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Diary Of An 80s Computer Geek: A Decade of Micro Computers, Video Games & Cassette Tape

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From bright colours and big hair to synthesized songs and day glow wardrobes. The 1980s were certainly loud, often garish and utterly fabulous - no matter how embarrassing the outfits were. There are so many elements, which made the 80s a truly great decade, but one of the greatest contributions, if not the greatest, is the mass introduction of affordable 8-bit home micro c From bright colours and big hair to synthesized songs and day glow wardrobes. The 1980s were certainly loud, often garish and utterly fabulous - no matter how embarrassing the outfits were. There are so many elements, which made the 80s a truly great decade, but one of the greatest contributions, if not the greatest, is the mass introduction of affordable 8-bit home micro computers. These curious machines of geekdom changed the way we regarded computers and technology. No longer were they the sole perverse of tweed jacket clad scientists sporting unruly beards, micro computers were now forming a staple inventory in millions of homes. Much of the technology that we enjoy today, such as desktop computers, notebooks, tablets, gaming consoles and smart phones, all of which are often taken for granted, can be traced back to this innovative decade. If you were a child of the 80s and remember the joy of receiving your very first home computer or maybe a young adult who fondly remembers the excitement, then you will appreciate this unabashed reminiscence of a simpler time whose adolescent technological was on the cusp of great advancements. This book is intended as celebration and reflection of all the computer technology that made the 80s such a wonderful, pioneering period and follows the journey of a self confessed, teenaged computer geek who experienced and enjoyed every ground breaking moment, including publishing his own software. 10 Print “The 80s are fab!” 20 Goto 10 Run Author's Comments: The current edition is dated 31st January 2016 and has been edited based on customer feedback.


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From bright colours and big hair to synthesized songs and day glow wardrobes. The 1980s were certainly loud, often garish and utterly fabulous - no matter how embarrassing the outfits were. There are so many elements, which made the 80s a truly great decade, but one of the greatest contributions, if not the greatest, is the mass introduction of affordable 8-bit home micro c From bright colours and big hair to synthesized songs and day glow wardrobes. The 1980s were certainly loud, often garish and utterly fabulous - no matter how embarrassing the outfits were. There are so many elements, which made the 80s a truly great decade, but one of the greatest contributions, if not the greatest, is the mass introduction of affordable 8-bit home micro computers. These curious machines of geekdom changed the way we regarded computers and technology. No longer were they the sole perverse of tweed jacket clad scientists sporting unruly beards, micro computers were now forming a staple inventory in millions of homes. Much of the technology that we enjoy today, such as desktop computers, notebooks, tablets, gaming consoles and smart phones, all of which are often taken for granted, can be traced back to this innovative decade. If you were a child of the 80s and remember the joy of receiving your very first home computer or maybe a young adult who fondly remembers the excitement, then you will appreciate this unabashed reminiscence of a simpler time whose adolescent technological was on the cusp of great advancements. This book is intended as celebration and reflection of all the computer technology that made the 80s such a wonderful, pioneering period and follows the journey of a self confessed, teenaged computer geek who experienced and enjoyed every ground breaking moment, including publishing his own software. 10 Print “The 80s are fab!” 20 Goto 10 Run Author's Comments: The current edition is dated 31st January 2016 and has been edited based on customer feedback.

30 review for Diary Of An 80s Computer Geek: A Decade of Micro Computers, Video Games & Cassette Tape

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jason Holliday

    Enjoyed the book since I experienced 80s electronics from a similiar perspective across the pond Great nostalgic moonwalk down 80s memory lane. Glad the author took the time to share his experiences. I felt the stories were genuine and real. I read the book in one swoop and didnt get bored. :)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Themistocles

