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ix • Introduction (Science Fiction Hall of Fame Volume III) • (1981) • essay by Arthur C. Clarke 2 • "Repent, Harlequin!" Said the Ticktockman • (1965) • shortstory by Harlan Ellison 15 • The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth • (1965) • novelette by Roger Zelazny 49 • The Saliva Tree • (1965) • novella by Brian W. Aldiss 122 • He Who Shapes • (1965) • novella by Roger ix • Introduction (Science Fiction Hall of Fame Volume III) • (1981) • essay by Arthur C. Clarke 2 • "Repent, Harlequin!" Said the Ticktockman • (1965) • shortstory by Harlan Ellison 15 • The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth • (1965) • novelette by Roger Zelazny 49 • The Saliva Tree • (1965) • novella by Brian W. Aldiss 122 • He Who Shapes • (1965) • novella by Roger Zelazny 216 • The Secret Place • (1966) • shortstory by Richard McKenna 232 • Call Him Lord • (1966) • novelette by Gordon R. Dickson 254 • The Last Castle • (1966) • novella by Jack Vance 318 • Aye, and Gomorrah. . . • (1967) • shortstory by Samuel R. Delany 329 • Gonna Roll the Bones • (1967) • novelette by Fritz Leiber 352 • Behold the Man • (1966) • novella by Michael Moorcock 406 • The Planners • (1968) • shortstory by Kate Wilhelm 422 • Mother to the World • (1968) • novelette by Richard Wilson 461 • Dragonrider • (1967) • novella by Anne McCaffrey 580 • Passengers • (1968) • shortstory by Robert Silverberg 593 • Time Considered as a Helix of Semi-Precious Stones • (1968) • novelette by Samuel R. Delany 632 • A Boy and His Dog • [Vic and Blood • 2] • (1969) • novella by Harlan Ellison


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ix • Introduction (Science Fiction Hall of Fame Volume III) • (1981) • essay by Arthur C. Clarke 2 • "Repent, Harlequin!" Said the Ticktockman • (1965) • shortstory by Harlan Ellison 15 • The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth • (1965) • novelette by Roger Zelazny 49 • The Saliva Tree • (1965) • novella by Brian W. Aldiss 122 • He Who Shapes • (1965) • novella by Roger ix • Introduction (Science Fiction Hall of Fame Volume III) • (1981) • essay by Arthur C. Clarke 2 • "Repent, Harlequin!" Said the Ticktockman • (1965) • shortstory by Harlan Ellison 15 • The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth • (1965) • novelette by Roger Zelazny 49 • The Saliva Tree • (1965) • novella by Brian W. Aldiss 122 • He Who Shapes • (1965) • novella by Roger Zelazny 216 • The Secret Place • (1966) • shortstory by Richard McKenna 232 • Call Him Lord • (1966) • novelette by Gordon R. Dickson 254 • The Last Castle • (1966) • novella by Jack Vance 318 • Aye, and Gomorrah. . . • (1967) • shortstory by Samuel R. Delany 329 • Gonna Roll the Bones • (1967) • novelette by Fritz Leiber 352 • Behold the Man • (1966) • novella by Michael Moorcock 406 • The Planners • (1968) • shortstory by Kate Wilhelm 422 • Mother to the World • (1968) • novelette by Richard Wilson 461 • Dragonrider • (1967) • novella by Anne McCaffrey 580 • Passengers • (1968) • shortstory by Robert Silverberg 593 • Time Considered as a Helix of Semi-Precious Stones • (1968) • novelette by Samuel R. Delany 632 • A Boy and His Dog • [Vic and Blood • 2] • (1969) • novella by Harlan Ellison

30 review for The Science Fiction Hall of Fame: Volume III: The Nebula Winners

  1. 4 out of 5

    Foxtower

    The problem with volume III and IV of this series is that Nebula winners, being chosen by authors, are often about what authors find clever. Most of the stories are so cerebral and cryptic I often found myself finishing a story and asking “what the heck was that?”. I’m a reader, not a literature major, and the majority of the stories just didn’t make any sense. UGH!

  2. 4 out of 5

    James

    An excellent collection of 60's science fiction works. A mixture of what at that time was old school SF and the humanist New Wave which makes a nice contrast and compare collection. Includes Ellison's A Boy and His Dog among others. I may not have read this particular collection, but I've read all of the stories listed. An excellent collection of 60's science fiction works. A mixture of what at that time was old school SF and the humanist New Wave which makes a nice contrast and compare collection. Includes Ellison's A Boy and His Dog among others. I may not have read this particular collection, but I've read all of the stories listed.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Adam Heine

    Didn't finish. I held on for a long time, but I don't think I'm going back to it. Some of the stories are very good. Maybe all of them. But most are too slow/literary for my taste. Didn't finish. I held on for a long time, but I don't think I'm going back to it. Some of the stories are very good. Maybe all of them. But most are too slow/literary for my taste.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Data

