counter Works Well with Others: An Outsider's Guide to Shaking Hands, Shutting Up, Handling Jerks, and Other Crucial Skills in Business That No One Ever Teaches You - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Works Well with Others: An Outsider's Guide to Shaking Hands, Shutting Up, Handling Jerks, and Other Crucial Skills in Business That No One Ever Teaches You

Availability: Ready to download

Esquire editor and Entrepreneur etiquette columnist Ross McCammon delivers a funny and authoritative guide that provides the advice you really need to be confident and authentic at work, even when you have no idea what’s going on.   Ten years ago, before he got a job at Esquire magazine and way before he became the etiquette columnist at Entrepreneur magazine, Ross McCammon Esquire editor and Entrepreneur etiquette columnist Ross McCammon delivers a funny and authoritative guide that provides the advice you really need to be confident and authentic at work, even when you have no idea what’s going on.   Ten years ago, before he got a job at Esquire magazine and way before he became the etiquette columnist at Entrepreneur magazine, Ross McCammon, editor at an in-flight magazine, was staring out a second-floor window at a parking lot in suburban Dallas wondering if it was five o’clock yet. Everything changed with one phone call from Esquire. Three weeks later, he was working in New York and wondering what the hell had just happened.   This is McCammon’s honest, funny, and entertaining journey from impostor to authority, a story that begins with periods of debilitating workplace anxiety but leads to rich insights and practical advice from a guy who “made it” but who still remembers what it’s like to feel entirely ill-equipped for professional success. And for life in general, if we’re being completely honest. McCammon points out the workplace for what it is: an often absurd landscape of ego and fear guided by social rules that no one ever talks about. He offers a mix of enlightening and often self-deprecating personal stories about his experience and clear, practical advice on getting the small things right—crucial skills that often go unacknowledged—from shaking a hand to conducting a business meeting in a bar to navigating a work party.  Here is an inspirational new way of looking at your job, your career, and success itself; an accessible guide for those of us who are smart, talented, and ambitious but who aren’t well-“leveraged” and don’t quite feel prepared for success . . . or know what to do once we’ve made it. 


Compare

Esquire editor and Entrepreneur etiquette columnist Ross McCammon delivers a funny and authoritative guide that provides the advice you really need to be confident and authentic at work, even when you have no idea what’s going on.   Ten years ago, before he got a job at Esquire magazine and way before he became the etiquette columnist at Entrepreneur magazine, Ross McCammon Esquire editor and Entrepreneur etiquette columnist Ross McCammon delivers a funny and authoritative guide that provides the advice you really need to be confident and authentic at work, even when you have no idea what’s going on.   Ten years ago, before he got a job at Esquire magazine and way before he became the etiquette columnist at Entrepreneur magazine, Ross McCammon, editor at an in-flight magazine, was staring out a second-floor window at a parking lot in suburban Dallas wondering if it was five o’clock yet. Everything changed with one phone call from Esquire. Three weeks later, he was working in New York and wondering what the hell had just happened.   This is McCammon’s honest, funny, and entertaining journey from impostor to authority, a story that begins with periods of debilitating workplace anxiety but leads to rich insights and practical advice from a guy who “made it” but who still remembers what it’s like to feel entirely ill-equipped for professional success. And for life in general, if we’re being completely honest. McCammon points out the workplace for what it is: an often absurd landscape of ego and fear guided by social rules that no one ever talks about. He offers a mix of enlightening and often self-deprecating personal stories about his experience and clear, practical advice on getting the small things right—crucial skills that often go unacknowledged—from shaking a hand to conducting a business meeting in a bar to navigating a work party.  Here is an inspirational new way of looking at your job, your career, and success itself; an accessible guide for those of us who are smart, talented, and ambitious but who aren’t well-“leveraged” and don’t quite feel prepared for success . . . or know what to do once we’ve made it. 