    This is nothing special, really. The author goes nowhere near getting deep into the subject matter and mostly fails to convey any nostalgia. However, you can't complain much after paying less than a euro for it - it really kept me good company during a trip, but that's just about it. This is nothing special, really. The author goes nowhere near getting deep into the subject matter and mostly fails to convey any nostalgia. However, you can't complain much after paying less than a euro for it - it really kept me good company during a trip, but that's just about it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mohab Koura

    Amazing time machine to the most wonderful decade Excellent book that almost replicated my passion , I just hoped it would be a bit longer; still an excellent read for me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This is an enjoyable short read covering a time period which meant a great deal to me. Having grown up on 8-bit computers, and the ZX spectrum being the one I owned and kick-started my interest in computers and programming meant that any books covering this subject are on my "to read" list. My biggest beef though is that there is simply not enough here to justify the books existence. Steven's very, very small role in 8-bit history (and he readily admits his role was small) is not enough for me t This is an enjoyable short read covering a time period which meant a great deal to me. Having grown up on 8-bit computers, and the ZX spectrum being the one I owned and kick-started my interest in computers and programming meant that any books covering this subject are on my "to read" list. My biggest beef though is that there is simply not enough here to justify the books existence. Steven's very, very small role in 8-bit history (and he readily admits his role was small) is not enough for me to rate this higher than 3 stars. Had he given far more context around growing up in the 80s and what it actually meant to live through a decade of huge change in home computers then I would have rating this higher.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Les Chatfield

    Very nostalgic I remember those wild days of the home computer revolution. Even boots sold them. Kids having no idea what to do with them wrote rude messages on their screens. Happy days

  6. 4 out of 5

    Luke Shaw

    Great flashback to the 80’s computer scene Great retrospective from someone who lived through the 80’s computer boom. I enjoyed the casual writing style, short length and unique insights into what made these computers enduring icons of the 1980’s.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Curt Jeffreys

    I enjoyed this little book very much. Having lived through the early days of personal computing in the US I was fascinated by the author's British perspective. This little book makes me wish I could relive those early days when every new machine or program seemed miraculous. I enjoyed this little book very much. Having lived through the early days of personal computing in the US I was fascinated by the author's British perspective. This little book makes me wish I could relive those early days when every new machine or program seemed miraculous.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Will

    3.5 (.5 for the nostalgia)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

    A quick sprint though the 80s which barely sketches in the details. Read it in one sitting in just over an hour.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Colin Aldred

    Ahhhh, the 80s This was a fairly short read, but I very much enjoyed and related to the author's experiences of home computing in the 80s. Brilliantly nostalgic. Ahhhh, the 80s This was a fairly short read, but I very much enjoyed and related to the author's experiences of home computing in the 80s. Brilliantly nostalgic.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alastair

    A good trip down memory lane of the 8-bit era, all too short though.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nick Greaves

    Seriously a good read Being around at the same time as the author, this book was fascinating, and jogged many memories. It really took me back there. 5 stars

  13. 5 out of 5

    Geoff

    Bit of a curate's egg, this one. A short and very easy read, this is the biography of a schoolboy growing up in the '80s during the middle days of the microcomputer revolution. As a bit of fun, it's OK. But it could have been so much more. I keep finding myself thinking "C'mon, man, what on earth are you *doing*!? Get out there, sort yourself out, there was so much to be doing!" Still, it was a strange era, and a lot of my chums will recognise this tale, having lived through it themselves. On a more Bit of a curate's egg, this one. A short and very easy read, this is the biography of a schoolboy growing up in the '80s during the middle days of the microcomputer revolution. As a bit of fun, it's OK. But it could have been so much more. I keep finding myself thinking "C'mon, man, what on earth are you *doing*!? Get out there, sort yourself out, there was so much to be doing!" Still, it was a strange era, and a lot of my chums will recognise this tale, having lived through it themselves. On a more mundane note, it really, really needs the services of a decent proofreader. I found I was constantly derailed by very simple spelling and grammatical errors.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    Diary Of An 80s Computer Geek is, as the title suggests, a diary-like visit to the early years of home computers in the UK from the perspective of a boy growing up with computers at home and school. The author is now a grown-up working within the IT industry and his diary, which spans years, not only follows technology trends at the time but also the authors own progression from owning an 8-bit computer through to writing and selling games for the platform, to moving on to working in the fledglin Diary Of An 80s Computer Geek is, as the title suggests, a diary-like visit to the early years of home computers in the UK from the perspective of a boy growing up with computers at home and school. The author is now a grown-up working within the IT industry and his diary, which spans years, not only follows technology trends at the time but also the authors own progression from owning an 8-bit computer through to writing and selling games for the platform, to moving on to working in the fledgling computer industry. Many of the anecdotes and stories shared made me laugh out loud, and the running joke about the latest and greatest computer being the ultimate in computing (only to be eclipsed within a few months or in some cases, a few weeks) brought a smile to the face. As someone who grew up during the time the author has diaried, the book was a wonderful read which prompted some lovely memories and some great nostalgia of my childhood.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Preeva Tramiel

