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Last Stop on Market Street

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Une balade en bus prétexte à une belle relation entre une grand-mère et son petit-fils, pour prendre la vie du bon côté et changer son regard sur le monde.Chaque dimanche, Tim et sa mamie traversent la ville en bus, jusqu’au terminus. Mais aujourd’hui, Tim traîne des pieds. Pourquoi doit-il attendre le bus sous la pluie, pourquoi toujours aller là-bas ? Pourquoi ce monsieu Une balade en bus prétexte à une belle relation entre une grand-mère et son petit-fils, pour prendre la vie du bon côté et changer son regard sur le monde.Chaque dimanche, Tim et sa mamie traversent la ville en bus, jusqu’au terminus. Mais aujourd’hui, Tim traîne des pieds. Pourquoi doit-il attendre le bus sous la pluie, pourquoi toujours aller là-bas ? Pourquoi ce monsieur aux lunettes noires ne peut-il pas voir comme tout le monde ? Pourquoi, pourquoi, pourquoi... Au fil du voyage, sa mamie répond avec humour et bon sens aux questions incessantes de son petit-fils, lui ouvrant les yeux sur le monde qui l’entoure, trouvant toujours quelque chose de beau là où Tim n’aurait pas pensé chercher. Arrivé à destination – la soupe populaire d’un quartier de la ville, où sa grand-mère est bénévole –, Tim se réconcilie avec lui-même : qu’il est bon de retrouver les habitués, de se sentir utile, d’être capable de donner…


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Une balade en bus prétexte à une belle relation entre une grand-mère et son petit-fils, pour prendre la vie du bon côté et changer son regard sur le monde.Chaque dimanche, Tim et sa mamie traversent la ville en bus, jusqu’au terminus. Mais aujourd’hui, Tim traîne des pieds. Pourquoi doit-il attendre le bus sous la pluie, pourquoi toujours aller là-bas ? Pourquoi ce monsieu Une balade en bus prétexte à une belle relation entre une grand-mère et son petit-fils, pour prendre la vie du bon côté et changer son regard sur le monde.Chaque dimanche, Tim et sa mamie traversent la ville en bus, jusqu’au terminus. Mais aujourd’hui, Tim traîne des pieds. Pourquoi doit-il attendre le bus sous la pluie, pourquoi toujours aller là-bas ? Pourquoi ce monsieur aux lunettes noires ne peut-il pas voir comme tout le monde ? Pourquoi, pourquoi, pourquoi... Au fil du voyage, sa mamie répond avec humour et bon sens aux questions incessantes de son petit-fils, lui ouvrant les yeux sur le monde qui l’entoure, trouvant toujours quelque chose de beau là où Tim n’aurait pas pensé chercher. Arrivé à destination – la soupe populaire d’un quartier de la ville, où sa grand-mère est bénévole –, Tim se réconcilie avec lui-même : qu’il est bon de retrouver les habitués, de se sentir utile, d’être capable de donner…

