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Facing the loss of half their comrades with Magneto's latest successes in his creation of the Mutant Empire, the remaining X-Men are forced to team up with the U.S. government in an effort to reprogram the Sentinels. Facing the loss of half their comrades with Magneto's latest successes in his creation of the Mutant Empire, the remaining X-Men are forced to team up with the U.S. government in an effort to reprogram the Sentinels.


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Facing the loss of half their comrades with Magneto's latest successes in his creation of the Mutant Empire, the remaining X-Men are forced to team up with the U.S. government in an effort to reprogram the Sentinels. Facing the loss of half their comrades with Magneto's latest successes in his creation of the Mutant Empire, the remaining X-Men are forced to team up with the U.S. government in an effort to reprogram the Sentinels.

30 review for Salvation

  1. 4 out of 5

    Thee_ron_clark

    This is the third and final book in the Mutant Empire series, which I read as one novel. The basic premise is that the X-Men are attempting to stop Magneto from starting a war between mutants and humans. From his mutant stronghold in Manhatten, Magneto is gathering hundreds of mutants to his cause. Outside of Manhatten, the military wait to be called to action. An error causes an all-out conflict between the military and Magneto's forces while the X-Men attempt to bring order to the situation. It w This is the third and final book in the Mutant Empire series, which I read as one novel. The basic premise is that the X-Men are attempting to stop Magneto from starting a war between mutants and humans. From his mutant stronghold in Manhatten, Magneto is gathering hundreds of mutants to his cause. Outside of Manhatten, the military wait to be called to action. An error causes an all-out conflict between the military and Magneto's forces while the X-Men attempt to bring order to the situation. It wasn't a bad read. It wasn't childish in any manner (no more so than zombies and vampires I guess). I recommend it to fans of superheroes, The X-Men, Marvel comics, and pulp fiction.

  2. 4 out of 5

    r.

    If I read this trilogy again today, I would probably think it was completely disposable cash-in trash fiction composed mainly of melodrama and cheese. BUT when I was about 14, I love the SHIT out of these three books. As in, read each one half a dozen times at least (and this final one probably twice as many times as that). And for that alone, I give it four stars. It captivated my very adolescent sooooul.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mloy

    Great conclusion to the trilogy! :D

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ben Mariner

    The final book in the Mutant Empire series. Again, this took me a long time to get through. Not sure why, but I kept struggling to want to make the time to sit down and read this one. I think my biggest issue was the fact that it was the third book. This could easily have been condensed into a single longer book instead of stretched out over three. They could have completely done away with the Shi'ar storyline and just focused on what was going on with Magneto. Since they didn't, I felt like it The final book in the Mutant Empire series. Again, this took me a long time to get through. Not sure why, but I kept struggling to want to make the time to sit down and read this one. I think my biggest issue was the fact that it was the third book. This could easily have been condensed into a single longer book instead of stretched out over three. They could have completely done away with the Shi'ar storyline and just focused on what was going on with Magneto. Since they didn't, I felt like it was dragging on a little. That being said, it was still fairly enjoyable. Now that all of the X-Men were back on Earth, it was much more enjoyable to follow their adventures. I love the addition of the Juggernaut, because he's always been a kind of complex character and did some things that some people may not have expected in this book. Overall, this was a pretty fun read, but nothing too spectacular. I've probably said this before, but if you like the X-Men, it's definitely worth picking up and giving it a once through.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    Golden's Mutant Empire trilogy is an excellent example of graphic characters being translated successfully into a prose format. His care for the work is evident as he explores peripheral characters that get short shrift in the comics, bringing them to life and showing how important they are to the big-name players and major story arcs. It's a very well-written story, not padded to fill a certain length as many of the similar comics trilogies of the day were, and would serve as an excellent start Golden's Mutant Empire trilogy is an excellent example of graphic characters being translated successfully into a prose format. His care for the work is evident as he explores peripheral characters that get short shrift in the comics, bringing them to life and showing how important they are to the big-name players and major story arcs. It's a very well-written story, not padded to fill a certain length as many of the similar comics trilogies of the day were, and would serve as an excellent starting point for anyone who wanted to know the X-universe before it became a film franchise. Each volume has very nice illustrations, too.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mary JL