30 review for Works Well with Others: An Outsider's Guide to Shaking Hands, Shutting Up, Handling Jerks, and Other Crucial Skills in Business That No One Ever Teaches You

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katie Bruell

    This book was really dumb. I hate books for men which tell them to have some self doubt. No duh! Try being a woman for a week! And, I don't need to know how to pick a bar for my after-dinner drink. It should be called crucial skills for young, male jerks in New York City business. This book was really dumb. I hate books for men which tell them to have some self doubt. No duh! Try being a woman for a week! And, I don't need to know how to pick a bar for my after-dinner drink. It should be called crucial skills for young, male jerks in New York City business.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Crysta

    This book was trying to straddle humor and useful content and for me it fell short in both categories. Good for you, bro, you got to proofread body paint on a nude model and then tricked us all into reading it. And now that you've told me to shake hands firmly I'll do it even though I ignored every other piece of advice and sitcom joke about it. There were a few nuggets of decent advice in there but it's not worth slogging through the whole book to get them. This book was trying to straddle humor and useful content and for me it fell short in both categories. Good for you, bro, you got to proofread body paint on a nude model and then tricked us all into reading it. And now that you've told me to shake hands firmly I'll do it even though I ignored every other piece of advice and sitcom joke about it. There were a few nuggets of decent advice in there but it's not worth slogging through the whole book to get them.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Summer

    "Facts x opinions - about how much salary everyone in the room probably makes - bullshit + knowledge of a good Thai place around here / you = The Score" Finally a business book that really tells it like it is. I was skeptical that a white dude could write a book about being an "outsider" but Mr. McCammon really IS an outsider in the offices of Esquire. (What would I be? An alien?) He hasn't got a single drop of blue blood in his veins and he's very very astute with his observations regarding "ve "Facts x opinions - about how much salary everyone in the room probably makes - bullshit + knowledge of a good Thai place around here / you = The Score" Finally a business book that really tells it like it is. I was skeptical that a white dude could write a book about being an "outsider" but Mr. McCammon really IS an outsider in the offices of Esquire. (What would I be? An alien?) He hasn't got a single drop of blue blood in his veins and he's very very astute with his observations regarding "very important people". I don't work with celebrities... but you know what... maybe I do. Everyone dies famous in a small town. Anyway, this book was fantastic. I laughed out loud in several places. McCammon's writing is so good I would buy a phonebook if he wrote it. I'm very seriously considering a SUBSCRIPTION to Esquire based on his writing. (I read the library's Esquire from time to time but his writing is so good, I feel like I need to vote with my dollars) Reading this book will make you feel better about whatever happened in the office today. It will give you real genuine actual things to say to weird people who try to make your life difficult. You will feel more comfortable with being who you are, where you're at and meandering through the concept of a profession.

  4. 5 out of 5

    James

    I...can't stand the way this guy writes – it's so cheesy. A lot of this might apply if you work at the type of job in New York where people are overly concerned about how you dress or what you order at a restaurant...but most of this just seems either blatantly obvious (it's okay to make mistakes! make eye contact!) or painfully white (actual quote when referring to interviewing 50 Cent) “I was going to ask him about...his life of crime (or “hustling” as it's always vaguely put.)” So if that I...can't stand the way this guy writes – it's so cheesy. A lot of this might apply if you work at the type of job in New York where people are overly concerned about how you dress or what you order at a restaurant...but most of this just seems either blatantly obvious (it's okay to make mistakes! make eye contact!) or painfully white (actual quote when referring to interviewing 50 Cent) “I was going to ask him about...his life of crime (or “hustling” as it's always vaguely put.)” So if that sounds like something you'd be in to...then enjoy!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amanda [Novel Addiction]

    I actually really liked this. I keep trying to read business-type books, maybe to make me feel more like an adult, but they are usually boring and full of information that I will never use. Sure, this book still has that - there's tons of stuff in here that will never matter in my business life, but at least it was very entertaining to read. Author Ross McCammon has a good sense of humor, and is not shy when it comes to tell readers where he went wrong, when he messed up, or that time he acted l I actually really liked this. I keep trying to read business-type books, maybe to make me feel more like an adult, but they are usually boring and full of information that I will never use. Sure, this book still has that - there's tons of stuff in here that will never matter in my business life, but at least it was very entertaining to read. Author Ross McCammon has a good sense of humor, and is not shy when it comes to tell readers where he went wrong, when he messed up, or that time he acted like a jerk. Given the opportunity, I'd gladly read this again in the future. Counts for 2016 reading challenge: A self-help book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    Caveat lector This book is entertaining but anecdotal. If you want to rationalize drinking at work or using profanity or working in New York then this is probably a book for you. For the rest of us in "fly over country" this book will make you glad to be where you are. Caveat lector This book is entertaining but anecdotal. If you want to rationalize drinking at work or using profanity or working in New York then this is probably a book for you. For the rest of us in "fly over country" this book will make you glad to be where you are.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Martin

