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The lifeblood of your business is repeat customers. But customers can be fickle, markets shift, and competitors are ruthless. So how do you ensure a steady flow of repeat business? The secret—no matter what industry you’re in—is finding and keeping automatic customers. These days virtually anything you need can be purchased through a subscription, with more convenience than The lifeblood of your business is repeat customers. But customers can be fickle, markets shift, and competitors are ruthless. So how do you ensure a steady flow of repeat business? The secret—no matter what industry you’re in—is finding and keeping automatic customers. These days virtually anything you need can be purchased through a subscription, with more convenience than ever before. Far beyond Spotify, Netflix, and New York Times subscriptions, you can sign up for weekly or monthly supplies of everything from groceries (AmazonFresh) to cosmetics (Birchbox) to razor blades (Dollar Shave Club). According to John Warrillow, this emerging subscription economy offers huge opportunities to companies that know how to turn customers into subscribers. Automatic customers are the key to increasing cash flow, igniting growth, and boosting the value of your company. Consider Whatsapp, the internet-based messaging service that was purchased by Facebook for $19 billion. While other services bombarded users with invasive ads in order to fund a free messaging platform, Whatsapp offered a refreshingly private tool on a subscription platform, charging just $1 per year. Their business model enabled the kind of service that customers wanted and ensured automatic customers for years to come. As Warrillow shows, subscriptions aren’t limited to technology or media businesses. Companies in nearly any industry, from start-ups to the Fortune 500, from home contractors to florists, can build subscriptions into their business. Warrillow provides the essential blueprint for winning automatic customers with one of the nine subscription business models, including: The Membership Website Model: Companies like The Wood Whisperer Guild, ContractorSelling.com, and DanceStudioOwner.com offer access to highly specialized, high quality information, recognizing that people will pay for good content. This model can work for any business with a tightly defined niche market and insider information. The Simplifier Model: Companies like Mosquito Squad (pest control) and Hassle Free Homes (home maintenance) take a recurring task off your to-do list. Any business serving busy consumers can adopt this model not only to create a recurring revenue stream, but also to take advantage of the opportunity to cross-sell or bundle their services. The Surprise Box Model: Companies like BarkBox (dog treats) and Standard Cocoa (craft chocolate) send their subscribers curated packages of goodies each month. If you can handle the logistics of shipping, giving customers joy in something new can translate to sales on your larger e-commerce site. This book also shows you how to master the psychology of selling subscriptions and how to reduce churn and provides a road map for the essential statistics you need to measure the health of your subscription business. Whether you want to transform your entire business into a recurring revenue engine or just pick up an extra 5 percent of sales growth, The Automatic Customer will be your secret weapon.


