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The Boy Knight (Historical Fiction for Teens: Illustrated Edition): A Tale of the Crusades

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An exciting new Illustrated ebook from the folks at Beebliome Books! The Boy Knight: A Tale of the Crusades is the tale of a young man facing many trials in battle during the excitement of the Crusades. The hero of the story, Cuthbert, is a young Englishman who follows King Richard to the Holy Land. The Boy Knight is one of the more exciting Henty adventures, and any love An exciting new Illustrated ebook from the folks at Beebliome Books! The Boy Knight: A Tale of the Crusades is the tale of a young man facing many trials in battle during the excitement of the Crusades. The hero of the story, Cuthbert, is a young Englishman who follows King Richard to the Holy Land. The Boy Knight is one of the more exciting Henty adventures, and any lover of Robin Hood will certainly enjoy this tale. Cuthbert's presence of mind and common sense, his loyalty, honesty, valor, and quick wits are all characteristics that make us and his comrades in the book admire and respect him. People learn by example, and the examples set by Henty's virtues of honesty, integrity, hard work, courage, diligence, perseverance, personal honor, and strong faith are unsurpassed. Here is the tale of a young man facing many trials in battle during the excitement of the Crusades. After hearing of the fall of the holy city of Jerusalem, King Richard the Lionheart decides to join the Third Crusade at the end of the twelfth century. This young Englishman follows King Richard to the Holy Land. The crusaders want to free the city from the clutches of the powerful Arab leader Saladin, who has conquered it. Cuthbert, a young follower of the Earl of Evesham, and his friend Cnut, join Richard in his quest. When it is time to return home to England, the hero must face a long and dangerous trip across Europe; they must deal with some vengeful Frenchmen, thwart a plot against the King's betrothed, escape pirate corsairs, survive a winter blizzard, and rescue the King! G.A. Henty was a prolific English novelist best known for his historical adventure stories that were popular in the late 19th century. Henty's heroes embody honesty, integrity, hard work, courage, diligence, perseverance, personal honor and strong Christian faith. Cuthbert embodies these characteristics perfectly. The Boy Knight features all of the classic elements of high adventure: pirates, sultans, a princess and a king; all within a backdrop supporting the value of virtue.


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An exciting new Illustrated ebook from the folks at Beebliome Books! The Boy Knight: A Tale of the Crusades is the tale of a young man facing many trials in battle during the excitement of the Crusades. The hero of the story, Cuthbert, is a young Englishman who follows King Richard to the Holy Land. The Boy Knight is one of the more exciting Henty adventures, and any love An exciting new Illustrated ebook from the folks at Beebliome Books! The Boy Knight: A Tale of the Crusades is the tale of a young man facing many trials in battle during the excitement of the Crusades. The hero of the story, Cuthbert, is a young Englishman who follows King Richard to the Holy Land. The Boy Knight is one of the more exciting Henty adventures, and any lover of Robin Hood will certainly enjoy this tale. Cuthbert's presence of mind and common sense, his loyalty, honesty, valor, and quick wits are all characteristics that make us and his comrades in the book admire and respect him. People learn by example, and the examples set by Henty's virtues of honesty, integrity, hard work, courage, diligence, perseverance, personal honor, and strong faith are unsurpassed. Here is the tale of a young man facing many trials in battle during the excitement of the Crusades. After hearing of the fall of the holy city of Jerusalem, King Richard the Lionheart decides to join the Third Crusade at the end of the twelfth century. This young Englishman follows King Richard to the Holy Land. The crusaders want to free the city from the clutches of the powerful Arab leader Saladin, who has conquered it. Cuthbert, a young follower of the Earl of Evesham, and his friend Cnut, join Richard in his quest. When it is time to return home to England, the hero must face a long and dangerous trip across Europe; they must deal with some vengeful Frenchmen, thwart a plot against the King's betrothed, escape pirate corsairs, survive a winter blizzard, and rescue the King! G.A. Henty was a prolific English novelist best known for his historical adventure stories that were popular in the late 19th century. Henty's heroes embody honesty, integrity, hard work, courage, diligence, perseverance, personal honor and strong Christian faith. Cuthbert embodies these characteristics perfectly. The Boy Knight features all of the classic elements of high adventure: pirates, sultans, a princess and a king; all within a backdrop supporting the value of virtue.