30 review for Last Stop on Market Street

  1. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    So--I should be honest and say that this review isn't really about this book as much as it is about my disappointment in the Newbery committee's decision. This is a nice picture book, and it represents all of the underrepresented groups that we're all looking to see in literature for kids. It's a sweet, earnest thing. Maybe a little didactic for my taste. The book takes on a big, difficult idea. And it handles it pretty nicely. For a picture book. For four-year-olds. Up to eight, if you go by th So--I should be honest and say that this review isn't really about this book as much as it is about my disappointment in the Newbery committee's decision. This is a nice picture book, and it represents all of the underrepresented groups that we're all looking to see in literature for kids. It's a sweet, earnest thing. Maybe a little didactic for my taste. The book takes on a big, difficult idea. And it handles it pretty nicely. For a picture book. For four-year-olds. Up to eight, if you go by the publisher's marketing materials. I am a huge believer in the importance of picture books, and for the great ones I don't think there's any limit to the top of the age range. I'm not prepared to go that far for this one. But REALLY, Newbery committee? Really? The most distinguished contribution to literature for children out of all the books of 2015 (ok, subject to residency requirements, etc.)? If we want to investigate ideas of community and diversity--if we want to find beauty in our surroundings no matter the difficulties we have to overcome--certainly we can allow more attention than a picture book affords. And textual complexity, maybe? While the Caldecott for Hugo Cabret was a surprise that made sense to me, this book just doesn't do what I need a Newbery book to do. It doesn't challenge readers to engage with characters or ideas in a profound or extended way. Obviously this is all only my opinion, but it seems to me that the committee missed an opportunity here.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    "Nana, how come we don't got a car?" "Boy, what do we need a car for? We got a bus that breathes fire, and old Mr. Dennis, who always has a trick for you." This book is about a black little boy and his grandmother who live in The City. WHAT I LIKED: - A children's book with a black MC that isn't all *puts on a serious voice* "This is an important message." - A boy and his grandmother spending time together as if this is a normal, everyday thing. That's sweet. You don't get the idea that grandma is "Nana, how come we don't got a car?" "Boy, what do we need a car for? We got a bus that breathes fire, and old Mr. Dennis, who always has a trick for you." This book is about a black little boy and his grandmother who live in The City. WHAT I LIKED: - A children's book with a black MC that isn't all *puts on a serious voice* "This is an important message." - A boy and his grandmother spending time together as if this is a normal, everyday thing. That's sweet. You don't get the idea that grandma is "babysitting," instead, you get the idea that she and CJ regularly spend days together. - The diversity. It's the city and you can really tell. You meet all kinds of people in these pages. Old, young, tattooed, blind, in a wheelchair, black, brown, white, different body types, etc. The illustrations of the tattooed man are pretty impressive. - Anti-materialism and discipline. The old woman is tough - but loving - with her grandson. She makes him go to church. She makes sure he smiles at the other people on the bus and says "Good afternoon" to them. She looks at the coin in his hand meaningfully so that he'll drop it into the hat of a guitar player. CJ asks, "How come we gotta wait for the bus in all this wet?" And his grandma reminds him that trees need water, too. You've read the opening quote where she explains why they don't need a car - it's not a matter of 'not having' it's a matter of 'not needing.' He's full of questions. "How come that man can't see?" "Boy, what do you know about seeing?" Nana told him. "Some people watch the world with their ears." "That's a fact. Their noses, too," the man said, sniffing at the air. "That's a mighty fine perfume you're wearing today, ma'am." Nana squeezed the man's hand and laughed her deep laugh. Wow, Grandma is flirting!!!! LOL What about when CJ sees some teenagers listening to an iPod. "Sure wish I had one of those," he said. Nana set down her knitting. "What for? You got the real live thing sitting across from you." She says, indicating the guitar-player. Other questions arise. "How come it's always so dirty over here?" CJ questions when they reach their destination, (view spoiler)[a soup kitchen. (hide spoiler)] She smiled and pointed to the sky. "Sometimes when you're surrounded by dirt, CJ, you're a better witness for what's beautiful." WHAT I DIDN'T LIKE: - I would have been smacked quickly corrected if I ever said stuff like "how come we don't got a car?" "How come we don't HAVE a car!" my mother would have scowled. "How come we always gotta go here after church?" "How come we always HAVE TO go here after church," My father would have quickly interjected. - Some parts of this book are just cheesy. Like when the guitar-player starts playing music and the blind man leans over to grandma and says "To feel the magic of music," the blind man whispered, "I like to close my eyes." Nana closed hers, too. Oh, please, spare me. *rolls eyes* Then we get ...the rhythm lifted CJ out of the bus, out of the busy city. He saw sunset colors swirling over crashing waves.... Blah blah blah. Too cheesy and cutesy for me. ... Tl;dr - This book could be a great tool without being preachy. Tattoos, blindness, disability, poverty, the world isn't fair, social injustice, and charity are all talking points here. But they don't have to be! I'm against making "reading with kids" into "this is a lesson." I'd much rather wait for the child to ask me "What's a soup kitchen?" "Why has that man drawn pictures all over himself?" etc. etc. They are obviously not a rich family, but they are on their way to help people who are even poorer than they are. This would be a great book for families (Catholic or otherwise) who are trying to instill an idea of charity within their children. Ages 3-6 Not available in Spanish.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lizzie

    Things I love about this book 1) So many wonderful child friendly moments (raindrops on your nose, older kids with nicer stuff than you) 2) It is set in a diverse neighborhood and city that could be ANY city 3) It is sweet, slow and poetic 4) Vibrant, saturated Keats-like illustrations 5) An awesome grandmother - stylish, thoughtful, and full of love. 6) This would be a great book for a religious setting, since it could be seen that it is Grandmother is motivated by her faith to help other in her com Things I love about this book 1) So many wonderful child friendly moments (raindrops on your nose, older kids with nicer stuff than you) 2) It is set in a diverse neighborhood and city that could be ANY city 3) It is sweet, slow and poetic 4) Vibrant, saturated Keats-like illustrations 5) An awesome grandmother - stylish, thoughtful, and full of love. 6) This would be a great book for a religious setting, since it could be seen that it is Grandmother is motivated by her faith to help other in her community. BUT it totally does not have to be read like that either. 7) What a great pairing of author and illustrator.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tatiana

    A bit to didactic for my taste, but it is undeniably a great tool to encourage many conversations with your child about how diverse people are. My son was endlessly fascinated by the guy covered in tattoos.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael Fitzgerald

    A lame, ridiculous tale of rose-colored glasses. Look, kid, you are absolutely right. You do live in a dump. If you want to get out of there and find something better, you can. Start by not listening to the platitudes. Go out and find the truth. Hang out with people who will correct your double negatives and your "how come we don't got a car" kind of talk. Pick up some of that trash that is lying on the ground instead of just walking on by. A lame, ridiculous tale of rose-colored glasses. Look, kid, you are absolutely right. You do live in a dump. If you want to get out of there and find something better, you can. Start by not listening to the platitudes. Go out and find the truth. Hang out with people who will correct your double negatives and your "how come we don't got a car" kind of talk. Pick up some of that trash that is lying on the ground instead of just walking on by.