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The lifeblood of your business is repeat customers. But customers can be fickle, markets shift, and competitors are ruthless. So how do you ensure a steady flow of repeat business? The secret—no matter what industry you’re in—is finding and keeping automatic customers. These days virtually anything you need can be purchased through a subscription, with more convenience than The lifeblood of your business is repeat customers. But customers can be fickle, markets shift, and competitors are ruthless. So how do you ensure a steady flow of repeat business? The secret—no matter what industry you’re in—is finding and keeping automatic customers. These days virtually anything you need can be purchased through a subscription, with more convenience than ever before. Far beyond Spotify, Netflix, and New York Times subscriptions, you can sign up for weekly or monthly supplies of everything from groceries (AmazonFresh) to cosmetics (Birchbox) to razor blades (Dollar Shave Club). According to John Warrillow, this emerging subscription economy offers huge opportunities to companies that know how to turn customers into subscribers. Automatic customers are the key to increasing cash flow, igniting growth, and boosting the value of your company. Consider Whatsapp, the internet-based messaging service that was purchased by Facebook for $19 billion. While other services bombarded users with invasive ads in order to fund a free messaging platform, Whatsapp offered a refreshingly private tool on a subscription platform, charging just $1 per year. Their business model enabled the kind of service that customers wanted and ensured automatic customers for years to come. As Warrillow shows, subscriptions aren’t limited to technology or media businesses. Companies in nearly any industry, from start-ups to the Fortune 500, from home contractors to florists, can build subscriptions into their business. Warrillow provides the essential blueprint for winning automatic customers with one of the nine subscription business models, including: The Membership Website Model: Companies like The Wood Whisperer Guild, ContractorSelling.com, and DanceStudioOwner.com offer access to highly specialized, high quality information, recognizing that people will pay for good content. This model can work for any business with a tightly defined niche market and insider information. The Simplifier Model: Companies like Mosquito Squad (pest control) and Hassle Free Homes (home maintenance) take a recurring task off your to-do list. Any business serving busy consumers can adopt this model not only to create a recurring revenue stream, but also to take advantage of the opportunity to cross-sell or bundle their services. The Surprise Box Model: Companies like BarkBox (dog treats) and Standard Cocoa (craft chocolate) send their subscribers curated packages of goodies each month. If you can handle the logistics of shipping, giving customers joy in something new can translate to sales on your larger e-commerce site. This book also shows you how to master the psychology of selling subscriptions and how to reduce churn and provides a road map for the essential statistics you need to measure the health of your subscription business. Whether you want to transform your entire business into a recurring revenue engine or just pick up an extra 5 percent of sales growth, The Automatic Customer will be your secret weapon.

30 review for The Automatic Customer: Creating a Subscription Business in Any Industry

  1. 5 out of 5

    David Huff

    A helpful, well-organized and quick read about the many advantages (and a few challenges) of building a subscription based business. If, for instance, you are an Amazon Prime customer, that is a large scale and classic example of the subscription model. Netflix would be another. I have a professional service business, some aspects of which I'm planning to move to a subscription based format. This book gave some helpful insight for me, and also has sections that deal with product-based businesses, A helpful, well-organized and quick read about the many advantages (and a few challenges) of building a subscription based business. If, for instance, you are an Amazon Prime customer, that is a large scale and classic example of the subscription model. Netflix would be another. I have a professional service business, some aspects of which I'm planning to move to a subscription based format. This book gave some helpful insight for me, and also has sections that deal with product-based businesses, and seven additional types. If you'd like a quick, broad overview of starting or growing a subscription based business, I would recommend Warrillow's book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Oleksandr Golovatyi

    An interesting book on building a business selling through a subscription. As we have seen for a long time, the main giants are trying to sell not single products but services with a subscription, keeping buyers as long as possible. The book gives different examples for different industries and types of business. It was very interesting to read it, I recommend. -------------------------------- Интересная книжка по построению бизнеса продавая через подписку. Как мы давно уже видим основные гиганты An interesting book on building a business selling through a subscription. As we have seen for a long time, the main giants are trying to sell not single products but services with a subscription, keeping buyers as long as possible. The book gives different examples for different industries and types of business. It was very interesting to read it, I recommend. -------------------------------- Интересная книжка по построению бизнеса продавая через подписку. Как мы давно уже видим основные гиганты стараются продавать не одиночные продукты а сервисы с подпиской удерживая покупателей как можно на длительное время. В книжке приводятся разные примеры для разных отраслей и видов бизнеса. Было очень интересно читать ее, рекомендую. I read books on Scribd or Google Books by Readlax Chrome Extension

