people who don't chase clients, clients chase them. In a world of endless choices, why does this happen? Why do people queue up? Why do they Don't fight for customers, let them fight over you! Have you ever queued for a restaurant? Pre-ordered something months in advance? Fought for tickets that sell out in a day? Had a hairdresser with a six-month waiting list? There are people who don't chase clients, clients chase them. In a world of endless choices, why does this happen? Why do people queue up? Why do they pay more? Why will they book months in advance? Why are these people and products in such high demand? And how can you get a slice of that action? In Oversubscribed, entrepreneur and bestselling author Daniel Priestley explains why…and, most importantly, how. This book is a recipe for ensuring demand outstrips supply for your product or service, and you have scores of customers lining up to give you money. Oversubscribed: Shows leaders, marketers, and entrepreneurs how they can get customers queuing up to use their services and products while competitors are forced to fight for business Explains how to become oversubscribed, even in a crowded marketplace Is full of practical tips alongside inspiring examples to alter our mindsets and get us bursting with ideas Is written by a successful entrepreneur who's used these ideas to excel in the ventures he has launched

30 review for Oversubscribed: How to Get People Lining Up to Do Business with You

  1. 5 out of 5

    Pat G

    To say this is the best book I've read in 2019 is an understatement.. "There's no scarcity in the world for people who share abundantly. One of the ways I keep myself oversubscribed today is by the very process of sharing big ideas. I've come to discover that the more I share, the more people demand." How? Build your own market by cultivating a tribe of people who are loyal to your business, your products, your personality and your philosophy. Rally your own troops. Break those people away from the To say this is the best book I've read in 2019 is an understatement.. "There's no scarcity in the world for people who share abundantly. One of the ways I keep myself oversubscribed today is by the very process of sharing big ideas. I've come to discover that the more I share, the more people demand." How? Build your own market by cultivating a tribe of people who are loyal to your business, your products, your personality and your philosophy. Rally your own troops. Break those people away from the industry, separate them one by one from the market and make them part of something special. You know these people better than they know themselves when it comes to being able to surprise and delight them. You care about these people almost to a fault. What are the ingredients? 1. Consistent and repetitive message - ala StoryBrand 2. Content - articles, blogs, books, case studies, reports, videos, podcasts, or updates for people to read 3. Commercial ecosystem - products for every price range $20, $200, $1500, $10,000, etc. Product-for-prospects to generate lots of customers and a core offering for client relationships that evolve over time. 4. Continuity - having an online profile that shows what you've been doing over the last few years and future years (YT, FB, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc.) 5. Collaboration - opportunities to do deals with other people who are famous to a similar group. Refer to your Mission to know what to say yes to and what to turn down. Gold nuggets: 1. Take the time to make sure your clients feel good about their purchase and they are given more than they expected. 2. Oversubscribed businesses understand that if you treat your clients as inspirational individuals, many more people will aspire to be like them too. 3. Oversubscribed businesses spend money on existing customers before they spend money on prospective ones. Do this right and your existing marketers will market for you. 4. Focus on people who like your philosophy. Your philosophy is made up of your strongly held beliefs and opinions. It's your take on life and it doesn't nee to appeal to everyone. If you have no philosophy you appear to be bland and like every other commodity in your market. You're back competing on price. What's your philosophy? What are your strongly held beliefs about what you do? What do you stand for? What do you stand against? What is the change you want to see in the world? The clearer you are when answering these questions, the closer you will be to being oversubscribed. 5. There's something very powerful about being "unable to cope with demand", yet most people and companies try to hide it. Rather than pretending you're superhuman when you get too busy, tell people that you're current;y fully booked and physically unable to cope with the demand. Be polite, be cheerful but be honest about it. Expose this fact to your clients. Tell them that you'd love to work with them but right now there's not enough room in your office to hire more staff, or you keep running out of the supplies you need. Tell people there's a problem caused by too much demand. Let them know you are working on having it fixed as a soon as you can and they should try again soon. You;ll be surprised at the response this generates. Yes, people will be frustrated and annoyed that you're not able to take their business, but they'll be curious and intrigues by it too. 6. You need to treat your business the same way - as an exclusive club. And just like Studio 54, you must be willing to turn away people at the door if