  6. 5 out of 5

    La Coccinelle

    Nope. This was a definite miss for me. I can't believe it won the Newbery! I have a feeling that much of this book's premise and intent would go right over kids' heads. Especially when it starts waxing poetic about sunsets and colours and the kid having some sort of eargasm from listening to music on the bus. He's little enough to have to hold his grandmother's hand; the sophistication of his reaction to music probably extends to, "I liked it." I also couldn't stand Nana. She's basically a virtue- Nope. This was a definite miss for me. I can't believe it won the Newbery! I have a feeling that much of this book's premise and intent would go right over kids' heads. Especially when it starts waxing poetic about sunsets and colours and the kid having some sort of eargasm from listening to music on the bus. He's little enough to have to hold his grandmother's hand; the sophistication of his reaction to music probably extends to, "I liked it." I also couldn't stand Nana. She's basically a virtue-signalling harpy. When the kid asks why a blind man can't see, she gives him some airy-fairy answer about how he sees with his other senses (when the kid probably just wanted to know why his eyes didn't work the way his did). When the kid says he wishes he had an iPod like the other boys on the bus, Nana tells him to impose on the guy holding a guitar. How does she know the guy is okay playing in front of strangers? Maybe he's just trying to get from Point A to Point B without being harassed by an old woman with a sense of entitlement. Sure, in this case, the guy starts playing voluntarily... but then Nana gives the kid a look and he feels he has to give away the coin the bus driver gave him. I bet Nana's the sort of person who'll throw him a birthday party and then make him donate all his presents to charity. Maybe I'm too cynical for this. Or maybe I just don't like books that try way too hard to look like they're promoting virtuous behaviour. Oh, and the illustrations are also terrible. So, there's that.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Beautiful. Profound. Colorful. And Alive! This book…this book is poetry! I loved it! Last Stop on Market Street tells the story of a little boy, CJ, and his Nana riding the bus. We meet and experience personalities, sounds, and smells right along with CJ and his grandmother. We see the world out the window, on the bus, and in the people we meet. From raindrops to music to butterflies to graffiti, CJ asks and wonders about it all as he makes his way through the city. “Why” this? and “How come” that Beautiful. Profound. Colorful. And Alive! This book…this book is poetry! I loved it! Last Stop on Market Street tells the story of a little boy, CJ, and his Nana riding the bus. We meet and experience personalities, sounds, and smells right along with CJ and his grandmother. We see the world out the window, on the bus, and in the people we meet. From raindrops to music to butterflies to graffiti, CJ asks and wonders about it all as he makes his way through the city. “Why” this? and “How come” that? And his Nana has an answer –perfect answers filled with compassion and grace and love every time. Pure love! ”How come it’s always so dirty over here?” She smiled and pointed to the sky. “Sometimes when you’re surrounded by dirt, CJ, you’re a better witness for what’s beautiful.” These words and pictures are a celebration of life’s little gems. Simple pleasures and wonders are captured in colorful pictures and lively words. Words that bring the bus ride to life. The bus “sighed” and “sagged” and “lurched”. CJ skipped, ducked and looked. Really looked and listened! And you will too! This beautiful story will inspire you to look and listen to the people and places around you. To find the beauty around you. Never forget to look for the wonder and beauty in you, in the people around you, and the world. I needed a reminder actually. Highly recommended.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lu Benke

