counter Women and Other Animals: Stories - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Women and Other Animals: Stories

Availability: Ready to download

The stories in this prizewinning debut collection encompass train wrecks, circus acts, river journeys, transspecies transmogrification, and growing up and growing old around the small towns of Michigan. Without glamorizing poverty, Bonnie Jo Campbell details a vision in which shabbiness, beauty, brutality, and wisdom all coexist -- and yet the stories can be surprisingly o The stories in this prizewinning debut collection encompass train wrecks, circus acts, river journeys, transspecies transmogrification, and growing up and growing old around the small towns of Michigan. Without glamorizing poverty, Bonnie Jo Campbell details a vision in which shabbiness, beauty, brutality, and wisdom all coexist -- and yet the stories can be surprisingly optimistic, often funny. In "Sleeping Sickness," a twelve-year-old copes with the sexually charged atmosphere at home by carefully tending her vegetable garden. In "Bringing Home the Bones," a farmer who prides herself on self-sufficiency must lose her leg before she can meet her estranged daughters halfway. In "Eating Aunt Victoria," a young woman finally looks into the face of her dead mother's lesbian lover. Campbell's hard-working, sometimes hard-drinking, women protagonists are both dangerous and vulnerable, living without seat belts or televisions or the right kind of love. Not surprisingly, the children in these stories often look beyond human role models to dogs, cows, and even gorillas.


Compare

The stories in this prizewinning debut collection encompass train wrecks, circus acts, river journeys, transspecies transmogrification, and growing up and growing old around the small towns of Michigan. Without glamorizing poverty, Bonnie Jo Campbell details a vision in which shabbiness, beauty, brutality, and wisdom all coexist -- and yet the stories can be surprisingly o The stories in this prizewinning debut collection encompass train wrecks, circus acts, river journeys, transspecies transmogrification, and growing up and growing old around the small towns of Michigan. Without glamorizing poverty, Bonnie Jo Campbell details a vision in which shabbiness, beauty, brutality, and wisdom all coexist -- and yet the stories can be surprisingly optimistic, often funny. In "Sleeping Sickness," a twelve-year-old copes with the sexually charged atmosphere at home by carefully tending her vegetable garden. In "Bringing Home the Bones," a farmer who prides herself on self-sufficiency must lose her leg before she can meet her estranged daughters halfway. In "Eating Aunt Victoria," a young woman finally looks into the face of her dead mother's lesbian lover. Campbell's hard-working, sometimes hard-drinking, women protagonists are both dangerous and vulnerable, living without seat belts or televisions or the right kind of love. Not surprisingly, the children in these stories often look beyond human role models to dogs, cows, and even gorillas.

30 review for Women and Other Animals: Stories

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    The softness of their kiss gives me the seasick feeling that I'm with my sister and the groom on their honeymoon bed. After all, I shared a room with her until I left for college. ...I fear that this kiss will not end, that time will freeze and abandon me in this orbit. My sister's eyes are closed, her lashes spread out over her cheeks. Even after they've opened again, her eyes remain in the sleep of that kiss as though covered with a milky effluent, something the fairies would make in their mou The softness of their kiss gives me the seasick feeling that I'm with my sister and the groom on their honeymoon bed. After all, I shared a room with her until I left for college. ...I fear that this kiss will not end, that time will freeze and abandon me in this orbit. My sister's eyes are closed, her lashes spread out over her cheeks. Even after they've opened again, her eyes remain in the sleep of that kiss as though covered with a milky effluent, something the fairies would make in their mouths and spit onto those they favor. I'm letting my sister down by being sucked into her fairy tale. Someone should always remain vigilant. ~ from Shotgun Wedding Bonnie Jo Campbell's women have trouble buying into the fairy tale. They are strong and capable women who do what needs to be done. They face reality every day and are too busy to wait around for the arrival of Prince Charming. Here are sixteen excellent stories about women, both young and old, who lead uncharmed lives, and their pets, their children and the men who try to love them. Most of the stories are dead serious, though there are some moments of levity, as in this bit from Shifting Gears: Tommy produced a second pair of beers from his house and gave one to Bob. As they were cracking open the beers, Sharon turned and pitched her rake through the air at the picnic table. It fell way short of them. "What's the matter, honey?" yelled Bob. "Why don't you two just stay out here all night and drink beer. I'm sick of your faces. You make me want to scream." She went inside and slammed the door. "I wonder if she's going to make supper," said Bob. I LOVE these women. Hell, I've occasionally BEEN one of these women.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Pamster

