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America's Queen: A Biography of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

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Who better than the biographer of Queen Elizabeth and Princess Grace to take on America's leading candidate for royalty, Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis? "America's Queen" will stake its claim as the definitive serious biography. As with her book on Elizabeth, Bradford will place the same emphasis on new and revelatory interviews -- including in-depth interviews with Ja Who better than the biographer of Queen Elizabeth and Princess Grace to take on America's leading candidate for royalty, Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis? "America's Queen" will stake its claim as the definitive serious biography. As with her book on Elizabeth, Bradford will place the same emphasis on new and revelatory interviews -- including in-depth interviews with Jackie's sister, Lee Radziwell, who has cooperated completely with Bradford, as have other members of the Bouvier, Kennedy, and Onassis intimate circles. The book is a sympathetic but frank portrait of a woman who has captured the world's imagination since her teenage years.


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Who better than the biographer of Queen Elizabeth and Princess Grace to take on America's leading candidate for royalty, Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis? "America's Queen" will stake its claim as the definitive serious biography. As with her book on Elizabeth, Bradford will place the same emphasis on new and revelatory interviews -- including in-depth interviews with Ja Who better than the biographer of Queen Elizabeth and Princess Grace to take on America's leading candidate for royalty, Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis? "America's Queen" will stake its claim as the definitive serious biography. As with her book on Elizabeth, Bradford will place the same emphasis on new and revelatory interviews -- including in-depth interviews with Jackie's sister, Lee Radziwell, who has cooperated completely with Bradford, as have other members of the Bouvier, Kennedy, and Onassis intimate circles. The book is a sympathetic but frank portrait of a woman who has captured the world's imagination since her teenage years.

30 review for America's Queen: A Biography of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

  1. 5 out of 5

    Linda Lipko

    While there is a lot of information I didn't know about Jackie Kennedy, I felt this was way over the top in detail, and very boring. I don't think it deserves a review. While there is a lot of information I didn't know about Jackie Kennedy, I felt this was way over the top in detail, and very boring. I don't think it deserves a review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    A "just the facts, ma'am" kind of book. Not much media history or cultural criticism. Nor much wit. (I had to refresh myself with Wayne Koestenbaum's Jackie Under My Skin from time to time.) I imagine the ideal Jackie book as a novel, a "maximalist" juggle of different styles and forms: part verse (pastiches of Millay for youth, Plath for childbirth and caked blood, Cavafy for age), part epistolary (Sévigné, intimate gossip), part casual social-political chronicle (Saint-Simon's court memoirs, t A "just the facts, ma'am" kind of book. Not much media history or cultural criticism. Nor much wit. (I had to refresh myself with Wayne Koestenbaum's Jackie Under My Skin from time to time.) I imagine the ideal Jackie book as a novel, a "maximalist" juggle of different styles and forms: part verse (pastiches of Millay for youth, Plath for childbirth and caked blood, Cavafy for age), part epistolary (Sévigné, intimate gossip), part casual social-political chronicle (Saint-Simon's court memoirs, the Goncourt Journal) studded with acidic portraits, and everything pierced through with a lonesome lyricism, like Salter's Light Years, with the enigmatic, essentially solitary wife Nedra. Their life is mysterious, it is like a forest; from far off it seems a unity, it can be comprehended, described, but closer it begins to separate, to break into light and shadow, the density blinds one. Within there is no form, only prodigious detail that reaches everywhere: exotic sounds, spills of sunlight, foliage, fallen trees, small beasts that flee at the sound of a twig-snap, insects, silence, flowers. And all of this, dependent, closely woven, all of it is deceiving. There are really two kinds of life. There is, as Viri says, the one people believe you are living, and there is the other. It is this other which causes the trouble, this other we long to see.

