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Suggs is one of pop music's most enduring and likeable figures. Written with the assured style and wit of a natural raconteur, this hugely entertaining and insightful autobiography takes you from his colourful early life on a North London council estate, through the heady early days of Punk and 2-Tone, to the eighties, where Madness became the biggest selling singles band Suggs is one of pop music's most enduring and likeable figures. Written with the assured style and wit of a natural raconteur, this hugely entertaining and insightful autobiography takes you from his colourful early life on a North London council estate, through the heady early days of Punk and 2-Tone, to the eighties, where Madness became the biggest selling singles band of the decade. Along the way he tells you what it's like to grow up in sixties Soho, go globetrotting with your best mates, to make a dead pigeon fly and cause an earthquake in Finsbury Park.


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Suggs is one of pop music's most enduring and likeable figures. Written with the assured style and wit of a natural raconteur, this hugely entertaining and insightful autobiography takes you from his colourful early life on a North London council estate, through the heady early days of Punk and 2-Tone, to the eighties, where Madness became the biggest selling singles band Suggs is one of pop music's most enduring and likeable figures. Written with the assured style and wit of a natural raconteur, this hugely entertaining and insightful autobiography takes you from his colourful early life on a North London council estate, through the heady early days of Punk and 2-Tone, to the eighties, where Madness became the biggest selling singles band of the decade. Along the way he tells you what it's like to grow up in sixties Soho, go globetrotting with your best mates, to make a dead pigeon fly and cause an earthquake in Finsbury Park.

30 review for That Close [Audiobook]

  1. 5 out of 5

    Baba

    Interesting autobiography which spends more time looking at London and Suggs' non-Madness career than one would expect, which may not be what a person picking up this would expect, or indeed want? ... and to be honest, it was not what I wanted. 5 out of 12. Interesting autobiography which spends more time looking at London and Suggs' non-Madness career than one would expect, which may not be what a person picking up this would expect, or indeed want? ... and to be honest, it was not what I wanted. 5 out of 12.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Leo .

    Still reading this one by the Madness front man. I grew up listening to Madness as a teenager and most of my peers, regardless to whether they were Punk/Mod/Motown/Reggae/Electric/Grunge/New Romantic or whatever genre, listened to their music. That is why they were so successful. Anyhow I have been reading That Close for a while now; had it for Christmas last year from my brother in law; and it is a good read. It is more like a book of anecdotes and the way Suggs writes is very... Theatrical. It Still reading this one by the Madness front man. I grew up listening to Madness as a teenager and most of my peers, regardless to whether they were Punk/Mod/Motown/Reggae/Electric/Grunge/New Romantic or whatever genre, listened to their music. That is why they were so successful. Anyhow I have been reading That Close for a while now; had it for Christmas last year from my brother in law; and it is a good read. It is more like a book of anecdotes and the way Suggs writes is very... Theatrical. It is almost like I am in one of his songs...Lol! Interesting to hear what life was like in and around Covent Garden and Notting Hill when Suggs was growing up. An eclectic of characters and diversity. It warms the heart. I really do not want to rush this book and pick it up every now and then. Like I am reading a book of prose. It is really worth the read.🐯👍

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jemma

    The Suggs charm is evident here but that can't disguise just how patchy this is. Some of the tales, such as about the Colony Club or Two-Tone are great but perhaps he should have gone with a ghost writer because this book is just so disjointed and spends way too long on things like football and various holidays. It reads as if he was a professional football fan who fronted a band in his spare time. I saw a review which criticised this book for not having enough about Madness in it and I thought The Suggs charm is evident here but that can't disguise just how patchy this is. Some of the tales, such as about the Colony Club or Two-Tone are great but perhaps he should have gone with a ghost writer because this book is just so disjointed and spends way too long on things like football and various holidays. It reads as if he was a professional football fan who fronted a band in his spare time. I saw a review which criticised this book for not having enough about Madness in it and I thought that was a bit unfair as it is about Suggs, not just about Madness. However now I think they had a point. There is to much here than could have been edited in favour of more witty bits. There is about as much on cycling in Italy as there is about post '92 Madness. Surely not a good balance. Plus there are all the song lyrics which are interspersed with the text that are often too long and only slightly relevant, sometimes not at all really.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paul Reid