    It no longer surprises me when I am not excited by the books that receive the prestigious Newbery and Caldecott Awards. I am not excited by Last Stop on Market Street--the 2016 Newbery Winner and Caldecott Honor book as well. The illustrations are interesting but I found them predictable. The storyline is sweet and with a great message--you don't have to be rich with money to be rich in other ways. We can use more titles that show how being poor isn't only about pain and suffering, but can be ab It no longer surprises me when I am not excited by the books that receive the prestigious Newbery and Caldecott Awards. I am not excited by Last Stop on Market Street--the 2016 Newbery Winner and Caldecott Honor book as well. The illustrations are interesting but I found them predictable. The storyline is sweet and with a great message--you don't have to be rich with money to be rich in other ways. We can use more titles that show how being poor isn't only about pain and suffering, but can be about living life to the fullest. Beyond that, I don't have much to say in support. And, aren't these two awards supposed to be about books chock full of things to get excited about?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    I have indeed much enjoyed the back and forth dialogue between young CJ and his grandmother. And unlike readers who have been faulting Matt de la Pena for penning their conversations in a non standard American vernacular, as a linguist, I do much appreciate the representation of language as primarily oral and thus and yes not as universally standardised, as this does not only add both colour and authenticity to the narrative of Last Stop on Market Street, but more importantly, it also underlines I have indeed much enjoyed the back and forth dialogue between young CJ and his grandmother. And unlike readers who have been faulting Matt de la Pena for penning their conversations in a non standard American vernacular, as a linguist, I do much appreciate the representation of language as primarily oral and thus and yes not as universally standardised, as this does not only add both colour and authenticity to the narrative of Last Stop on Market Street, but more importantly, it also underlines that ALL language (except perhaps certain artificially created lingoes such as Esperanto) originally were and generally still are dialects of multiple variation and that it is in fact these dialects, these oral vernaculars that both enable, that cause language change, language development and evolution, and NOT what is generally considered the written norm (in other words, without the various parlances of the people(s), there would also not be for example standard written English, German, French, Italian, Spanish etc.). But while I have definitely enjoyed the general narrational set-up of Last Stop on Market Street and do appreciate CJ's grandmother pointing out the many positives of his obviously inner city neighbourhood, and that being friendly, having a social conscience (with the two of them taking a bus after church to volunteer at a local soup kitchen) are generally more important and essential than material wealth such as owning vehicles, iPods and the like, I also tend to think that the grandmother is at times just a bit too insistent on knowing one's "place" in society and not striving to achieve more. Because while I do happen to agree with the message that too much materialism is not all that inherently wonderful, the grandmother's attitude seems to almost suggest that CJ should not even dare to wish that his family had a car, that wanting, that desiring an iPod is somehow even very much wrong in and of itself. And with that salient latter fact in mind, I do (and my general enjoyment of the textual presentation of Last Stop on Market Street quite notwithstanding) kind of fault Matt de la Pena for verbally hitting us readers over our collective heads with his ideals of anti-materialism, of seeing beauty even in run-down communities and neighbourhoods, of promoting social responsibility (I mean, these are ALL philosophies with which I happen to most heartily and even very much adamantly AGREE, but the lack of displayed subtlety and textual nuances does really bother me a bit, as it kind of makes me feel as though I am reading a sermon). And is a somewhat preachy sermon on the evils of materialism and that one needs to see beauty everywhere, that being socially aware and conscious is a positive, truly worth the 2016 Newbery Medal for Last Stop on Market Street? Now with regard to Christian Robinson's accompanying illustrations (which also won a 2016 Caldecott Honour designation for Last Stop on Market Street), while I do absolutely adore and love the colours used, and how the city in both its positives and negatives is generally so vibrantly and emotionally, glowingly depicted, I do find the presented human figures a bit too one-dimensional and emotionally stagnant, a bit too cartoony for my personal tastes. However and that all being said, Robinson's pictorial renderings do work very well with Matt de la Pena's narrative, both reflecting and at times expanding on the latter's printed words (and I can thus much understand how many have found Last Stop on Market Street a successful and wonderful combination of text and images, although I for one do personally rather wish that Christian Robinson's illustrations were a trifle less naive and move detailed, more rounded and expansive in visual scope). And sorry, I did and do find that white head covering CJ's grandmother is wearing a trifle strange and distracting, as it almost feels as though it has been added by the illustrator as somewhat of an after-thought (it just feels a bit artificial and superimposed, and if that white headdress is supposed to actually represent the grandmother's hair, well to my eyes, it sure does not really look like hair).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    In the two weeks since the ALA Awards were announced, one very special picture book has suddenly found itself showered with accolades and thrust in the center of attention. This book, which was somewhat overshadowed in the past year, received not only a Caldecott Honor, but - much to the surprise and even shock of many kid lit enthusiasts - the highly coveted 2016 Newbery Medal as well. The book to cause such a stir is Last Stop on Market Street. Written by Matt De La Pena and illustrated by Ch In the two weeks since the ALA Awards were announced, one very special picture book has suddenly found itself showered with accolades and thrust in the center of attention. This book, which was somewhat overshadowed in the past year, received not only a Caldecott Honor, but - much to the surprise and even shock of many kid lit enthusiasts - the highly coveted 2016 Newbery Medal as well. The book to cause such a stir is Last Stop on Market Street. Written by Matt De La Pena and illustrated by Christian Robinson, this book was nationally recognized for its story content along with the illustrations, and, after a thoughtful read, it's not difficult to understand why. It is no surprise that this book was acknowledged and hailed for its art. Christian Robinson, who was once again given the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor this year along with the Caldecott Honor, has certainly made a name for himself recently in the world of children's literature. Robinson's distinctive and expressive art has been celebrated in the award-winning books Gaston and Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker. Here he applies his stylistic illustrations once again to complement and enhance the story of CJ, his bus ride across the city, and his diverse interactions along the way. True to Robinson's approach, while the illustrations as a whole are rather simple, the attention to detail is incredible. Children reading this book will be able to relate to the sheer ordinariness that they themselves experience every day in their own daily routines. From the street signage to the handheld devices, CJ's world is very obviously the world of today. The vibrant colors and appealing textures are also worth pointing out. With just a few strokes of his brush, Robinson creates a world that is beautiful and very much believable. Perhaps what makes this book so special is the fact that the words and the story itself are as high quality as the wonderful art. Much like the illustrations, the story appears simple at first glance. It takes a second or third reading to truly discover the depth of meaning being conveyed here. To begin with, the language is magnificent. There is an almost musical pulse to the words when spoken aloud. In fact, some of the lines unexpectedly rhyme and many phrases are incredibly sensory: "Crumbling sidewalks and broken-down doors, graffiti-tagged windows and boarded-up stores" and "The outside air smelled like freedom, but it also smelled like rain." These perfectly chosen words by De La Pena paint pictures in the mind that are as vivid as Robinson's illustrations. Upon initially hearing the premise, one might be immediately reminded of another Caldecott Honor book. After all, this story is also about a young boy, his "nana", and their experience in the city. And yet, that is where the similarities end. Last Stop has its own story to tell, and it is certainly distinct from what has already been done. Here, we follow CJ along for the ride as he discovers the simple joys of living, the gift of giving to others, and the beauty that is found in human interactions. The book's title is a fitting one, as the majority of the story takes place for the duration of a bus ride across the city. It is not until the last two pages that we actually realize where CJ and his grandmother are going, but by then, we - like CJ - have already been reminded about the things in life that are truly important. Nana is an incredible character, and readers just might find that her gentle rebukes to her grandson resound with them as well. She is obviously not wealthy (they don't have a car and CJ points out things that he wishes he could have), but she teaches her grandson to appreciate ordinary beauty, to experience the communal nature of music, and to understand the importance of service to others. Matt De La Pena says he drew inspiration for this story from his own upbringing. "You can feel like you've been slighted if you're growing up without, if you have less money," he's commented, "or you can see the beauty in that. And I feel like the most important thing that's ever happened to me is growing up without money. It's one of the things I'm the most proud of." This backdrop is felt throughout the book and will certainly resonate with kids across the country who find themselves in similar situations to De La Pena and CJ. I find the end page of Last Stop to be particularly profound. While waiting for the bus to come pick them up and take them back home, Nana is knitting, CJ is shown reading a book, and the rain has definitely stopped. Knowing what we now do, it is easy to imagine that Nana is making a scarf for a homeless person. CJ is reading, perhaps aloud to her. It is a subtle yet appreciative nod to the critical role that reading played in changing De La Pena's life and is a striking, meaningful scene that clinches the overall message of the story. Last Stop on Market Street is undeniably beautiful. The vibrant art, the melodic words, and the significant story all come together for an unforgettable experience that takes multiple readings to truly appreciate. However, the question which has been raised since the ALA conference is this: does Last Stop deserve the Newbery Medal? After all, it was a completely unexpected choice and the children's literature community continues to debate why this book should or should not have won the prestigious Medal. In the end, that is something each reader will have to decide for themselves. But consider this: the Award is given each year to the most distinguished contribution to children's literature. Past Newberys have communicated relevant messages, showcased different lifestyles, and featured strong characters. Last Stop on Market Street most certainly does all of these things. And, while most Newberys need hundreds of pages to accomplish all of this, Last Stop does it in 32. Reviewed on my blog: http://discoverbookjoy.wix.com/childr...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dione Basseri