they aren't a good fit. "No" is powerful. It's a word that is said by people and businesses that are sure of what they do and who they are for. Only the best business consultants will say no to a potential client. Only the best will say no to a person who wants to discount or to bend your rules. In my business we interview people before they become clients. And we turn people away all the tie that aren't a good fit. We know that we have to spend time and energy on every client. We also know that some people or business would be either too much hard work or we would struggle to deliver to them a remarkable result. Saying no to someone who's not right for the business creates the space for perfect clients to show up. 7. Businesses that struggle don't make people wait for quality. Ie. quality, speed, price: pick 2 and I get the other 8. It's the ecosystem as a whole that creates the value, NOT any one product, service, system or person. Today's high-performing businesses are ecosystems of people, product and services that are all working in harmony. They are complex, paradoxical and hard to mimic. You must give away information freely or cheaply and then charge for the implementation work. 9. It's easier to climb small stairs than to jump big walls. Asking people jump over the wall freezes people into inaction. People gate making big commitments or taking any action that's hard to back out from. Giving people a low risk first step is a powerful way to move people in the right direction (opt in, expressions of interest) 10. Your goal isn't to tell people why they should be delighted; your goal is to watch and see if people ARE delighted after doing business with you. If they aren't, then you have a problem. 11. Oversubscribed businesses more often talk about something bigger than what they do. They talk about the lifestyle of their customers, they talk about philosophy, they talk about a big problem they want to solve or they talk about the transformation they want to see in the world. You must look for the bigger game your business is playing for and beat the drum for it in your campaigns. Every business, yours included, is up to something big in the world and you need to be bold enough to share it. It takes courage to stop shouting about your products and to start talking about your big ideas but it's worth it. The reason you began business isn't only about the money. You're doing what you do because you believe there's more to it than just the cash. If you can get other people to believe what you believe they will want to be part of what you do too. The key is to talk about something bigger than what you do. 12. Signalling is about telling people what's going to happen before it happens. It's about explaining your process and your terms in advance so that the market can prepare itself. It is also about getting your market to signal their intentions back to you before they act, rather than asking people to take action. Signalling is a big part of getting yourself oversubscribed. Companies that are not oversubscribed don't do much of it, and din;t ask their clients to do it either. If they want to sell a new product they simply put a product up for sale on their website and hope people buy it (SNT lol). A CDE won't do that. They will signal their intention to release a new product. They will let people know that there's a limited capacity available and ask their market to signal in kind if the want to know more or buy the product when it's available. A CDE isn't hoping to sell some products; it's strategically ensuring that the product will be oversubscribed. A big part of becoming oversubscribed involves having the courage to signal your intentions before you act and to name the terms under which you will be doing business in the future. Naming your terms sends a powerful signal: "If you want to work with us, you need to behave a certain way." You'll need to state openly who you want to work with, how many people you can serve and on what terms you'll work with them. When you see a business naming their terms, you know they are on track to be oversubscribed. My belief is that you'll never become oversubscribed if you're not willing to name your terms. Signalling is all about - telling people when something will be made available and how to get it, when they have to register their interest by, when they will have to pay, and on what grounds they will be accepted or rejected. You're setting time limits, performance standards and prerequisites. 13. Don't ask for the sale - ask for the signal. Rather than asking people to buy, ask them to signal interest. Let them know that there will be a widget for sale soon and if they are interested in more information, can they please email a request or fill in an expression of interest form. This is a much lower commitment for people. Rather than having to get their credit card out right there and then, all they have to doc is fill in a form, click "like" or reply to an email. When you ask people to buy straight away they only have two choices: they buy or they don't. It's a binary decision. But people aren't binary. You'll get a better picture if you ask people to signal their interest. A person who is only 25% interested in what you have might still signal their interest to you. Once they've done so, you can make sure they have all the information they need. 14. 