    First of all, please check out her author page: http://www.bonniejocampbell.com/about... So awesome! Loved these stories. I'd recommend them to anyone, but I'd say you should skip Old Dogs because it is too fucking sad and I wish I could unread it. These stories of poor rural women and girls, Michiganders all, are great. Some are amazing. I had to reread the first one after I finished it, and I never ever read like that, but it had hooked me intensely from the first sentence and I needed to go th First of all, please check out her author page: http://www.bonniejocampbell.com/about... So awesome! Loved these stories. I'd recommend them to anyone, but I'd say you should skip Old Dogs because it is too fucking sad and I wish I could unread it. These stories of poor rural women and girls, Michiganders all, are great. Some are amazing. I had to reread the first one after I finished it, and I never ever read like that, but it had hooked me intensely from the first sentence and I needed to go through it all again. I've read both her short story collections, and now have only her novel to read. That part sucks. I'd like more.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    This is the first book I've read by this author, and I love it and her. Her extraordinary writing skills aside, half of these stories are deep explorations of fat women characters, which I wasn't expecting. I've never heard Bonnie Jo Campbell's name come up in relation to fat studies, and when I google "bonnie jo campell" and "fat activism" / "fat studies" / "fat politics," absolutely nothing comes up, which, after reading this book, is astonishing to me. Her writing, though. It's sublime. Not "w This is the first book I've read by this author, and I love it and her. Her extraordinary writing skills aside, half of these stories are deep explorations of fat women characters, which I wasn't expecting. I've never heard Bonnie Jo Campbell's name come up in relation to fat studies, and when I google "bonnie jo campell" and "fat activism" / "fat studies" / "fat politics," absolutely nothing comes up, which, after reading this book, is astonishing to me. Her writing, though. It's sublime. Not "wow, what terrific writing!" sublime, but creepy sublime, the kind of sublime that makes you feel, as you're reading it, like something might be out there--and she's not saying anything particularly creepy; it's just the way she's arranged her words, and even though you can see what she's doing there, it still affects you as though you can't.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Roxy

    A good collection of short stories, I especially liked Shotgun Wedding, and Fishing Dog, which was expanded to the novel Once Upon A River. Campbell writes about ordinary people whose lives are so fraught with poverty and abuse, that their dreams are small.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dan Trudeau

    I'm a little prejudiced when it comes to Bonnie Jo Campbell. When I was in the Creative Writing program at WMU, she was the star grad student. That said, this is one of the best story collections I've ever read. Characters that would come off as "bigger than life" in the hands of other authors feel compelling and real in hers. The stories I enjoyed the most were "Gorilla Girl", "Eating Aunt Victoria", "Sleeping Sickness", "The Fishing Dog", and "Bringing Home the Bones." I'm a little prejudiced when it comes to Bonnie Jo Campbell. When I was in the Creative Writing program at WMU, she was the star grad student. That said, this is one of the best story collections I've ever read. Characters that would come off as "bigger than life" in the hands of other authors feel compelling and real in hers. The stories I enjoyed the most were "Gorilla Girl", "Eating Aunt Victoria", "Sleeping Sickness", "The Fishing Dog", and "Bringing Home the Bones."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Candice

    Michigan stories about Michigan women. I love this writer! She's GREAT! She's so Michigan!! He tried to make conversation: "Do you like working in the plastics factory?" Smoke poured out of her nose as she spoke. "It's sort of like dying and going to hell five days a week." Michigan stories about Michigan women. I love this writer! She's GREAT! She's so Michigan!! He tried to make conversation: "Do you like working in the plastics factory?" Smoke poured out of her nose as she spoke. "It's sort of like dying and going to hell five days a week."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Peter William Warn

