counter The Nature of Balance: An Apocalyptic Horror Novel - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

The Nature of Balance: An Apocalyptic Horror Novel

Availability: Ready to download

From New York Times-bestseller and award-winning horror author Tim Lebbon comes this terrifying apocalyptic vision. One morning, the world does not wake up. Millions lie dead in their beds, killed by their own nightmares. They’re the lucky ones. For the survivors, the new world is a confusing, terrifying place. Things are different now. The balance of nature has shifted From New York Times-bestseller and award-winning horror author Tim Lebbon comes this terrifying apocalyptic vision. One morning, the world does not wake up. Millions lie dead in their beds, killed by their own nightmares. They’re the lucky ones. For the survivors, the new world is a confusing, terrifying place. Things are different now. The balance of nature has shifted, and humankind is not longer the dominant species. Blane is a man on his own in this world gone mad. He has no distant memories, only the vague certainty that something momentous has happened in his past. Fay is enigmatic, dangerous, a dark witch and a player of gruesome games. What roles will they play in nature’s new era? And will they be able to survive long enough to find out? “Beautifully written and mysterious, The Nature of Balance will put some readers in mind of the great Arthur Machen. But with more blood and guts. A real Winner!” – Richard Laymon “Tim Lebbon displays the sort of cool irony and uncanny mood-making that drive the best ''Twilight Zone'' stories.” – New York Times Book Review "Tim Lebbon is an immense talent and he's become a new favorite. He has a style and approach unique to the genre. “ – Joe R. Lansdale ”One of the most powerful new voices to come along in the genre ... Lebbon's work ... is infused with the contemporary realism of Stephen King and ... the lyricism of Ray Bradbury." – Fangoria “Lebbon is among the most inventive and original contemporary writers of the dark fantastic.” – Ramsey Campbell "Lebbon is a genuinely masterful writer ... [with] fresh ideas, shimmering prose, and often terrifying scenarios." – Rue Morgue "…Lebbon’s writing … is profoundly moral, which is the hallmark of a serious writer, not merely a writer who takes his writing seriously." – All Hallows "Tim Lebbon is an important new voice in the fantasy field.  Bring on the night!” – Mark Chadbourn, author of The Age of Misrule and The Dark Age


Compare

From New York Times-bestseller and award-winning horror author Tim Lebbon comes this terrifying apocalyptic vision. One morning, the world does not wake up. Millions lie dead in their beds, killed by their own nightmares. They’re the lucky ones. For the survivors, the new world is a confusing, terrifying place. Things are different now. The balance of nature has shifted From New York Times-bestseller and award-winning horror author Tim Lebbon comes this terrifying apocalyptic vision. One morning, the world does not wake up. Millions lie dead in their beds, killed by their own nightmares. They’re the lucky ones. For the survivors, the new world is a confusing, terrifying place. Things are different now. The balance of nature has shifted, and humankind is not longer the dominant species. Blane is a man on his own in this world gone mad. He has no distant memories, only the vague certainty that something momentous has happened in his past. Fay is enigmatic, dangerous, a dark witch and a player of gruesome games. What roles will they play in nature’s new era? And will they be able to survive long enough to find out? “Beautifully written and mysterious, The Nature of Balance will put some readers in mind of the great Arthur Machen. But with more blood and guts. A real Winner!” – Richard Laymon “Tim Lebbon displays the sort of cool irony and uncanny mood-making that drive the best ''Twilight Zone'' stories.” – New York Times Book Review "Tim Lebbon is an immense talent and he's become a new favorite. He has a style and approach unique to the genre. “ – Joe R. Lansdale ”One of the most powerful new voices to come along in the genre ... Lebbon's work ... is infused with the contemporary realism of Stephen King and ... the lyricism of Ray Bradbury." – Fangoria “Lebbon is among the most inventive and original contemporary writers of the dark fantastic.” – Ramsey Campbell "Lebbon is a genuinely masterful writer ... [with] fresh ideas, shimmering prose, and often terrifying scenarios." – Rue Morgue "…Lebbon’s writing … is profoundly moral, which is the hallmark of a serious writer, not merely a writer who takes his writing seriously." – All Hallows "Tim Lebbon is an important new voice in the fantasy field.  Bring on the night!” – Mark Chadbourn, author of The Age of Misrule and The Dark Age

