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Mary Louise and the Liberty Girls (Bluebird Books, #4)

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Mary Louise and the Liberty Girls L. Frank BAUM (1856 - 1919) The Bluebird Books is a series of novels popular with teenage girls in the 1910s and 1920s. The series was begun by L. Frank Baum using his Edith Van Dyne pseudonym, then continued by at least three others, all using the same pseudonym. Baum wrote the first four books in the series, possibly with help from his son Mary Louise and the Liberty Girls L. Frank BAUM (1856 - 1919) The Bluebird Books is a series of novels popular with teenage girls in the 1910s and 1920s. The series was begun by L. Frank Baum using his Edith Van Dyne pseudonym, then continued by at least three others, all using the same pseudonym. Baum wrote the first four books in the series, possibly with help from his son, Harry Neal Baum, on the third. The books are concerned with adolescent girl detectives— a concept Baum had experimented with earlier, in The Daring Twins (1911) and Phoebe Daring (1912). The Bluebird series began with Mary Louise, originally written as a tribute to Baum's favorite sister, Mary Louise Baum Brewster. Baum's publisher, Reilly & Britton, rejected that manuscript, apparently judging the heroine too independent. Baum wrote a new version of the book; the original manuscript is lost. The title character is Mary Louise Burrows. In this, the fourth book of the series, Mary Louise and friends form a group dedicated to supporting the soldiers in World War I, and she brings Josie O'Gorman in to spoil a treasonous plot against the government. (Summary from Wikipedia and Sibella Denton) Genre(s): General Fiction, Detective Fiction Language: English Running Time:4:17:38


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Mary Louise and the Liberty Girls L. Frank BAUM (1856 - 1919) The Bluebird Books is a series of novels popular with teenage girls in the 1910s and 1920s. The series was begun by L. Frank Baum using his Edith Van Dyne pseudonym, then continued by at least three others, all using the same pseudonym. Baum wrote the first four books in the series, possibly with help from his son Mary Louise and the Liberty Girls L. Frank BAUM (1856 - 1919) The Bluebird Books is a series of novels popular with teenage girls in the 1910s and 1920s. The series was begun by L. Frank Baum using his Edith Van Dyne pseudonym, then continued by at least three others, all using the same pseudonym. Baum wrote the first four books in the series, possibly with help from his son, Harry Neal Baum, on the third. The books are concerned with adolescent girl detectives— a concept Baum had experimented with earlier, in The Daring Twins (1911) and Phoebe Daring (1912). The Bluebird series began with Mary Louise, originally written as a tribute to Baum's favorite sister, Mary Louise Baum Brewster. Baum's publisher, Reilly & Britton, rejected that manuscript, apparently judging the heroine too independent. Baum wrote a new version of the book; the original manuscript is lost. The title character is Mary Louise Burrows. In this, the fourth book of the series, Mary Louise and friends form a group dedicated to supporting the soldiers in World War I, and she brings Josie O'Gorman in to spoil a treasonous plot against the government. (Summary from Wikipedia and Sibella Denton) Genre(s): General Fiction, Detective Fiction Language: English Running Time:4:17:38

30 review for Mary Louise and the Liberty Girls (Bluebird Books, #4)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    People who read this book and gave it low ratings have to remember that it was written in 1917, the World War I era. Americans were very patriotic then and I'm sure that the author was incorporating what people thought of the enemy. Yes, there is some racism because books written then had it. I'm not saying that it's right; I'm just saying that yes, it existed. Mary Louise forms a group with her friends and name themselves the Liberty Girls. The girls are all from rather well-to-do families. The People who read this book and gave it low ratings have to remember that it was written in 1917, the World War I era. Americans were very patriotic then and I'm sure that the author was incorporating what people thought of the enemy. Yes, there is some racism because books written then had it. I'm not saying that it's right; I'm just saying that yes, it existed. Mary Louise forms a group with her friends and name themselves the Liberty Girls. The girls are all from rather well-to-do families. The purpose of the group is to raise money to buy things of comfort for the American boys fighting the Germans. Fear of traitors to the US government was a very real thing. There are anti-government pamphlets appearing all over town. It isn't long before Mary Louise decides that there is a traitor in town. She invites her friend Josie O'Gorman to visit. Josie's father is head of the Secret Service and Josie carries a pistol and fancies herself a detective. The girls are collecting cast-offs from the town's residents and selling them in their liberty shop. Josie goes undercover and follows the trail to the traitor. And of course, gets things wrong on the way. If you can ignore the racism and anti-Germanism, it's a fun read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth S