    Okay, this is the climax of the "Mutant Empire" trilogy. Hopefully, you have read Books 1 and 2 or you will be totally lost. The two teams of X-men unite for a action filled attack against Magneto and those mutants loyal to him. A good conclusion to the trilogy and I do not want to give spoilers, so I will say no more. Although written in the 1990's, this trilogy hold up. In all three books, the various X-men are true to their characters, as previously established in the comics. Nothing incredibly Okay, this is the climax of the "Mutant Empire" trilogy. Hopefully, you have read Books 1 and 2 or you will be totally lost. The two teams of X-men unite for a action filled attack against Magneto and those mutants loyal to him. A good conclusion to the trilogy and I do not want to give spoilers, so I will say no more. Although written in the 1990's, this trilogy hold up. In all three books, the various X-men are true to their characters, as previously established in the comics. Nothing incredibly new or earthshaking here--but a satisfying trilogy aimed at X-men fans.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anthony McDowell

    Wonderful conclusion to the trilogy. With a comic book novel, obviously you know the good guys will win, but the journey to the climax is the real suspense. I was captivated to the very end, so top rated in my book. As I pointed out in the other two reviews, even though this is a trilogy, they are not stand alones, so be mindful of that. I found all three at a used bookstore for $1.50 each, and I feel I got my money's worth. Wonderful conclusion to the trilogy. With a comic book novel, obviously you know the good guys will win, but the journey to the climax is the real suspense. I was captivated to the very end, so top rated in my book. As I pointed out in the other two reviews, even though this is a trilogy, they are not stand alones, so be mindful of that. I found all three at a used bookstore for $1.50 each, and I feel I got my money's worth.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Neil