30 review for The Nature of Balance: An Apocalyptic Horror Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Seemingly overnight, nature revolts against humans, most of whom die inexplicably while they sleep, bodies crushed horribly by unseen forces, and those that survive are left to deal with a world gone mad. And the remaining denizens, both plant and animals are mutating in deadly ways. Blane doesn't know about his past, and his love of nature is questioned in this horrific new world he's woken to. He's banded with a few survivors from a nearby village, and they desperately try to seek answers to th Seemingly overnight, nature revolts against humans, most of whom die inexplicably while they sleep, bodies crushed horribly by unseen forces, and those that survive are left to deal with a world gone mad. And the remaining denizens, both plant and animals are mutating in deadly ways. Blane doesn't know about his past, and his love of nature is questioned in this horrific new world he's woken to. He's banded with a few survivors from a nearby village, and they desperately try to seek answers to this sudden and bizarre apocalypse. Fay is a dark and enigmatic figure, blessed or cursed with strange powers, and while she may hold the answers to the world's fate, she alone knows the true nature of Blane's mysterious past. Tautly written and frightening in its scope and scale, Lebbon weaves an original tale about the price mankind pays for its decades long abuse of the planet. But this novel does not come off as preachy or political, which is refreshing. Highly recommended.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    The Nature of Balance is an interesting horror which echoes sentiments of Nod by Adrian Barnes, with sleep, or significant lack thereof being a prime factor in the downfall of modern day society. The popular myth of dying in your sleep by falling from a great height or experiencing some form of significant trauma whilst at the mercy of the sandman has been a told time and time again, generation to generation. Here, author Tim Lebbon exploits that notion and then some; adding an element of animal The Nature of Balance is an interesting horror which echoes sentiments of Nod by Adrian Barnes, with sleep, or significant lack thereof being a prime factor in the downfall of modern day society. The popular myth of dying in your sleep by falling from a great height or experiencing some form of significant trauma whilst at the mercy of the sandman has been a told time and time again, generation to generation. Here, author Tim Lebbon exploits that notion and then some; adding an element of animalistic horror, a mysterious entity with godly powers, and a relentless mother earth which wants to reclaim the wild. There’s plenty of gore and creative massacre built in to this truly terrifying dystopian-like tale so if you’re squeamish, beware. Whilst I enjoyed the book for the most part, the ending felt abrupt and too convenient for my liking. That said, the opening stanza and first glimpse of Fay was nothing short of breathtaking, perfect for horror aficionados. If dystopian horror is your thing, I highly recommend giving this one a go. 3.5/5 stars.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    2.5* This book is a very difficult one for me to review.... On one hand, it was beautifully written, had intense characters, and the concept of "Nature" rebelling against the treatment of humans over time. On the other hand, the story was one I had to force myself to keep coming back to. I believe this was mostly because the tale was paced so slowly, and while we know what is happening--as well as part of the "why"--the journey the characters embarked on just didn't seem to really go anywhere. The 2.5* This book is a very difficult one for me to review.... On one hand, it was beautifully written, had intense characters, and the concept of "Nature" rebelling against the treatment of humans over time. On the other hand, the story was one I had to force myself to keep coming back to. I believe this was mostly because the tale was paced so slowly, and while we know what is happening--as well as part of the "why"--the journey the characters embarked on just didn't seem to really go anywhere. There were some memorable passages, however: ". . . she had no control. . . With loss of reason went a distortion of love. . . " Another comment regarding the sudden change that nature has undergone is reflected perfectly by the following sentiment: "That puzzle's changed. . .I don't fit in any more. . . I don't think any of us do . . ." While the idea behind the novel was one that I felt had a lot of potential, the leisurely pacing and characters walking around trying to capture their thoughts to put into words, just made me feel like the story had stalled after the initial catastrophe. *I received an e-copy of this novel through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.*

  4. 4 out of 5

    DeAnna Knippling

    I struggled with this and skimmed most of it. I felt like, as a reader, I wasn't welcomed into the book; the book starts out with something that never really gets tied into the plot; the actual plot doesn't get set up and just comes out of nowhere about 2/3 of the way through the book; the book felt like it was all setup until it hit the very ending. The ultimate bad guy was boring until they suddenly developed backstory (at the end). The penultimate bad guy was boring, even after we knew their I struggled with this and skimmed most of it. I felt like, as a reader, I wasn't welcomed into the book; the book starts out with something that never really gets tied into the plot; the actual plot doesn't get set up and just comes out of nowhere about 2/3 of the way through the book; the book felt like it was all setup until it hit the very ending. The ultimate bad guy was boring until they suddenly developed backstory (at the end). The penultimate bad guy was boring, even after we knew their backstory (near the beginning). The good guys were better fleshed out, but not compelling as protagonists. The ending isn't explained or set up: it just happens because of flawed story logic and bad prophesy. However, I feel like there's no way I can be objective about this book, because it messes up the things I'm trying to do as a writer, so all I can see are flaws.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Milliebot