7 hour rule: Big purchasing decisions will take about seven hours. Whether you are buying a new car, making a career move, engaging a consultant or choosing a holiday destination, when you add up all the time you spend thinking about it, you can be fairly sure it totals about seven hours. If you sell something to which a purchaser is required to have an emotional connection, develop trust or gain a new understanding - and if he/she must make a significant decision - you would be silly to try to force the deal to complete sooner than seven hours. Japanese businessmen know this. They will rarely talk business until after a round of golf or two. Also consider whether they would be morel likely to choose you if you provided them with seven hours of content, ideas, conversation and connection. Or 11 touches which can be found online as digital content. Two great things happen after you have a seven-hour relationship. Firstly, you don't feel uneasy offering something of value; and secondly, you are less likely to blow the relationship by offering something you don't fully believe in. 15. Being oversubscribed and running powerful campaigns doesn't remove the need to sell. It gives you more opportunities to sell and better qualified people to sell to. 16. Today, your job is to "cook great steak" and let your customers create the "sizzle" for you. Your marketing team is comprised of your clients, and your long-term lead generation strategy is being brilliant. Look at every touchpoint in your business - your website, brochures, people, products, premises, ads, staff handbook, uniforms, packaging - ask ask yourself the question, "Is this touchpoint positively remarkable?" You can list off every touchpoint in a spreadsheet, not only for the customer/client but also for the team and suppliers too. Then identify one or two things a month to improve and invest in them. 17. The key to leaving people uplifted is to keep quiet about some of the good stuff you know you can deliver. Don't talk about it, keep your moth shut, and leave it as a surprise. When you sell, only talk about 70% of what you intent on doing. 18. Tell your stories. In the world of business, many people become so close to their own story that the excitement fades and they stop telling people. They simply take their story for granted. 19. The "vital people" who organize things, act as industry spokespeople, are well connected and well known will increase in their value. A lot of very smart people have now figured this out. The key point: every day you spend in your office doing functional things is a day you slip behind in terms of your real value. On the flip side, every day you are out building your network, connecting with thought leaders, positioning yourself as a key person of influence in your industry is a day that your value is on the rise. You must do your best in this critical moment to stay on the "surfing" side of the big wave of change. Every campaign you run, every idea you implement, every remarkable product you create and sell, every partnership you forge is you padding hard. Merely working isn't hard enough, especially if the work you are doing is functional, replaceable, average, and unremarkable. You need to be creating, storytelling, leading, team building, partnering, deal making, innovating, refining, investing and systemizing what you do. Goal: a lifestyle game - the lifestyle business use the Campaign Driven Enterprise method to generate all the clients they want in short space of time. They often run 2-4 campaigns per year and enjoy downtime in between. Focus on getting oversubscribed on your capacity and earning good money without working crazy hours. Most importantly, surround yourself with other people who want to surf those waves too - and who are also using the CDE method. Your goal is to be oversubscribed, not necessarily to be big. Both lifestyle and performance businesses require you to work with others - a surefire way to struggle is to try and do everything on your own. Whether you're building a lifestyle business with four people or high-performance business of 150, you'll need a team of talented people around you (Key Person of Influence, Head of sales and marketing, Head of operations and product, Head of finance, logistics and reporting) to implement ideas with you. You'll need mentors to guide you and a peer group that inspires you. 20. Future entrepreneurs will solve problems of contribution. They will create ways for people to contribute more. My business really took off when we focused on helping people to develop and achieve a deeper personal mission. I believe the entrepreneurs who can unlock the value of contribution will be rewarded greatly now and in the future. These are the individuals who will have influence, travel, adventure and wealth beyond measure. They will be the ones who look back at their life with a smile on their face rather than the pain of regret. Rather than focusing on creating new things for people to buy, make it about creating new things for people to get involved in and contribute to. Sometimes being a good friends, sending a thoughtful letter, showing compassion to a stranger or sharing an authentic moment can spark a chain of events that impacts the world. Our lives are barely a second in the grand scheme of things. Yet in that time we are afforded an opportunity to do the best we can with what we have and trust the process that something good will of it all. In any case, if you go out to create something of value you will barely fathom the ways you impact the world just by being here for those precious few laps around the sun. Misc: organizations that make social change desirable, interesting, cool and fun will win ala Charity: Water