  3. 5 out of 5

    E Wilson

    I never cared for Jackie Kennedy when she was first lady and this book did little or nothing to change my opinion. It also proved to further erode my diminishing respect for Jack Kennedy. I was interested to learn that according to a schoolmate during her teenage years Jackie's voice was quite normal. That breathy little girl voice was one of the things I found most annoying and it was almost a relief to learn that it was not natural, but an affectation. Jackie seemed to always be playing a part I never cared for Jackie Kennedy when she was first lady and this book did little or nothing to change my opinion. It also proved to further erode my diminishing respect for Jack Kennedy. I was interested to learn that according to a schoolmate during her teenage years Jackie's voice was quite normal. That breathy little girl voice was one of the things I found most annoying and it was almost a relief to learn that it was not natural, but an affectation. Jackie seemed to always be playing a part especially in the political world. Sometimes it was just plain dishonest for example tucking the children into bed for a magazine story and saying that she and Jack did not have a nanny when they very well did. In todays world where every move of politicians and their families is scrutinized and publicized, its amazing how much the Kennedy's kept secret. I know, I was never aware that the President was a serial adulterer . Even a little thing like Jackie's smoking was never ever shown. Of course, no one deserves the tragedies that Jackie experienced. I just didn't find many redeeming qualities in the life she led. By coincidence, I read this book during the month of the 50th anniversary of Jack Kennedy's assassination.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Bloodorange

    Don't mock: this is an excellently crafted celebrity biography, and does deserve 5 stars in its class. It gave me a lot of ideas for further reading, Jackie being book and art lover that she was. Don't mock: this is an excellently crafted celebrity biography, and does deserve 5 stars in its class. It gave me a lot of ideas for further reading, Jackie being book and art lover that she was.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Caroline

    Well, that was kind of disappointing. Sarah Bradford is one of those authors that I have fairly high expectations for. Her Borgia biographies are quite good; but then, this Jackie bio makes me want to go back and fact-check all of her claims in previous books. Maybe she became overwhelmed with the Kennedy legend? I don't know. This just... wasn't up to par. For much of the book, Bradford comes off less as a biographer and more as a gossipmonger. She has a shoot first and ask questions later kind o Well, that was kind of disappointing. Sarah Bradford is one of those authors that I have fairly high expectations for. Her Borgia biographies are quite good; but then, this Jackie bio makes me want to go back and fact-check all of her claims in previous books. Maybe she became overwhelmed with the Kennedy legend? I don't know. This just... wasn't up to par. For much of the book, Bradford comes off less as a biographer and more as a gossipmonger. She has a shoot first and ask questions later kind of attitude, reporting every little scandalous detail without actual wondering if it's true. There is so much rumor surrounding the Kennedys, and so much of it well-recorded, that in my opinion you really have to take everything with a grain of salt. In his superb biography "Robert Kennedy: His Life" Evan Thomas painstakingly picks apart every major rumor surrounding his subject. He reports what some have said, but admits that it may or may not be true based on x, x, and y reasons. Bradford, on the other hand, chooses to regurgitate everything anyone has ever said, citing several "sources" (a la Us Weekly) without naming names. She also manages to, for lack of a better term, screw up some fairly big details. She says at one point that Marilyn Monroe had two husbands, while it has been common knowledge for quite some time that she had three. (Bradford specifically forgets Monroe's non-famous husband that she married before becoming an actress; Joe Dimaggio and Arthur Miller, she of course remembers.) She also recounts a tale of JFK talking about assassination the day of his death, making finger guns and lurching into a crouch. But... wait a second. Hasn't Bradford spent numerous pages talking about how bad Jack's back was? If he couldn't pick up his own son, how could he spontaneously crouch down in a dramatic moment of play-acting? It's just--fishy. I'm not saying that the Kennedys were pure as driven snow. It's just that Bradford spins so much rumor that I can't really tell fact from fiction. She treats the rumored affair between Bobby Kennedy and Jackie as if it's pure fact, relying on "sources" and rumors spread by RFK's enemies. (Of which he had plenty.) However, numerous biographers have cited RFK as being too sanctimonious to approach infidelity. More still have admitted that, while it's quite possible that he did have an affair with Jackie, we just CAN'T know. (See: Evan Thomas.) This is a huge event for Bradford to just arbitrarily declare truthful. She seems incapable of admitting, "Well, there's no solid evidence but it's possible..." rather jumping to conclusion after conclusion. Much of what she writes flies straight in the faces of other accounts I've read. So I must conclude that she picked and chose what she wanted to present as fact. Look--there's a lot of fact here. But there's also a lot of murkiness, and sometimes, I suspect, fiction, even if it wasn't intentional on Bradford's part. The writing is really engaging, which is why I'm giving this three stars. (That, and the aforementioned fact. This isn't all made up, by a long shot! It's just not very well researched.) So: read this, with that grain of salt I was talking about. And then check out some other Kennedy bios for greater detail and more objective writing.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis' life was like a fairy-tale "with a lot of jewelled beauty... But it is a fairy-tale, and like all fairy-tales it has tragedy in it" A mammoth, comprehensive portrait of the woman behind the icon. Bradford perfectly captures the glamorous, intelligent, aloof Jackie, with her indomitable spirit which survived two marriages and countless losses. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis' life was like a fairy-tale "with a lot of jewelled beauty... But it is a fairy-tale, and like all fairy-tales it has tragedy in it" A mammoth, comprehensive portrait of the woman behind the icon. Bradford perfectly captures the glamorous, intelligent, aloof Jackie, with her indomitable spirit which survived two marriages and countless losses.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Very comprehensive biography portraying Jackie as neither saint nor sinner. I enjoyed it start to finish.