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    An excellent guide to creating a subscription business, packed with actionable insights backed by data and real-world examples. It has the right mix of theory and application. The examples include software companies (e.g., HubSpot, Basecamp, FreshBooks), services companies (e.g., Mosquito Squad, Hassle Free Home Services), and product companies (e.g., BirchBox, Blacksocks). I read this because I'm overhauling the WordPress website care plans (maintenance plans) offered by my web agency, OptimWise. An excellent guide to creating a subscription business, packed with actionable insights backed by data and real-world examples. It has the right mix of theory and application. The examples include software companies (e.g., HubSpot, Basecamp, FreshBooks), services companies (e.g., Mosquito Squad, Hassle Free Home Services), and product companies (e.g., BirchBox, Blacksocks). I read this because I'm overhauling the WordPress website care plans (maintenance plans) offered by my web agency, OptimWise. Notes Who Wins in the Subscription Economy? The act of subscribing spurs members to buy more frequently and from a broader array of categories. When you pay for an Amazon Prime membership, you want to buy from Amazon to get your money's worth. Why You Need Automatic Customers A subscription offering creates customers who interact with your company each month, and every touch point is an opportunity to sell more. A subscription service is more resilient to recession. In a recession, people may pause new purchases but remain subscribed (e.g., maintenance services). Membership Website Model People have realized that free info is often low quality, so they've become more willing to pay for membership sites containing quality info. The most financially successful membership sites focus on helping biz owners master a specific industry or skill. It can be difficult to make a good living from subscriptions alone, so offer adjacent products and services (e.g., events, coaching, courses). Front-of-the-Line Model Sell priority access to a subset of customers. E.g., Salesforce.com sells support plans with different response times. Software like Zendesk or Desk.com lets you auto-prioritize tickets from customers you specify. Simplifier Model Take 1 or more recurring tasks off customers' to-do lists. E.g., home maintenance, lawn care, bookkeeping. Interaction breeds familiarity, so when customer needs a big job that falls outside the typical service, they're more likely to ask you to do it rather than shopping around. Peace-of-Mind Model Offer insurance against something your customers hope they'll never need. E.g., home security, website uptime, online reputation management. This is different than simplifier model, in which you preemptively service customers. Here, you help only if customer needs it (like insurance). The New Math According to GAAP, a subscription is recognized on the P&L in equal installments over life of subscription. LTV (lifetime value) = MRR multiplied by # of months customer stays, minus cost of servicing them. To be viable over long term, must have LTV:CAC (customer acquisition cost) ratio of 3:1 or better. The most successful have 8:1. Churn = MRR at beginning of month divided by MRR lost in month, or # of customers lost in month divided by total customers at beginning of month. Acceptable churn varies greatly based on kind of biz. Cost of serving each new subscriber includes costs of your staff to onboard and serve customer over time, and is considered COGS. Margin = MRR - cost of serving. LTV:CAC = (MRR * margin) / churn. The Cash Suck vs. the Cash Spigot CAC is almost always higher than MRR, so it takes months to profit from a new subscriber. CAC payback period = total sales and marketing costs for month / new MRR added for month, or CAC payback period = (total sales and marketing costs for month) / (new MRR added for month * gross margin). Acceptable CAC payback period depends on how sticky customers are and how much they spend. Under 6 months is excellent; over 36 months is concerning. To get more cash up front, charge for the year in advance, or charge a setup or initiation fee. HubSpot disguises its setup fee as a "success training package." Charging up front can lengthen sales cycle and increase CAC. The Psychology of Selling a Subscription Give a big ROI. Think 10x the value of the alternative, not a 10% savings. Make a rational case for the convenience or reliability of your offering. You may want to make subscriptions the only option for buying what you sell, since most customers prefer to buy a la carte. This is especially important if you want to sell subscriptions to those already buying a la carte. If you offer both options, customers may feel you're not committed to the subscription offering, and may not take it seriously enough to try it. If your offering is hard to describe and customers have to use before they understand benefits, consider offering free or discounted trial. Scaling The more a subscriber uses your services, the less likely they are to churn. Insert your service into the daily life of the subscriber so they need to interact with it to perform their daily tasks, and can't ignore it. Onboarding must get subscriber to break old habits and insert your service into their daily lives. This must be done in 1st weeks (up to 90 days) after signing up. Give new subscriber a quick win or "wow" within 1st 90 days that's fun or motivational. Charging for a year up front locks in a year of renewals, gets cash up front, and prompts customer to make a bigger commitment to adopting your subscription into their daily lives, making them more likely to renew. Most subscription companies have found that charging for the year up front reduces churn. Over-communicate in 1st 90 days, then settle down. Sprinkle in spontaneous gifts. Use data gathered on subscriber to tailor gifts. Longer businesses churn less than smaller ones, because they're generally more stable and less price-sensitive. But larger businesses are harder to win, and the longer, more complex sales cycle increases CAC. Net churn = gross churn - upgrade revenue (getting existing customers to upgrade). Reduce logo churn (total loss of subscriber's company) by offering multiple subscriptions to same company.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Daniel DiPiazza