    I was expecting something creepy, maybe a touch horrific and what I got was a mixture of pretension and boredom. This is a story about nature taking over the earth - where animals are running rampant and sometimes trying to kill people. But also they're controlled by some witch. But also she's like a semi-mortal embodiment of nature? But also her other half is living as a human with no memory, but they are still two separate people and he's her brother and they tried to have a baby but it died, I was expecting something creepy, maybe a touch horrific and what I got was a mixture of pretension and boredom. This is a story about nature taking over the earth - where animals are running rampant and sometimes trying to kill people. But also they're controlled by some witch. But also she's like a semi-mortal embodiment of nature? But also her other half is living as a human with no memory, but they are still two separate people and he's her brother and they tried to have a baby but it died, but that was a long time ago, so why did any of this happen? Introducing: A cast of characters I didn't give a shit about; random attacks from animals; people dying violently in their sleep from nightmares that seemed in no way related to nature trying to reclaim the earth; a cast of characters who can easily go days without sleeping; copiuos amounts of showing and then telling in case you're too fucking stupid to understand the powerful pretentious subtleties written by the esteemed author; and a scene where the witch villain basically orgasms from watching a herd of cows murder a group of people because she's an evil woman and finds her powers sexually appealing and definitely wasn't just written that way so a dude could write an almost orgasm scene in a story where sexual activity was in no way necssary to the plot or character development. Oh and villain woman is crazy and is doing all this because she's crazy and women are fragile, right? Here's a quote from the end of the book that pretty much sums up the whole story, said by our witch villain: "We're so very old, Blane. We have control, you and I. We're the ideas of nature, the basic forms of male and female. The controlling influences. Only...I went mad. I saw what humans were doing to the world, and I couldnt stand it, and I went mad. I have been for a long time. I went mad, and you couldn't stand it, and you went mad too, in your own way." You might ask why I read this whole book, given my lack of glowing review. At first I was intruigied by our villainess. Her inital physical description seemed badass and I figured she'd be powerful and awesome and scary. Nothing about this book was awesome or scary. As our bland characters navigated the strange landscape, setting everything up for Ultra Bland Blane to meet up wth Witch Villainess in order for her to monologue the explanation for the entire book, I lost hope in our villainess. Then I kind of just wanted to understand what the fuck was going on and why. It ended up all very underwhelming. The writing was at times overly pretentious, but in all it wasn't awful. Mostly I was bored and should have just DNF'd this. But I didn't quite hate it. I do have two other Lebbon books on my shelf (somehow I've started a small collection without realizing it) and I'll give one of them a chance. If I don't enjoy it, I'll likely donate the third without reading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    I'd give this 3.5/5 stars. Reminded me to a degree of James Herbert's work, but with dark fantasy elements mixed with the horror. I'd give this 3.5/5 stars. Reminded me to a degree of James Herbert's work, but with dark fantasy elements mixed with the horror.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robert Beveridge