    Nothing much happens in Bonnie Jo Campbell's stories, or very much does. Her writing in Women and Other Animals is as vibrant and evocative as a fine oil painting. It invites one to see carefully captured details and to ponder their context. If you look at Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa and see a smiling woman, you will find much to enjoy in Campbell's stories. If you wonder why she is smiling and what the smile led to, you will find much more. In one of Campbell's stories, a girl's trip with her Nothing much happens in Bonnie Jo Campbell's stories, or very much does. Her writing in Women and Other Animals is as vibrant and evocative as a fine oil painting. It invites one to see carefully captured details and to ponder their context. If you look at Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa and see a smiling woman, you will find much to enjoy in Campbell's stories. If you wonder why she is smiling and what the smile led to, you will find much more. In one of Campbell's stories, a girl's trip with her mother to the town garbage dump is simply a routine errand. Or it is a flight over the lush landscape of a young imagination. The featured rhyming game hints at the ineffable links between parent and child, who know each other as they can know no one else. In "Shotgun Wedding" the tale hauntingly makes good on its title, but not in a way one might expect. In another story, a young woman exults in the new and wonderful power of her extraordinary chest: Unfettered by gravity, Debra's breasts rose and floated above her rib cage, helium-filled flesh dirigibles, buoyant and blissful honeydew melons. Debra had been heartbroken this summer when her ex-best friend Nicole had invited another girl to go with her to Disney World, but it seemed God had taken pity on her, and as a consolation had sent her these sacred globes, these heavenly orbs, these twin suns around which the rest of her body now revolved. Or perhaps the breasts are extraordinary only to the person on whose body they have suddenly appeared. The treasures in Campbell's stories are varied. Their richness can lure a reader more strongly to one than to the others until the allure of another makes it most highly prized. One stand-out among the exceptional others is "Gorilla Girl," in which a young woman finds an unusual outlet for her rage and alienation, which might be more than the typical emotional tumult of adolescence. Tempting also is "Old Dogs" a seemingly simple description of three women and their dogs sleeping in one room during winter. They share history and much more as well, and Campbell's prose allows us to share it all with them. Among the sixteen gems in Women and Other Animals, "The Smallest Man in the World" is especially dazzling. Our narrator is a woman who might be especially beautiful. We have only her word for that. There is no doubt that she has given unusual thought to the power of beauty. The narrator's beauty causes her to feel kinship with a man who makes his living as a circus freak. At the jukebox the two men who accompany the Smallest Man in the World stand near him so they can form an equilateral triangle, as if this can protect him. They are heartbroken at what transpires between their small man and the showgirls. After all, they must love him; they have become attached to his smallness the way men become attached to my beauty. When a man is with me, he cannot forget my beauty the way he forgets everything else. Intimate conversations and promises are forgettable, as are meals created with attention to every detail of taste and presentation. Even the loveliness of naked breasts can mean nothing when skin remains covered for too long. But his size is a constant reminder, as is my face. The story concludes with the beautiful woman preparing to reach out to the Smallest Man in the World, although the tale is almost certain not to end there. Campbell's storytelling creates momentum that carries her characters into readers' thoughts. Without trying to, we imagine what will happen next. We see the possibilities as clearly as if they were our memories. Many of the stories in Women and Other Animals were published originally in such publications as Alaska Quarterly Review, So to Speak and Third Coast. "Shifting Gears," a rich and surprising glimpse into how a man tries to adjust after a divorce, was the official story of the 1999 Detroit Auto Show. Perhaps such honors are not on par with, say, landing a book on top of The New York Times best-seller list or winning a Pulitzer Prize. It might be said that Campbell has not yet reached literature's big time. That might be said, but only with regret.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    I shied away from reading this book for a lot of years, having seen some of the stories in workshop and feeling like I wasn't all that interested in then. But way turns on to way, as we all know, and finally it's time to read these, and maybe it was the time away, but I really enjoyed these, even some of those that I remember, which seem better now, more realized and interesting and fuller and stranger than I remember. This isn't a perfect collection: Bonnie writes two kinds of stories here, comi I shied away from reading this book for a lot of years, having seen some of the stories in workshop and feeling like I wasn't all that interested in then. But way turns on to way, as we all know, and finally it's time to read these, and maybe it was the time away, but I really enjoyed these, even some of those that I remember, which seem better now, more realized and interesting and fuller and stranger than I remember. This isn't a perfect collection: Bonnie writes two kinds of stories here, comic ones about people in town, and then tragic ones about folks in the country, and that's a little odd, since I think it kind of patronizes both groups by how orthodox her approach is here-- a story about funny misfits in the country, or a serious one about kids in high school would go a long way. And while some of these stories have jagged and strange shapes, many of the others progress toward conflicts and then resolutions that you can kind of see coming as the machinery of story gears up-- the conflict and resolution don't feel fake or unearned, just telegraphed in ways. That said, some dynamite stories, including the last one ("Bringing Home the Bones") that kept me feeling like I'd been punched in the face and made me want to cry, even though I'm pretty sure it doesn't end as much as peter out. I will track down a copy of _American Salvage_ and try to read Bonnie's stuff more consistently, and with more charity, in the years to come.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Carla