    Since Rich20 is actively developing a subscription-based monthly product, we want to pack as much value as possible. This book gets right to the point and delivers on the promise. Very good insights on the development of recurring business models over the last 10 years, what types of models work and how to keep people happy long-term. Quick read, too. Legit!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Samson Sunny

    This book talks about subscription based business model. Author gives so many examples on subscription based business companies and he is suggesting this is the good approach to run a business in current situation. WhatsApp, apple, amazon, Microsoft and many big companies already following this approach to maximise their profit. Amazon prime is a kind of subscription which makes the customers to buy more products in amazon and it stopping the customers to buy from other competitors. Author says This book talks about subscription based business model. Author gives so many examples on subscription based business companies and he is suggesting this is the good approach to run a business in current situation. WhatsApp, apple, amazon, Microsoft and many big companies already following this approach to maximise their profit. Amazon prime is a kind of subscription which makes the customers to buy more products in amazon and it stopping the customers to buy from other competitors. Author says companies have to give more preference to recurring customers than the one time customers. In recurring based business first allow the customers to trial the product for a month. Also in this business model customers will get more value over a period of time. With in 90 days make the customers to onboard in to your product. Other wise they will leave. Also this book gives suggestions on how to create a subscription based business for any kind of business and how to approach your customers. It's a good book to read

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jana

    I wasn't completely new to the benefits of subscription model businesses, but there were definitely good takeaways: - Explains 9 TYPES of subscription model businesses with examples - Explains how to adjust your metrics in order to accurately monitor your business performance. E.g measuring your business using the traditional P&L (profit and loss) statement is not a good indication of performance for subscription businesses; it is more appropriate to take your MRR (monthly recurring revenue) and p I wasn't completely new to the benefits of subscription model businesses, but there were definitely good takeaways: - Explains 9 TYPES of subscription model businesses with examples - Explains how to adjust your metrics in order to accurately monitor your business performance. E.g measuring your business using the traditional P&L (profit and loss) statement is not a good indication of performance for subscription businesses; it is more appropriate to take your MRR (monthly recurring revenue) and perform a LTV:CAC (lifetime value of a customer: customer acquisition) cost calculation and ensure it is above 3:1 Overall a good read!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Roustem Karimov

    Perfect timing I never thought that I would be interested in the subject but a few months ago we introduced 1Password Teams and 1Password Families service that helps businesses and families take control of their passwords. The reaction from our customers was all over the place, some of them loved the new service and some hated the idea of a subscription. It was great to read about other companies, similar challenges, and learn about new ideas and what to expect in the future.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shaw