    I would probably rate this book a solid three stars. Maybe 2.9 - 3.1, even 3.2 if I were being generous, but rounded to 3 stars even. It moves at a fast pace. As it has been over twenty years since I last read it, I had forgotten most of what happened (I did remember bits of it, but not much), so there were plenty of "twists and turns" in it (well, enough to keep me interested in reading it). I don't know if it was because the second book was "so weak" or not, but I did feel this was a relativel I would probably rate this book a solid three stars. Maybe 2.9 - 3.1, even 3.2 if I were being generous, but rounded to 3 stars even. It moves at a fast pace. As it has been over twenty years since I last read it, I had forgotten most of what happened (I did remember bits of it, but not much), so there were plenty of "twists and turns" in it (well, enough to keep me interested in reading it). I don't know if it was because the second book was "so weak" or not, but I did feel this was a relatively satisfying conclusion to the trilogy (overall; that is not to say there are no problems with this book, either). It actually does have some "good character development," but not necessarily of the "main characters" (i.e. - the X-Men, Magneto, and the Acolytes). It has some good action in it; there is no suspense, however, because ultimately the reader knows the X-Men will triumph and none of the "important bad guys" will be seriously hurt, mortally wounded, or even killed. Some of "the problems" that I had with the book had to do with the general plot of the story itself. (view spoiler)[For example, Magneto claims he intends to "take over the world" and create a "mutant empire" with normal humans as the servants to their new mutant overlords (little bit of paraphrasing, there). I still do not know how Magneto expects to be able to take over the whole world when he does not have enough mutants to do so, especially considering the “limited” number of mutants who actually joined him versus those who came to “Haven” looking for a new homeland where they would be accepted. The world is too big a place, and there were not enough mutants alive to be able to “conquer” it and hold it. Not only that, but he obviously never studied history enough to really learn from him. Humanity has a nasty tendency to destroy that which it cannot have or to prevent something from happening again. Rome destroyed Carthage by also seeding the land surrounding the city with salt to ensure it would never be populated again. The Russians practiced a "scorched earth" policy when it came to keeping the French from holding the land they took, followed by the Germans in WWII. The Germans also practiced a "scorched earth" policy when fleeing Russia. Xavier is the one to point out to Magneto that he truly does not understand humans because there are plenty of normal humans who would rather see the entire Earth destroyed than to either see it controlled by mutant humans or be subservient to mutant humans. Even if the US government would not launch a nuclear strike against NYC, the Russians and even the Chinese were said to have nukes targeted at NYC and either of them could launch enough missiles to take out the city and its new inhabitants. In the book, Magneto clearly did not consider this as a possibility, which is a bit shocking. I was kinda annoyed that Caroline (mutant human) and Kevin (normal human) were the “red shirt casualties” for “the good guys” in the book (120-121). The author spent a "lot of time" before they died, trying to build up a “burgeoning relationship” between the two of them, and then kills them. I guess it was supposed to have some kind of “deep emotional” impact upon the reader, but it felt more like an attempt to get a “cheap emotional thrill/response” because of how they died. It was also annoying that Bobby Drake had ridden down in the elevator with Cargill earlier, was down there with them, but did not appear until after Cargill killed the two “redshirts.” What the heck was he doing that whole time? He was in the elevator with her (Cargill, earlier)! (Or, so it sounded like.) In any case, I also thought that was a sign of poor writing, to have Bobby show up “too late” (as opposed to “in the nick of time," which would also have been "to convenient") to save the two young potential lovebirds. He could have shown up at the same time with them and made sure Cargill was truly unconscious, and then joined Trish, Kevin, and Caroline in freeing the X-Men (122). OR!!!! He could have arrived before them, captured Cargill, and freed the other X-Men before Trish Tilby and Co. arrived (which would have been "the best scenario," in my mind)! This was more of a "minor annoyance," since I always have felt that Bobby Drake (Iceman) has been underestimated from the get-go as an X-Men, but how can a man (person) who can “flash freeze the air” in someone’s nose or mouth (or even one’s chest!) be considered “the weakest link of the team” (212)? How can somebody who can flash freeze a person’s chest to the point of it shattering be considered “the weakest member” of the X-Men? By his own admission, Bobby Drake could easily kill people yet chooses not to do so. He has to maintain exact control to avoid such a thing happening. It’s crazy! Finally, during the “final battle,” Magneto supposedly realizes he prefers Xavier’s dream (vision) of the future to his own (231). If that is the case (and since this storyline is supposed to fit into the comics, somehow), he either quickly forgets or changes his mind shortly after returning to Avalon. I do “get it,” in that Xavier’s dream represents “hope” whereas Magneto’s dream represents the opposite of hope (despair, I guess, because of what Magneto’s dream would mean). Well, "finally" finally. I still find it annoying that the author ignores other teams who could have helped free NYC from Magneto's conquest. While I am glad that the Juggernaut served as a "white hat" and provided much-needed support, I still felt that leaving out all of the other super heroes was pretty weak on the author's part. It would have been better if he had given some kind of reason(s) as to why none of the other superheroes were not available to assist in retaking Manhattan. At the very least, Excalibur could have been brought in to assist! That would have made some kind of sense! (hide spoiler)] There were some moments that I liked, or thought were interesting. (view spoiler)[Amelia Vought’s role is interesting in these stories. She has been used in the prior books to point out flaws in Xavier, and she now is used to point out some flaws in Magneto (16) (the situation is that Magneto claims he will not tolerate bigots in his new society, but he clearly only refers to “human bigots” and not the mutant bigots who serve him as his Acolytes). The author has her making some interesting observations throughout the books (when she's not too busy spouting the "party line" of Magneto, that is). It is also a bit interesting how she does not have nearly the issues that Kurt Wagner has when transporting people around. Chapter 3 was a fun chapter. It starts out with the Shi’ar X-Team throwing down with Marko Cain (Juggernaut) and ends with him joining their “team.” They saw him coming their way down the street and assumed he was on Magneto’s side and attack him without warning. Rogue is the first one to realize they jumped to conclusions and made a mistake in their assumption about him and what he was doing at that moment. (As it turns out, he had a date that lasted a couple of days, only to wake up and find Magneto in control of the city; he was on his way out when he encountered the X-Men.) It reminded me of a couple of moments in the comics, actually. The first was when Thor assumed Crusher Creel was up to no good at Thunderstrike’s gravesite and attacked him without warning. Thor tried to apologize when he realized his mistake, not knowing that Eric Masterson (Thunderstrike) had been working with Creel, trying to rehabilitate him and giving him the benefit of the doubt at times, unlike Thor and the other Avengers who automatically assume he is always up to no good. Creel obviously rejected Thor’s apology before leaving the cemetery. The second was when Titania and Creel were at