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The Invisible Man (Classics Illustrated Graphic Novels 2)

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One of the most gripping of H.G. Wells’ science-fiction sagas, The Invisible Man is the story of a brilliant young scientist who impetuously experiments upon himself, and then becomes invisible and mad, imprisoned in a nightmare of his own making.  A spellbinding and unforgettable fantasy, it also provides a lesson in the calamity that can result when knowledge is used One of the most gripping of H.G. Wells’ science-fiction sagas, The Invisible Man is the story of a brilliant young scientist who impetuously experiments upon himself, and then becomes invisible and mad, imprisoned in a nightmare of his own making.  A spellbinding and unforgettable fantasy, it also provides a lesson in the calamity that can result when knowledge is used toward a corrupt end.  Eisner-Award winner Rick Geary’s fanciful artwork captures the tragedy and irony of Wells’ fascinating tale.


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One of the most gripping of H.G. Wells’ science-fiction sagas, The Invisible Man is the story of a brilliant young scientist who impetuously experiments upon himself, and then becomes invisible and mad, imprisoned in a nightmare of his own making.  A spellbinding and unforgettable fantasy, it also provides a lesson in the calamity that can result when knowledge is used One of the most gripping of H.G. Wells’ science-fiction sagas, The Invisible Man is the story of a brilliant young scientist who impetuously experiments upon himself, and then becomes invisible and mad, imprisoned in a nightmare of his own making.  A spellbinding and unforgettable fantasy, it also provides a lesson in the calamity that can result when knowledge is used toward a corrupt end.  Eisner-Award winner Rick Geary’s fanciful artwork captures the tragedy and irony of Wells’ fascinating tale.

30 review for The Invisible Man (Classics Illustrated Graphic Novels 2)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Atti

    Very good book, interesting, easy to understand and awesome pictures. I like the storyline.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Duncan

    I've now read H.G. Wells' The Invisible Man three times in three different formats. I read his initial book 35 or so years ago in high school. I then read another graphic novel retelling of this sometime in the late 80's or so. Now I've read Rick Geary's version and I love Geary's books and am tracking them all down but this wasn't completely successful for a couple of reasons. Number one is I think Geary's are is much better in plain black and white, everything comes across as more attractive a I've now read H.G. Wells' The Invisible Man three times in three different formats. I read his initial book 35 or so years ago in high school. I then read another graphic novel retelling of this sometime in the late 80's or so. Now I've read Rick Geary's version and I love Geary's books and am tracking them all down but this wasn't completely successful for a couple of reasons. Number one is I think Geary's are is much better in plain black and white, everything comes across as more attractive and dramatic with those brilliant clean lines Geary is known for. I guess he did the coloring of this version because no-one else is listed as a colorist, and his coloring is as good as anyone else's, it's just that his art is better uncolorized. Number two and this isn't Geary's fault probably but the "in media res" telling of the story was a bit laborious for me to get through. I think this is Wells' way of telling the story in the original novel where the invisibility of the main character would still be shocking and a mystery to readers from the late 1800's. Not only our readers from the early 2000's quite familiar w/the invisible man character but as well invisibility is a well-worn trope of horror and science-fiction these days so going over the alarming events in the village of Iping for half the book was laborious to me, it took me several days to get through 30 or so pages. The second half book where the invisible man starts to recount the events of his initial experimenting and becoming invisible and his arrogance in the said recounting, flows much better as a story. This is something we can sink our teeth into, a mad-genius extolling his life of crime. Then of course the mad genius declaring war upon mankind and specifically his one-time friend and colleague, the beleaguered Kemp. If you've never read the Invisible Man before I recommend the original HG Wells novel. If you are a Rick Geary fan, definitely you'll want this in your collection. It pains me to say though that if you aren't a fan of Geary already and haven't read the book don't start w/Geary. Read Wells first.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Horton

    The best of the comics/graphic novel adaptations.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alicia K

    fun and extremely quick read. 😉

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    Very good comic. I have read the original story and this added to it by seeing the visuals. It something we all wonder if we have a special ability. How we would we use it? Would it be to help or hurt others. Griffin comes across this issue when he solves the equation of invisibility. On one hand he was able to be undiscovered but he was also very lonely. He was unable to work so he had to steal for money. And there was a part of him that wanted to get back at anyone who caused him any harm. I lo Very good comic. I have read the original story and this added to it by seeing the visuals. It something we all wonder if we have a special ability. How we would we use it? Would it be to help or hurt others. Griffin comes across this issue when he solves the equation of invisibility. On one hand he was able to be undiscovered but he was also very lonely. He was unable to work so he had to steal for money. And there was a part of him that wanted to get back at anyone who caused him any harm. I look forward to reading more of these comics.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Raja99

    This is a graphic novel adaptation by Rick Geary of the classic H.G. Wells novel. Why I read this book: I'd read the prose version before, and enjoyed it, and also a fan of Rick Geary. I enjoyed this, but a little less than I expected to. I think I like Geary's artwork better in black and white ;-). (Finished 2009-06-01 21:07) This is a graphic novel adaptation by Rick Geary of the classic H.G. Wells novel. Why I read this book: I'd read the prose version before, and enjoyed it, and also a fan of Rick Geary. I enjoyed this, but a little less than I expected to. I think I like Geary's artwork better in black and white ;-). (Finished 2009-06-01 21:07)

  7. 5 out of 5

    wildct2003

    Another good Geary graphic novel.

  8. 5 out of 5

    J.V. Seem

    A very nice, very creepy adaptation, sticking very close to the story, and beautifully illustrated.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Damon

    very dry.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tammy Mannarino

    I read the graphic novel adaptation of the story. While I did enjoy it, I wonder if I missed any detail in the story due to the format. It could just be that it is an old story!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    You can read my thoughts here. You can read my thoughts here.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Norma Winter

  13. 4 out of 5

    Neal D.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Subroto Mandal

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jay

  16. 5 out of 5

    Leif Jones

  17. 4 out of 5

    Allie

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jess

  19. 5 out of 5

    TJ

  20. 4 out of 5

    muhhh3

  21. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  24. 5 out of 5

    Summer_white123icloud.Com

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nathan

  27. 5 out of 5

    Febna Sherin

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bengi

  29. 4 out of 5

    Niharika Kumari

  30. 4 out of 5

    John

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