  8. 4 out of 5

    julianne

    A well-written biography that makes no apologies for pointing out in several places that the breathy voice Jackie was well known for was an affectation. Enjoyed it but wouldn't read again. A well-written biography that makes no apologies for pointing out in several places that the breathy voice Jackie was well known for was an affectation. Enjoyed it but wouldn't read again.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jacky

    Fascinating but way too long and wordy

  10. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    I really enjoyed this book such an interesting look into her life

  11. 4 out of 5

    Carmen Quest

    Until recently, I had no interest in the Kennedys. I’m always wary of high-profile people, as more often than not, little lies beneath the surface. Jack Kennedy’s colleagues in the Senate used to tell him, Less profile, more courage. But my love for history eventually got the best of me. After watching the biopic Jackie with Natalie Portman, I found myself wanting to know more about the real person. So I began researching books and fell down the rabbit hole. A lot of what has been written about Until recently, I had no interest in the Kennedys. I’m always wary of high-profile people, as more often than not, little lies beneath the surface. Jack Kennedy’s colleagues in the Senate used to tell him, Less profile, more courage. But my love for history eventually got the best of me. After watching the biopic Jackie with Natalie Portman, I found myself wanting to know more about the real person. So I began researching books and fell down the rabbit hole. A lot of what has been written about her is tabloid trash (C. David Heymann’s Bobby and Jackie); other literature contains some truth that indulges in a bit of sensationalism (Edward Klein’s All Too Human). Thankfully, I then chose Sarah Bradford’s America’s Queen. Bradford paints the whole picture without an agenda to either present Jackie as a saint or as a sinner. She writes about her as a human being, which many biographies (especially those about people with legendary status) fail to do. However, Bradford shoots herself in the foot in a few instances, like when she presents as fact the rumored marriage of Jack Kennedy to one Durie Malcolm in 1947, which was apparently promptly annulled and concealed by his powerful father. The source is so far removed from the people involved that it might as well be a game of Chinese whispers. Though to be clear, my objection is not to the notion that Jack did something reckless and his father cleaned up the mess; it’s to the conjecture that he would get married at all. He put off marriage for a long time because he enjoyed being single, and when he finally did it, it was to favour his political career; he even told a friend that he married so people wouldn’t think he was “queer.” So no, Jack Kennedy doesn’t strike me as a man who would do something romantic in the spur of the moment. Questionable moments notwithstanding, she also interviewed people who knew Jackie personally, such as her stepbrother Yusha Auchincloss, sister Lee Radziwill, sister-in-law Joan Kennedy, Lady Bird Johnson, Richard Goodwin, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Arthur Schlesinger Jr., Charles L. Bartlett, Pierre Salinger, and Gore Vidal. That I think speaks volumes of Bradford as an author. America’s Queen is the best biography of Jackie out there. It doesn’t shy away from her worst qualities, such as her greed, which was endless and downright cruel (when she learned that Jack was donating his presidential salary to charity, she told him she could use that money instead), and her spoiled attitude (she tried to get out of attending Eleanor Roosevelt’s funeral because she wanted to go foxhunting in Virginia). On the other hand, Jackie could be unexpectedly sweet: during her honeymoon, she wrote a letter to her father forgiving him for not walking her down to the altar because he had drunk himself to a stupor; she became angry at Arthur Miller for his unflattering portrayal of Marilyn Monroe in his plays, even though Marilyn had been the most famous and brazen of her husband’s lovers; she insisted that Bill Greer, the man who had driven the car in Dallas during that fateful motorcade, drive them to the Bethesda hospital where the autopsy of the President was to be conducted, so he knew she did not blame him for what had happened. These acts denote a greatness of spirit that was undermined by material matters. The contradictions in Jackie are fascinating, but I cannot bring myself to admire her. The world was on fire when her husband was president (although one can argue that the world is always on fire) and instead of using that power to contribute something meaningful, she dedicated herself to redecorating the White House, with the occasional lavish party thrown in, even after witnessing first-hand the devastating poverty in West Virginia. My lady Eleanor Roosevelt came from an even more privileged background than Jacqueline Kennedy, but unlearned her education and became a role model for the ages. That said, if there’s one thing we can all learn from Jackie, is that a person can not only survive personal tragedy, they can also thrive afterwards. She raised two children virtually by herself and in her middle age began a fulfilling career as a book editor. And in the end, when death came, she faced it with dignity and on her own terms. Charles de Gaulle said of her after JFK’s assassination: “She gave the world an example of how to behave.” I agree.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Donna