    This book won multiple awards from the American Library Association this year, and some of them I just really don't get. Mostly it's the Newbery Medal, which has pretty much always gone to a book of at least more than 50 mostly-text pages. This is just a standard 32 page picture book, with a few lines of text per page. Not a compelling and fully-developed story like past winners, such as "The Graveyard Book" or "The Higher Power of Lucky." There's been criticism that Newbery books are too hard f This book won multiple awards from the American Library Association this year, and some of them I just really don't get. Mostly it's the Newbery Medal, which has pretty much always gone to a book of at least more than 50 mostly-text pages. This is just a standard 32 page picture book, with a few lines of text per page. Not a compelling and fully-developed story like past winners, such as "The Graveyard Book" or "The Higher Power of Lucky." There's been criticism that Newbery books are too hard for kids, but this award shoots off in the opposite direction. I can agree with the awarding of a Caldecott honor, and actually prefer this book over the actual winner for the year. The artwork emulates a child's own drawings, bit with just a bit more polish. It's relate-able, and would likely inspire your own little ones to give illustrating their favorite stories a try. Similarly, I can completely support the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor. The artwork is just fun, looking simultaneously childlike and well-polished. The story irks me a bit, living in the Bay area. It falls victim to that over-romanticizing of the City. Magic-trick-performing bus drivers, guitarists showing superiority over mp3 players, and street art that overcomes the more dingy neighborhoods. It feels like an idealized City which you only find in books and movies. Having lived in the City for a while, it just feels off. Will your kids mind? Probably not. I'd say check the book out from the library, but I doubt your little ones will clamber for you to purchase it outright. All the honors it won this year are about the art of the book, and not really about if it's enjoyable.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    Enjoyed the bright colors and nice feeling of a young boy with his grandma, but very disappointed that it was chosen for the Newbery. This was not "distinguished" to me. I don't understand why they broke with the tradition of "chapter books"!! The following quotes taken from the Newbery award page: "The Medal shall be awarded annually to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children published by an American publisher in the United States in English during Enjoyed the bright colors and nice feeling of a young boy with his grandma, but very disappointed that it was chosen for the Newbery. This was not "distinguished" to me. I don't understand why they broke with the tradition of "chapter books"!! The following quotes taken from the Newbery award page: "The Medal shall be awarded annually to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children published by an American publisher in the United States in English during the preceding year. There are no limitations as to the character of the book considered except that it be original work." “Distinguished” is defined as: • Marked by eminence and distinction; noted for significant achievement. • Marked by excellence in quality. • Marked by conspicuous excellence or eminence. • Individually distinct. I will admit I read the book after it was chosen, so this may have clouded my feelings.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Calista

    This is a newberry winning young children's book. I didn't know they covered this young literature. It is a good story with lessons in finding the beauty in simple things and being grateful for the present moment. Pretty powerful Grandmother this boy has. Give this a look This is a newberry winning young children's book. I didn't know they covered this young literature. It is a good story with lessons in finding the beauty in simple things and being grateful for the present moment. Pretty powerful Grandmother this boy has. Give this a look

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ricki

    Matt de la Pena is a literary genius. I pre-ordered this book because I knew it would be excellent, but the story and illustrations blew me away. CJ wonders why he doesn't have a car, and Nana reassures him that they are better off without one. They take an adventure on a bus to a soup kitchen. Nana sees the beauty in life, and her words are powerful. I highly recommend this title for all children. Matt de la Pena is a literary genius. I pre-ordered this book because I knew it would be excellent, but the story and illustrations blew me away. CJ wonders why he doesn't have a car, and Nana reassures him that they are better off without one. They take an adventure on a bus to a soup kitchen. Nana sees the beauty in life, and her words are powerful. I highly recommend this title for all children.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rebekah

    It's a great picture book. However, I'm not happy it won the Newbery Award. There were so many deserving middle grade novels to choose from this year. I'm miffed. It's a great picture book. However, I'm not happy it won the Newbery Award. There were so many deserving middle grade novels to choose from this year. I'm miffed.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Donna Backshall

    "Sometimes when you're surrounded by dirt, CJ, you're a better witness for what's beautiful." I had literally no expectations for this book, but I'm confident it will rank among the best I'll read this year. If you need a healthy dose of appreciation for what you have, look no further than Nana's no-nonsense wisdom in Last Stop on Market Street. "Sometimes when you're surrounded by dirt, CJ, you're a better witness for what's beautiful." I had literally no expectations for this book, but I'm confident it will rank among the best I'll read this year. If you need a healthy dose of appreciation for what you have, look no further than Nana's no-nonsense wisdom in Last Stop on Market Street.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    I liked the life lesson in this one