    Firstly, it's not bad, it's just that I expected to learn a lot more about Suggs and indeed Madness, I have always been a fan and discovered very few new facts about either. In fact the patchy jumping about became a little annoying. We heard a great deal about the early days of his own life and then the band but Madness's most successful period was rushed past. The break up of the band was skipped over, the getting back together mentioned in passing. As much as the early life of anyone that write Firstly, it's not bad, it's just that I expected to learn a lot more about Suggs and indeed Madness, I have always been a fan and discovered very few new facts about either. In fact the patchy jumping about became a little annoying. We heard a great deal about the early days of his own life and then the band but Madness's most successful period was rushed past. The break up of the band was skipped over, the getting back together mentioned in passing. As much as the early life of anyone that writes a biography has to be covered what we all want is the behind the scenes tales and insight when they reach the big time. It's not an "Embarrassment" but falls short of being a "House of fun"

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nigeyb

    A supremely enjoyable biography. I am a similar age to Suggs and also grew up in north London so there were many aspects of his story that I recognised from growing up in the same place at the same time. That said, he has plenty of amusing and interesting tales to tell, and this book is peppered with them. He's also an enthusiastic and engaging narrator. So, whatever your background, if you enjoy books that embrace social history, music, travel, humour, growing up, families, and this thing we ca A supremely enjoyable biography. I am a similar age to Suggs and also grew up in north London so there were many aspects of his story that I recognised from growing up in the same place at the same time. That said, he has plenty of amusing and interesting tales to tell, and this book is peppered with them. He's also an enthusiastic and engaging narrator. So, whatever your background, if you enjoy books that embrace social history, music, travel, humour, growing up, families, and this thing we call life, then you should find plenty to enjoy here.

  6. 4 out of 5

    D.M.

    Before anything else I may be about to commit to print, let me say this: That Close was an enjoyable, brisk read and I don't regret reading it. American readers are likely unaware of a strange love in Europe for celebrity memoirs and biographies. Walk into any bookshop this side of the Atlantic, and you're likely to find first and foremost a large display of books on and by celebrities of various stripe. That tendency has no match in the US. This may be the first autobiography I've read since hig Before anything else I may be about to commit to print, let me say this: That Close was an enjoyable, brisk read and I don't regret reading it. American readers are likely unaware of a strange love in Europe for celebrity memoirs and biographies. Walk into any bookshop this side of the Atlantic, and you're likely to find first and foremost a large display of books on and by celebrities of various stripe. That tendency has no match in the US. This may be the first autobiography I've read since high school (something like 25 years ago), so my expectations were set pretty low. I have been a fan of Madness for only slightly longer than that, and had heard mention of their lead singer Graham 'Suggs' McPherson's rough childhood before so was curious to hear what he had to say about his life. As it turns out, the title he's chosen for his memoir is more apropos than he may have thought, because That Close is always just so short of being any one thing, but never quite makes it. Suggs gives us titbits about his upbringing in London (and, briefly, Wales), but seems more interested in showing local colour than delving into the impact it made on him. He touches on the disappearance and dissolution of his father, but in such a way as to prove tantalising for closure that never comes. Likewise, he gives a rough run-through of the birth of the band, but without giving much more background than it seemed like fun at the time. He even manages to do a bit of travelogue on his more recent years, but again...that close. Two chapters spent recounting football-fandom escapades is not what I'd call interesting reading, and yet not enough to make this a book about football fandom. Perhaps at this stage in his life, his earlier memories are lost in the 'thick fug of tobacco smoke' he repeatedly mentions (in exactly those words, several times in the same chapter) and the best he could offer was this rambling, but no less entertaining, collection of vague reminiscences. However, I choose to blame the book's editor for most of its flaws. Little things like the recurring 'thick fug,' as well as the almost total lack of chronology and the misplacing of subjects' introductions AFTER they've been referred to all suggest there was a fairly lax editorial view toward this book. Any editor worth their mettle would have noticed the length Suggs dedicates to Madness' weakest album, Mad Not Mad (the only one without the entire band), especially compared with the almost total absence of anything about their debut album! Surely, the leap from some kids playing in a pub to a band with a top-selling album made some impact, but you wouldn't know it from this book. Clearly, this is meant to be the story of Suggs' life, and not the story of Madness, but even that is only halfway here. This book could have been twice as long, still have been just as readable, and then perhaps given us some actual insight into who this man is and how he got here. Instead, it is an entertaining, interesting and quite often funny clutch of anecdotes that might just as easily have been recounted by someone else. This edition includes two sections and endsheet spreads of colour photos, with black and white photos and illustrations (most of which are from Suggs' own collection) throughout.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Poppy99

