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Lives of Extraordinary Women: Rulers, Rebels ~ and What the Neighbors Thought

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Not all governments have been run by men. Lives of Extraordinary Women turns the spotlight on women who have wielded power, revealing their feats--and flaws--for all the world to see. Here you'll find twenty of the most influential women in history: queens, warriors, prime ministers, first ladies, revolutionary leaders. Some are revered. Others are notorious. What were the Not all governments have been run by men. Lives of Extraordinary Women turns the spotlight on women who have wielded power, revealing their feats--and flaws--for all the world to see. Here you'll find twenty of the most influential women in history: queens, warriors, prime ministers, first ladies, revolutionary leaders. Some are revered. Others are notorious. What were they really like? In this grand addition to their highly praised series, Kathleen Krull and Kathryn Hewitt celebrate some of the world's most noteworthy women, ranging from the famous to those whose stories have rarely been told. Features twenty extraordinary women, including: Cleopatra Joan of Arc Elizabeth I Harriet Tubman Eleanor Roosevelt Eva Perón


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Not all governments have been run by men. Lives of Extraordinary Women turns the spotlight on women who have wielded power, revealing their feats--and flaws--for all the world to see. Here you'll find twenty of the most influential women in history: queens, warriors, prime ministers, first ladies, revolutionary leaders. Some are revered. Others are notorious. What were the Not all governments have been run by men. Lives of Extraordinary Women turns the spotlight on women who have wielded power, revealing their feats--and flaws--for all the world to see. Here you'll find twenty of the most influential women in history: queens, warriors, prime ministers, first ladies, revolutionary leaders. Some are revered. Others are notorious. What were they really like? In this grand addition to their highly praised series, Kathleen Krull and Kathryn Hewitt celebrate some of the world's most noteworthy women, ranging from the famous to those whose stories have rarely been told. Features twenty extraordinary women, including: Cleopatra Joan of Arc Elizabeth I Harriet Tubman Eleanor Roosevelt Eva Perón

30 review for Lives of Extraordinary Women: Rulers, Rebels ~ and What the Neighbors Thought

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brandi

    The lives of the 20 women discussed in this book were indeed extraordinary. Each entry is kept brief enough that it can be read in a single sitting, but not so brief as to leave the reader wondering, “Wait. Who was that lady again?” The book is formatted chronologically, which makes the progression logical and easy to follow. The illustrations also help readers absorb additional information about the text. Illustrations by Kathryn Hewitt include many beautiful full-page drawings that have the s The lives of the 20 women discussed in this book were indeed extraordinary. Each entry is kept brief enough that it can be read in a single sitting, but not so brief as to leave the reader wondering, “Wait. Who was that lady again?” The book is formatted chronologically, which makes the progression logical and easy to follow. The illustrations also help readers absorb additional information about the text. Illustrations by Kathryn Hewitt include many beautiful full-page drawings that have the subject along with many significant items from her life. There are also smaller drawings within the text that illustrate specific events being discussed. For example, Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine’s entry beings with a full page illustration of her riding a horse across the European continent, holding a book in an outstretched hand. In her time it was rare for a woman to be able to read, ride a horse, or be a capable ruler. A few pages into the article the text is interrupted with a small illustration of a jester’s hat and tools. This is right after a paragraph discussing how Eleanor had moved herself out of her husband’s castle and set up her own court which included many musicians, jugglers and artists. In the introduction Kathleen Krull states clearly that although many of the women she wrote about in this collection would make excellent role models, many of them may not. All of them were strong and significant in their time. Even the biographies of women of questionable morality are still appropriate for older elementary students. Queen Nzingha kept a harem of young men around, but Krull does not go into the nitty-gritty details. At the end of each entry is a section called “Ever After.” This section consists of a few bullet point facts generally about how their actions affected history. These parts are not as narrative in nature as the early parts of the text, but are extremely informative. They cover any important details that were not included otherwise. Many of them are about how the actions of the subject continue to influence the world today. An example of which is Elizabeth I’s love of poetry who, despite her personal challenge of creating it herself, allowed many great works to be created under her reign. Artists who, under a different ruler would have had their talent crushed, were allowed to blossom and have their work shared by all. This is not a collection of only ancient historical women. Many of the later subjects are still living. Several are still fighting for their causes and suffering hardships because of it. Aung San Suu Kyi, at the time this book was written, was still under house arrest because of her fight for democracy in the Burmese government. This would be a great book for older elementary students up through middle school. Even high school students could find value within these pages. Teachers could use the book in its entirety, but could also use select passages to augment other lessons. Many different countries and time periods are covered, so it should be fairly simple to find an appropriate entry for a variety of topics. If being used for a research assignment a bibliography of the resources the author found most useful is included in the back. The biographies in this book include: Cleopatra, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Joan of Arc, Isabella I, Elizabeth I, Nzingha, Catherine the Great, Marie Antoinette, Victoria, Harriet Tubman, Tz’u-hsi, Gertrude Bell, Jeannette Rankin, Eleanor Roosevelt, Golda Meir, Indira Gandhi, Eva Perón, Wilma Mankiller, Aung San Suu Kyi, and Rigoberta Menchú.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Charlynn