  18. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I'm making it my mission to seek out all the books Christian Robinson has illustrated; I just love his use of color and light and the way he has of creating a world on the page that emphasizes the points being made by the author. That being said, I also love Matt de la Peña's story. Nana and CJ take the bus from church to serve a meal in their neighborhood soup kitchen, and as they travel, Nana encourages CJ to use his eyes and ears to celebrate the world around him: "Sometimes when you're surro I'm making it my mission to seek out all the books Christian Robinson has illustrated; I just love his use of color and light and the way he has of creating a world on the page that emphasizes the points being made by the author. That being said, I also love Matt de la Peña's story. Nana and CJ take the bus from church to serve a meal in their neighborhood soup kitchen, and as they travel, Nana encourages CJ to use his eyes and ears to celebrate the world around him: "Sometimes when you're surrounded by dirt, CJ, you're a better witness for what's beautiful." CJ might think he wants to ride in a car or have an IPod, but Nana's attentiveness to and interactions with the people she meets give him a better understanding of what really counts in life. I especially love the final illustration of the two of them at the bus stop: Nana knitting and CJ reading a book. Inspiring and surprisingly touching, for adults and children alike.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    I've been in a little bit of a reading slump and saw this cute little kids book and thought why not. It actually is quite profound and it's message I don't remember kids books being like this besides the velveteen rabbit quite sweet I like to this book. I've been in a little bit of a reading slump and saw this cute little kids book and thought why not. It actually is quite profound and it's message I don't remember kids books being like this besides the velveteen rabbit quite sweet I like to this book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Hearkening back to the work of the immortal Ezra Jack Keats Mr. de la Pena has painted a beautiful, gently gritty portrait of the day in the life of one young boy and his Nana in his well deserved Newberry Award winning Last Stop on Market Street. This is a wonderful book that I read more than once with my son. de la Pena's style may be simple at first glance but the world he draws in wonderfully complex. CJ and Nana catch the local bus after school on route to a destination they know well but CJ Hearkening back to the work of the immortal Ezra Jack Keats Mr. de la Pena has painted a beautiful, gently gritty portrait of the day in the life of one young boy and his Nana in his well deserved Newberry Award winning Last Stop on Market Street. This is a wonderful book that I read more than once with my son. de la Pena's style may be simple at first glance but the world he draws in wonderfully complex. CJ and Nana catch the local bus after school on route to a destination they know well but CJ doesn't seem to want to arrive at. Why can't they own their own car like his friends and why are they always getting off in the dirty part of town? For every question Nana has a firm but gentle answer. If they didn't take the city bus they would never have met the bus driver who always has a magic trick for CJ. "What do we need a car for? We got a bus that breathes fire!" she chortles! I won't spoil their destination except to say this book has a wonderful lesson about generosity of spirit and understanding everyone from all walks of life and all social backgrounds but it is the farthest thing possible from preachy or "very special episode." de la Pena's beautiful, simple shapes and brilliant eye popping colors capture busy and bustling city streets with a fantastical realism and make the darker sides of town seems less frightening to a young reader and perhaps a bit more real. I loved the two teenagers on the bus sharing an iPod and the blind man Nana shares a few gentle jokes with. Tiny slices of life that get lost in flashier, more platitude laden books of similar subjects. CJ asks the questions our own children ask all the time and Nana's answers are ones we'd do well to remember. Being less fortunate in this world is not the same as being less intelligent or less creative or less loving. For CJ and his Nana it means seeing opportunity in different places and understanding that wealth, real wealth isn't measured by fancy cars or impressive bank accounts. I loved this. My son loved this. Read this.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    Unhappy that he and his Nana have to take the bus after church - why don't they have a car, he wonders? - young CJ delivers a litany of complaints, only to be answered time and again with his grandmother's wise observations about the beauty of the world around them. After a brief moment of epiphany while listening to a musician on the bus, CJ comes to himself and disembarks. He and Nana have arrived at their destination: a soup kitchen where they volunteer. A much-discussed book, Last Stop On Mar Unhappy that he and his Nana have to take the bus after church - why don't they have a car, he wonders? - young CJ delivers a litany of complaints, only to be answered time and again with his grandmother's wise observations about the beauty of the world around them. After a brief moment of epiphany while listening to a musician on the bus, CJ comes to himself and disembarks. He and Nana have arrived at their destination: a soup kitchen where they volunteer. A much-discussed book, Last Stop On Market Street is a title with many admirable qualities. The artwork, which approximates a child's own drawing style, ably complements the text, and was worthy of the Caldecott Honor it won. The story itself presents a number of noble ideas, from the importance of courtesy to one's elders and to the disabled, to the valuing of the intangibles of experience over material possessions. Service to others, in the form of CJ and Nana's involvement at the soup kitchen, is also emphasized. But although I appreciated Christian Robinson's artwork, and was in sympathy with the didactic project being undertaken by Matt de la Peña - the idea of finding beauty in blasted landscapes reminds me of William Carlos Williams' poetry - I cannot say that this title really deserved the Newbery Medal it was awarded. I wasn't put off by the colloquial language that some have decried - this is dialogue, after all, and literature is replete with colloquial language that doesn't meet the more stringent requirements of grammatically 'correct' speech - but I also wasn't convinced that the writing here was so skilled, so "distinguished," that this could be considered the best-written book published for children in 2015. Despite its good qualities, I wouldn't even described this as the best-written picture-book of 2015. An odd, odd choice on the part of the award committee. I can't help but feel that they wanted to be ground-breaking, and put that desire before any objective analysis.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Linthicum