    I love Bonnie Jo Campbell's writing. Her collection of short stories are so breathtaking. She takes everyday people, often down and out, and her depiction of their lives, loves and losses are overwhelmingly accurate. She brings to life every character she writes about. It's as if she knows these people personally. Her depiction of woman who are often hard drinking, vulnerable, and so wise is both compassionate and humourous. She is such a fantastic storyteller!! I love Bonnie Jo Campbell's writing. Her collection of short stories are so breathtaking. She takes everyday people, often down and out, and her depiction of their lives, loves and losses are overwhelmingly accurate. She brings to life every character she writes about. It's as if she knows these people personally. Her depiction of woman who are often hard drinking, vulnerable, and so wise is both compassionate and humourous. She is such a fantastic storyteller!!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    There's something special about this collection of short stories. I found myself unable to breeze through this book...even if a story was only a few pages long I would have to take a break after finishing it. I think it's because the characters were so realistic that it was hard to move quickly between stories—I had to take time to absorb everything I had read. However...as I neared the end of the book, I started to grow bored of it. The stories are all character-driven and didn't have very stron There's something special about this collection of short stories. I found myself unable to breeze through this book...even if a story was only a few pages long I would have to take a break after finishing it. I think it's because the characters were so realistic that it was hard to move quickly between stories—I had to take time to absorb everything I had read. However...as I neared the end of the book, I started to grow bored of it. The stories are all character-driven and didn't have very strong or interesting plots. Most of the stories focused on women in rural Michigan—women who are self-sufficient, tough, and maybe a little bit on the redneck side, yet intelligent...or at least clever and practical enough. Most of the characters are dealing with some sort of problem (sexuality, Holocaust survivor guilt, mental illness, being too beautiful...), but the author is so brilliant at portraying characters that she humanizes even the most unlikable people. Unfortunately, most of the stories in this collection are stories that I would not care to read again, with the exception of "Gorilla Girl," "Eating Aunt Victoria," and "The Perfect Lawn."

  11. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    Brilliant stories set in rural Michigan, from the points of view of a variety of women from many walks of life. Funny, quiet, intense, and honest. Good stuff.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mckinley

    I did not like the writing style.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    This author is from a city in Michigan about 20 miles from me. She's quite popular, is an award-winning author, and engages the reader with a style that's simple yet profound. This author is from a city in Michigan about 20 miles from me. She's quite popular, is an award-winning author, and engages the reader with a style that's simple yet profound.

  14. 5 out of 5

    M S H

    Excellent stories, every one. Becoming one of my favorite authors.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    A stunning collection. Campbell sets most of these stories in her home state of Michigan, particularly its blink-and-you'll-miss-it towns and endless expanses of rural nothingness, and as a native of one of these very places, I found them all too relatable. Many of her characters struggle with their circumstances and the feeling of being stuck in an eternally unsatisfying existence, and she nails this sense of malaise and apathy so well that it's downright chilling and more than a little depress A stunning collection. Campbell sets most of these stories in her home state of Michigan, particularly its blink-and-you'll-miss-it towns and endless expanses of rural nothingness, and as a native of one of these very places, I found them all too relatable. Many of her characters struggle with their circumstances and the feeling of being stuck in an eternally unsatisfying existence, and she nails this sense of malaise and apathy so well that it's downright chilling and more than a little depressing - especially for a reader who has experienced such feelings, in all their geographic specificity, herself. At the same time, Campbell often allows her characters small victories: the light at the end of the tunnel remains distant, but it's still visible. Her subtle sense of humor also adds a touch of levity, and she has a talent for convincingly writing from the perspective of anyone from a cynical twelve-year-old girl to a diet-obsessed housewife and from a teenage boy who stalks his crush to a taciturn middle-aged divorced man. Her prose throughout remains easy and unfussy, as natural and no-nonsense as the people she writes about. My overall highlights: "Circus Matinee," "Gorilla Girl," "Eating Aunt Victoria," "The Fishing Dog," "Sleeping Sickness," and "Bringing Home the Bones."