the courthouse to get married. The fabulous She-Hulk thought they were attacking the courthouse, based on the number of super villains there as well, so she calls the Avenger in for backup. As it turns out, the Avengers are mortified to discover the “villains” are actually there to celebrate the wedding with Titania and Creel and have no ill intent in mind. Much to their chagrin, the Avengers are actually “in the wrong” this time and sheepishly leave the courthouse in ruins. So, it was interesting to read this chapter, especially with how it ended. It was “fun” reading this “team-up” between the X-Men and the Juggernaut. He actually taught them a “thing or two” that helped them in their endeavor to free the Island of Manhattan from Magneto’s control, as he thought like a criminal whereas they did not, so he could see things from a different perspective. Also, this almost felt like a harbinger of sorts, as the Juggernaut actually served on the X-Men for a period of time and assisted them with some of their missions. He would then go on to Britain to help with Excalibur before returning to the States and eventually becoming a criminal again. I liked the verbal tongue-lashing "speech" that Warren gives Magneto before the Sentinels come after Magneto (200). ”Oh, shut up! . . . If you’re going to kill us, then just do it. I’ve been listening to your posturing and watching you feed off this world’s fears for too long. You’re the worst kind of leader, Magneto. You ignore your press, but believe all your own PR. . . . Go ahead, then. Strike me down with the wrath of the god you want us all to think you are. But when I’m dead, ask yourself one question. If your goals are so noble, why do you always leave corpses in your wake?” Definitely one of the better moments in the book! (Right up there with the surprise of Juggernaut fighting as a “white hat” beside the X-Men for the sake of humanity.) I was glad that Colonel Tomko gave Major Skolnick a “way out” so that the Major was not court-martialed for his actions (113-114). I realize the Colonel's interpretation of events was not the “correct sequence of events,” but the Major did “turn traitor, again” by supporting the effort to take back NYC from Magneto, AND he surrendered himself to the first highest ranking officer he came across. It in no way justifies what the Major did, how he betrayed his team like he did, but I still liked the “evolution” that Major Skolnick went through over the course of the second and third novel. It was pretty crazy how Xavier was able to take Magneto to the Astral Plane, at which point Magneto thought he had killed all of the X-Men, only to discover how thoroughly Xavier had deceived him before getting his butt seriously kicked by the X-Men in the real world! That whole thing, though, with Wolverine trying to decide if he should kill Magneto or not, before deciding against it, was probably a "thing" Wolverine would have done, but it has happened enough in the comics that I doubt the reader was surprised that Wolverine would hold back at all and not go through with killing Magneto. So, that was kinda mixed for me, as the "thing" with Logan kind of "ruined the moment for me," as there was no doubt in my mind that Logan would not kill the X-Men's longtime foe and "enemy." (hide spoiler)] Regarding the "character development," (view spoiler)[I felt that Marko Cain actually had the "greatest character development" in the story, and I could see how it could be said to lay the foundation for his working with the X-Men for the short period of time he was on the team in the comics. The author describes how Cain had a sadistic streak that used to mark his work, how he acted and behaved, but how he had changed over time and was no longer the man he used to be. Sure, he was a career criminal, but he no longer had that sadistic streak that used to drive him "in the old days," the early days of his "career" (life) as the Juggernaut. He also undergoes some interesting internal growth as he fights on the side of the X-Men. Instead of lashing out without concern like he used to do, even after that sadistic side was "gone" (or, no longer controlling him), he tried to do a better job of controlling himself so that he "followed" the moral code of the X-Men as opposed to his own moral code (which had a lot more gray areas in it). I also liked how, once he made the decision to fight on the X-Men's side and assist them, he also looked out for them and watched their backs. So, yeah, it was a pretty interesting side of Cain Marko I really do not remember seeing in the comics until he joined the team for a short time. Also, his conversation towards the end of the battle with Rogue regarding "the fastball special" was a little amusing. It was interesting to see the interaction between these two characters throughout the story (as it was Rogue who stopped the attack on Juggernaut and then convinced the man to join them, to assist them). I did feel the author "depowered" him a bit regarding some of his fights with some of the opposing mutants to make it more of a "fair fight" (or equal contest) than it might have been (or should have been). I also thought that Major Skolnick had some of the "best" character development in the story. Yes, he turned traitor, but it was due to internal struggles and Magneto's "Haven" being a nearly impossible lure for someone like himself (serving with honor in the US Armed Forces but having to hide he was a mutant human because of what it would have cost him). Magneto makes him promises, but over time the Major discovers that Magneto is unable to back up those promises. He also discovers that Magneto might claim to not be a bigot and will not tolerate bigotry, but all of Magneto's talk is entirely one-sided. He finally reaches the point where he has to make a choice (another choice) and decides that he is no longer going to work under a tyrant (and the accompanying anarchy) but work to restore "law and order" and hopefully regain some of his lost honor in the process. I felt he achieved that, especially with how he tried to take responsibility for his actions and submit to a higher authority. I also liked how he was "given grace and mercy" as opposed to "legal justice" and given the chance to continue making amends for his action(s), his betrayal. I did feel like Gambit, Rogue, and maybe Bishop were expanded a bit further as characters. Maybe more Bishop and Gambit than Rogue, but I did like how their characters seemed to be utilized a bit more than I remember them maybe being used in the comics. I also thought the author did a "good job" regarding the abilities of Storm and Archangel. It felt like he had a good idea of how their powers worked and how to describe them using their powers in battle. (hide spoiler)] Overall, I enjoyed this book and this storyline. I am glad that I revisited it and reread it. Much to my surprise and delight, I found myself enjoying it far more than I thought I would.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    I really have to commend Golden on this trilogy. Noting felt rushed, under explained, or not easily understandable. Even though the world of the x-Men was already established when he started writing the trilogy, I think even someone that isn't very familiar with the world and the characters would have a good grasp on who everyone is and how everything works fairly easily. As the last book of a trilogy, nothing about this finale ever felt rushed or underdone. I was on the edge of my seat the entir I really have to commend Golden on this trilogy. Noting felt rushed, under explained, or not easily understandable. Even though the world of the x-Men was already established when he started writing the trilogy, I think even someone that isn't very familiar with the world and the characters would have a good grasp on who everyone is and how everything works fairly easily. As the last book of a trilogy, nothing about this finale ever felt rushed or underdone. I was on the edge of my seat the entire time and was never annoyed with the pacing. It was also very well written. There was just the right amount of description without it bogging down the story or the action.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ronald Wilcox