    A re-read to see how these stories hold up over time. -Favorite: Mother to The World by Richard Wilson I remember this story, many of the details have stayed with me over a long period of time. basic story is what might happen if the last two people in the world were a "normal", smart male and a much lower functioning female. The story of the journey they have is well-crafted, filled with hope and anguish at once. This time around, though, I had another thought. What would the story be if it were A re-read to see how these stories hold up over time. -Favorite: Mother to The World by Richard Wilson I remember this story, many of the details have stayed with me over a long period of time. basic story is what might happen if the last two people in the world were a "normal", smart male and a much lower functioning female. The story of the journey they have is well-crafted, filled with hope and anguish at once. This time around, though, I had another thought. What would the story be if it were a normal, "smart" woman and a dull-witted man? Examining the rest of these stories in a similar light, it is depressing how they are nearly universally they are so tuned to the male orientation and ego. Some are just flat out sexist. Most portray women as objects or story props. I was mildly pleased to find a couple stories by Roger Zelazny (he is one of my favorites, even though pretty blatantly sexist in some of his writing). Although his writing is told from a macho point of view, as usual, he actually explores the complication of a relationship between a brilliant capable man and an even more brilliant, dominant woman in The Doors of His Face, The Lamps of His Mouth. AND in He Who Shapes.. I wasn't particularly enamored or either of these stories, but he gets a gold star for effort. The two women writers who are represented (Kate Wilhelm and Anne McCaffrey) are right in there with the boys when it comes to pervasive sexism; yes, I'm old enough to have lived through those times, and sexism was really pervasive in RL. But really, is it a good thing to create a world where sexism is in the fabric of everything, just so you can show off your "strong women"? (The famous beginning of it all, Dragonrider by Anne McCaffrey). I don't really know the answer, just wondering out loud. I've only touched on a few stories; this is a fat little paperback. Worth a try, especially if these writers are new to you.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kolya Matteo

    Most of these are excellent stories, but several make me wonder what the SFWA members were thinking when they chose them. I wish there was some sort of discussion included of what swayed the voters. "Repent, Harlequin!" Said the Ticktockman Well-crafted, poetic social critique. The science-fictional element is there (the "cardio-plate"), but the emphasis here is definitely on the flow of words. Has a great title and a great sentence about jelly beans. The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth Ve Most of these are excellent stories, but several make me wonder what the SFWA members were thinking when they chose them. I wish there was some sort of discussion included of what swayed the voters. "Repent, Harlequin!" Said the Ticktockman Well-crafted, poetic social critique. The science-fictional element is there (the "cardio-plate"), but the emphasis here is definitely on the flow of words. Has a great title and a great sentence about jelly beans. The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth Very readable tale of man confronting something greater than himself, set on a Venus they must have known was impossible by 1965. The Saliva Tree Very scary gothic tale set on a remote farm in Victorian England. Walking through a dimly lit city square after reading this, I saw a statue of a frog out of the corner of my eye, and jumped a foot. The build-up of the sense of looming doom is scarcely perceptible, but inexorable. He Who Shapes Another very readable tale from Mr. Zelazny, with lots of fun predictions for our own time with the usual distortion (we have already greatly improved on the clunky interface he presents for his self-driving cars, but we're still lacking the self-driving cars.) I'm not sure I understand the ending. The Secret Place I don't really see how this is science fiction. (view spoiler)[A team is sent to search the Oregon desert for uranium during World War II. None is found, but one man becomes involved with a local girl whose fantasy play-world inexplicably mirrors the topography of the Miocene epoch. (hide spoiler)] It may be classifiable as speculative fiction, but it's not particularly illuminating speculation. Call Him Lord An entertaining concept - (mild spoilers:) Earth is maintained as a museum world by a Space Empire, with the population living like an Amish enclave (adopting some new technologies, not others.) The heir to the Empire has to visit Kentucky, of all places, (view spoiler)[ to have his character judged - if he's too much of a city slicker, no Empire for him! (hide spoiler)] The Last Castle Nicely written far-future tale on an Earth reverted to wilderness. Reminds me of Against the Fall of Night. The use of animals in the place of machines (for ground and air transport) is a novel touch. The aversion of the gentlemen to any manual labor seems faintly silly, but cases nearly as extreme can be found in actual history. I like the raucous Birds and the occasional info-dumping footnotes. Aye, and Gomorrah. . . Very New Wave. The basic conceit (view spoiler)[(that space travelers, to avoid radiation problems, must be neutered pre-puberty, like castrati; and that the resulting androgynes would become objects of sexual fascination to certain people) (hide spoiler)] is interesting, but I would like it better as a backdrop element in a larger tale, rather than the sole focus of a story. Gonna Roll the Bones This is a work of fantasy, not science fiction! A few references to space ships and Martian creatures could be deleted with no effect on the story. It seems to be set on an asteroid, but that, too, is immaterial. Behold the Man Time travel is the only science-fictional element here. Otherwise, it is filled with mainstream strained-relationship flashbacks mixed into a version of "Life of Brian" without the humor. The Planners This is a story about injecting sRNA (in blood) into chimps and other subjects, to transfer training or knowledge. Of course, if this happened, recipients of blood transfusions would find themselves suddenly able to speak foreign languages or play new instruments, which they don't. This basically silly idea is made to appear more serious by having the protagonist constantly hallucinate bizarre scenes and be sick of his wife. This might be interesting if it turned out to be somehow linked to the experiments, but it's not. Mother to the World Standard postapocalyptic Adam-and-Eve story with the twist that Eve is mentally deficient. Dragonrider The second Pern story. The world-building is fantastic (the well-developed social and political structures forming the backdrop of the story.) The characters are a bit stilted. The resolution is rather pat. Honestly, I think the universe would have been better off without the time-jumping bit (which Wikipedia tells me John W. Campbell was responsible for.) Certainly deserves to be in this volume. Passengers Good, true sci-fi: society deals with the effects of "Passengers" which can unexpectedly take control of anyone's body, to use for their own purposes for some hours or days, then depart. New-Wavey in that it focuses solely on the effects on people; no investigation or explanation is offered as to the cause or agency of these possessions. I would prefer that something be said about this, but it's good nonetheless. Time Considered as a Helix of Semi-Precious Stones A picaroon in space! An enjoyable romp with a discordant ending. I like the concept of the Singers. A Boy and His Dog This is New Wave done right. Sure, the focus is on the characters, and those characters are certainly not the heroic heroes and villainous villains of older sci-fi; but stuff actually happens, and there are reasons why it happens, and the world is clearly described. Recommended if you have a strong stomach.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Great little collection of sci-fi with stories that are all over the map. Really enjoyed The Doors of His Face The Lamps of His Mouth, Gonna Roll The Bones, Dragonrider, and Time Considered As a Helix of Semi-Precious Stones. Only a few weren’t my style, but that’s the joy of a collection book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lucien