  2. 4 out of 5

    Fabrizio Poli

    The book revolves around the concept of creating exclusivity/scarcity around your product and/or service. None of what the author has put in this book is original, which is why I gave it 2 stars. He talks about the Net Promoter Score (NPS) and never talks about where it comes from, almost as if he wants the reader to think he came up with the concept. To find out about NPS, read "Answering the Ultimate Question" by Richard Owen and Dr. Laura Brooks of Satmetrix here they describe the Net Promoter The book revolves around the concept of creating exclusivity/scarcity around your product and/or service. None of what the author has put in this book is original, which is why I gave it 2 stars. He talks about the Net Promoter Score (NPS) and never talks about where it comes from, almost as if he wants the reader to think he came up with the concept. To find out about NPS, read "Answering the Ultimate Question" by Richard Owen and Dr. Laura Brooks of Satmetrix here they describe the Net Promoter Operating Model that captures the elements necessary for a successful customer-focused program. It provides a best practice framework for how companies collect, evaluate, and act on customer feedback to optimize financial benefits.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ishtiaq Ali

    Unlike other business/how-to books, Priestly has trimmed the fat and provided incredibly useful and actionable advice on business growth. Principles on creating your own market and campaigns were particularly impressive.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Liam Delahunty

    Decent enough book essentially on making your business unique so that you've defined your market. I think some of this has been said better by Seth Godin and others. It's a light easy read but he does seem to fall into the trap of thinking that freelancers and entrepreneurs can behave the same way / are the same thing. As a (mainly) freelancer I am not in a position to employ or partner with three others as he suggests is vital to grow the business. It does have some useful reminders and is a ligh Decent enough book essentially on making your business unique so that you've defined your market. I think some of this has been said better by Seth Godin and others. It's a light easy read but he does seem to fall into the trap of thinking that freelancers and entrepreneurs can behave the same way / are the same thing. As a (mainly) freelancer I am not in a position to employ or partner with three others as he suggests is vital to grow the business. It does have some useful reminders and is a light pithy read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    Great tips, real life examples and simple concepts to help change the way we look at business and being entrepreneurs. Great to think of capacity and setting limits to ensure a high level of service to clients. The example of a personal trainer who caters to a specific clientele, and how that changed this professional's life and wealth... This book spurred a lot of ideas, which I will try. Great tips, real life examples and simple concepts to help change the way we look at business and being entrepreneurs. Great to think of capacity and setting limits to ensure a high level of service to clients. The example of a personal trainer who caters to a specific clientele, and how that changed this professional's life and wealth... This book spurred a lot of ideas, which I will try.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anastasios Pardalis

    amazing book! read if you want to think of new ways of developing and promoting your business

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shaw

    Great principals, great examples. I really enjoyed this book. Absolutely, worth the 5 hours.

  8. 5 out of 5

    BLACK CAT

    Marketing of how to create your own market and select only the customer that are willing to be your ideal customers. Similar to the idea of the 20/80 principle: go after only the customer that generate the most revenue.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Maya Panika

    An absolutely terrific business book, a real breath of fresh air. I really cannot recommend this startling and inspirational little tome highly enough, especially if you’re a small business looking to renew the spark, wanting to regenerate, or a start up or even a one man/woman band. It is very readable; concise – just 200 pages long and not a trace of fat on the bones. It is full of innovative ideas to really get the imagination spinning and ideas sparking, and at its heart, a truly exciting co An absolutely terrific business book, a real breath of fresh air. I really cannot recommend this startling and inspirational little tome highly enough, especially if you’re a small business looking to renew the spark, wanting to regenerate, or a start up or even a one man/woman band. It is very readable; concise – just 200 pages long and not a trace of fat on the bones. It is full of innovative ideas to really get the imagination spinning and ideas sparking, and at its heart, a truly exciting concept - forget mass-appeal; be exclusive; set yourself apart, ‘building a group of loyal fans, a tribe loyal to your business. Forget aiming to please everyone and aim to please a very few. Be unique - or at least, be special, ‘you only need to be famous for a few 1000 people’. Become your own market. You probably won’t end up with the Malibu beach house, but you might very well achieve a profitable business and a great lifestyle. Oversubscribed is divided into three parts. The first part explains the concept and philosophy, well peppered by apposite anecdotes and stories of entrepreneurs who used these concepts in their business. Par two is a practical ‘how to’ guide. Part three is al about the digital ecosystem; how to fit it all together to get maximum mileage – in the digital world, the sum is worth a great deal more than each of its parts – Jamie Oliver is a fine example of the latter and Daniel Priestly does a great job of breaking down all of what Jamie does, how each component of what he does works and how it all works together to make Jamie Oliver such a stunningly successful brand. I don’t know what I expected when I started reading this book, certainly not something as genuinely entertaining and certainly nothing as innovative and *useful*. I finished reading it last night - I read it in 2 days, work-booked it, filled one notebook with ideas, went out, bought a new notebook. My copy is full of scribble and notes; I’m going to start reading it again tonight and start working on how to apply these ideas to my own tiny operation. I have a feeling it could work really well. It’s very exciting.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Alexandru