    Comments based on advanced copy - Thanks Dutton/Penguin/Random. This is an exceptional business etiquette book. I wish I had this when I moved to the private sector from the not-for-profit world 27 years ago. This very readable book uses humor to deliver sound practical advice. My only criticism is that instead of October, this book should be out now so that it could be a gift for all recent graduates. I will be assigning this to my work group and I have already recommend this to colleagues.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Katra

    It's not often I read a business book and laugh out loud. Everyone in the break room is very puzzled. I hope that they're puzzled enough to take a peek. It's mirthfully good advice. It's not often I read a business book and laugh out loud. Everyone in the break room is very puzzled. I hope that they're puzzled enough to take a peek. It's mirthfully good advice.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Deb Lockwood

    This book was really enjoyable. The author handled the subject matter truthfully, frankly, and with a well-honed sense of humor. He is witty, irreverent, and utterly entertaining. His “what not to do” chapters were especially funny. Even though the author looks at things from a humorous, absurdist point of view at times, at other times his content it right on the mark and quite serious. I learned more about working in a corporate environment while I wryly smiled because I recognized the characte This book was really enjoyable. The author handled the subject matter truthfully, frankly, and with a well-honed sense of humor. He is witty, irreverent, and utterly entertaining. His “what not to do” chapters were especially funny. Even though the author looks at things from a humorous, absurdist point of view at times, at other times his content it right on the mark and quite serious. I learned more about working in a corporate environment while I wryly smiled because I recognized the characters in his stories and descriptions.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    If I keep this up, I'm going to have to start a "self-help" shelf on my Goodreads page. This was decent. It's a quick read. Probably the most useful thing I picked up, and I'm actually eager to try this, is to ask an asshole/underminer/problem case "Why would you do that?" It's a nice variation on the way I've been trained to respond to bigoted jokes, by saying "I don't understand. Can you explain that to me?" In both cases, you get to watch the asshole sputter and make excuses while you try to If I keep this up, I'm going to have to start a "self-help" shelf on my Goodreads page. This was decent. It's a quick read. Probably the most useful thing I picked up, and I'm actually eager to try this, is to ask an asshole/underminer/problem case "Why would you do that?" It's a nice variation on the way I've been trained to respond to bigoted jokes, by saying "I don't understand. Can you explain that to me?" In both cases, you get to watch the asshole sputter and make excuses while you try to keep your glee from showing on your face.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cassie Gutman (happybooklovers)

    Putting this down. I read several sections that pertained to me and it's very "white man in corporate New York" rather than being helpful or applicable to many people in many environments. Going to look for another book on this topic instead. Putting this down. I read several sections that pertained to me and it's very "white man in corporate New York" rather than being helpful or applicable to many people in many environments. Going to look for another book on this topic instead.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I really enjoyed this very humorous, tongue-in-cheek business guide. Short topical chapters. Besides being funny it actually is helpful.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michael McDougall

    Not my cup of tea - useless as a guide for anyone outside of the staff of 'Esquire' magazine. I picked it up and zipped through it because my niece had dropped a quote from chapter 49 on social media. Sadly, this was the best chapter in the book -- maybe just read those six paragraphs and pass over the remainder. Not my cup of tea - useless as a guide for anyone outside of the staff of 'Esquire' magazine. I picked it up and zipped through it because my niece had dropped a quote from chapter 49 on social media. Sadly, this was the best chapter in the book -- maybe just read those six paragraphs and pass over the remainder.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Fun and deceptively light. I wish I had read 20 years ago – some of the techniques would've been very useful at work. I hope to use some of them in the future. Fun and deceptively light. I wish I had read 20 years ago – some of the techniques would've been very useful at work. I hope to use some of them in the future.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Creane