    This book is just horrible. I would only advise you to read it if you study history or are in love with Woodrow Wilson. It helps if you like such statements as " the flag represent the President." At times I really thought this was satire but I fear that it was serious. This book is not only racist against Germans it is also filled with Americanism, which sounds nice but is not. I am not someone who has any particular fondness for the German's behavior in WWI but this is way too much. For more i This book is just horrible. I would only advise you to read it if you study history or are in love with Woodrow Wilson. It helps if you like such statements as " the flag represent the President." At times I really thought this was satire but I fear that it was serious. This book is not only racist against Germans it is also filled with Americanism, which sounds nice but is not. I am not someone who has any particular fondness for the German's behavior in WWI but this is way too much. For more information about some of the behavior of the government at this time I would recommend "Unsafe for democracy" by William H Thomas. I am glad I read it, for it did me a good idea of what it was like to live back then but it was a unpleasant experience.

  3. 5 out of 5

    puck

    accusation of treason for questioning war, noble crips, jolly black servants, and a mystery, oh my! l. frank baum, you sure were wacky.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I have never read a more racist, xenophobic book. There is some casually paternalistic racism against the black servants (they're happy to think of themselves as "property"), but the vitriol against Germans is astounding. Mary Louise and her friend Josie O'Gorman condone interment camps for German-Americans, talk with satisfaction about hanging traitors, suspect every hereditary German in town, make impassioned speeches about the opposite of civil liberties, and believe that speaking against the I have never read a more racist, xenophobic book. There is some casually paternalistic racism against the black servants (they're happy to think of themselves as "property"), but the vitriol against Germans is astounding. Mary Louise and her friend Josie O'Gorman condone interment camps for German-Americans, talk with satisfaction about hanging traitors, suspect every hereditary German in town, make impassioned speeches about the opposite of civil liberties, and believe that speaking against the Great War and the draft is a crime. Besides being anti-human rights, this book is badly written. Everyone walks about speaking woodenly and employing the most magnitudinous loquations. Mary Louise and her friends start out the book bullying businessmen into buying liberty bonds. They are hugely successful, so they start a fantastically marvelous charity shop. Meanwhile, some sneaky German sympathizer is mailing anti-war letters around town. Since Mary Louise believes that pacifists should be locked up, these anti-war mailings don't sit well with her. Then her friend Josie O'Gorman turns up and the second half of the book is about her. Josie O'Gorman's father is a secret service agent so Josie sets out to uncover the sneaky German spy ring. After trailing some sinister German sympathizers, she believes that the plot is more complex than it is and accidentally attempts to foil a meeting between a [SPOILER] suspender salesman and a socialite who turn out to be on the up and up. At the same time, the actual spy is forty feet away doing nefarious things. Caught and shot, the book turns back to Mary Louise, who organizes the Liberty Girls to prepare corn-based foodstuffs for the war effort. And the second-generation German whom Mary Louise originally suspected covers his clothing store with flags because his son was shot in France, allowing Mary Louise to forgive him his opposition to war for the sake of humanity. There seems to be a debate about whether L. Frank Baum was a racist. Maybe he was polite to Pullman porters, but if racism means condemning a group of people based on their ethnic heritage then the answer is in this terrible book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    Although it's sad to see Mary Louise Brewster, Josie O'Gorman, and company putting jingoism before the Constitution, the book is a fast-paced thriller and only two of those who point out the unconstitutionality of Wilson's sedition laws turn out to be actual traitors. The words "unconstitutional" and "propaganda" both appear in this book ("sedition" does not, but "traitor" and "treason" do), and one of the book's top suspects, a German-American, may echo Baum's true sentiments in regard for a wa Although it's sad to see Mary Louise Brewster, Josie O'Gorman, and company putting jingoism before the Constitution, the book is a fast-paced thriller and only two of those who point out the unconstitutionality of Wilson's sedition laws turn out to be actual traitors. The words "unconstitutional" and "propaganda" both appear in this book ("sedition" does not, but "traitor" and "treason" do), and one of the book's top suspects, a German-American, may echo Baum's true sentiments in regard for a war that history shows us was incredibly foolhardy and pointless. Jason and Alora Jones return from the previous book, but they are strictly in supporting roles. Stephen Kane's aircraft company is here and is the victim of a bombing, but Kane himself doesn't even rate a mention. Josie O'Gorman is in top form, and it's clear why these books were buried under the far more feminine girl sleuthing of Nancy Drew. I do have a hard time imagining her in my head as Baum must have, since the awkwardness of her clothes are never detailed (and even if they were, only an expert on fashions of 1918 would probably notice), and her supposedly ugly features include red hair and a snub nose. Her "stout" figure doesn't even rate a mention, although she does decline to where the flag-inspired Liberty Girl uniforms depicted on the book's frontispiece. It's true that Josie makes some mistakes, but she reacts to them with more negativity than anyone else would. The ending was a bit anachronistically amusing, in which Irene Macfarlane gets the Liberty Girls cooking with corn instead of wheat, which sounds like a Monsanto dream to modern eyes.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Orion