    A book sale find. My rule is give the book back...but I don't want to.. I thoroughly enjoyed spending time with this book. I’ve read more than a few Kennedy books over the years, I’m familiar with the territory. As with most bios I don't take any as perfectly true. Especially the Kennedy's..there was so much cover up and editing. However, for my taste I thought Bradford wrote this fairly. The positive and the negative. This one is now my favorite. There is so much in this book about her, and ther A book sale find. My rule is give the book back...but I don't want to.. I thoroughly enjoyed spending time with this book. I’ve read more than a few Kennedy books over the years, I’m familiar with the territory. As with most bios I don't take any as perfectly true. Especially the Kennedy's..there was so much cover up and editing. However, for my taste I thought Bradford wrote this fairly. The positive and the negative. This one is now my favorite. There is so much in this book about her, and there is so much that wasn’t. It read more like a novel, beginning with her early years and ended with JFK Jr’s death. The woman was intriguing and fascinating, that fact can’t be denied. The author used opinions and comments from others in many cases to explain or suggest why she may have acted a certain way, or caused Jackie to be upset or otherwise. There were lots of comments from my particular favorite person Gore Vidal. A favorite quote by Ben Bradlee said it was impossible to write a story the Kennedy’s liked. Even if it was favorable, they would find something they didn’t like. They cut people off. “ Maybe that’s where she learned that trait. An eerie comment made by Jackie about John Jr after the death of his father, was that John Jr. loved planes. She was groomed to marry wealthy, that was the world she grew up in. So she did. Thankfully she was smart and all the things she loved and appreciated came in handy. I’ll be forever grateful for her decision in making the Whitehouse a historical place and testament to all those that came before. Without her style and grace, I doubt it could have been pulled off. In my opinion Jackie was a woman destined for her role in the US’s history books. As for Onassis….what else could she do? As for Maria Callas...I do feel for her… the world of power and privilege is not for the week or meek. There is so much about this woman I admire, yes she sure did have her faults. But with the upbringing she had, who can blame her? Her family was not the greatest of role models. Her Kennedy years and beyond I doubt she was surrounded by people who truly worried about her well being. Anyway...I’m not really discussing the book..just my admiration for a remarkable woman.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Schmidt

