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Healing for a Broken World: Christian Perspectives on Public Policy

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Do today's believers know how to be not simply good citizens but good Christian citizens? Are they ready to respond to contemporary public policy issues such as genocide, global AIDS, global warming, and human trafficking according to Scripture rather than any particular political agenda? A growing segment of them are, even if they aren't quite sure how to accomplish it. T Do today's believers know how to be not simply good citizens but good Christian citizens? Are they ready to respond to contemporary public policy issues such as genocide, global AIDS, global warming, and human trafficking according to Scripture rather than any particular political agenda? A growing segment of them are, even if they aren't quite sure how to accomplish it. This book is for them. With American evangelicals having more political influence today than ever before, this book is especially important. The opening chapters establish the foundational biblical principles that are relevant to our lives as Christian citizens no matter the topic. Author Steve Monsma next highlights crucial global issues in which believers are called to live out their faith. Forgoing ready-made answers, Monsma encourages a reflective, thoroughly biblical response via a lively writing style. His book will equip all believers to make godly, humanitarian choices rather than purely political ones. A DVD featuring a 10 minute introduction to each chapter of this book is available from Crossway at www.crossway.org or from the Henry Institute for the Study of Christianity and Politics at www.calvin.edu/henry. It is ideal for use in classes and discussion groups.


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Do today's believers know how to be not simply good citizens but good Christian citizens? Are they ready to respond to contemporary public policy issues such as genocide, global AIDS, global warming, and human trafficking according to Scripture rather than any particular political agenda? A growing segment of them are, even if they aren't quite sure how to accomplish it. T Do today's believers know how to be not simply good citizens but good Christian citizens? Are they ready to respond to contemporary public policy issues such as genocide, global AIDS, global warming, and human trafficking according to Scripture rather than any particular political agenda? A growing segment of them are, even if they aren't quite sure how to accomplish it. This book is for them. With American evangelicals having more political influence today than ever before, this book is especially important. The opening chapters establish the foundational biblical principles that are relevant to our lives as Christian citizens no matter the topic. Author Steve Monsma next highlights crucial global issues in which believers are called to live out their faith. Forgoing ready-made answers, Monsma encourages a reflective, thoroughly biblical response via a lively writing style. His book will equip all believers to make godly, humanitarian choices rather than purely political ones. A DVD featuring a 10 minute introduction to each chapter of this book is available from Crossway at www.crossway.org or from the Henry Institute for the Study of Christianity and Politics at www.calvin.edu/henry. It is ideal for use in classes and discussion groups.

30 review for Healing for a Broken World: Christian Perspectives on Public Policy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cedric Aegis

    Monsma was a former Democrat politician when he wrote this book, and it shows in some of his opinions. However, as a Christian, he still defended his policy positions from a Biblical worldview and held traditional Christian views on issues of marriage and sexuality. Overall, I didn't agree with everything he had to say, but I did agree with the vast majority of it. Monsma was a former Democrat politician when he wrote this book, and it shows in some of his opinions. However, as a Christian, he still defended his policy positions from a Biblical worldview and held traditional Christian views on issues of marriage and sexuality. Overall, I didn't agree with everything he had to say, but I did agree with the vast majority of it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I appreciated that Monsma was not pushing an agenda with this book, but rather giving principles by which to make policy choices with a biblical perspective, and not mere theological decisions, but looking at it in terms of, "how can we see justice make headway here?" Two important points he makes: 1) Justice isn't justice if it only helps one group. This reminds me of conversations I have with my kids - I often have to point out that they don't really want me to be fair, they want me to be unfair I appreciated that Monsma was not pushing an agenda with this book, but rather giving principles by which to make policy choices with a biblical perspective, and not mere theological decisions, but looking at it in terms of, "how can we see justice make headway here?" Two important points he makes: 1) Justice isn't justice if it only helps one group. This reminds me of conversations I have with my kids - I often have to point out that they don't really want me to be fair, they want me to be unfair in their direction. They are often fair more concerned about whether someone else is getting more of a good thing than about actual fairness. In Monsma's chapter on Justice, he discusses the "common good" on pp. 55-56: Justice and another Christian concept, the common good, are firmly linked. Working for more justice in society will result in the advancement of the common good. The common good is that which is good for our communities and our society as a whole. The common good puts the well-being of society as a whole ahead of the well-being of certain narrow segments of society, such as certain regions of the country; certain ethnic, racial, or religious groups; or certain economic interests. When in pursuit of justice, all individuals are given their due, the common good moves forward. This speaks directly to what ought to be the motive of Christian citizens as we think about public-policy issues of the day. It certainly is right and proper for us to be concerned for justice for ourselves or for the religious or occupational groups of which we are members. But if our concern for more justice stops here, we are really not concerned about justice at all; we are acting much like any other special-interest group pushing its interests over that of the common good. 2) (to be continued)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael Dunlop