    An hour of pleasant nostalgia for less than two bucks A great little snapshot view of an exciting decade in computing. The style of writing was far from artistic, but as it was honest and heartfelt, I quickly dove into to the mind of the teenager and young man who became a small game developer. The historical vignettes at the beginning of each chapter were very helpful, and this book is great for people like me, who lived with computer geeks. I hope the author's mother read the book. The micro co An hour of pleasant nostalgia for less than two bucks A great little snapshot view of an exciting decade in computing. The style of writing was far from artistic, but as it was honest and heartfelt, I quickly dove into to the mind of the teenager and young man who became a small game developer. The historical vignettes at the beginning of each chapter were very helpful, and this book is great for people like me, who lived with computer geeks. I hope the author's mother read the book. The micro computing age was an exciting time, and the author captures that well. For a buck fifty, you will have an hour of nostalgia.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    A quick read full of great memories - personal and RAM!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    it was OK, nothing to particularly write home about! The tense of the writing changes from past to future, which is odd given that it's supposed to be written as a diary rather than look back.... There is some nostalgia offered but not a great deal, and it's littered with shocking typos (It seams, this was the brake I had been waiting for etc.) It's OK as a toilet book but don't expect to get too much from it. it was OK, nothing to particularly write home about! The tense of the writing changes from past to future, which is odd given that it's supposed to be written as a diary rather than look back.... There is some nostalgia offered but not a great deal, and it's littered with shocking typos (It seams, this was the brake I had been waiting for etc.) It's OK as a toilet book but don't expect to get too much from it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nick Johnson

    Sadly, no real flavor and excitement, and the ever-frustrating use of "it's" as a possessive over and over again. The book is a journal of someone who was briefly interested in early generation computer games that you've likely never heard of. Probably a really small niche that would get anything out of this. Sadly, no real flavor and excitement, and the ever-frustrating use of "it's" as a possessive over and over again. The book is a journal of someone who was briefly interested in early generation computer games that you've likely never heard of. Probably a really small niche that would get anything out of this.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Iain Brown

    Not the best read... The book is generously littered with spelling and grammatical errors and is very brief. The Author's ego also shines through his prose and the tone is occasionally distracting - not the best of reads and I don't feel that the diary structure works... Not the best read... The book is generously littered with spelling and grammatical errors and is very brief. The Author's ego also shines through his prose and the tone is occasionally distracting - not the best of reads and I don't feel that the diary structure works...

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gary Boyer

    Nostalgic A fun read for anyone who spent time growing up with computers in the 80s. A quick and interesting read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sheila McCarthy

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gavin Lewandowski

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vidar Hokstad

  24. 4 out of 5

    Paul Ellams

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ken Miller

  26. 4 out of 5

    Maritina

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hector M. Rodriguez

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cor Heijboer

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andy

  30. 5 out of 5

    Roger Womack

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