    The book highlights Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis's relationships and shows how aspects of her family shaped these relationships. I thought the book was interesting, some of the writing got dull though. The book would touch on aspects of the Kennedy family that I felt were key to making her the way she was. The books was good, not great. The book highlights Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis's relationships and shows how aspects of her family shaped these relationships. I thought the book was interesting, some of the writing got dull though. The book would touch on aspects of the Kennedy family that I felt were key to making her the way she was. The books was good, not great.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nada

    An excellent, definitive biography for sure. Bradford spares no detail–even the tabloidish ones; one must distinguish the fact from the fiction through one's own fact-check. All in all a worthy addition to the Kennedys' collection. An excellent, definitive biography for sure. Bradford spares no detail–even the tabloidish ones; one must distinguish the fact from the fiction through one's own fact-check. All in all a worthy addition to the Kennedys' collection.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    best jackie bio. You find out all kinds of scandalous things about her that other bios leave out.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lynda Kelly

    I really enjoyed this huge brick of a book !! Lots in there I didn't know already, surprisingly. I really enjoyed this huge brick of a book !! Lots in there I didn't know already, surprisingly.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Rose

    Perfect biography. This is the definite bio of Jackie O. I've read it at least 3 times! And I'll probably re-read it soon ;) If you are a Jackie Kennedy fan, please read this book! Perfect biography. This is the definite bio of Jackie O. I've read it at least 3 times! And I'll probably re-read it soon ;) If you are a Jackie Kennedy fan, please read this book!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    Well written. A good account without being salacious - her life was interesting enough!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lora Shouse

    A good and very thorough biography of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. It follows all the way from the pretensions of her Lee and Bouvier ancestors (both, especially the Bouviers, apparently inflated the social credentials of their more remote ancestors, to the point where even most family members didn’t realize that the claims were not the truth) all the way through to the time of her death and beyond. I especially liked the in-depth look at some of the parts of Jackie’s life that I have always known A good and very thorough biography of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. It follows all the way from the pretensions of her Lee and Bouvier ancestors (both, especially the Bouviers, apparently inflated the social credentials of their more remote ancestors, to the point where even most family members didn’t realize that the claims were not the truth) all the way through to the time of her death and beyond. I especially liked the in-depth look at some of the parts of Jackie’s life that I have always known about on the surface but never really understood up close, such as her relationships with John Kennedy and Aristotle Onassis and the details of the day John Kennedy was assassinated. Although there really wasn’t as much detail about them, it was also nice to have a little more information about John Jr. and Caroline, and also some of the Kennedy women.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sunny

    I ended up really enjoying this book, it's very well researched (or so it seems). But I still think it just gets really side tracked when it comes to Jack and Ari, I wanted more on Jackie in the Whitehouse Years and much, much less on Jack's infidelities and failed politics. Also more of Jackie in Greece and less of Ari's failing business and antics. Some may not mind that, but to me it bored me quite a lot considering I wanted more of a Jackie focus. The very first chapters were especially mind- I ended up really enjoying this book, it's very well researched (or so it seems). But I still think it just gets really side tracked when it comes to Jack and Ari, I wanted more on Jackie in the Whitehouse Years and much, much less on Jack's infidelities and failed politics. Also more of Jackie in Greece and less of Ari's failing business and antics. Some may not mind that, but to me it bored me quite a lot considering I wanted more of a Jackie focus. The very first chapters were especially mind-numbing for me.

  21. 5 out of 5

    John Krowka

    Having grown up during the era of JFK's "Camelot", this detailed account of Jackie's life was very compelling to me. She was the epitome of wealth, elegance, and grace but seemed to be very much "of the people." Like a friend, everyone called her "Jackie." I had forgotten about the great controversy created by her liking of French designer fashion. It tells the story of a bygone era that will never happen again and the joys and tragedies of her unique life. It provides a striking contrast to the Having grown up during the era of JFK's "Camelot", this detailed account of Jackie's life was very compelling to me. She was the epitome of wealth, elegance, and grace but seemed to be very much "of the people." Like a friend, everyone called her "Jackie." I had forgotten about the great controversy created by her liking of French designer fashion. It tells the story of a bygone era that will never happen again and the joys and tragedies of her unique life. It provides a striking contrast to the tawdry glitz of the Trumps.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stef

