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Women Artists: The Linda Nochlin Reader

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Linda Nochlin is one of the most accessible, provocative, and innovative art historians of our time. In 1971 she published her essay “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?”—a dramatic feminist call-to-arms that called traditional art historical practices into question and led to a major revision of the discipline. Women Artists brings together twenty-nine essential es Linda Nochlin is one of the most accessible, provocative, and innovative art historians of our time. In 1971 she published her essay “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?”—a dramatic feminist call-to-arms that called traditional art historical practices into question and led to a major revision of the discipline. Women Artists brings together twenty-nine essential essays from throughout Nochlin’s career, making this the definitive anthology of her writing about women in art. Included are her major thematic texts “Women Artists After the French Revolution” and “Starting from Scratch: The Beginnings of Feminist Art History,” as well as the landmark essay and its rejoinder “‘Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?’ Thirty Years After.” These appear alongside monographic entries focusing on a selection of major women artists including Mary Cassatt, Louise Bourgeois, Cecily Brown, Kiki Smith, Miwa Yanagi, and Sophie Calle. Women Artists also presents two new essays written specifically for this book and an interview with Nochlin investigating the position of women artists today.


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Linda Nochlin is one of the most accessible, provocative, and innovative art historians of our time. In 1971 she published her essay “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?”—a dramatic feminist call-to-arms that called traditional art historical practices into question and led to a major revision of the discipline. Women Artists brings together twenty-nine essential es Linda Nochlin is one of the most accessible, provocative, and innovative art historians of our time. In 1971 she published her essay “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?”—a dramatic feminist call-to-arms that called traditional art historical practices into question and led to a major revision of the discipline. Women Artists brings together twenty-nine essential essays from throughout Nochlin’s career, making this the definitive anthology of her writing about women in art. Included are her major thematic texts “Women Artists After the French Revolution” and “Starting from Scratch: The Beginnings of Feminist Art History,” as well as the landmark essay and its rejoinder “‘Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?’ Thirty Years After.” These appear alongside monographic entries focusing on a selection of major women artists including Mary Cassatt, Louise Bourgeois, Cecily Brown, Kiki Smith, Miwa Yanagi, and Sophie Calle. Women Artists also presents two new essays written specifically for this book and an interview with Nochlin investigating the position of women artists today.

30 review for Women Artists: The Linda Nochlin Reader

  1. 4 out of 5

    Judy G

    As it is this is a superb book. I did not read all of it. I read about certain artists and each woman artist has her own study and photos of her art like Alice Neel and Joan Mitchell and Mary Cassat and Berthe Morisot. The author is an expert on art and did stupendous job with this book. She knew many of the artists.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Listening to this digital talking book was like taking an Art history seminar. I graduated in 1994, so hearing the arguments and theories was fun and got the old brain thinking again. I completely enjoyed it!!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This was a bittersweet ride for me. It was great to learn about some, in my case, never before heard about artists, but sad too as very few artists of colour. Just mentioned. I still consider it a very important read for anyone who wants some history about women and art.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bridget Quinn

    Clear-eyed, comprehensive & essential. Enough said.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I enjoyed this book. Some essays are better written than others. Vey thought provoking

  6. 4 out of 5

    erica

    I read approx. 1/2 - 3/4 of this book. My favorite essays were the ones that were more art history (covering topics such as the history of females in art schools). I enjoyed reading the personal reminisces of the author at the dawn of feminist art theory. [Including: Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists? +30 yrs after; Women Artists After the French Revolution; Starting From Scratch: The Beginnings of Feminist Art History; Women Artists Then & Now: Painting, Sculpture, and the Image of the I read approx. 1/2 - 3/4 of this book. My favorite essays were the ones that were more art history (covering topics such as the history of females in art schools). I enjoyed reading the personal reminisces of the author at the dawn of feminist art theory. [Including: Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists? +30 yrs after; Women Artists After the French Revolution; Starting From Scratch: The Beginnings of Feminist Art History; Women Artists Then & Now: Painting, Sculpture, and the Image of the Self] As a rule, I don't tend to like essays that are more about the viewer's interpretation of art, so even in a feminist context, I skipped many of the essays that were about particular artists' work. I prefer to see the work first myself than read someone else's idea of their work. That said, I did read some of the essays of artists I was already familiar with and enjoy, like Alice Neel and Joan Mitchell [Including: A Rage to Paint: Joan Mitchell and the Issue of Femininity; Alice Neel; Old-Age Style: Late Louise Bourgeois] I might have read more of these essays, it just wasn't exactly a "summer read" and it happened that I checked it out of the library at the busiest time of year for me and I had already renewed it twice.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    704.042 N757 2015

  8. 4 out of 5

    Uva Costriuba

    inspiring research, amazing artists analised, overall step up on the complexity of studies on women who are visual artists. essa primeira leitura foi inspiradora.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jodie

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brigitte Lauren

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  12. 4 out of 5

    Phoebe

  13. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Mui

  14. 5 out of 5

    Erika

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  16. 4 out of 5

    lucija

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bee

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marissa

  20. 4 out of 5

    Michela

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emma Williams

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Borgo

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ivana Tilešová

  24. 5 out of 5

    Errika Gerakiti

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tory Talayi

  26. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emilia

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jason Arnold

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Gloster

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