    Most of these stories are great and i can see why they won awards; however, i am amazed at some the choices made by the SFWA as they just don't cut it for me - by the late 60s, the SF "golden age" was assuredly over. Most of these stories are great and i can see why they won awards; however, i am amazed at some the choices made by the SFWA as they just don't cut it for me - by the late 60s, the SF "golden age" was assuredly over.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Bobbitt

    There's a very good reason why these stories won awards. There's a very good reason why these stories won awards.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Steven Peterson

    There are some fine works in this collection of Nebula Award winners. Arthur Clarke and George Proctor edited this book, with winners from 1965 through 1969. These include some absolutely crackerjack works. Among my favorites: Harlan Ellison's "'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman," Roger Zelazny's "He Who Shapes," Jack Vance's "The Last Castle," Fritz Leiber's "Gonna Roll the Bones," Anne McCaffrey's "Dragonrider," and Samuel Delany's "Tome Considered as a Helix of Precious Stones." A classi There are some fine works in this collection of Nebula Award winners. Arthur Clarke and George Proctor edited this book, with winners from 1965 through 1969. These include some absolutely crackerjack works. Among my favorites: Harlan Ellison's "'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman," Roger Zelazny's "He Who Shapes," Jack Vance's "The Last Castle," Fritz Leiber's "Gonna Roll the Bones," Anne McCaffrey's "Dragonrider," and Samuel Delany's "Tome Considered as a Helix of Precious Stones." A classic compilation. . . .

  10. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    This volume collects the short fiction Nebula Award winners from 1965-1969. There's not a bad story in the lot, and the works by Zelazny, Moorcock, and Ellison are still my favorites these many years later. It's one of those few books I'd seriously call a must-read for anyone interested in the modern genre. This volume collects the short fiction Nebula Award winners from 1965-1969. There's not a bad story in the lot, and the works by Zelazny, Moorcock, and Ellison are still my favorites these many years later. It's one of those few books I'd seriously call a must-read for anyone interested in the modern genre.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cole Schoolland

    I can not recommend this particular series highly enough. What a spectacular collection. Some HUGE names are in here. My Favorites Were: - Repent Harlequin Said the Ticktockman - The Saliva Tree - Call Him Lord - The Last Castle - Gonna Roll the Bones - Dragonrider - A Boy and His Dog This book wont be getting donated. I intend to pass it around.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    Includes short stories, novellettes and Novellas. Features two very good stories by Harlan Ellison, including the dynamite "A Boy and His Dog." Includes short stories, novellettes and Novellas. Features two very good stories by Harlan Ellison, including the dynamite "A Boy and His Dog."

  13. 5 out of 5

    proto

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christina

  15. 5 out of 5

    Luke

  16. 4 out of 5

    John Bohnert

  17. 4 out of 5

    Roxanne

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mark Henrikson

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cirrostratus

  20. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  21. 4 out of 5

    Randal

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  23. 4 out of 5

    Phyllis Griffiths

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cacophonix1984

  25. 5 out of 5

    Zenon

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bill

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pete

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

  29. 4 out of 5

    George C. Kerr

  30. 4 out of 5

    Pete

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