    An introduction to the subscription business model with plenty of great ideas and examples for businesses already working in the subscription model. Short and sweet.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    An excellent book exploring the benefits of the subscription-based model over "sell/do" Here are the points I noted in my reader: * Amazon Prime membership was not about additional revenue, it was about changing people's mentality so they would not shop anywhere else. * Millennials value access over assets. Rent vs. Owning; Spotify vs. buying songs; Blinkist vs. Buying books. Therefore, the subscription model is relevant if millennials are your target audience. * "Customers want to express their ind An excellent book exploring the benefits of the subscription-based model over "sell/do" Here are the points I noted in my reader: * Amazon Prime membership was not about additional revenue, it was about changing people's mentality so they would not shop anywhere else. * Millennials value access over assets. Rent vs. Owning; Spotify vs. buying songs; Blinkist vs. Buying books. Therefore, the subscription model is relevant if millennials are your target audience. * "Customers want to express their individuality, and increasingly they are using subscriptions do that" That's why subscription boxes with unique items every month are received so well. * When you run a front-of-line subscription model (premium/faster support, for example), tell your customers that you prioritize them. Tell them how and why. Your customers will appreciate your transparency and perhaps even upgrade. Win/win. * Build your brand and guard your supply chain. "If customers see 'Dollar Shave Club' as just a middle hawking a commodity blade they can buy elsewhere, consumers will be inclined to price-shop competitors" * "It's human nature to wait until you absolutely need to act unless there is something you will miss out on by procrastinating". Therefore, sometimes you need to artificially stimulate the customer to act (limited time offer, premium feature, etc) Also, when your customer no longer needs your service/product to complete their daily tasks, they will quit. Make your service relevant and needed. * Provide the best possible product/service during the first 90 days. Statistics show that customers that stay subscribed for longer than 90 days, have a much lower Churn rate. However, when this phase is over - slow down. An analogy would be dating & excitement vs. relationship and commitment. *

  10. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    The author has much experience running businesses and converting his consulting business from a per-episode individualised one to a subscription-based one with generic research. So he knows his stuff. He strongly advocate running the subscription model of business because it allows you to plan and sleep at night. Rather than starting from zero income at the start of each month, the subscription model allows you to have recurring income so you would know how much manpower you will need 6 months d The author has much experience running businesses and converting his consulting business from a per-episode individualised one to a subscription-based one with generic research. So he knows his stuff. He strongly advocate running the subscription model of business because it allows you to plan and sleep at night. Rather than starting from zero income at the start of each month, the subscription model allows you to have recurring income so you would know how much manpower you will need 6 months down the line. He introduced different kinds of subscription business, for example the convenience one (automatic diaper/shaving blade), buffet-style one (Amazon Prime), peace of mind one (air-con/ swimming pool service), insurance type (roof fixing guarantee). He introduced new concepts to run a subscription business: monthly income, cost of acquiring new subscriber, lifetime income, churn (loss) rate, etc that will make an accountant proud. Oh and the most important: subscriber businesses are considered to worth more in the sale of businesses. An excellent read.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eszter Pálmai

    I abandoned the book halfway in because I found it way too long-winded. I also didn't see much of a point of separating subscription models based on which need of the customers they satisfy. Some simplify their lives, others give them the chance to discover something they like, also others give exclusive access to a very scarce resource. Obviously different products / services serve the customers in different ways, and while it can be useful to learn ablut some common variations of subscription I abandoned the book halfway in because I found it way too long-winded. I also didn't see much of a point of separating subscription models based on which need of the customers they satisfy. Some simplify their lives, others give them the chance to discover something they like, also others give exclusive access to a very scarce resource. Obviously different products / services serve the customers in different ways, and while it can be useful to learn ablut some common variations of subscription businesses, in the end there are as many different types of them as many different and creative entrepeneurs who manage to discover demand no one has served before. For me this was a way too long book containing way too few ideas, diluted with long anecdotes that illustrate simple and self-explaining categories. I liked Built to Sell from this author many times more, and hoped this book would be similarly well-written and insightful. It was not.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Elli Izō

    A 4.5/5 read, actually. Warrillow sprinkled in just about enough evidence and studies to make a strong case for his points. Not too dissimilar to Ask (R. Levesque), this one sure stood out as a solid package filled with highly constructive advice. I couldn't quite manage to put it down and the only times I did, I was drafting pricing strategies and other formulae just to test out some ideas sparked by the author. I'd recommend it to anyone currently active in the e-commerce space for its valuabl A 4.5/5 read, actually. Warrillow sprinkled in just about enough evidence and studies to make a strong case for his points. Not too dissimilar to Ask (R. Levesque), this one sure stood out as a solid package filled with highly constructive advice. I couldn't quite manage to put it down and the only times I did, I was drafting pricing strategies and other formulae just to test out some ideas sparked by the author. I'd recommend it to anyone currently active in the e-commerce space for its valuable info/reasoning/proven ideas on optimising recurring revenues as well as minimising stresses relating to typical operations of businesses online.