    This review is for the trilogy as a whole rather than the individual third book. Magneto has taken over several Sentinels from a hidden US base in Colorado and has started gathering more mutants who share his dream. Together the mutant gathering with the Sentinels take over New York City to create Haven, a Mutant Empire that Magneto will rule. The X-Men all work together to defeat the mutant army and Magneto and free NYC. There is, of course, a lot more to the story but this sums it up. Very good This review is for the trilogy as a whole rather than the individual third book. Magneto has taken over several Sentinels from a hidden US base in Colorado and has started gathering more mutants who share his dream. Together the mutant gathering with the Sentinels take over New York City to create Haven, a Mutant Empire that Magneto will rule. The X-Men all work together to defeat the mutant army and Magneto and free NYC. There is, of course, a lot more to the story but this sums it up. Very good portrayals of both the protagonists and the villains.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ruby Ridge

    So much better than the previous two in the trilogy, this was pure X-men with none of the padding. Padding like the Starjammers and all of the ridiculous "Oh, Scott"..."Oh, Jean" garbage from the previous novels. The action sequences were good and made even better by the presence of the Juggernaut - one of my favorite characters. Christopher Golden keeps close to the original comic book flavor of the X-men whick is why I have forgiven the unsatisfying ending. So much better than the previous two in the trilogy, this was pure X-men with none of the padding. Padding like the Starjammers and all of the ridiculous "Oh, Scott"..."Oh, Jean" garbage from the previous novels. The action sequences were good and made even better by the presence of the Juggernaut - one of my favorite characters. Christopher Golden keeps close to the original comic book flavor of the X-men whick is why I have forgiven the unsatisfying ending.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Indah Threez Lestari

    336 - 2020

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sylvia

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Hiltibidal

  15. 5 out of 5

    Doug

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lee F.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shanon

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jason Glynn

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joey Wolfson

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katie Hager

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jared Ransom

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Graff

  24. 5 out of 5

    William Gothard

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ian Gill

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lee (Rally the Readers)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bigonsgn Nguyen

  29. 4 out of 5

    Perry

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gianna

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