    Overall pretty helpful. The book is divided into two parts. The first part overviews four principles that can be applied to various public policy issues. The second part attempts to apply them to several issues (such as life issues, poverty, the environment, etc), though without always claiming that the author's perspective is the "biblical" one. It does a good job of showing how Christians can come to different conclusions on issues of public policy, and why. I would have liked to see more reas Overall pretty helpful. The book is divided into two parts. The first part overviews four principles that can be applied to various public policy issues. The second part attempts to apply them to several issues (such as life issues, poverty, the environment, etc), though without always claiming that the author's perspective is the "biblical" one. It does a good job of showing how Christians can come to different conclusions on issues of public policy, and why. I would have liked to see more reasoning for why the four principles themselves were chosen, and whether or not there should have been others... I also would have liked a chapter on immigration in part 2.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Milligan

    An interesting and well-rounded look at public policy from a Christian perspective. However, I feel that Mr. Mosma could have spent more time pulling directly from Scripture for support as opposed to focusing almost solely on the morals of Christianity.

  5. 5 out of 5

    J.E. Jr.

    Finally, a book that I can recommend to my congregation about public policy and how to consider their responsibilities in voting! I’ve been frustrated with the lack of clear and constructive guidance on this topic for a long time. Many American Christians misunderstand what it means to vote in accordance with the principles of their/our faith, and too often this leads to an inappropriate over-alignment with particular political parties, movements, or other “camps.” Before I read this book, I was Finally, a book that I can recommend to my congregation about public policy and how to consider their responsibilities in voting! I’ve been frustrated with the lack of clear and constructive guidance on this topic for a long time. Many American Christians misunderstand what it means to vote in accordance with the principles of their/our faith, and too often this leads to an inappropriate over-alignment with particular political parties, movements, or other “camps.” Before I read this book, I was dismayed at what was available along the lines of good biblical instruction on how to view civil affairs. My only strong concern here: this title will be somewhat dated in a few years; even then, however, the illustrative examples will stand as good historical case-studies. Otherwise, I strongly commend it. The author is knowledgeable about the subject, and offers much first-hand experience. Yet, he takes pains to conceal his particular biases when matters are more ambiguous, and presents only the more concrete biblical views.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Josh Mccoy

    This books gives a very much needed look at politics from the perspective of the Christian faith. Dare I say "unbiased"? Monsma is a politician and a devoted believer that clearly seeks to see his faith play an active role in the daily decisions he makes. This book gives a fantastic and clear synopsis of the gospel and how that plays out in different facets of public life. The reason I gave it 3 stars while I think so highly of the book is because Monsma fails to help us draw the line or give per This books gives a very much needed look at politics from the perspective of the Christian faith. Dare I say "unbiased"? Monsma is a politician and a devoted believer that clearly seeks to see his faith play an active role in the daily decisions he makes. This book gives a fantastic and clear synopsis of the gospel and how that plays out in different facets of public life. The reason I gave it 3 stars while I think so highly of the book is because Monsma fails to help us draw the line or give perspective on social issues. Should I be voting my personal values? What I think is best for the country as a whole? According to equality? and/or what I think God would do if he were running the good ole' USA? This is not clear. I wish it were. But this book is a huge step forward into some uncharted territory for the average believer.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Tim Hoiland