    Needless to say that Jackie had to live through a lot of tough times and it's hard to imagine how anyone can even handle that much tragedy and grief. But besides that what else did she do or achieve in her life for so many people to be appreciative of her or consider her the "Queen of America ". Did she do any good with all that fortune? She was only interested in money and status. At least that's what the book portrays for me. Nothing against the book but it didn't make me admire Jackie. Needless to say that Jackie had to live through a lot of tough times and it's hard to imagine how anyone can even handle that much tragedy and grief. But besides that what else did she do or achieve in her life for so many people to be appreciative of her or consider her the "Queen of America ". Did she do any good with all that fortune? She was only interested in money and status. At least that's what the book portrays for me. Nothing against the book but it didn't make me admire Jackie.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kiersten Schilinski

    A beautiful portrait of a fascinating, and often misunderstood, life. Do you ever really know a celebrity? Does the image of them align with the person they actually are? When do you stop becoming yourself but a collection of what the world wants you to be? How would you ever know who you are? For a woman I thought I grew up knowing, I think it's important to get a proper picture outside of the fame. A beautiful portrait of a fascinating, and often misunderstood, life. Do you ever really know a celebrity? Does the image of them align with the person they actually are? When do you stop becoming yourself but a collection of what the world wants you to be? How would you ever know who you are? For a woman I thought I grew up knowing, I think it's important to get a proper picture outside of the fame.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    I learned lots of new information about Jackie and her extended family in this book, but it was hard sometimes to separate fact from fiction. There are tons of quotes from various people who interacted with Jackie and it was occasionally hard to decipher who was talking. I also noticed a couple of incorrect dates and some typos. Overall an interesting read if taken with a grain of salt.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Hobgood

    I had read this book because I had an interest in the former first lady. I enjoyed reading this book because I learned more Jacqueline Kennedy's childhood, her family, and her marriages to John F. Kennedy and Aristotle Onassis. I loved that the book was well researched and informative. I thought the book was well written. I had read this book because I had an interest in the former first lady. I enjoyed reading this book because I learned more Jacqueline Kennedy's childhood, her family, and her marriages to John F. Kennedy and Aristotle Onassis. I loved that the book was well researched and informative. I thought the book was well written.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Craig Werner

    Went to this for information about some key moments in Jackie's life and came out impressed with it as a pretty good hybrid of celebrity bio and serious history. Bradford's clearly celebrating Jackie but she doesn't avoid the tougher questions. Can't imagine there's a better book about her. Went to this for information about some key moments in Jackie's life and came out impressed with it as a pretty good hybrid of celebrity bio and serious history. Bradford's clearly celebrating Jackie but she doesn't avoid the tougher questions. Can't imagine there's a better book about her.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    Overall good, noticed a good few errors there- particularly Teddy's birth date being given as the 2nd of Feburary, it's the 22nd. Pretty digestible biog of Jackie, could have done with more of her life post-Onassis though. Overall good, noticed a good few errors there- particularly Teddy's birth date being given as the 2nd of Feburary, it's the 22nd. Pretty digestible biog of Jackie, could have done with more of her life post-Onassis though.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bernice

    I thought it was wonderful. I've had the book for many years and dedicated myself to finally finishing it. Jackie was raised in a world so unlike mine. It was interesting to read how one operates in such a world. I thought it was wonderful. I've had the book for many years and dedicated myself to finally finishing it. Jackie was raised in a world so unlike mine. It was interesting to read how one operates in such a world.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Wow - what a book! She definitely did her research and I love that Sarah Bradford is not dramatic, but factual. Having said that, it is a very dense book. Took awhile to get through it with some parts just too much. What an interesting, enigmatic and amazing woman she was.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    Fabulous book! If anyone wants to read it I'll pass it along! Fabulous book! If anyone wants to read it I'll pass it along!

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