  16. 5 out of 5

    Paris (parisperusing)

    I'm more than half-way through the collection, but I can't bring myself to finish it right now. If I can be honest, I think having read Mothers, Tell Your Daughters, sort of puts me in a biased position. While I admire Bonnie Jo's work I just don't think this is going to get any better for me at this time. Despite my decision, this is a very impressive debut nonetheless. Her kick-off story, "Circus Matinee," was an amazing introduction to this collection; "Gorilla Girl" was as strange as it was s I'm more than half-way through the collection, but I can't bring myself to finish it right now. If I can be honest, I think having read Mothers, Tell Your Daughters, sort of puts me in a biased position. While I admire Bonnie Jo's work I just don't think this is going to get any better for me at this time. Despite my decision, this is a very impressive debut nonetheless. Her kick-off story, "Circus Matinee," was an amazing introduction to this collection; "Gorilla Girl" was as strange as it was superb; "Shotgun Wedding" gave me all the feels; and "Sleeping Sickness" and "The Perfect Lawn" were mesmerizing reads. While I'm DNFing this one for now, I'm only 50-some pages from completion. Which means I'll most likely pick this one up again in the future before the month ends. Either way, my opinion of Women and Other Animals in no way means Bonnie's writing is flawed, but I am a bit one-sided seeing as I was so in awe of her most recent collection, and had not trekked back through her biblio until now.

  17. 4 out of 5

    LindaJ^

    Bonnie Jo Campbell has become a favorite author for me. I read American Salvage first and was absolutely amazed by the stories. Her use of language to set the scene is amazing. This book of short stories are focused on women, although not to the exclusion of men. One of the stories about the girl who is the main character in Campbell's novel Once Upon a River. The characters in these stories struggle - theirs are not easy lives. Some might call the stories dark, which they are, but they are also Bonnie Jo Campbell has become a favorite author for me. I read American Salvage first and was absolutely amazed by the stories. Her use of language to set the scene is amazing. This book of short stories are focused on women, although not to the exclusion of men. One of the stories about the girl who is the main character in Campbell's novel Once Upon a River. The characters in these stories struggle - theirs are not easy lives. Some might call the stories dark, which they are, but they are also about real life and how it is often not "fun" or carefree.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alissa Hattman

    An excellent story collection! Favorite quote: "It should not surprise anyone that P.T. Barnum himself pioneered the modern beauty contest, recognizing that striking beauty was fundamentally no different from any other aberration. Such absurdly perfect integration of woman's bones, flesh, and features was not unlike a third arm growing out of the center of another woman's back. Barnum was the first to figure out that strangers would pay to see this sort of female oddity paraded before him"(174). An excellent story collection! Favorite quote: "It should not surprise anyone that P.T. Barnum himself pioneered the modern beauty contest, recognizing that striking beauty was fundamentally no different from any other aberration. Such absurdly perfect integration of woman's bones, flesh, and features was not unlike a third arm growing out of the center of another woman's back. Barnum was the first to figure out that strangers would pay to see this sort of female oddity paraded before him"(174).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Izabela

    Now this was a great short story collection -- the stories were interesting and they were told well. The stories were also really focused, and even though nothing much happens in some of the stories, they were all interesting. My favorite story is 'The Fishing Dog' in which a girl lives alone in a house right by the river. She has no money and can only get around by rowing on the river. Her growth as a character is really beautiful; she transforms from a untrusting rough girl to a woman who begi Now this was a great short story collection -- the stories were interesting and they were told well. The stories were also really focused, and even though nothing much happens in some of the stories, they were all interesting. My favorite story is 'The Fishing Dog' in which a girl lives alone in a house right by the river. She has no money and can only get around by rowing on the river. Her growth as a character is really beautiful; she transforms from a untrusting rough girl to a woman who begins to trust the men around her. Every story is worth reading, and probably re-reading.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sara Cutaia