    The Mary Louise series is about a girl amateur detective and were written for teenage girls. Set in World War I, Mary Louise and the Liberty Girls explores the themes of patriotism and dissent in wartime. Mary Louise is 17 and teams up with her friends aged 14 to 18 to form the Liberty Girls to help out the war effort. They start with helping to sell bonds, but, when anonymous letters opposing the war appear, the girls go searching for the treasonous pro-German people of the town. Are they trait The Mary Louise series is about a girl amateur detective and were written for teenage girls. Set in World War I, Mary Louise and the Liberty Girls explores the themes of patriotism and dissent in wartime. Mary Louise is 17 and teams up with her friends aged 14 to 18 to form the Liberty Girls to help out the war effort. They start with helping to sell bonds, but, when anonymous letters opposing the war appear, the girls go searching for the treasonous pro-German people of the town. Are they traitors or are they just voicing their right to disagree? Being in the Public Domain you can find a copy of Mary Louise and the Liberty Girls in Project Gutenberg.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Troupish but nice A nice story with an incorporated mystery, if you don't mind WWI propaganda about bonds & the wartime efforts along with some alarming "patriotic" sentiment (like limiting freedom of speech). Such books were common during that time, but not all were interesting. It felt a bit juvenile (like a Trixie Beldon or Ginny Gordon book, as it is much in that vein of troupe) but all around not a bad read if you can accept it for what it is. Troupish but nice A nice story with an incorporated mystery, if you don't mind WWI propaganda about bonds & the wartime efforts along with some alarming "patriotic" sentiment (like limiting freedom of speech). Such books were common during that time, but not all were interesting. It felt a bit juvenile (like a Trixie Beldon or Ginny Gordon book, as it is much in that vein of troupe) but all around not a bad read if you can accept it for what it is.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amyem

    http://librivox.org/mary-louise-and-t... http://librivox.org/mary-louise-and-t...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Denise Kuntz

    This series is excellent and the narrator is outstanding!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Majenta

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nickole Schlapkohl

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brittnie

    Some of the "patriotism" ideas were a bit strong for my taste. Some of the "patriotism" ideas were a bit strong for my taste.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brielle Nickole

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sibella

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amy Depew

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ran Abdelrahman

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rebecka

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Robertson

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Ford

  20. 5 out of 5

    Abby

  21. 5 out of 5

    MaryAnn Vazzano

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tomás García

  23. 4 out of 5

    Krishnamurthy Venkataraman

  24. 5 out of 5

    John Leasure

  25. 4 out of 5

    Miriam Roush

  26. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bianca

  28. 5 out of 5

    Prastudy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Liv Worthen

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