    Tim Lebbon, The Nature of Balance (Leisure Books, 2001) It's interesting that horror has made a comeback in the American bookselling business these days, the same way it did in the eighties. (And the same way it will again twenty years from now.) Often, cycles of something being popular and unpopular are blamed on a fickle public. Those of us in the business of media manipulation through the creation of art know better. Without going into the details, let's just say that the more popular somethin Tim Lebbon, The Nature of Balance (Leisure Books, 2001) It's interesting that horror has made a comeback in the American bookselling business these days, the same way it did in the eighties. (And the same way it will again twenty years from now.) Often, cycles of something being popular and unpopular are blamed on a fickle public. Those of us in the business of media manipulation through the creation of art know better. Without going into the details, let's just say that the more popular something guess, the more the quality is likely to decline. The business itself brings about the downfall of the genre, whatever that genre may be. (Look at the long, painful death of industrial music in the mid-nineties.) It's pretty easy to see that the new horror revival will soon be headed that way, as well. The stalwarts who weather the last death of horror as popular art form are still around, of course. King, Koontz, Ed Lee, etc. will never go anywhere while they live. And, as always, the newer crop of horror writers contains some brilliant writers who are destined to topple and replace the stalwarts (Kiernan, Brite, etc.), some who have been around for years and just never got the recognition they deserved (Koja, Laymon, et al.), and, well, the rest. To call Tim Lebbon one of the rest is not to imply that Lebbon's work lacks quality. It doesn't. The Nature of Balance is a good, solidly-written novel that keeps the pages turning and is likely to appeal to any horror fan (it may be a bit laid back for fans of extreme horror novelists like Laymon and Lee). But it's not more than that. When you pick up something by Cait Kiernan or Kathe Koja (when Koja's writing horror, anyway), you're not only getting horror, you're getting your socks knocked off. They transcend simple horror novels and become something else. The Nature of Balance never achieves that transcendence. Anyone remember Rick Hautala? Ken Eulo? John R. Holt? William Valtos? Doug Hawk? Leslie Whitten? I could keep going for a very long time here, and at a guess, you'll get maybe ten percent of the names unless you were an obsessive horror fan like was an obsessive horror fan back during its last popular heyday. If it hit the Atlantic Books shelves in the horror section, I was there waiting with $3.99. (Depressing, isn't it?) And all of the above authors were writers of good, solid horror novels (okay, we'll make an exception for Whitten). I can (and have) go back and pick up John Holt's When We Dead Awaken or Edward Levy's The Beast Within and come up with a fantastic read. It's not a new Kathe Koja novel, but it's a great way to kill a few hours on a rainy day. And, ultimately, that's what The Nature of Balance is; good for what it is, but at a guess, not destined for immortality. ***

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This was a book that I had to force myself to keep reading. I like the idea of nature revolting, but I've read books where this idea has been executed so much better. I suppose my main issue with the book was that it really moved very slowly. I almost felt like I was wading through sticky mud to get to the interesting parts. This book, ok - nothing special. This was a book that I had to force myself to keep reading. I like the idea of nature revolting, but I've read books where this idea has been executed so much better. I suppose my main issue with the book was that it really moved very slowly. I almost felt like I was wading through sticky mud to get to the interesting parts. This book, ok - nothing special.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Not bad, but very slow; it dragged on and on.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Croke

    I really struggled to finish this. The plot made no sense and the ending was lazy. There were some sentences that seemed like stream of consciousness writing. Yuck.

  11. 5 out of 5

    D.M. Shiro

    I'm just going to say, I did not see that one coming. Absolutely intense read with imagery that will haunt my nightmares for nights to come. I'm just going to say, I did not see that one coming. Absolutely intense read with imagery that will haunt my nightmares for nights to come.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    My feeling is pretty luke warm, to grossed out, as it usually is with these Leisure Horror books. I mean, maybe it's the huge font they use in their paperbacks, or the ugly photoshopped covers, but I can't take them seriously. Or maybe it's the tendency of these books to have promising premises, and fair to moderate character development and writing, but then devolve into fantasy mystery mumbo jumbo. Lebbon's book isn't horrible, in fact a lot of his character development reminds me of Stephen Ki My feeling is pretty luke warm, to grossed out, as it usually is with these Leisure Horror books. I mean, maybe it's the huge font they use in their paperbacks, or the ugly photoshopped covers, but I can't take them seriously. Or maybe it's the tendency of these books to have promising premises, and fair to moderate character development and writing, but then devolve into fantasy mystery mumbo jumbo. Lebbon's book isn't horrible, in fact a lot of his character development reminds me of Stephen King. His way of showing a character dealing with the mundane, everyday stuff and then showing them deal with the apocalypse is quite intriguing. The apocalypse of "The Nature of Balance" is quite compelling. Nature has turned against man - not only the plants and the animals - but the very physics of existence. Unfortunately this has been caused by an angry witch who doesn't show up until the book is 2/3 of the way through, and the reader is comfortably rolling with a very scary, yet very possible and not at all corny end of the world scenario. I mean, Paul, one of the secondary characters and a rational forester, actually explains how the turning of nature and existence might happen by twisting astrophysics just a little bit. But no, Lebbon doesn't listen to his own characters. He drives them all to a climax that is unbelievable and boring. It's a damn shame, too. I had high hopes for this book and Lebbon. On a more positive note, a scene at the midpoint of this novel sticks with me. The group of survivors holes up at a rest stop in the British countryside, waiting for help, deciding what to do. When they finally make their way out through the still-working automated sliding glass doors toward their vehicles, a mass of birds, swifts and crows and sparrows, swarms down upon them, clogging up the vestibule and ravaging a woman, forcing them all back into the building. The onslaught of the birds is unrelenting. This is shockingly vivid in Lebbon's words - not so much in mine.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Weirder than I was expecting. The atmosphere was taut and richly described. The massive scale of the event was impactful and the writing was pretty well done. I thought the ending came together a bit rushed after the terror of the beginning and then this odd little wrap up and done. I don't mind weird if it's done right. I liked the use of nature as a visual horror, enacting a sickness upon humankind for all the awful things we've done to the planet. I've always been interested when people use h Weirder than I was expecting. The atmosphere was taut and richly described. The massive scale of the event was impactful and the writing was pretty well done. I thought the ending came together a bit rushed after the terror of the beginning and then this odd little wrap up and done. I don't mind weird if it's done right. I liked the use of nature as a visual horror, enacting a sickness upon humankind for all the awful things we've done to the planet. I've always been interested when people use horrific metaphor to convey the feelings of the earth. I'm one of those people who recycles and respects animals and their right to life etc. so I definitely enjoyed the human/nature involvement and turn. There wasn't much build up to the reveal of Blane's identity. No foreshadowing. That deeply in to the story you're aware of the supernatural element impacting the world, but never hints about why. Or vague as hell hints to that conclusion. Anyway, the bit of reveal for Blane left me feeling bored. It seemed like a "just because" stereotypical fairy tale ending that would somehow work out and then happen again. The tone of the very end, the positivity, felt out of place among the story with so much gore and woe. I liked it. It was a different sort of read, but the social commentary overtones were overkill and that took away from the "horror" aspect. Anyway still enjoyable.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jess(ToTheMoonAndBackReviews)