    The Last Stop on Market Street is a fictional, though realistic, story about a young boy named CJ and the trip he takes every Sunday with his grandmother after church. The story tells of the many different types of people CJ meets on the bus, such as the old woman with curlers, the blind man and his dog, the young boys, and the man with the guitar. Each time CJ poses a complaint, such as the rain, the bus ride, or about his lack of music and headphones, his grandmother is able to spin the situat The Last Stop on Market Street is a fictional, though realistic, story about a young boy named CJ and the trip he takes every Sunday with his grandmother after church. The story tells of the many different types of people CJ meets on the bus, such as the old woman with curlers, the blind man and his dog, the young boys, and the man with the guitar. Each time CJ poses a complaint, such as the rain, the bus ride, or about his lack of music and headphones, his grandmother is able to spin the situation in a much more positive light. The trees were thirsty, they have a bus that breathes fire, and the man with the guitar will play him a song. As the music plays, CJ closes his eyes, gets lost in the music, and travels in his mind to a place of waves, butterflies, birds, and moonlight. When the song is over they have reached their destination, the last stop on Market Street. CJ and his grandmother arrive at the soup kitchen where they help serve a meal, and CJ proudly proclaims that he is glad they came. This book could serve in a variety of different ways in a classroom. CJ encounters a great deal of diversity on his journey which could be used to support learning and celebrating the differences of those around us. There is also a feeling of making the best of what you have; though there are things that CJ wants and does not have, he still has very rich experiences on his journey. Lastly, this book teaches the value in giving back to others in whatever way that you can and could be used as a supplemental resource during food drives, walk-a-thons, and other community partnerships. This is an excellent read-aloud for younger elementary kids. The easy to read language and child-like appearance of the illustrations could enable a young child to feel as though they were right there with CJ on the bus.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Blah. I don't really think this book makes sense. In the beginning Nana mentions the friends from the soup kitchen. They are never mentioned again until, after many pages and other interactions, including a (supposedly?) climactic musical dream sequence that has no effect on CJ whatsoever, they are once again introduced. With a pronoun. I thought I had accidentally missed a page because I had no idea to whom the "their" was referring to. Does this bug anyone else? Why did this win the Newbery? I Blah. I don't really think this book makes sense. In the beginning Nana mentions the friends from the soup kitchen. They are never mentioned again until, after many pages and other interactions, including a (supposedly?) climactic musical dream sequence that has no effect on CJ whatsoever, they are once again introduced. With a pronoun. I thought I had accidentally missed a page because I had no idea to whom the "their" was referring to. Does this bug anyone else? Why did this win the Newbery? I also don't understand why it won a Caldecott Honor. I guess the text and illustrations don't HAVE to match up, but when the story is about noticing beauty in the little things, shouldn't the little things (street lamps, kitty cat shadows) be illustrated? Where were they? I would have been disappointed reading this book if it hadn't won a Newbery, but it wouldn't really have mattered that much and I could have set it aside without a second thought. But knowing it won leaves a bitter taste in my mouth.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    I have been excited to read this book simply for the fact that the cover reminded me of any Ezra Jack Keats book. I embrace that feeling of personal nostalgia that this book brought forth in me as an early reader in the 70s. The inside of the book didn't disappoint with more illustrations reminiscent of Keats...urban life, diversity, lots of color,(loved the tattooed guy on the bus), news print, etc. Kids ask a lot of questions and Matt de la Pena captures the heart of a child in the character o I have been excited to read this book simply for the fact that the cover reminded me of any Ezra Jack Keats book. I embrace that feeling of personal nostalgia that this book brought forth in me as an early reader in the 70s. The inside of the book didn't disappoint with more illustrations reminiscent of Keats...urban life, diversity, lots of color,(loved the tattooed guy on the bus), news print, etc. Kids ask a lot of questions and Matt de la Pena captures the heart of a child in the character of CJ. Nana is a wealth of wisdom as she carefully answers each of CJ's questions with enlightenment, patience, and creativity. This book communicates a subtle message on the importance of looking at life outside of selfish eyes.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Runa