30 review for The Boy Knight (Historical Fiction for Teens: Illustrated Edition): A Tale of the Crusades

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lila Kims

    I didn't really care for the main character all that much, and I suppose I'm not in the mood for so much telling instead of showing, and I won't deny that I'm relieved to be finished. But even if I didn't like it all that much, I do respect this short book. The historical detail, though... :) Besides, Robin Hood made an appearance. He had no dialogue, and he was only there for about half a page, but... ROBIN HOOD. So yeah. That was the highlight of the book for me.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I read this years ago in my early teens. I still love this story.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    When this adventure begins, Cuthbert is a boy of fifteen living at home with his mother in Norman England. He hears information and is able to warn the outlaws living in the forest, among whom he has relatives, of an impending attack by the Earl of Evesham, who resents their killing his deer without permission. The forest men are reconciled to the Earl, however, when Cuthbert summons their help to rescue the Earl’s daughter from a kidnapping by a nearby vindictive Norman nobleman. After Cuthbert When this adventure begins, Cuthbert is a boy of fifteen living at home with his mother in Norman England. He hears information and is able to warn the outlaws living in the forest, among whom he has relatives, of an impending attack by the Earl of Evesham, who resents their killing his deer without permission. The forest men are reconciled to the Earl, however, when Cuthbert summons their help to rescue the Earl’s daughter from a kidnapping by a nearby vindictive Norman nobleman. After Cuthbert participates in the victorious siege of the latter’s castle, the Earl of Evesham, who is himself a distant relative of Cuthbert, promises to take him with him when he next rides off to battle. Neither had any idea that they would be going off to battle so soon. King Richard the Lionhearted was gathering troops to set off on another crusade, and Cuthbert gets to go along, and be a party to major historic events. He witnesses the French and British rivalry, rescues a princess, wins a duel, fights the Moorish pirates, is knighted for saving King Richard’s life in a battle, escapes Saracen captivity, visits with a Dead Sea hermit, and returns to Europe with King Richard. When the Earl of Evesham was mortally wounded, he begged the king that his estates, title and daughter would be granted to Cuthbert. After Cuthbert and his faithful men make their dangerous journey across the snowy Alps and hostile European cities with many narrow escapes, they find themselves rather unwelcome in England. There he leads a Robin Hood style life, and with Robin Hood, no less! They finally see that Cuthbert’s mother and fiancée are in safety, and Cuthbert goes with Blondel to discover the place of King Richard’s imprisonment, and arrange for his ransom. This is one of the more exciting Henty adventures, and any lover of Robin Hood will certainly enjoy this tale. Cuthbert’s presence of mind and common sense, his loyalty, honesty, valor, and quick wits are all characteristics that make us and his authorities in the book admire and respect him. If it were a movie, you would find yourself holding your breath, but by the time you’re halfway through the book, you will be confident that Cuthbert can extricate himself and his friends from any kind of sticky situation. Plus, there is plenty of history and background included, from geography and the baron wars of England, to rivalries on the Crusades, to lifestyles of the Middle East. Find a comfortable seat and enjoy!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Willis

    Winning His Spurs is an amazing book, detailing the life and adventures of a young Saxon/Norman page during the Third Crusade. Usual gallantry, adventure, and chivalry follow the antics of this very courageous and spirited young warrior. This was the book that first inspired me to write my own medieval series and was the book that made me keep trying to be a good writer - no matter what. For the most part, historical accuracy predominates the storyline. However, I did catch one or two questionabl Winning His Spurs is an amazing book, detailing the life and adventures of a young Saxon/Norman page during the Third Crusade. Usual gallantry, adventure, and chivalry follow the antics of this very courageous and spirited young warrior. This was the book that first inspired me to write my own medieval series and was the book that made me keep trying to be a good writer - no matter what. For the most part, historical accuracy predominates the storyline. However, I did catch one or two questionable factors, such as a twenty year old page. However, the few errors were very slight. I would consider this book one of the most historically accurate medieval tales available. I loved the storyline. Brave Sir Cuthbert, his lovely fiancee, his friend Cnut, Robin Hood, Prince John, and King Richard the Lionhearted made for an adventurous tale of heroism and war. Venture into the Holy Land and see for yourself the perils of the Third Crusade. Stand for King Richard and honor chivalry in the pages of this must-read! Highly recommended.