  13. 4 out of 5

    LeikHong Leow

    This is indeed one of the best read this year. It gave me many great ideas on how I can turn my business into a subscription-based and generating monthly recurring revenue. In the book, Warrillow shared many great examples from the existing company that is subscription/membership business model. Giving you a clear path on which model would suit you the best. Apart from the success stories, the book also shared some of the difficulties you might face should you decided to go into such business mod This is indeed one of the best read this year. It gave me many great ideas on how I can turn my business into a subscription-based and generating monthly recurring revenue. In the book, Warrillow shared many great examples from the existing company that is subscription/membership business model. Giving you a clear path on which model would suit you the best. Apart from the success stories, the book also shared some of the difficulties you might face should you decided to go into such business model and the suggestion on how you could overcome them. Highly recommended for the business owner who likes to improve and make an adjustment to their business and revenue model.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Harpham

    Simply an excellent book! If you've ever looked at businesses like Netflix and wondered "how can I have that kind of recurring business model?," this is the book for you. I liked how the author fully explored a variety of business models for a subscription style business and fleshed out each model with actual companies practicing that model. I was mainly interested in tech and online businesses but found it interesting to see how traditional businesses (e.g. home maintenance services) can be tra Simply an excellent book! If you've ever looked at businesses like Netflix and wondered "how can I have that kind of recurring business model?," this is the book for you. I liked how the author fully explored a variety of business models for a subscription style business and fleshed out each model with actual companies practicing that model. I was mainly interested in tech and online businesses but found it interesting to see how traditional businesses (e.g. home maintenance services) can be transformed with this process. The author is to be commended for a rare combination of personal expertise and solid research covering a variety of models.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ronald J.

    A good complement book to Subscribed, about implementing a subscription business model in your business. Warrillow builds a good case for why subscribers are more valuable than one-time customers, and offers 9 subscription models for your consideration. He also explains the new accounting required, as well as how to evaluate a subscription business to know when to step on the gas vs. retreating and tweaking. I liked his chapter on the psychology of selling a subscription and also the one on idea A good complement book to Subscribed, about implementing a subscription business model in your business. Warrillow builds a good case for why subscribers are more valuable than one-time customers, and offers 9 subscription models for your consideration. He also explains the new accounting required, as well as how to evaluate a subscription business to know when to step on the gas vs. retreating and tweaking. I liked his chapter on the psychology of selling a subscription and also the one on ideas to reduce the churn rate, which can be a killer in this model. if you're interested in this model, this is a good resource to have and think about.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Szymon Kulec

    Engaging, short and to the point. If you're thinking about starting SaaS, a premium club or just considering moving to a subscription model this is the book. I wish I knew it before I had spent a lot of time on reading various blog posts about this topic. And to be clear: they are not bad at all. This is about this books: it's just great! Divided in a few parts, describes both strategies and the mechanics behind the subscription model. Shows in a really simple way what Customer Lifetime Value and Engaging, short and to the point. If you're thinking about starting SaaS, a premium club or just considering moving to a subscription model this is the book. I wish I knew it before I had spent a lot of time on reading various blog posts about this topic. And to be clear: they are not bad at all. This is about this books: it's just great! Divided in a few parts, describes both strategies and the mechanics behind the subscription model. Shows in a really simple way what Customer Lifetime Value and Customer Acquisition Cost interact. Provides 9 strong examples how to apply subscriptions. Highly recommended for people wanting to start this journey.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shubham Bansal