    If you want to read a pile of bullshit that repeats its title "oversubscribed" for around 500 times than this is your chance. The book is a total waste of money and time. A book where you'll see the names of famous brands (Apple, Nike etc.) multiple times, without any usefulness and plenty of names from the business world that as well are so ubiquitous already (Jobs, Branson etc.). The book as well will remind you from chapter to chapter how successful was in starting his event organising busine If you want to read a pile of bullshit that repeats its title "oversubscribed" for around 500 times than this is your chance. The book is a total waste of money and time. A book where you'll see the names of famous brands (Apple, Nike etc.) multiple times, without any usefulness and plenty of names from the business world that as well are so ubiquitous already (Jobs, Branson etc.). The book as well will remind you from chapter to chapter how successful was in starting his event organising business and words like Rolex, Ferrari and other cheap attention seeking techniques will be used plenty of times. The author is bravely throwing numbers around expressing the vast amount of money he can count. As well from page to page you'll be presented some primitive caricatures which are supposed to make the reading fun. The author uses all possible techniques to get your attention - how he met his wife and how while writing the book they made their first baby boy. To be brief reading this book is similar to attending a cheap MLM event presenting to you snake oil or some other "magical" (a word actually used in the book a couple of times) ingredient that will make you live forever by a person who will show you pictures of places where he allegedly is on holiday and how easy it was for him so you can do it as well. As well forget about morality - the important part is to reap off as many people as possible. In the end, you'll be invited to follow the author on Twitter. As well as a call for you to follow your heart. So trivial... Don't waste your life on this piece of junk.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Poor Bjorn - Books & Experiments

    Being oversubscribed is about having more customers than you could possibly serve. Why would you want to be in that position? Don’t you want to be able to serve every possible client and make every $? . Not necessarily. Being oversubscribed allow you focus on the clients you already have and spend less time hunting new ones — freeing up valuable time for you to innovate your business. . Happy clients will rave about you and the limited supply of your product will make it more desirable; People will Being oversubscribed is about having more customers than you could possibly serve. Why would you want to be in that position? Don’t you want to be able to serve every possible client and make every $? . Not necessarily. Being oversubscribed allow you focus on the clients you already have and spend less time hunting new ones — freeing up valuable time for you to innovate your business. . Happy clients will rave about you and the limited supply of your product will make it more desirable; People will line up to do business with you! . This book goes through both the theoretical and practical aspects for setting up oversubscribed business. . 📝 “It’s the tension of high demand and limited supply that creates the opportunity for profit.” . 📝 “Your value is much higher than you think to a small number of people.” . 📝 “Lean into the discomfort of how much there is to be done.” Business is hard. This is good news for you. It keeps the wannabes and posers away. . 📝 “Give away ideas, charge for implementation.” Information is cheap these days. . 📝 Question to consider: How many customers do you need per year and how much do they need to pay? . 📝 Question to consider: What “special edition” can you make of your product? . ⭐️ TAKEAWAY: “Focus on your new paying customers instead of immediately looking for new ones.” Make your current clients happy, beat their drum, share their success stories, and they will sell your product for you. . ⚖️ VERDICT: This is now my favorite marketing book and it will be my map and compass going forward in business. I read the book for a book club and the general consensus was a big thumbs up. . 5/5