    My favorite chapter was 12 ("How to Shut up"), which I think is perfect. I bookmarked it and showed it to everyone I saw while the book was in the living room. This is how to talk in a meeting. Shh. Shh. Speak. Shh. In the best humor books there's always good advice for not being ridiculous or (in this book) an asshole but the gifts in here are how to deal with things like undermining (brilliant), how to handle being incompetent bravely and intimidating responsibly (sorry about the adverbs), and how My favorite chapter was 12 ("How to Shut up"), which I think is perfect. I bookmarked it and showed it to everyone I saw while the book was in the living room. This is how to talk in a meeting. Shh. Shh. Speak. Shh. In the best humor books there's always good advice for not being ridiculous or (in this book) an asshole but the gifts in here are how to deal with things like undermining (brilliant), how to handle being incompetent bravely and intimidating responsibly (sorry about the adverbs), and how to be genuine in awkward social situations. There are chapters that didn't speak to me--the scotch drinking and blingy work parties and such. Most of my work life has been in hospitals where not even the crappy office coffee with powdered creamer is free. But the universal theme is that when Ross McCammon writes a good piece the reader is happy and everyone associated with him looks competent and smart. When he doesn't the opposite happens. Even with writing it turns out we're all interconnected. Find that stressful? Read the book and you'll chill.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Some career advice gems: --Jobs aren't to be gotten; jobs are to be matched to. --Being late is about a ton of little decisions you make on the way to being late. --Be cool when someone is crying at work; speak as if there is no crying. --Never kill them with kindness; underhanded people don't respond to kindness. --Two beers and a puppy. Some career advice gems: --Jobs aren't to be gotten; jobs are to be matched to. --Being late is about a ton of little decisions you make on the way to being late. --Be cool when someone is crying at work; speak as if there is no crying. --Never kill them with kindness; underhanded people don't respond to kindness. --Two beers and a puppy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    I found this eminently useful. Wish I had read it years ago when I started managing in a dept outside my specialty. It's casual but frank. I found this eminently useful. Wish I had read it years ago when I started managing in a dept outside my specialty. It's casual but frank.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Roger Smitter

    Author Ross McCammon opens his advice about careers with the story of how Esquire Magazine hired him when he was happily working as an editor for the Southwest Airlines in-flight magazine. An Esquire editor is on a Southwest Airlines plane. He does what all of us do. He glances through the in-flight magazine. He likes it. He likes it a lot and, after landing, invites McCammon (the SWA editor) to an interview. It leads to more interviews and finally a new job with Esquire. McCammon discovered in Author Ross McCammon opens his advice about careers with the story of how Esquire Magazine hired him when he was happily working as an editor for the Southwest Airlines in-flight magazine. An Esquire editor is on a Southwest Airlines plane. He does what all of us do. He glances through the in-flight magazine. He likes it. He likes it a lot and, after landing, invites McCammon (the SWA editor) to an interview. It leads to more interviews and finally a new job with Esquire. McCammon discovered in his first few weeks at Esquire that he had to adjust his thinking about the skills for entering a new workplace. That rethinking process spawned the book. He spends time on the fundamentals. For example, how should you enter a room. That skill is a part of having a successful career. We think of walking into a room as a routine matter. But, the new member of the staff should establish presence when he or she enters the room. It’s one piece of long-term success. Another chapter tells the new hire how best to handle mistakes. He reminds us if you are NOT making a mistake in the first weeks; you’re overqualified for the job. There is plenty of humor in the advice. For example, "Not only should you assume that every email you send will get forwarded to someone else; you should assume that every email you send will someday be read aloud in a court of law." (It’s sophisticated humor.) He likes challenging the usual advice given to a new hire. For example, new hires should show passion on the job. What really matters, says McCammon, is intensity. Passion can make it difficult for others to listen to you and gets in the way of being professional. I took issue with some chapters, especially what he says about alcohol consumption. However, it’s difficult to challenge the role model he provides (Winston Churchill). It’s a good book for someone taking on a new job. Just wait about 6 months to give the present.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Annie Kate