    A truly moving and expertly written collection of short stories in which Campbell explores the rich, poor, old, young, scared and confident lives of women. Each story has a rich and powerful voice, one that captured me and sucked me into the small world that was created. Again and again I'd finish a story and realize how impressed and awed I was at the writing, the characterization of these women, and the troubles that plagued them. I'm excited to see Bonnie Jo Campbell read and speak this Monda A truly moving and expertly written collection of short stories in which Campbell explores the rich, poor, old, young, scared and confident lives of women. Each story has a rich and powerful voice, one that captured me and sucked me into the small world that was created. Again and again I'd finish a story and realize how impressed and awed I was at the writing, the characterization of these women, and the troubles that plagued them. I'm excited to see Bonnie Jo Campbell read and speak this Monday in Chicago.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    This is one of those short story collections that really taught me something about how to put a short story collection together. It hits so many different notes but yet the sense of place (Michigan), the common themes (gender, adolescent females, mother/daughter, women as object), and her unique voice make Campbell a writer I'm really gonna follow. This is one of those short story collections that really taught me something about how to put a short story collection together. It hits so many different notes but yet the sense of place (Michigan), the common themes (gender, adolescent females, mother/daughter, women as object), and her unique voice make Campbell a writer I'm really gonna follow.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    Bonnie Jo Campbell has been my favorite author for a very long time. She is a wonderful human and writer; I am lucky to have met her several times. Although this is one of her earliest published books, it's the last one I've read. I've officially run out of BJC books to read and now I don't know what to do with myself. Send help and more words. Bonnie Jo Campbell has been my favorite author for a very long time. She is a wonderful human and writer; I am lucky to have met her several times. Although this is one of her earliest published books, it's the last one I've read. I've officially run out of BJC books to read and now I don't know what to do with myself. Send help and more words.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    I give this short story collection 4.5 stars out of 5. I really enjoyed all of the stories and many left an emotional impact, particularly 'Old Dogs', 'Eating Aunt Victoria', 'The Fishing Dog', and 'Sleeping Sickness'. This collection was published in 1999 so I hope that means there are many more stories by this talented author to read. I give this short story collection 4.5 stars out of 5. I really enjoyed all of the stories and many left an emotional impact, particularly 'Old Dogs', 'Eating Aunt Victoria', 'The Fishing Dog', and 'Sleeping Sickness'. This collection was published in 1999 so I hope that means there are many more stories by this talented author to read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pete

    necessary short fiction. knocking a point for the occasionally sameyness of the stories, and intermittent valorization of poverty/scruff but just perfectly crafted, humane, weird stories. dybek without its intermittent male-romantic schmaltz. hope to read more of campbell if time/the universe cooperates.

  25. 5 out of 5

    janicec100

    This is a collection of short stories--a bizarre collection. I can read about one story per train ride to work. Despite the disturbing circumstances of the women, the stories are interestingly upbeat. Kind of a weird book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Some stories were a bit dark, but they were all intriguing and thought provoking, made me wonder about about the writer- I need to google her;)Read fast...the stories are short. Wouldn't recommend it if you're already in a blue mood, but otherwise you might enjoy it...dark or not. Some stories were a bit dark, but they were all intriguing and thought provoking, made me wonder about about the writer- I need to google her;)Read fast...the stories are short. Wouldn't recommend it if you're already in a blue mood, but otherwise you might enjoy it...dark or not.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    So glad I finally read it! This is a book of short stories. All deal with women or animals - mostly women. Several stories dealt with food and our relationship with food. The last one was my favorite: generational eating, generational work, and lack of conversation.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    I am very happy to be introduced to author Bonnie Jo Campbell. This is a strong collection where the excellent stories outnumber the average. I read this prior to attending an author reading at College of DuPage. I will read more of her work.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Abandoned after two stories. Well-written but FAR too dark and violent for me, and with similarly abrupt choose-your-own-resolution sort of endings.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    I enjoyed it! Okay, so it was rough in some places, but I enjoyed the variety.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.