    Being a good Christian citizen means a lot more than going to the voting booth once every four years and forwarding emails to relatives in the time in between. But an election year is as good a time as any to give some thought to citizenship and what it might mean for us to be good Christian citizens. Stephen Monsma, author of Healing for a Broken World: Christian Perspectives on Public Policy (Crossway) and former member of the Michigan state House and Senate, believes we need to start with the Being a good Christian citizen means a lot more than going to the voting booth once every four years and forwarding emails to relatives in the time in between. But an election year is as good a time as any to give some thought to citizenship and what it might mean for us to be good Christian citizens. Stephen Monsma, author of Healing for a Broken World: Christian Perspectives on Public Policy (Crossway) and former member of the Michigan state House and Senate, believes we need to start with the big story of the Bible. “Thinking about creation, sin and redemption,” he writes, “are crucial to right thinking about today’s public-policy issues.” Creation. Sin. Redemption. Not where we usually start when thinking about public policy, is it? - See more at: http://tjhoiland.com/wordpress/2012/0...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dalaina May

    While I did not agree with every conclusion drawn, I very much appreciated Mr. Monsma's approach. His appeal to think biblically when approaching politics really challenges many of the common views held among American evangelicals (such as the erroneous "christian nation" view). In particular, I love how he points out that the right tends to care very much about the unborn, while neglecting those very children after they are born, and the left does the opposite. I also liked his explanation on c While I did not agree with every conclusion drawn, I very much appreciated Mr. Monsma's approach. His appeal to think biblically when approaching politics really challenges many of the common views held among American evangelicals (such as the erroneous "christian nation" view). In particular, I love how he points out that the right tends to care very much about the unborn, while neglecting those very children after they are born, and the left does the opposite. I also liked his explanation on church and state separation. He points out that if we are advocating our own rights at the expense of the rights of others, we are not acting in accordance with Scripture, and that, I believe, is the best contribution I've heard to the discussion in a very long time.

  9. 5 out of 5

    tomlinton

    You may well wonder since I count myself agnostic and fairly apolitical but! I was very concerned that evangelicals who could do so much good if they only remembered their own simple principles were making some god-awful choices about what to pursue Well that's exactly what this book is about And it restored for me a belief that amongst Christians there are still people who do good in the world I confess I lost that belief during the last Bush administration I'll leave discussion where it belongs amongst believers A You may well wonder since I count myself agnostic and fairly apolitical but! I was very concerned that evangelicals who could do so much good if they only remembered their own simple principles were making some god-awful choices about what to pursue Well that's exactly what this book is about And it restored for me a belief that amongst Christians there are still people who do good in the world I confess I lost that belief during the last Bush administration I'll leave discussion where it belongs amongst believers All I want to add is I got this book free for my Kindle on Amazon

  10. 5 out of 5

    Paulieanne

    I enjoyed reading this book for my public policy class. The author focuses on a wide variety of policies and how Christians might respond. He argues our response most often in disasters and with controversial policies should be that of solidarity, understanding and humility, treating others like we would want to be treated. He leaves open room for debate and discussion on how best and how effectively to deal with our broken world.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jerica Bennett

    Interesting read! This book truly calls on the reader to look deep within themselves and take note of their principles that influence their own life choices. Monday brilliantly provides a non-biased analysis on the relationship between Christianity and public policy.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Edy Gies

    There were some parts of this book that I liked very much and agreed with and others I didn't. Despite my opinions, the book did a good job of making me think and forcing me to formulate opinions based on the Bible and Christian principles rather than conservative politics. There were some parts of this book that I liked very much and agreed with and others I didn't. Despite my opinions, the book did a good job of making me think and forcing me to formulate opinions based on the Bible and Christian principles rather than conservative politics.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Andrew T.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Calin

  15. 5 out of 5

    Krissy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Beth

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Liz Ruiz-Garcia

  18. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Robinson

  19. 5 out of 5

    Edwin Siahaan

  20. 4 out of 5

    Axsel Cintron

  21. 4 out of 5

    FA Albert

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  23. 5 out of 5

    David Meers

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  25. 4 out of 5

    Em

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christina

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kristina Bradford

  28. 4 out of 5

    William Guice

  29. 5 out of 5

    Yui Fa

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mrs. Conrady's 5th Grade

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