    I came across this library book when one of my children had problems at work, so I quickly read it to see if it might help her. Works Well with Others has some helpful pointers but the book itself is not worth reading. It is meant to be funny and the author tells stories about himself, some of which are fun and some of which are inappropriate. The fact that there is even a chapter defending profanity says enough. So here are the helpful pointers; with this information you won’t have any need to lo I came across this library book when one of my children had problems at work, so I quickly read it to see if it might help her. Works Well with Others has some helpful pointers but the book itself is not worth reading. It is meant to be funny and the author tells stories about himself, some of which are fun and some of which are inappropriate. The fact that there is even a chapter defending profanity says enough. So here are the helpful pointers; with this information you won’t have any need to look at the book itself: • Shake hands well • Make eye contact • Be curious about things • Admit ignorance • Smile • Shut up • Small talk is important • Formulas for speeches: (Tell them what you’ll say, say it, and then tell them what you said; vivid personal story, recommend one action, explain how they will benefit from it; personal story about why it is important, then tell about it, then draw a pithy conclusion) • Clothes give you confidence • It helps to seem successful • Think about the motivation of nasty people, and, if necessary, ask them bemusedly why they would do that. • Think through ‘wince’ memories and defuse emotion by focussing on peripheral details Or, in Christian terms: • Respect and care about others • Be honest • Honor others above self • Do not be full of timidity • Work for God; don’t be self-focussed • Help others become better • Forgive and focus on what is good, beautiful, and true

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cliff Watson

    I'm probably around the same age as Ross McCammon. And while I've never shaken hands with Kanye, there was a year where I occasionally shared a men's room with John Mayer. Not exactly apples-to-apples, I know. More like apples-to-pineapples, but they're both still fruit. Anyway, I wasn't expecting to learn anything new from this book, but I did just return to the corporate world after working for myself for several years. I expected it might be a good refresher course on office skills, people sk I'm probably around the same age as Ross McCammon. And while I've never shaken hands with Kanye, there was a year where I occasionally shared a men's room with John Mayer. Not exactly apples-to-apples, I know. More like apples-to-pineapples, but they're both still fruit. Anyway, I wasn't expecting to learn anything new from this book, but I did just return to the corporate world after working for myself for several years. I expected it might be a good refresher course on office skills, people skills and office people skills. What I didn't expect was that it would be such good advice and so damn funny. This should be required reading for college seniors in the semester before they graduate. Or upon receiving their first internship, regardless of age. Or for people of any age who have a) an adult office job, and b) the feeling that no one is having quite the same experience at the office as they are. This book is The Truth, told with a distinct voice and a languid middle finger to The Man from a guy that has a cool job with good stories. There is no way your job is this cool. Yet the lessons — which build in scope and gravitas throughout — are universal. "Two Beers and a Puppy" is the best accidental HR manifesto written. And "The Score" is worth an entire book, not just several pages.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Teena in Toronto

    Ross McCammon is an editor at GQ magazine and the business etiquette columnist at Entrepreneur magazine. When he wrote this book, he was a senior editor at Esquire magazine (from 2005 to 2016), where he was responsible for the magazine’s coverage of pop culture, drinking, cars and etiquette. The author starts by telling us a little bit about himself and how he ended up at Esquire. Then he proceeds to tell you everything you need to know to be a professional and to work well with others. This inc Ross McCammon is an editor at GQ magazine and the business etiquette columnist at Entrepreneur magazine. When he wrote this book, he was a senior editor at Esquire magazine (from 2005 to 2016), where he was responsible for the magazine’s coverage of pop culture, drinking, cars and etiquette. The author starts by telling us a little bit about himself and how he ended up at Esquire. Then he proceeds to tell you everything you need to know to be a professional and to work well with others. This includes how to act in an interview, being the new guy, partying with your colleagues, shaking hands, eye contact, writing an email (short and to the point), behaving in a meeting (no need to give too much information), your social media presence, swearing, handling jerks and pricks and more. I liked the writing style. Rather than being a dry and boring business book, I liked the author's humour. The chapters are short and snappy. I knew most of the things the author covered but it was a good reminder. As a head's up, there is swearing. Blog review post: http://www.teenaintoronto.com/2018/07...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I listened to the audiobook, which is short and sweet (and perfect for x2 speed). The reader picked up all of the funny asides from the author and so it was entertaining overall, but at times it was distracting and I couldn't tell if he was being serious or joking. (I assumed 'joking' for the remainder of the book.) Contains some hidden gems. Favourite quotes: "Imposter Phenomenon can be broken down into three types of feelings: - that you aren't as successful as people think - that your accomplish I listened to the audiobook, which is short and sweet (and perfect for x2 speed). The reader picked up all of the funny asides from the author and so it was entertaining overall, but at times it was distracting and I couldn't tell if he was being serious or joking. (I assumed 'joking' for the remainder of the book.) Contains some hidden gems. Favourite quotes: "Imposter Phenomenon can be broken down into three types of feelings: - that you aren't as successful as people think - that your accomplishments can be chalked up to luck, and - that even if you've obtained success, it isn't all that impressive." "Success is about being a human being, not a drone." "It's amazing to me how little I used to listen to people when they were talking. Now when I make a conscious effort to listen, it's as if I've turned up the volume, or put in a hearing aid, or acquired a soul." "You have to act: with gratitude, self-awareness, maybe a tiny bit of residual self-doubt that helps to keep you grounded, and a big smile that makes you feel a little stupid."

