counter Suffer the Little Children - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Suffer the Little Children

Availability: Ready to download

In Elizabethan London, no child is safe. Children are misused and exploited by parents, masters, strangers, and society at large. Even the children of the rich are in danger. When a five-year-old heiress to great estates is kidnapped, Christoval Alvarez, the players of James Burbage’s company, and a disreputable group of child beggars all become involved in the search. At In Elizabethan London, no child is safe. Children are misused and exploited by parents, masters, strangers, and society at large. Even the children of the rich are in danger. When a five-year-old heiress to great estates is kidnapped, Christoval Alvarez, the players of James Burbage’s company, and a disreputable group of child beggars all become involved in the search. At Seething Lane, matters are approaching a crisis. Sir Francis Walsingham is dying and, as Thomas Phelippes struggles to hold the intelligence service together, he receives information that another attack on the Queen is planned. The identity of the assassin is unknown, but Phelippes does know the place and the date – Whitehall Palace on the day of the Twelfth Night Revels.


Compare

In Elizabethan London, no child is safe. Children are misused and exploited by parents, masters, strangers, and society at large. Even the children of the rich are in danger. When a five-year-old heiress to great estates is kidnapped, Christoval Alvarez, the players of James Burbage’s company, and a disreputable group of child beggars all become involved in the search. At In Elizabethan London, no child is safe. Children are misused and exploited by parents, masters, strangers, and society at large. Even the children of the rich are in danger. When a five-year-old heiress to great estates is kidnapped, Christoval Alvarez, the players of James Burbage’s company, and a disreputable group of child beggars all become involved in the search. At Seething Lane, matters are approaching a crisis. Sir Francis Walsingham is dying and, as Thomas Phelippes struggles to hold the intelligence service together, he receives information that another attack on the Queen is planned. The identity of the assassin is unknown, but Phelippes does know the place and the date – Whitehall Palace on the day of the Twelfth Night Revels.

30 review for Suffer the Little Children

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Doohan

    The fifth book in the continuing Chronicles of Christoval Alvarez is another wonderful edition in the ongoing travails of the eponymous hero. This edition sees Kit achieve professional success, contribute to the ongoing security of the sovereign and the state, assist in the recovery of a kidnapped child, and lose a mentor of great worth and great status. The ending of the volume leaves Kit in a state of uncertainty, but there has been much to celebrate over the course of the novel as well. As usua The fifth book in the continuing Chronicles of Christoval Alvarez is another wonderful edition in the ongoing travails of the eponymous hero. This edition sees Kit achieve professional success, contribute to the ongoing security of the sovereign and the state, assist in the recovery of a kidnapped child, and lose a mentor of great worth and great status. The ending of the volume leaves Kit in a state of uncertainty, but there has been much to celebrate over the course of the novel as well. As usual, Ann Swinfen provides a wonderful narrative while drawing historical realities into the story as well. This combination of a powerful narrative, the historical setting and attention to detail, and a sympathetic hero makes for a great read and an engaging story. Well worth reading.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Back in London from the disastrous Portuguese expedition, Christopher Alvarez has time to practice the lute with James Burbage’s company of players and meet Will, their newest actor and playwright. Kit is quite busy with the mothers-to-be and newborn infants at St Thomas’s hospital. But these duties are interrupted when the spy service operated by the dying Francis Walsingham hears of a threat to Queen Elizabeth at the coming Twelfth Night Revels. The book is well-researched and the reader can s Back in London from the disastrous Portuguese expedition, Christopher Alvarez has time to practice the lute with James Burbage’s company of players and meet Will, their newest actor and playwright. Kit is quite busy with the mothers-to-be and newborn infants at St Thomas’s hospital. But these duties are interrupted when the spy service operated by the dying Francis Walsingham hears of a threat to Queen Elizabeth at the coming Twelfth Night Revels. The book is well-researched and the reader can step effortlessly into Elizabethan London. Children do suffer in the plot but they also show considerable resilience and, for a few of them, Kit is able to send their lives on a new trajectory.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nat

    This series just keeps getting better and better. The characters keep growing in each new book and the historical feel is almost unsurpassed. This book concentrates more on the main characters doctor profession ( although there is a bit of spymastering) and is all the better for it. An excellent read!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    Another great book in this series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hebby Roman

    This is one of Ms. Swinfen's best book, telling about the children of the Middle Ages and the challenges they faced, especially if they were poor and/or sick. Very satisfying read. This is one of Ms. Swinfen's best book, telling about the children of the Middle Ages and the challenges they faced, especially if they were poor and/or sick. Very satisfying read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Karen Pirelli Appelbaum

    Provides great insight into the plight of children in times when parents often died or could not support them.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cindy Woods

    A must read A descriptive picture of 16th century London's abandoned children. Hard to digest. Even harder to fathom. Highly interesting. A must read. A must read A descriptive picture of 16th century London's abandoned children. Hard to digest. Even harder to fathom. Highly interesting. A must read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rose Lambert

    Outstanding Fascinated with the book. Could hardly wait to delve into it again. wanted to get to the end. Marvellous reading

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    Another wonderful entry in this delightful series, this one focuses on the plight of children in London during the Elizabethan era. Fascinating!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Vivienne