  5. 4 out of 5

    The Gatekeeper

    The thing I don't like about G.A. Henty is that he usually seems more interested in teaching history than in writing a good story. In The Dragon and the Raven, for example, he spends a lot more time talking about the battles between the British and Danish people than about the actual plot. For me, at least, that got a little boring. But Winning His Spurs is more balanced; there's still plenty of history, but it's mainly a series of fast-paced adventures in the life of Cuthbert, an exceptionally The thing I don't like about G.A. Henty is that he usually seems more interested in teaching history than in writing a good story. In The Dragon and the Raven, for example, he spends a lot more time talking about the battles between the British and Danish people than about the actual plot. For me, at least, that got a little boring. But Winning His Spurs is more balanced; there's still plenty of history, but it's mainly a series of fast-paced adventures in the life of Cuthbert, an exceptionally brave and resourceful young knight. It's a fun, exciting story that I really enjoyed reading. Owing to Henty's formal writing style, it wasn't as engrossing as The Brethren, my favorite book about the crusades, but Winning His Spurs is still worth checking out.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dani

    Read this aloud to the kids. We always enjoy reading Henty together; wonderful language, and great historical backgrounds. His books, if you read too many close together, definitely will start to sound alike; rather formulaic. Enjoyable nonetheless.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brittni

    I just do not like Henty

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jatosion

    its boring beyond beleif. Half life 3 will come out before i finish this book. i pick the book up and put it down instantly. in short its boring as watching to yaks waiting for there paint to dry on their fur.

  9. 5 out of 5

    John Yelverton

    G.A. Henty's book was weak on the history, and a little brief on the relay of events. It also felt like he was just copying the story of Robin Hood with the character Sir Cuthbert, until Robin Hood actually shows up. It's not a bad book, but Henty has written a lot better.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dianne

    Cuthbert, "...a lad of some fifteen years of age", finds himself in a series of incidents that demonstrate the strength of character that catches the eye of the nobles. Throughout the entire story, we see a young teenage boy develop into a mighty man of character, as he receives the trials and adventures which befall him on the journey of the Third Crusade in King Richard's army. The adventures allow the reader to glimpse into many facets of the history of the Third Crusade, and while no judgmen Cuthbert, "...a lad of some fifteen years of age", finds himself in a series of incidents that demonstrate the strength of character that catches the eye of the nobles. Throughout the entire story, we see a young teenage boy develop into a mighty man of character, as he receives the trials and adventures which befall him on the journey of the Third Crusade in King Richard's army. The adventures allow the reader to glimpse into many facets of the history of the Third Crusade, and while no judgment is made about the Crusade, one is able to see the circumstances and events which shaped its outcome. This book is captivating, exciting, and the reader will love the hero. In true Henty style, the hero depicts character qualities that young men can desire to model, because becoming a man of integrity is not bound by culture or time.

  11. 5 out of 5

    David Burchard

    Simple, in the Right Way This is my first foray into the writings of Henty, "With Lee in Virginia" being my intended next target. Henty is simple in style, and makes quite plain where the plot is going with transparent foreshadowing throughout. But Henty knows how to capture truth, goodness, and beauty. He knows substantive glory. He writes in "The Boy Knight" a tale like that of St. George and the Dragon. This book is a celebration of chivalry, loyalty, valor, and winning the woman upon much har Simple, in the Right Way This is my first foray into the writings of Henty, "With Lee in Virginia" being my intended next target. Henty is simple in style, and makes quite plain where the plot is going with transparent foreshadowing throughout. But Henty knows how to capture truth, goodness, and beauty. He knows substantive glory. He writes in "The Boy Knight" a tale like that of St. George and the Dragon. This book is a celebration of chivalry, loyalty, valor, and winning the woman upon much hard work. It is a tale to aid boys in becoming courageous men.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mark Zodda

    Enjoyable, Victorian-era romance that tells the story of a teenager who becomes a Crusader knight loved by all of his men because he cares for them and performs great feats of arms. That description is a bit tongue-in-cheek; in this telling, feudalism under King Richard was paternalistic and good for the people who would do anything for their beloved king. Still, as a historical romance and adventure, the hero saves the king, takes care of his men and saves the damsel who marries him. What more Enjoyable, Victorian-era romance that tells the story of a teenager who becomes a Crusader knight loved by all of his men because he cares for them and performs great feats of arms. That description is a bit tongue-in-cheek; in this telling, feudalism under King Richard was paternalistic and good for the people who would do anything for their beloved king. Still, as a historical romance and adventure, the hero saves the king, takes care of his men and saves the damsel who marries him. What more could you want?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patrick

    Well written book. The challenging vocabulary interweaves with the youthful adventure story perfectly for a kids book. There is lots of indirect (and some outright) reference to an assumed racial superiority of the English that is troubling. It sort of ruined the book for me but probably seemed normal at the time the book was written.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brianna Beckett

    I say: Give this book a second chance, I say read it, then read it again... my second time reading it I found it not as confusing as the first. The literature was good, but not great!! the story line was kinda confusing, but the second time I'm telling you, I understood it a LOT more!!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    The Best Loyalty and bravery wrapped in gripping battles and painful suspense The King of England and the crusades and the battle for Jerusalem