  12. 4 out of 5

    Paul McGillivray

    I’ve been running my own business for over 18 years, and this is certainly one of the most valuable and inspirational business books I’ve read during that time. I’d read Key Person of Influence back to back while in holiday, and followed it on right away with this book, and simply couldn’t put it down. Priestley runs through the essential principles in creating more demand than supply. This is a combination of a marketing framework and a framework for running a successful business. From key roles I’ve been running my own business for over 18 years, and this is certainly one of the most valuable and inspirational business books I’ve read during that time. I’d read Key Person of Influence back to back while in holiday, and followed it on right away with this book, and simply couldn’t put it down. Priestley runs through the essential principles in creating more demand than supply. This is a combination of a marketing framework and a framework for running a successful business. From key roles to execution to driving successful campaigns, there’s so much to work with here, but all in a very easy to read and understand format. Proving that his principles work by using it on his own company, I’m certainly going to be following this up with workshops with Priestley’s company, Dent, and I’ve already downloaded ‘24 Assets’ to my Kindle! Highly recommended.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    I wasn't all that impressed by this book. It lacks in any real substance (I finished it in a couple of hours), mostly about strategy but not much in the way of tactics. I got the impression that it was only published as a lead generator for the author. Definitely better books out there if you're a freelancer like me, 'The Well Fed Writer' by Pete Bowerman for one. I wasn't all that impressed by this book. It lacks in any real substance (I finished it in a couple of hours), mostly about strategy but not much in the way of tactics. I got the impression that it was only published as a lead generator for the author. Definitely better books out there if you're a freelancer like me, 'The Well Fed Writer' by Pete Bowerman for one.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mahmood Al-yousif

    Light on substance and originality. Feels like it's written as a gateway for the author to gain reputation and higher speaker fees. The whole premise of the book is to marketing campaigns and provide exclusivity, however no real examples or case studies are given. The concept is good but a disappointing read. Light on substance and originality. Feels like it's written as a gateway for the author to gain reputation and higher speaker fees. The whole premise of the book is to marketing campaigns and provide exclusivity, however no real examples or case studies are given. The concept is good but a disappointing read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michal

    I liked this innovative approach of getting "oversubscribed." It pretty much describes the good ol' concept of sales conversions, but looks at it from a different & innovative angle. There are some good & actionable take-aways. I liked this innovative approach of getting "oversubscribed." It pretty much describes the good ol' concept of sales conversions, but looks at it from a different & innovative angle. There are some good & actionable take-aways.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sean Xie

    What a read This is probably the most inspiring and yet down to earth and practical business book I've ever read. There is no BS, no bragging, a simple bag of gold that you can use to your daily business life. Can't recommend it highly enough What a read This is probably the most inspiring and yet down to earth and practical business book I've ever read. There is no BS, no bragging, a simple bag of gold that you can use to your daily business life. Can't recommend it highly enough

  17. 5 out of 5

    Giustino Borzacchiello

    There are a lot of good hints in this book: of course, the examples are subject to the survivorship-bias, but nonetheless, you can get the right mindset to make your company more successful. In some sections, especially at the beginning, it's a bit repetitive (you really WANT to be oversubscribed), but this is a common theme in this type of book. Things I liked * The weekly-quarterly-yearly framework it's the most interesting part of the book. * the 7-4-11 rule Some excerpts You'll only make a profit There are a lot of good hints in this book: of course, the examples are subject to the survivorship-bias, but nonetheless, you can get the right mindset to make your company more successful. In some sections, especially at the beginning, it's a bit repetitive (you really WANT to be oversubscribed), but this is a common theme in this type of book. Things I liked * The weekly-quarterly-yearly framework it's the most interesting part of the book. * the 7-4-11 rule Some excerpts You'll only make a profit if you are oversubscribed on your capacity to deliver; demand for your stuff must always be greater than your ability to supply it. It's the tension of high demand and limited supply that creates the opportunity for profit. If you want to be oversubscribed, you'll need to get comfortable with some people missing out on what you have to offer. That's how markets work – and that's how the market determines your rewards. Service providers take on clients without setting any boundaries. They answer calls late at night, get paid late and incur costs. If they don't answer the phone, their message apologises and promises a return call as soon as possible. Everything about the typical service provider screams, “I will do anything for a sale.” Consumers make their mind up about brands based on who they see buying. Entrepreneurs and leaders can no longer simply deliver value and then get fairly paid. That model died a long time ago. Today's high‐performing businesses are ecosystems of people, products, media, software and services all working in harmony. They are complex, paradoxical and hard to mimic. We get famous from the results of our clients – You aren't trying to put yourselves in the spotlight; instead, you're looking for ways to showcase your clients' success stories and let their results speak for you.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tor