    This was a slow starter for me. I actually had to force myself to keep reading, I am not one to readily put a book down unless it was absolutley horrid. I have also had books, that take forever for me to get into. This was partially the case. While it isn't a book I would re-read, it was deffinatly an interesting read. I mean you have to wonder, how would people react if they couldn't sleep? If the ones they held dear to them suddenly died, with no explination what so ever. It wouldn't be an easy This was a slow starter for me. I actually had to force myself to keep reading, I am not one to readily put a book down unless it was absolutley horrid. I have also had books, that take forever for me to get into. This was partially the case. While it isn't a book I would re-read, it was deffinatly an interesting read. I mean you have to wonder, how would people react if they couldn't sleep? If the ones they held dear to them suddenly died, with no explination what so ever. It wouldn't be an easy death but a horrific one that has body bits showing that should be on the inside. I like the thought put behind the detail, because it truly was well written, and brought to mind how humanity really is on the knife edge, dangerously tipping each way. The end of the story had a great twist to. I would recomend it more for men then female, I don't know if all the gory bits is why the guy who recomended it to me recomended it but it still was a good story once I found myself submerged into it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Charles Dee Mitchell

    I felt like I was reading a horror movie, and as a result it was taking too long. Lebbon creates the disorientation of a world where most of the population has died -- horribly -- in their sleep. And that sleep is the enemy is perfectly captured in a scene where a woman comforts a sobbing child who has lost his family. She strokes his head, he dozes off, his head collapses in on itself. There is a predictably mismatched band of survivors, who while contending with flesh eating farm animals find t I felt like I was reading a horror movie, and as a result it was taking too long. Lebbon creates the disorientation of a world where most of the population has died -- horribly -- in their sleep. And that sleep is the enemy is perfectly captured in a scene where a woman comforts a sobbing child who has lost his family. She strokes his head, he dozes off, his head collapses in on itself. There is a predictably mismatched band of survivors, who while contending with flesh eating farm animals find time to complain that emergency services are not doing their job. At least there are no zombies. What you get instead is a plot that over reaches itself to incorporate dying earth spirits gone berserk and an ending that comes several dozen pages too late. But I did like the flesh eating farm animals.

  16. 4 out of 5

    William M.

    I enjoyed this book, my first experience with Tim Lebbon. It took a while to get into the story, but it was interesting enough for me to finish it. The big problems were the lack of character development and the overwritten style of his descriptions. He takes a full page to describe what should be only be a paragraph. By doing this, I constantly got pulled out of the story. What brought me back? The villian. I love a powerful antagonist that seems on track to conquer our hero, and this novel mad I enjoyed this book, my first experience with Tim Lebbon. It took a while to get into the story, but it was interesting enough for me to finish it. The big problems were the lack of character development and the overwritten style of his descriptions. He takes a full page to describe what should be only be a paragraph. By doing this, I constantly got pulled out of the story. What brought me back? The villian. I love a powerful antagonist that seems on track to conquer our hero, and this novel made up a few points in that area. Those two complaints aside, I had a fun time with it and I look forward to reading more by Mr. Lebbon.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Richard Barber