  23. 4 out of 5

    Renee Dougherty

    This may be the best business book I've ever read. Dead funny, but also full of really simple and excellent advice for those new to the workplace. It summarizes all of those social skills that make any office environment better and more productive. All of those things that some people pick up along the way and some never seem to. Things like how to interview, making eye contact, smiling, giving a toast, giving a speech, shaking someone's hand, listening at a meeting, using social media, talking This may be the best business book I've ever read. Dead funny, but also full of really simple and excellent advice for those new to the workplace. It summarizes all of those social skills that make any office environment better and more productive. All of those things that some people pick up along the way and some never seem to. Things like how to interview, making eye contact, smiling, giving a toast, giving a speech, shaking someone's hand, listening at a meeting, using social media, talking to important people. This was part memoir, part self-help book about managing anxiety, and part new employee handbook. It's full of short chapters with descriptive titles that can be read in short bursts. And it has one of the best chapter titles ever, "Why Strident Postures on Social Media, Are, at the End of the Day, Probably a Bad Idea -- Especially if You're Looking for a Job." Read it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    This was my first audio book. Taken out of the local library. Interesting way to read books. I'll be doing it again. What I remember. Lots of people have imposter syndrome. How to interview people. Ask them about what is important to them. Models and what they do. Rihanna and details of her life before fame. Small talk. Get better at it. Weather is your friend. How to shake hands like Kanye west - short strong focused. Everyone wants you to be successful. Act like it. Listen to people. Talk less This was my first audio book. Taken out of the local library. Interesting way to read books. I'll be doing it again. What I remember. Lots of people have imposter syndrome. How to interview people. Ask them about what is important to them. Models and what they do. Rihanna and details of her life before fame. Small talk. Get better at it. Weather is your friend. How to shake hands like Kanye west - short strong focused. Everyone wants you to be successful. Act like it. Listen to people. Talk less. Email like Brando - short. If you don't know something. Say so. How to pronounce scotches. Eye contact. Work parties is work. Drinking and work can be done but carefully. Leave early. Drink no more than 2 drinks. Drink and brain storming works. Swear like Biden. Not too much passion. Style.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    This is a good book for a entry level understanding of social interaction and networking. Ross uses a very inviting prose which allows readers to not feel intimidated in a subject they already are intimidated by. Ross uses lots of satire and contemporary references to relate to audiences which is nice. He also uses a lot of stories if his own to give a personal touch to the lessons. I really enjoyed his: - Rules to drinking. Social gatherings, how to select a bar, limitations, etc. - Hand shaking - This is a good book for a entry level understanding of social interaction and networking. Ross uses a very inviting prose which allows readers to not feel intimidated in a subject they already are intimidated by. Ross uses lots of satire and contemporary references to relate to audiences which is nice. He also uses a lot of stories if his own to give a personal touch to the lessons. I really enjoyed his: - Rules to drinking. Social gatherings, how to select a bar, limitations, etc. - Hand shaking - Email correspondence - His ending notes and appendix(s) I do feel Ross used too many simple ideas and didnt go in depth as much as I would have liked. I think he could have had a slightly more serious tone without useless quips and tests throughout the book. All in all... I enjoyed the book and would recommend it to others.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mander Pander