    Sometimes it does not make sense to write a 200-page book when you can concise the same learning in 15-20 min long read blog. Many business books try to provide a theory but they are nothing more than correlations carved out by studying some case studies. The problem with such correlations is that they don't apply universally as they don't delve into the core principles. This book was of that type. A good blog could have been enough. Nevertheless, the case made for subscription-based business ag Sometimes it does not make sense to write a 200-page book when you can concise the same learning in 15-20 min long read blog. Many business books try to provide a theory but they are nothing more than correlations carved out by studying some case studies. The problem with such correlations is that they don't apply universally as they don't delve into the core principles. This book was of that type. A good blog could have been enough. Nevertheless, the case made for subscription-based business against one-shot business is pretty strong.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Stark

    A wealth of great ideas Fabulous book! Both high level and detailed. John gets into the nuts and bolts of the math, but also the big picture and psychology of switching from a "sell and do" model to an "automatic customer" subscription model. Interestingly, about half of the book did not apply to my business but in spite of that fact, the examples gave me about a half a dozen ideas for subscriptions that I could offer in my business. A must read for any small business owner in any industry. A wealth of great ideas Fabulous book! Both high level and detailed. John gets into the nuts and bolts of the math, but also the big picture and psychology of switching from a "sell and do" model to an "automatic customer" subscription model. Interestingly, about half of the book did not apply to my business but in spite of that fact, the examples gave me about a half a dozen ideas for subscriptions that I could offer in my business. A must read for any small business owner in any industry.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mike Ncube

    Impressive book with many good ideas on how to implement a subscription model in any business. Having read it I can see the possibilities in my business, but the implementation will not be easy. I believe this book is a good introduction on how to get started but a lot more research will be required to get it implemented. I particularly like the LTV:CAC model the author suggests to assess the viability of the subscription model - and later sellability of the business.

  20. 4 out of 5

    John Stepper

    I've read a few books on subscription business models (Subscribe by Tien Tzuo being the best), and this book complements it extremely well. I found the nine different kinds of subscription business models to be an excellent framework as both an analysis tool and also as a way to pick and choose elements to create my own model. I've read a few books on subscription business models (Subscribe by Tien Tzuo being the best), and this book complements it extremely well. I found the nine different kinds of subscription business models to be an excellent framework as both an analysis tool and also as a way to pick and choose elements to create my own model.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Richard Mulholland

    The first two thirds of the book was a ** at best, the last third was a ****. I'm not sure I'd recommend reading the whole thing. if you have an idea of your subscription type, which you probably would have, the read then non-breakable stuff at the end. The first two thirds of the book was a ** at best, the last third was a ****. I'm not sure I'd recommend reading the whole thing. if you have an idea of your subscription type, which you probably would have, the read then non-breakable stuff at the end.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Arturo Hernández

    General review of the origins, main features, possible flaws, details and potential of the subscription business model. It’s a short read but it points out key elements of the system. Will definitely come back to follow-up on some of those highlights.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mike Lander

    Highly recommended It's a fantastic read for anyone looking to move towards a more sustainable and less stressful business model. Great examples to illustrate key points and all the metrics you'll need to put theory into practice. Highly recommended It's a fantastic read for anyone looking to move towards a more sustainable and less stressful business model. Great examples to illustrate key points and all the metrics you'll need to put theory into practice.

  24. 5 out of 5

    André Barnes

    Good read discussing subscription businesses that got better as you mover along. Helpful ideas to potentially implement and evaluate if you are thinking about subscription based busunesses and predictable cash flow. Good examples as well.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Arseniy Gushin

    I would cut the first 2/3 of the text. The third part is nice, but still way too generic. It's not something you expect from subscription business guru. I would cut the first 2/3 of the text. The third part is nice, but still way too generic. It's not something you expect from subscription business guru.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nguyen Ly

    Clarity of models, useful before starting a subscription business

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rodney

    enjoyed this easy read. provides good food for thought on how to build a recurring revenue biz.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Derek Jackson

    Great insights into subscription based businesses.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Drew

    Excellent topic. Crisp writing. Highly recommended for anyone looking to build a valuable business.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Scott Couchenour

    Need to read this again. Things have changed since I read it before.

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