    I need to start this off with a caveat and an explanation. Tim is a stunning writer, but for me this isn't quite up there with the best. It may just be that my head wasn't in the right place to engage with the story (I'm really busy at the moment so I pecked at this book which couldn't have helped) but I never really got drawn into the narrative. The opening is suitably intriguing, and the basic premise is certainly interesting, but it took too long for me to get the characters straight in my he I need to start this off with a caveat and an explanation. Tim is a stunning writer, but for me this isn't quite up there with the best. It may just be that my head wasn't in the right place to engage with the story (I'm really busy at the moment so I pecked at this book which couldn't have helped) but I never really got drawn into the narrative. The opening is suitably intriguing, and the basic premise is certainly interesting, but it took too long for me to get the characters straight in my head.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    A good - if weird - read. It doesn't take long to get into the story, and I did like the gradual increase of tension and horror. Beautifully written, too, as Lebbon's work usually is! However, there was an awful lot of aimless story - most of the middle 60% - which caused it to lag an awful lot. With my "to read" pile getting taller by the hour, it's hard to pull myself back to something when it starts to drag, or lose it's point. That said, there's a lot to recommend a good quick horror read, es A good - if weird - read. It doesn't take long to get into the story, and I did like the gradual increase of tension and horror. Beautifully written, too, as Lebbon's work usually is! However, there was an awful lot of aimless story - most of the middle 60% - which caused it to lag an awful lot. With my "to read" pile getting taller by the hour, it's hard to pull myself back to something when it starts to drag, or lose it's point. That said, there's a lot to recommend a good quick horror read, especially if it's weird but actually has a recognisable resolution, which this definitely does.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andy Phillips

    This book isn't terrible but I had to force myself to finish it. It starts off well with an interesting idea of everyone asleep simultaneously being killed in a rather messy fashion, and a group of survivors trying to figure out what to do. These characters are mostly believable and the writing style is good. The negatives are mainly associated with the supernatural elements to the story, which I found more ridiculous than scary. The end of the book in particular is awful, in my opinion. Not a bad This book isn't terrible but I had to force myself to finish it. It starts off well with an interesting idea of everyone asleep simultaneously being killed in a rather messy fashion, and a group of survivors trying to figure out what to do. These characters are mostly believable and the writing style is good. The negatives are mainly associated with the supernatural elements to the story, which I found more ridiculous than scary. The end of the book in particular is awful, in my opinion. Not a bad horror book, and well written, but a few elements let it down for me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Zina

    I read this book when I was thirteen and then didn't sleep for a week because I was so frightened to close my eyes. This book was everything I didn't know I wanted and at the last readthrough, I was still in chills because of that scene with the (potentially flesh-eating) cows and their bloody mouths. God. I don't think I'm ever going to get over this book entirely and I'm honestly okay with that. I read this book when I was thirteen and then didn't sleep for a week because I was so frightened to close my eyes. This book was everything I didn't know I wanted and at the last readthrough, I was still in chills because of that scene with the (potentially flesh-eating) cows and their bloody mouths. God. I don't think I'm ever going to get over this book entirely and I'm honestly okay with that.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Scott Wieczorek

    The book started out strong, but seemed to fizzle toward the end. The ending itself fell flat for me and the plot came off contrived. The editing seemed decent, but I did catch a number of small mistakes peppered through the pages. All in all, I'd say that I liked it, but was not overly wowed. The book started out strong, but seemed to fizzle toward the end. The ending itself fell flat for me and the plot came off contrived. The editing seemed decent, but I did catch a number of small mistakes peppered through the pages. All in all, I'd say that I liked it, but was not overly wowed.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    I found this book to not very interesting, it has weird supernatural things happening and odd characters that are never fully explained.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    Beautifully written, interesting. Definitely liked it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gizmatic Cantor

    Love Tim Lebbon!!!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Gallan

    i enjoyed this book very much

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sci-Fi & Scary

    I tried. I really, really tried. But it's just one of those books where the writing style did absolutely nothing for me. I tried. I really, really tried. But it's just one of those books where the writing style did absolutely nothing for me.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jackie Primo

    I couldn't put it down, I was hooked from the beginning. Another great novel by Lebbon. I couldn't put it down, I was hooked from the beginning. Another great novel by Lebbon.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Susan Mcreynolds

    Started good but then....not really.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Mcgee

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aaron Boyer

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.