    The Dreadful Underbelly of Elizabethan London Four stars is high praise, five reserved for outstanding books. There are (hopefully) no spoilers in this review. Again, Ann Swinfen has written a well-researched book, skilfully interweaving fictional characters with historical ones. There are no grammatical errors that I could see which makes reading much more pleasant. Kit is still employed as an assistant physician at St Thomas' Hospital in Southwark, just outside the walls of London, caring mainly The Dreadful Underbelly of Elizabethan London Four stars is high praise, five reserved for outstanding books. There are (hopefully) no spoilers in this review. Again, Ann Swinfen has written a well-researched book, skilfully interweaving fictional characters with historical ones. There are no grammatical errors that I could see which makes reading much more pleasant. Kit is still employed as an assistant physician at St Thomas' Hospital in Southwark, just outside the walls of London, caring mainly for children and lying-in wards. She lodges in the same building as her friend, Simon, who is one of James Burbage's players, and as often as she can, she spends time with the company who she looks upon as her good friends. In Elizabethan England, children and wives are the property of the husband and he can do what he will with them, presumably short of murder, although in the case of the very poor, who would notice one less child? Kit comes face to face with this problem when a child is left at the hospital bleeding from her mouth and with a bad cough. Does she have consumption ..... or is it something else? Beggars are plentiful, both adult and children and it is autumn and growing colder when Kit notices a particular group of beggar children outside the playhouse. How the lives of these children and Kit intersect is very moving and shows just how truly compassionate Kit is. When it comes to the five-year old abducted heiress we see how far depravity can go. There is another plot against the Queen's life, and the Intelligence Service is running down as Sr Francis lies dying. This book ranges over several different storylines but instead of feeling fractured, the author has managed to make it a cohesive whole. I do recommend this book but advise reading the series in order.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Paul Burnette

    In this, the fifth of the Chronicles of Christoval Alvarez, Our heroine Kit continues her disguise as a man, her friendship with James Burbage’s group of actors, and continues her involvement with Sir Francis Walsingham’s group of spies, this time seeking to prevent an assassination of Queen Elizabeth I. Swinfen re-creates the colorfully dangerous milieu of Elizabethan England, including historical and fictional characters with equal skill and interest for the reader. We even glimpse such lumina In this, the fifth of the Chronicles of Christoval Alvarez, Our heroine Kit continues her disguise as a man, her friendship with James Burbage’s group of actors, and continues her involvement with Sir Francis Walsingham’s group of spies, this time seeking to prevent an assassination of Queen Elizabeth I. Swinfen re-creates the colorfully dangerous milieu of Elizabethan England, including historical and fictional characters with equal skill and interest for the reader. We even glimpse such luminaries as Christopher Marlowe and Will Shakespeare. Kit attempts to qualify as a full-fledged, licensed physician. Interest is continued in her relationship with Simon Hetherington, the Lopez family, the Nunezes, while most of the action revolves around Kit’s efforts to redeem the lives and condition of poor children in London. In the course of this broadening in her concerns, at one point she reflects “I no longer knew what I was, Christian or Jew. Perhaps it did not matter. If one tried to live a good life, and to care for others, to try to be worthy of this precious thing, a human life, why did theology matter? Could not God see into my heart?” Swinfen continues to grow her characters!

  12. 5 out of 5

    C.P. Lesley

    I have enjoyed all of this series—some books more than others, but every one has its own charms. This one was a particular pleasure. Kit is installed as an assistant physician at St. Thomas's Hospital, the second great facility caring for the poor in late 16th-century England, and in charge of the maternity ward. Abandoned, abused, and unwanted children are everywhere in this novel—the most compelling a group of young urchins who beg for food outside the playhouse where Kit's friend Simon makes I have enjoyed all of this series—some books more than others, but every one has its own charms. This one was a particular pleasure. Kit is installed as an assistant physician at St. Thomas's Hospital, the second great facility caring for the poor in late 16th-century England, and in charge of the maternity ward. Abandoned, abused, and unwanted children are everywhere in this novel—the most compelling a group of young urchins who beg for food outside the playhouse where Kit's friend Simon makes his living as an actor. A young playwright named Will (with an unpronounceable last name—guess who?) has just joined the theater, and there are amusing references to his plays. But the central story line involves the approaching death of Sir Francis Walsingham, the potential threats to his secret service as a result, a kidnapped child, and, of course, a plot against the throne. It's all fast-paced and riveting and sets Kit up for the next journey, to Muscovy, which I loved even more.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    A strong continuation of the series The plot felt a bit disjointed, as it dealt with several different individuals and groups of children in 1589 London. Cristoval has matured from his/her teens into adulthood with adult responsibilities. A visit with old friends. I look forward to the next volume.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Vivienne

    I have become such a fan of this excellent series which combines historical events and figures with social issues. Here the plight of poor children within London. Kit has a clear voice as narrator. Glad number 7 is out.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Liz C

    Very good Once again, Ann Swinfen has written a well researched and entertaining book. I heartedly recommend this series to anyone who enjoys historical fiction.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Marnie Spencer

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chris Falley

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marsha King

  19. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Connor

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Gunning

  21. 4 out of 5

    Carol

  22. 4 out of 5

    Booklover

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jean smith

  24. 5 out of 5

    christopher garnett

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maude Weiss

  26. 5 out of 5

    Simon Starkey

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alison L.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  29. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Ava Siegler

  30. 5 out of 5

    CNickerson

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.