    It was a good read (or listen in my case). I think there are a lot of good insights here, especially if you can take part 2 of the book and make a strategy out of it. This is kind of problematic for me that bought it as an audiobook. I wish there were some kind of PDF or something that could map it all out. I was a bit disappointed in part 3. Daniel maps out how you should assemble your team, but he does so in a way that almost states that his way is the only way. This goes in the face of a lot o It was a good read (or listen in my case). I think there are a lot of good insights here, especially if you can take part 2 of the book and make a strategy out of it. This is kind of problematic for me that bought it as an audiobook. I wish there were some kind of PDF or something that could map it all out. I was a bit disappointed in part 3. Daniel maps out how you should assemble your team, but he does so in a way that almost states that his way is the only way. This goes in the face of a lot of new thinking around entrepreneurship lately, e.g Paul Jarvis' Company of One. There are a lot of different ways to do something, of course. You can assemble a great team, or you can do it on your own. Nothing is right or wrong. Maybe you can't build a 10 or 100 million-dollar business alone, but maybe you don't want to? As for the chapter he almost didn't include in the book... It just really annoyed me ending the book like that. I get what he is trying to do, but I just found it annoying. Why not just give it to me? I have bought your book for heaven's sake, don't hold back like that! Anyways, I'd like to try some of the strategies in this book and see how it goes!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris Weatherburn

    Thought this book was slightly overrated, here are all the learning points that I took from it: Oversubscribed is when supply out strips demand. The main example is American actors, only 1% of them make above minimum wage, with very few earning large amounts, these few are ‘oversubscribed’. The four drivers for market imbalance are: Innovation, Relationships, Convenience and Price. People buy what they want not what they need. Promote your customers not yourself. In particular a success story of Thought this book was slightly overrated, here are all the learning points that I took from it: Oversubscribed is when supply out strips demand. The main example is American actors, only 1% of them make above minimum wage, with very few earning large amounts, these few are ‘oversubscribed’. The four drivers for market imbalance are: Innovation, Relationships, Convenience and Price. People buy what they want not what they need. Promote your customers not yourself. In particular a success story of a customer and a customer speaking highly of you recommending you is what you want to aim for. Giving personalised service is important. Make sure you know your true capacity so you can provide excellent service and obtain delighted customers. This may well include declining work and putting people on a waiting list so that when you are ready they get great service. Realise what is your core offering to clients is? Get seven hours of contact time before the sale, this builds trust and is why advertisers pay certain celebrities lots of money as they already have a connection and trust with their audience. Check out my VLOG summary of this book: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHQLz... If you found this helpful please check my other summaries on my website www.chrisweatherburn.com

  20. 5 out of 5

    Umair Aslam

    Ordinary and most facts are known. Good for people who are starting their own businesses and would want to understand how some businesses work creating hype around their products. Dwells a little too much on the hype part and perceptual side of the business. I think what is imp is how to create a business / product that will be oversubscribed due to the product and not the theatrics. The last part about paddling and cde teams was also ordinary and something that should not come as the end but a Ordinary and most facts are known. Good for people who are starting their own businesses and would want to understand how some businesses work creating hype around their products. Dwells a little too much on the hype part and perceptual side of the business. I think what is imp is how to create a business / product that will be oversubscribed due to the product and not the theatrics. The last part about paddling and cde teams was also ordinary and something that should not come as the end but a starting concern.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Angella

    Your job is not to please anyone but finding the people who want to follow you! Find your niche and get comfortable on some people missing out on what you have to offer. Become more influential, involve others in your ideas and products and build your brand. Focus on serving your customers (spend even more than advertising for that) and turn them into celebrities. Celebrate their successes. Remember that it's OK to fail. Your job is not to please anyone but finding the people who want to follow you! Find your niche and get comfortable on some people missing out on what you have to offer. Become more influential, involve others in your ideas and products and build your brand. Focus on serving your customers (spend even more than advertising for that) and turn them into celebrities. Celebrate their successes. Remember that it's OK to fail.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Laurentiu Andrei