    I am not a Madness fan (don't mind them but don't follow them) but I share the same points of reference as Suggs (Soho/Clerkenwell/Camden) and I find him an engaging and enthusiastic presenter. He did a really interesting TV programme about London and the accompanying book was a good read. This is written in the same easy style and if the whole book was written in the same way as the first half I would have given it five stars. However it goes downhill in the last half. Like he had run out of th I am not a Madness fan (don't mind them but don't follow them) but I share the same points of reference as Suggs (Soho/Clerkenwell/Camden) and I find him an engaging and enthusiastic presenter. He did a really interesting TV programme about London and the accompanying book was a good read. This is written in the same easy style and if the whole book was written in the same way as the first half I would have given it five stars. However it goes downhill in the last half. Like he had run out of things to say but he was obliged to keep going. Strange editing - he kept repeating stuff, like he had amnesia and had forgotten that he had already told us something. There wasn't a great deal about Madness, which I was not bothered about, but Madness fans might feel short changed. I bought this in a bargain book shop, and I am glad I did not pay full price. I would like to see more books from Suggs, about topics that interest him, but he has to be a bit more business like and produce a book that is consistent throughout rather than the first half.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I always enjoy an informative autobiography and this was another one of those I enjoyed. Suggs takes us through his life and that of his band Madness. My only gripe with the book is that it jumps around from now to then and in between. However I understand why because each chapter covers certain aspects of his life and I found what he had to say very entertaining and I laughed a fair bit. Of course I went and looked at goodreads and of course just saw negativity. It's a great read, he's written i I always enjoy an informative autobiography and this was another one of those I enjoyed. Suggs takes us through his life and that of his band Madness. My only gripe with the book is that it jumps around from now to then and in between. However I understand why because each chapter covers certain aspects of his life and I found what he had to say very entertaining and I laughed a fair bit. Of course I went and looked at goodreads and of course just saw negativity. It's a great read, he's written it himself, it's honest, it's true,what more do you want. I didn't give it 5 stars simply because I found the bouncing around disconcerting

  9. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    I love autobiographies, so when I had to download a title to test the e-audio app we use at work, this seemed like a good one to pick. I wouldn't say I'm a huge Madness fan, but I like quite a few of their songs, and their cheeky performances raise a smile. So I began listening with high hopes. I enjoyed this stroll down memory lane, narrated by Suggs himself. I laughed out loud a few times. But I'm afraid that overall I found it very disjointed. It hopped about back and forth throughout his lif I love autobiographies, so when I had to download a title to test the e-audio app we use at work, this seemed like a good one to pick. I wouldn't say I'm a huge Madness fan, but I like quite a few of their songs, and their cheeky performances raise a smile. So I began listening with high hopes. I enjoyed this stroll down memory lane, narrated by Suggs himself. I laughed out loud a few times. But I'm afraid that overall I found it very disjointed. It hopped about back and forth throughout his life and times with no clear sense of direction. At times there were repetitions. Sadly, these things detracted from my enjoyment, meaning I don't feel I can rate it above a 3 star.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Malcolm Frawley

    Suggs was, & is, the lead singer of Madness whose string of effervescent pop tunes (Baggy Trousers, House Of Fun, Embarrassment, It Must Be Love, Driving In My Car & quite a few others!) were among the most enjoyable hits of the 80s. His auto-biog is an equally enjoyable read, particularly the early years, growing up in London & passionately supporting Chelsea, sometimes at the risk of serious physical harm. Well recommended.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul Slater

    I enjoyed this book and found out a few new bits about Suggs and the boys. The book has its fair share of funny stories as to be expected and if you are a madness fan or someone who has come across suggs on tv you will enjoy the book. As other readers have said its hard not to read the book with suggs voice in your head telling the stories and exploits.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gill

    Hmmmm I think you would need to be British or at least have grown up in the UK, be a Madness fan and a Suggs fan to appreciate this book. I am all three and found it interesting, amusing and enjoyable.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Suz

    loved it. i love madness & wat i got from this book was humour, normality, a sense of fun & a joy of life. i love madness & this just added 2 my joy of life madness & a realisation that even my dull little life has moments of joy which makes life worth living.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nicki