    I saw a handful of negative reviews and I think they were a bit hard handed--business books can be pretty dry, and this one was actually pretty witty. The biggest rock it drags around and never really seems to unlock itself from is being "terminally hip." You know, like the resident Cool Guy who'd rather die than actually have anyone actually say he put a whole bunch of work into his Look is writing this book and it's kinda his metaphorical way of taking you under his wing and getting you over t I saw a handful of negative reviews and I think they were a bit hard handed--business books can be pretty dry, and this one was actually pretty witty. The biggest rock it drags around and never really seems to unlock itself from is being "terminally hip." You know, like the resident Cool Guy who'd rather die than actually have anyone actually say he put a whole bunch of work into his Look is writing this book and it's kinda his metaphorical way of taking you under his wing and getting you over to the Cool Table.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Trisha

    I'm not the type of person to read these types of books normally, but a friend recommended I read it (and then handed it to me). I thouroughly enjoyed reading this! Most of the things in this book don't apply to me bevause I don't work for a higher class corporation. I work at a small learning center... Some of it was good advice though and the author made me laugh. I feel like he and I have a similar sense of humor. I finished this in less than a day, while sick, and taking naps... I also had t I'm not the type of person to read these types of books normally, but a friend recommended I read it (and then handed it to me). I thouroughly enjoyed reading this! Most of the things in this book don't apply to me bevause I don't work for a higher class corporation. I work at a small learning center... Some of it was good advice though and the author made me laugh. I feel like he and I have a similar sense of humor. I finished this in less than a day, while sick, and taking naps... I also had to work for two hours... So.. I read it fast and enjoyed it... :)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    I did it on audio & enjoyed it. Tom Taylorson is the voice actor who did a good job narrating. Funny. Some good tips. Anecdotes are easily relatable. I would recommend this if you just want something quick & funny to listen to. If you’ve recently doing a job search & want a laugh to help destress for an hour. Or if you’re starting a new job & feeling stressed, this lets you know that it’s ok. WE don’t all know EVERYTHING right away. Most jobs are a learning process. So destress for an hour while l I did it on audio & enjoyed it. Tom Taylorson is the voice actor who did a good job narrating. Funny. Some good tips. Anecdotes are easily relatable. I would recommend this if you just want something quick & funny to listen to. If you’ve recently doing a job search & want a laugh to help destress for an hour. Or if you’re starting a new job & feeling stressed, this lets you know that it’s ok. WE don’t all know EVERYTHING right away. Most jobs are a learning process. So destress for an hour while listening to this.

  29. 5 out of 5

    May-Ling

    i had mixed feelings about this book. certainly there are nuggets of wisdom, but his humor can make it difficult to take certain perspectives seriously (duh, but relevant when doling out professional advice...) and of course, instances can feel industry-specific, as he's a journalist writing for a popular publication - much different from my role. that said, if you can bear with the line spacing and dumb cosmo like quizzes, you'll certainly glean a few takeaways on basic work stuff that no one t i had mixed feelings about this book. certainly there are nuggets of wisdom, but his humor can make it difficult to take certain perspectives seriously (duh, but relevant when doling out professional advice...) and of course, instances can feel industry-specific, as he's a journalist writing for a popular publication - much different from my role. that said, if you can bear with the line spacing and dumb cosmo like quizzes, you'll certainly glean a few takeaways on basic work stuff that no one tends to spell out for you, which is helpful.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sally Farley

    This was a fun read. The author, who has a well-established career editing for men's publications, injects self-deprecating humor into his advice. Advice that may or may not be applicable to each reader. He provides general business etiquette which can be generally applied to many everyday workplace situations. I don't feel it's strictly intended to be a serious business guide and readers should not expect it to be. This was a fun read. The author, who has a well-established career editing for men's publications, injects self-deprecating humor into his advice. Advice that may or may not be applicable to each reader. He provides general business etiquette which can be generally applied to many everyday workplace situations. I don't feel it's strictly intended to be a serious business guide and readers should not expect it to be.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.