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amelia

    (This is a "critique" that I wrote as an assignment. I hope it's helpful! It was a good book, just as I said, but not one of my all time favorites...) Cuthbert, a young boy, aspiring knight, and prodigal page, begins his journey to win his spurs during the crusades and on the way grows to be a man and ultimately saves his country. Winning His Spurs: A Tale of the Crusades, first published in 1882 and written by G. A. Henty, is a historical adventure novel set during the Third Crusade. It follows (This is a "critique" that I wrote as an assignment. I hope it's helpful! It was a good book, just as I said, but not one of my all time favorites...) Cuthbert, a young boy, aspiring knight, and prodigal page, begins his journey to win his spurs during the crusades and on the way grows to be a man and ultimately saves his country. Winning His Spurs: A Tale of the Crusades, first published in 1882 and written by G. A. Henty, is a historical adventure novel set during the Third Crusade. It follows the travels of Cuthbert, from his home in the great forests near Evesham, England, to the Holy City of Jerusalem, and back again. Along the way he has many fantastical adventures, such as rescuing damsels in distress, meeting Robin Hood, fighting pirates, communing with a Dead Sea hermit, scaling the Alps fraught with avalanches and savage wolves, and becoming enslaved in Jerusalem, to name a few. The story is written in third person, so we go through the story with no internal access to Cuthbert’s thoughts. We know that he is brave, kind, and patriotic, but also brilliant, strategic, and, at fifteen years old, can beat basically anyone in one-on-one combat. This is a lot to say of a character, and in short he is a boy prodigy. The majority of the other characters are also similarly glorified, even Saladin and other disfavored historical figures, with the exception of various rivals of Cuthbert’s. This transcendence and lack of much character development causes the reader to be disconnected from the characters; Historical events, not an individual’s growth, are the focus of the book. The plot, so dependent on historical events and details, is crippled by these superficial, lionized characters. Cuthbert’s adventures, while not unbelievable by themselves, are cheapened by his extreme ‘luck’ and his ability to easily get out of the situation with no harm. Often, he was able to run away from his captors while they stand there stupefied, or sneak away while they sleep. This ridiculous escapade is similar to the Adventures of Tintin by Herge or the Swiss Family Robinson, leaving the reader exasperated with the repeatedly unbelievable turn of events(or in this case Cuthbert’s impeccable “sagacity”) that gets the him out whatever hopeless scrape he is in. But all that is lacking in the character department is made up for in the setting and the description thereof. For, historical detail and accuracy are something that the G. A. Henty is acclaimed for. His battle and military descriptions are interesting and understandable compared to the confusing jargon of other books, and his story is packed with accounts of medieval town culture and knight chivalry. You are immersed in the history of the Crusades, and every political and cultural anxiety are demonstrated in the plot, which is probably why Cuthbert’s exploits are so fantastical- Would a typical crusader experience all of these mishaps, and at the same time receive no more than a few cuts and a banged head or two? Probably not. But along the way the author shows us much more of the landscape and turmoil of the time than if he had followed the path of a typical crusader, which is the author’s goal. Overall the book was very good, an unpretentious adventure story aimed at young to teenage boys. The clear descriptions of medieval warfare and medieval life were robust, and so was the protagonist’s strong sense of piety, chivalry and bravery. A message of justice was very faintly present but not very noticeable. Winning His Spurs: A Tale of the Crusades was just that; A typical adventure story that was written for the sake of the adventure, not the story. In the end it was a good book, but it was lacking in some areas that prevented it from being a great one.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Skjam!