    I really enjoyed this very easy to read memoir from Suggs, lead singer and front-man of Madness. It's a very funny memoir with lots of stories about growing up in London in the 60s/70s and forming the band, continuing right up to the present day. If you like Madness you'll love it. I really enjoyed this very easy to read memoir from Suggs, lead singer and front-man of Madness. It's a very funny memoir with lots of stories about growing up in London in the 60s/70s and forming the band, continuing right up to the present day. If you like Madness you'll love it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Badgley

    I love Madness. Simple as that, love the band and their music. I also now have a deep appreciation for Suggs. An excellent read, I enjoyed every page and highly recommend for fans and fans of autobiographies.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    I always enjoy Suggs writings, they bring back memories of my times in London. I met many of the characters he writes about and fondly remember most of them.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Leonard Entwistle

    Very enjoyable light read 'not a heavy, heavy monster show!' Brought back some great memories I'd forgotten how big and how many hits Madness had Very enjoyable light read 'not a heavy, heavy monster show!' Brought back some great memories I'd forgotten how big and how many hits Madness had

  18. 5 out of 5

    Simon Dyer

    As a life long fan of Madness I enjoyed the story of Suggs early life and it showed the inspiration for many of their early songs.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael Legge

    Shame he dies in the end.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gill Christina

    I enjoyed this memoir by Suggs, especially the first part, focussing on his childhood, the lead up to forming the band and the early days of Madness. How extraordinary that his mum was a jazz singer at the Colony Club! Suggs’ warmth and charisma brings his anecdotes to life. The book does jump about a bit, chronologically, but I didn’t mind that too much, as the stories are fun and interesting. He is an engaging narrator and comes across as genial, self-effacing, grounded and loyal. The author’ I enjoyed this memoir by Suggs, especially the first part, focussing on his childhood, the lead up to forming the band and the early days of Madness. How extraordinary that his mum was a jazz singer at the Colony Club! Suggs’ warmth and charisma brings his anecdotes to life. The book does jump about a bit, chronologically, but I didn’t mind that too much, as the stories are fun and interesting. He is an engaging narrator and comes across as genial, self-effacing, grounded and loyal. The author’s deep affection for his home city is a strong thread throughout and I enjoyed time travelling back to the London of the late 1970s, as at the time I was living not far from there and Two Tone music was a big part of the soundtrack of my teenage years. I loved that first Madness album especially! The stories relating to the pub music scene, the lead up to the first album and the Two Tone tour were fascinating. Also the bits about the fashions and the various teenage music and style ‘tribes’ that existed back then. It made me feel sad and nostalgic, as there doesn’t seem to be anything comparable for teenagers now. I think Suggs could have expanded on the early years, as the latter part of the book seemed to meander into some random areas. However, I still enjoyed the bits about football and cycling, due to the humour and infectious enthusiasm. A delightfully fun and nostalgic read. What a lovely man.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Does Suggs care? Certainly on this evidence he doesn't care for grammatical structure and what his school teachers would recognise as good English. He certainly doesn't care who knows that his professional name was first chosen at random so he had a snappy graffiti tag, and he certainly doesn't give a monkeys that he sounds like a most unrepentant football hooligan, thankfully retired. And what he doesn't really care about too much here is his musical career – this 340pp book takes a hundred pag Does Suggs care? Certainly on this evidence he doesn't care for grammatical structure and what his school teachers would recognise as good English. He certainly doesn't care who knows that his professional name was first chosen at random so he had a snappy graffiti tag, and he certainly doesn't give a monkeys that he sounds like a most unrepentant football hooligan, thankfully retired. And what he doesn't really care about too much here is his musical career – this 340pp book takes a hundred pages to get to the start of his band's life, his solo success is reduced to one paragraph, and that mostly the anecdote about his single Cecilia presented, while at #6 in the charts, by a twat with a lisp. So there is very little to be learnt here about the days of Madness, but even if we take this as a personal look back by one man about one man it's still very random. The opening chapters seem to jump from month to month and year to year, only to drag us back to the day after we started. An extended vignette about going to Anfield is only revenge from the football gods; a skippable chapter about the birth of his beloved ska reads like a straight transcript from the Radio 4 documentary he led about it. When we do close with some more pages about the bandmates that have given him (and of course us) so much over the years, it is as episodic and devoid of anything hard-hitting as the rest. It must be duff, it seems.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Millstone