    Tokenizing poor people, people of color, and people with disabilities is part of the problem, not the solution to a lack of diverse literature for young people. This just othered already marginalized populations and it doesn't help how painfully flat and stereotypical the characters all were too. Sad, I was so excited by all the hype... We have enough of an inspiration porn problem with adult lit, don't bring it to kid lit too. Tokenizing poor people, people of color, and people with disabilities is part of the problem, not the solution to a lack of diverse literature for young people. This just othered already marginalized populations and it doesn't help how painfully flat and stereotypical the characters all were too. Sad, I was so excited by all the hype... We have enough of an inspiration porn problem with adult lit, don't bring it to kid lit too.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    Not a Newbery in my humble opinion...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    On one hand, I am a bit of a purist when it comes to the Newbery award. My all-time professional goal is to be on the Newbery committee, and I remember checking off books on the Newbery poster in the school library when I was in 4th grade. And that's what I believe that the Newbery should be--an excellent narrative for middle grade readers. For some reason, I was much more inclined to accept a middle-grade book (The Invention of Hugo Cabret) winning the Caldecott award than I am a picture book w On one hand, I am a bit of a purist when it comes to the Newbery award. My all-time professional goal is to be on the Newbery committee, and I remember checking off books on the Newbery poster in the school library when I was in 4th grade. And that's what I believe that the Newbery should be--an excellent narrative for middle grade readers. For some reason, I was much more inclined to accept a middle-grade book (The Invention of Hugo Cabret) winning the Caldecott award than I am a picture book winning a Newbery. I did look up the Newbery criteria and it doesn't mention age range (nor does Caldecott), but given that there was plenty of great middle grade writing this year (loved The Hired Girl and The War that Saved My Life--which did garner a Newbery Honor), it didn't seem necessary for a picture book to win. Still, I do feel that this year's winner, Last Stop on Market Street met an important need at this particular time. On the other, smaller, hand, I was excited that Last Stop on Market Street was a picture book because it meant that I could quickly read this year's Newbery winner before passing it on. In less than ten minutes too, which was plenty of time to pore over the writing and illustrative styles. Currently, the #weneeddiversebooks movement is growing, and I think benefitted last year's winner. (I'm not saying that The Crossover wasn't deserving. It more than deserved the prize, and I absolutely love it. It's a fantastic choice for reluctant readers. It's just that I think the committee wouldn't have paid the attention it deserved were it not for that movement. But then again, maybe not. Who knows.) Right now, readers want, and NEED, books that depict the socioeconomic realities of all people. CJ and his grandmother ride the bus because they don't have a car, and every Sunday after church, they go to the soup kitchen to serve food. It's all about finding beauty in everything, even the eccentric people who ride the bus, and the dirt and graffiti by the soup kitchen. Overall, lovely and transcendent writing. I like the illustrations (which won the Caldecott honor--double dipping!), but the writing is better. Ages 5-7

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    The whole family will read all these Goodreads Children's Illustrated book nominees for 2015 and rate all of them. I initially reviewed this in the summer of 2015 (see below) and thought it was just okay. I was flying through a lot of books and read this one too fast, initially. But this is a fine book about a grandmother whose family can't afford a car who helps her grandson see the beauties of the city as they ride the bus. The writing is strong, the art is splashy and colorful, and we learn s The whole family will read all these Goodreads Children's Illustrated book nominees for 2015 and rate all of them. I initially reviewed this in the summer of 2015 (see below) and thought it was just okay. I was flying through a lot of books and read this one too fast, initially. But this is a fine book about a grandmother whose family can't afford a car who helps her grandson see the beauties of the city as they ride the bus. The writing is strong, the art is splashy and colorful, and we learn some useful lessons about beauty, about cityscapes and how interesting people can be, in a city. Now it's one of my favorites of the year, probably runner-up for me. Dave 4.5 stars Tara 5 stars Harry (10) 5 stars ("the art is good, the boy is nice and there's a lot to think of in the book; he's poor and has to ride th ebus, but he loves his grandma and helps people.") Henry (9) 4.5 stars Lyra 5 stars Here's my initial and totally lame review from just this past June 2015: Christian Robinson's splashy, colorful illustrations are the highlight of this book, which inaugurates my journey this summer into the work of de la Pena, whom I heard speak last fall. I thought the story was okay: Ride the bus, see the city, experience it's diversity. With your grandma. Nice.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jeice

    This book is kind of a mess. There's a running theme of seeing beauty in the dirt and grime and mundane things of the world, but the emotional climax of the book seems to be a weird dream sequence about the magic of music. Which doesn't really change anything, because the whiny main character goes right back to whining afterwards. A page at the end of the book starts with a pronoun referencing an antecedent that was only mentioned once at the beginning of the book, which makes it feel like a pag This book is kind of a mess. There's a running theme of seeing beauty in the dirt and grime and mundane things of the world, but the emotional climax of the book seems to be a weird dream sequence about the magic of music. Which doesn't really change anything, because the whiny main character goes right back to whining afterwards. A page at the end of the book starts with a pronoun referencing an antecedent that was only mentioned once at the beginning of the book, which makes it feel like a page was missed. "When CJ saw their faces," wait. Whose faces? Who cares? You'll never find out unless you flip back to the beginning of the book, and frankly this book doesn't merit such interest. Also, I was annoyed that there were objects in scenery that the author wrote in the text that didn't show up in the illustrations. Isn't that your job, illustrator? If the author wrote, "the cat stretched on the porch" and you draw a beautiful porch but no cat, haven't you failed? How did this win a Caldecott honor? While the art is colorful and vibrant and included several different types of people, it's not terribly unique or gorgeous. On the other hand, it doesn't annoy me as much as the text, and the fact that this won a Newbery. Fails all around, people.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maryallyn

    This is the 2016 Newbery winner? Proof that we are living in an era when "political correctness" trumps all - a good story, great writing, even memorable images have all gone by the wayside, in favor of a picture book glorifying childhood in a dismal ghetto . On closer examination, this book is not really even politically correct. It appears to be celebrating poverty, deprivation and discrimination with no hope for a better life, as the grandmother responds to all the little boy's observations o This is the 2016 Newbery winner? Proof that we are living in an era when "political correctness" trumps all - a good story, great writing, even memorable images have all gone by the wayside, in favor of a picture book glorifying childhood in a dismal ghetto . On closer examination, this book is not really even politically correct. It appears to be celebrating poverty, deprivation and discrimination with no hope for a better life, as the grandmother responds to all the little boy's observations of the bleakness of Market Street by encouraging him to be grateful for and see beauty in them. The insidious message of "Last Stop on Market Street" seems to be "Accept your unacceptable circumstances because no escape is possible. There is no action you can take to improve your life." Nothing about this book deserves to be rewarded.

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