    G.A. Henty (1852-1902) was a writer of children’s historical fiction, who began his career as an author after a friend heard him telling bedtime stories to his kids. Like many Victorian authors, he’s out of favor these days, but my parents found this book at an estate sale. Cuthbert is fifteen when the story begins, a lad of mixed Norman and Saxon blood during the reign of Richard I (Richard the Lionheart.) This gives him ties to both his late father’s cousin, the Earl of Evesham, and his mother’ G.A. Henty (1852-1902) was a writer of children’s historical fiction, who began his career as an author after a friend heard him telling bedtime stories to his kids. Like many Victorian authors, he’s out of favor these days, but my parents found this book at an estate sale. Cuthbert is fifteen when the story begins, a lad of mixed Norman and Saxon blood during the reign of Richard I (Richard the Lionheart.) This gives him ties to both his late father’s cousin, the Earl of Evesham, and his mother’s relative, the landless freeman Cnut. Learning that the Earl plans to rid the forest of the landless men, Cuthbert warns them in time, then happily finds a way for the woodsmen to help save the Earl’s daughter from his real enemy, the Baron of Wortham. Recognized for his bravery and cleverness, Cuthbert is made the Earl’s squire when a Crusade is called. The noble (in the best sense of the word) lad is quickly noted by King Rchard, and soon becomes a knight. Alas, after many adventures the old Earl dies without a male heir, but before he goes convinces Richard to appoint Cuthbert the new Earl of Evesham and the betrothed of the old Earl’s lovely daughter. More adventures later, Cuthbert arrives back in England incognito, to discover that wicked Prince John has appointed one of his unpleasant cronies as Earl and betrothed. Now Cuthbert must defeat the false Earl, save the maiden and find the missing true king. With a little help from Robin Hood and Blondel, he accomplishes all this. The prose is rather stiff with an antiquated vocabulary–today’s children might get the impression that they’re reading a book for grown-ups. Those looking for deep characterization are likely to be disappointed. Cuthbert begins the story honest, kind, brave and clever, and remains so throughout. His primary character flaw is that he is, perhaps, just a little too boyishly fond of adventure. When not engaged in battle, even the lowliest of persons is formal of speech. This is not to say the work is free of moral ambiguity. It’s admitted that the Crusades had generally bad results in spite of their lofty purposes, the Muslims have valid reasons for opposing the Crusaders, and King Richard’s selfish actions are shown to have negative consequences even while he remains the great hero of the story. Parents reading this with their children may wish to discuss how easily religion can be used as an excuse for war, and the real history of the Crusades. This book can also be found under the title “Winning His Spurs.” It’s a good example of children’s literature of a bygone age, and with some caveats is suitable as a bedtime story even today. As it’s in the public domain, there have been some inexpensive reprints in recent years.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Seth

    I love a lot of G.A. Henty's works. This is one of my favorites, covering a period of time during the crusades. Though a bit stiff in style (Henty died in the early 1900s), the adventure is exciting, the romance palatable, and from what I've read in other sources, the history is relatively accurate. I would suggest this book to history lovers, readers of Verne, Hugo, Conan Doyle, or Turtledove--or someone looking for a good adventure book outside the spectrum of popular fiction.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Faith Bradham

    I read this for my Omnibus class and they give intros to each book we read. In their intro they say that Henty has the marvelous gift of writing historical fiction. Ummm, a lot of people have that gift, and Henty is definately not one of my favorites. His heroes are so incredibly perfect that they're annoying (kind of like Elsie Dinsmore) and his prose is a bit stiff.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I really liked this book. I haven't read it to the kids yet as I think the subject matter such that they need to be a bit older. It is well written and fast paced. The main character is someone you can really like and cheer for. Great historical context and would be a great addition to a study of the Crusades. Best used during the middle school/junior high years.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elise

    Henty books are always super informative and epic in scope. The language is challenging, especially to read aloud (which is how I have read 2 of the 3 Henty books on my shelf), but it's worth wading through the detail and the dated language to learn a slice of history very well. I consider Henty's books to be valuable reading/listening for my children.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Fun and very informative tale set in the time of King Richard, Robin Hood and his merry men. And in grand Henty fashion...where else can a young boy gain favor with the King of England, come up with cunning idea's in battle, come back from the war an earl at only 16, take back his castle from a villain, and marry the girl! ;)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chrystal

    I am learning that I am not a huge Henty fan. (I probably shouldn't have publicly admitted that) I love his desire to inspire young readers in bravery and honor and to teach them history while weaving a fictional thread through it. I just have a hard time following his style of writing. I'm glad I read it, but this may be my last Henty.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Henty's stories are always good, and this was no exception. This is the story of a boy who succeeds beyond his wildest imagination through hard work, determination, courage, and inventiveness. A great character building story written a century ago, but still applicable in its moral lessons.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    The setting and view of King Richard was kinda cool but the kid was like bleh and it was unrealistic. Robin Hood's guest appearance also made me happpy but other than that...it just wasnt fun to read. the adventures were kinda repetitive really.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Absolute Henty. Some of the stuff here is really good (Richard and John are loads of fun.) The ending got exciting and then fizzled. Perhaps the best thing about this book is the character arc of the sidekick.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Craig Herbertson

    Distinctly remember the bravery of the christian knights just before they were beheaded. In some cases this was of course true but Henty's world view was so steeped in militant Christianity I'm not sure I would swing with it now

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jimi

    Winnning His Spurs? I haven't read it, but "Winning his Spurs" is a famous quip about the Black PrinceFrom the 1346 Crecy Campaign. Nothing to do with the crusades!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This Henty book took longer to get into than the King Alfred one...overall, too fantastic for believability but a fun adventure book for a young male reader, the aim of Henty.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joe

    A devastatingly good read.

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