    Amazing, I really enjoyed my first listen of the book. I can see how the strategies presented can be very useful, especially nowadays. I will be listening to the book again, but slower and looking to implement, the initial listen was to see if the content is worth taking the time to implement the ideas presented. Data-oriented and the main principle of Oversubscribed is valid in today's markets. Amazing, I really enjoyed my first listen of the book. I can see how the strategies presented can be very useful, especially nowadays. I will be listening to the book again, but slower and looking to implement, the initial listen was to see if the content is worth taking the time to implement the ideas presented. Data-oriented and the main principle of Oversubscribed is valid in today's markets.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katrina Douglas

    Part 2 of the book 'buiding up to being oversubscribed' was my favourite part and contains a great model for success. Beyond this some good ideas but nothing that most business owners wouldn't already be familliar with. The book is still worth reading though and Daniel Priestly's model for being overscribed is quite a good one. Part 2 of the book 'buiding up to being oversubscribed' was my favourite part and contains a great model for success. Beyond this some good ideas but nothing that most business owners wouldn't already be familliar with. The book is still worth reading though and Daniel Priestly's model for being overscribed is quite a good one.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ross Craig

    For the first couple of pages I thought this was going to be a bog-standard Kindle book about business... but it's actually very useful. It's written clearly, offers real world examples and avoids either gobbledegook or boasting. A refreshing and interesting guide that could be applied to many businesses. For the first couple of pages I thought this was going to be a bog-standard Kindle book about business... but it's actually very useful. It's written clearly, offers real world examples and avoids either gobbledegook or boasting. A refreshing and interesting guide that could be applied to many businesses.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Fadilah

    This a more recent book from the same author of Key Person of Influence. Again, another simple steps, and this one more relatable because it’s more recent. It did mention KPI at some point, and talked about the same personal trainer in the KPI book. But overall, this has great examples especially for people in the business and wanna make it oversubscribe.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Oversubscribed is a lesson on supply and demand. The author fills the book with dozens of examples of scarcity, generating interests, setting up a team, creating value, and much more. The book is a short read at 210 pages and has tools to support a lot of the ideas provided. Overall, I walked away with a few new ideas and that’s a win in my book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Khai Sheng

    It's a cool concept that the author put forward of creating demand, and having the discipline to manage capacity. Of course, it's not the most original but it is hypnotic to read Priestley's anecdotes and real-life examples of how a few simple business tricks and a play on consumer behaviour can really make the difference when starting a business. An interesting read nevertheless! It's a cool concept that the author put forward of creating demand, and having the discipline to manage capacity. Of course, it's not the most original but it is hypnotic to read Priestley's anecdotes and real-life examples of how a few simple business tricks and a play on consumer behaviour can really make the difference when starting a business. An interesting read nevertheless!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dustin Overbeck

    I thought this was a very well written book and quite helpful for entrepreneurs. To me it offered a different perspective of attracting clients. Instead of trying to get the most customers, this book talks about trying to get just the best. And to get them lined up and to be oversubscribed, you need to provide a 5-star experience when engaging with the customers

  29. 4 out of 5

    Libby Andrews

    Fantastic, inspirational read detailing how you can make your business one that’s in demand. Priestly gives plenty of useful hints and tips to help you along the way. He explains how to make your customer feel valued and how to look at the value you offer. I’ve highlighted lots of paragraphs to use in my own business and urge anyone to read and do the same.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    Certainly the ideas on this book are quite interesting. Sometimes they feel like gimmicks, but thinking about the real goal behind them, perhaps not so much. I'm yet to try any of this, and surely if I do it'd be way harder than they describe on this book, but at least the reasoning behind it sounds solid. Read with an open mind. Certainly the ideas on this book are quite interesting. Sometimes they feel like gimmicks, but thinking about the real goal behind them, perhaps not so much. I'm yet to try any of this, and surely if I do it'd be way harder than they describe on this book, but at least the reasoning behind it sounds solid. Read with an open mind.

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