    I don't usually read show biz autobiographies and for quite a while I wasn't sure what to make of this one. I'm a very similar age to Suggs and I liked their singles in the early 80s (who didn't?) but that's as far as my knowledge of him and the band went, other than knowing they're still working: I saw their Glastonbury appearance on tv last (?) year. I used to read a lot of ghostwritten cricket 'autobiographies' and I remember one, Graham Dilley's, I think that said he'd instructed his ghost t I don't usually read show biz autobiographies and for quite a while I wasn't sure what to make of this one. I'm a very similar age to Suggs and I liked their singles in the early 80s (who didn't?) but that's as far as my knowledge of him and the band went, other than knowing they're still working: I saw their Glastonbury appearance on tv last (?) year. I used to read a lot of ghostwritten cricket 'autobiographies' and I remember one, Graham Dilley's, I think that said he'd instructed his ghost to ditch all the 'soppy stuff' (growing up, school, junior teams) and just get on with what he thought people would be interested in - his first class career in the public eye. If you cut the 'soppy stuff' out of this one, you'd be left with a couple of anecdotes you might hear him tell on a panel show. If you aren't familiar with the band's career, you won't add much to that file with this book. He's quite clear at the beginning that his ideas differed from the publisher's ghost and that they parted ways early on and there's little in the structure to make you disbelieve that. (Although them long words like eschew do surface occasionally.) Overall though, I ended up liking it more than not. And if he ever wants to, there's another book he could write with the same material with almost no duplication.

  23. 4 out of 5

    cherubEagleEyes

    I loved Madness, Im totally inlove with Suggs n now Im totally inlove with this book of his; so glad that he narrated it himself cos no one could do it like Suggs wanted, needed. This is not about Madness, this is about Suggs himself; his autobiography. Ok! Madness is in here aswel, but that is cos if there were no Suggs there wouldn't of been Madness!its that simple really cos a few reviewers in Amazon thought this to be dissappointing as they thought it would be all about Madness; but look at I loved Madness, Im totally inlove with Suggs n now Im totally inlove with this book of his; so glad that he narrated it himself cos no one could do it like Suggs wanted, needed. This is not about Madness, this is about Suggs himself; his autobiography. Ok! Madness is in here aswel, but that is cos if there were no Suggs there wouldn't of been Madness!its that simple really cos a few reviewers in Amazon thought this to be dissappointing as they thought it would be all about Madness; but look at his Gorgeous face n captivating eyes. This is a brilliant read n Suggs (Graham McPherson) performs it to perfection. Well worthy for the price paid on Audible n will listen to it again. A fab collection for a Suggs/Madness fan.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tom Rowe

    This was a fun audio book, and while I'm a big fan of Madness, I know almost nothing of them other than their music. I don't even know the band members names. I like that it was read by Suggs himself. His style of speaking is so much fun to listen to. I must admit that my American ears did not comprehend a lot of the references he made to British culture, but it was still fun. The only downside to this book was that it could have used a gentle editing. By that, I mean some of the chapters seemed This was a fun audio book, and while I'm a big fan of Madness, I know almost nothing of them other than their music. I don't even know the band members names. I like that it was read by Suggs himself. His style of speaking is so much fun to listen to. I must admit that my American ears did not comprehend a lot of the references he made to British culture, but it was still fun. The only downside to this book was that it could have used a gentle editing. By that, I mean some of the chapters seemed out of (chronological) order. So, if you are a Madness fan or you just like listening to English people speak, I would recommend this book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Richard McGeough

    It’s Suggs’ story: you’re only going to read it if you have fond memories of Suggs and Madness. What you get is mostly more than good enough to keep you turning the pages. The stuff that doesn’t happen to most of us is inevitably the most interesting: hanging out with London’s jazz musicians when he was a little kid, joining a band and unexpectedly becoming a national institution. Lengthily yarns about cycling holidays in Italy might be indulged by Suggs’ family and friends, but they’re just not It’s Suggs’ story: you’re only going to read it if you have fond memories of Suggs and Madness. What you get is mostly more than good enough to keep you turning the pages. The stuff that doesn’t happen to most of us is inevitably the most interesting: hanging out with London’s jazz musicians when he was a little kid, joining a band and unexpectedly becoming a national institution. Lengthily yarns about cycling holidays in Italy might be indulged by Suggs’ family and friends, but they’re just not really interesting enough for the rest of us to enjoy. I still recommend it: Suggs is an interesting character who deserves a book to tell his story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Peter O'Connor

    This one by the lead singer of Brit-Ska jokesters, Madness is much like the band itself - it is light, tongue in cheek and has a charm all it's own. Anyone expecting an in depth analysis of the band and it's machinations are probably in for a bit of a let down but for mine, this autobiography was all the better for it and probably made it all that much nicer to read. His tales of boyhood in North London make for the majority of the book and are probably the highlights while he humbly glosses ove This one by the lead singer of Brit-Ska jokesters, Madness is much like the band itself - it is light, tongue in cheek and has a charm all it's own. Anyone expecting an in depth analysis of the band and it's machinations are probably in for a bit of a let down but for mine, this autobiography was all the better for it and probably made it all that much nicer to read. His tales of boyhood in North London make for the majority of the book and are probably the highlights while he humbly glosses over the seven album recording career of the band in just a handful of chapters. All in all, this is full of nutty goodness for those that always loved the Madness sense of fun.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Richard Ninnim

    If you are a madness fan then this gives an insite to some of their past, but not quite all, good read for fans though. It does jump around an awful lot which makes it hard to follow and get into as far as ease of reading goes. As a fan i would of liked abit more about the band and the songs and goings on, but still it tells the story of a wayward lad earning his way from a pretty poor begining to playing ontop of buckingham palace. As i dont read often it was interesting to sit and read through If you are a madness fan then this gives an insite to some of their past, but not quite all, good read for fans though. It does jump around an awful lot which makes it hard to follow and get into as far as ease of reading goes. As a fan i would of liked abit more about the band and the songs and goings on, but still it tells the story of a wayward lad earning his way from a pretty poor begining to playing ontop of buckingham palace. As i dont read often it was interesting to sit and read through about someone i thought i knew as a madness fan but really didnt know at all.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Richie Garner

    The book falls short of 5 stars only by the narrowest of margins. I thoroughly enjoyed it but it does suffer a little because of the way that it’s timeline becomes muddled. When I read a biography I want to have an insight as to the authors mind, I want he or she to drag me into their story and show me each aspect of what made each chapter important. This book does that. I found myself - an 80s child who grew up loving Madness - taken back to those days at times. Suggs builds a world of imagery whi The book falls short of 5 stars only by the narrowest of margins. I thoroughly enjoyed it but it does suffer a little because of the way that it’s timeline becomes muddled. When I read a biography I want to have an insight as to the authors mind, I want he or she to drag me into their story and show me each aspect of what made each chapter important. This book does that. I found myself - an 80s child who grew up loving Madness - taken back to those days at times. Suggs builds a world of imagery which was overwhelmingly joyous in its depictions of the era I grew up in and that’s the books real strength. It is overwhelmingly Suggs from start to finish and although I really did love 99% of it, it’s not quite 5* - yet it really is That Close. Definitely worth your time and money.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Paul Foley

    Light hearted read. Overall a good memoir. I found the early days of Suggs upbringing very good and a interesting story. Could have had more depth on the his Madness days. The book seemed to wander off onto Suggs telling stories, almost trying to be as funny as he could. The story about cycling in Italy was just pointless and added nothing to the overall book. But overall it was a enjoyable read of a interesting character.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Trevor

    A largely enjoyable book although it does jump around a bit and bizarrely misses out the entirety of Madness' most successful period. Suggs appears to struggle with his memory a little too as he claims he was listening to certain songs whilst dossing at a mates house (before they'd "made it") yet these songs were released 2 years after Madness' first hit "The Prince" in September 1979. Overall a fun and enjoyable read but those mentioned above can be a little annoying at times. A largely enjoyable book although it does jump around a bit and bizarrely misses out the entirety of Madness' most successful period. Suggs appears to struggle with his memory a little too as he claims he was listening to certain songs whilst dossing at a mates house (before they'd "made it") yet these songs were released 2 years after Madness' first hit "The Prince" in September 1979. Overall a fun and enjoyable read but those mentioned above can be a little annoying at times.

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