    In the introduction to her book, Krull states that her subjects' personalities could sometimes seem “larger than life.” This is then reflected by Hewitt's illustrations of dis-proportioned women whose heads and bodies dwarf their surroundings, giving the images a rather cartoonish, unrealistic perspective which fails to reflect the serious nature of the work. While the ambition of the book – to present stories of women triumphing over adverse conditions, attitudes, beliefs, and customs in a ligh In the introduction to her book, Krull states that her subjects' personalities could sometimes seem “larger than life.” This is then reflected by Hewitt's illustrations of dis-proportioned women whose heads and bodies dwarf their surroundings, giving the images a rather cartoonish, unrealistic perspective which fails to reflect the serious nature of the work. While the ambition of the book – to present stories of women triumphing over adverse conditions, attitudes, beliefs, and customs in a light which portrayed them as flawed humans rather than either good or bad – is laudable, Krull includes a ridiculous, inordinate amount of superfluous details such as what these influential women wore and the food they preferred. Additionally, though she provides her audience with a list of further reading material, the information in the text is without references, and the author fails to establish her authority as a reliable source of knowledge.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Loanne Cheng

    Krull, Kathleen. Lives of Extraordinary Women: Rulers, Rebels (and What the Neighbors Thought). (2000). Illustrated by Kathryn Hewitt. Award-winning children’s author, Krull, was notable for her biographies. In Lives of Extraordinary Women, biographies of twenty women are chronologically explained in this book who have shown great political powers. These women include queens, prime ministers, government officials, revolutionary leaders, warriors, Indian Chiefs, First Ladies and others who have b Krull, Kathleen. Lives of Extraordinary Women: Rulers, Rebels (and What the Neighbors Thought). (2000). Illustrated by Kathryn Hewitt. Award-winning children’s author, Krull, was notable for her biographies. In Lives of Extraordinary Women, biographies of twenty women are chronologically explained in this book who have shown great political powers. These women include queens, prime ministers, government officials, revolutionary leaders, warriors, Indian Chiefs, First Ladies and others who have been in positions of power. Biographies of such women include Cleopatra, Joan of Arc, Nzingha, Marie Antoinette, Harriet Tubman, Tzu-Hsi, Indira Gandhi, Eva Peron, and Rigoberta Menchu. These extraordinary women biographies are included because of their adversities and triumphs, their larger-than-life personality and accomplishments. The focus of this collection of biographies is on the women’s daring and brave deeds, yet not all of these women are role models, where some are good and some are bad. They are included because they are an inspiration to women throughout history. Illustrations are done in watercolor as well as colored pencil on watercolor paper. As an introduction to each women’s biography, their picture is drawn with a bobblehead style, with the oversized head compared to the body. The background and details around the women depict the setting and the importance of their position, power, status or event. Introductions include a larger font for the name, the timestamp, subtitles, and a snippet of the importance of the women’s role makes the relevance to the character illustrations. The illustrations and the text make a good connection for a children’s nonfiction biography. Target audience: grades 4-6.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bailey Neumann

    Lives of Extraordinary Women is a book about past famous women around the world. They could have been famous for many reasons, some were rulers, some were rebels, and some did something really important. The book puts the women in chronological order and designates a chapter for each one. Starting with Cleopatra and ending with Rigoberta Menchú the book contained interesting information about them all. I really enjoyed the book, it taught me a lot of interesting facts and about women who I had n Lives of Extraordinary Women is a book about past famous women around the world. They could have been famous for many reasons, some were rulers, some were rebels, and some did something really important. The book puts the women in chronological order and designates a chapter for each one. Starting with Cleopatra and ending with Rigoberta Menchú the book contained interesting information about them all. I really enjoyed the book, it taught me a lot of interesting facts and about women who I had never heard of before. I would recommend the book to anyone who wants to learn about powerful women and history.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Crawford

    This is a really neat book examining the lives of various outstanding women including birth and death dates and what they did. The women covered include: Cleopatra (ruler of Egypt, lover of Caesar and Marc Antony, spoke 8 languages.) Eleanor of Aquitaine: The Queen of France, literate (an unusual thing for women at the time) divorced the king, married the guy that would become Henry II of England. Joan of Arc: The young girl who said God spoke to her she led French troops to victories over the Brit This is a really neat book examining the lives of various outstanding women including birth and death dates and what they did. The women covered include: Cleopatra (ruler of Egypt, lover of Caesar and Marc Antony, spoke 8 languages.) Eleanor of Aquitaine: The Queen of France, literate (an unusual thing for women at the time) divorced the king, married the guy that would become Henry II of England. Joan of Arc: The young girl who said God spoke to her she led French troops to victories over the British, dressed as a man, burned at the stake when she was only 19. Isabella I: Founded the first military hospital in Europe, helped Columbus. This was the time of the Inquisition. Elizabeth I: Spoke 9 languages, studied history, theology and music. Queen of England. Nzinga: West African Queen. Catherine the Great: Ruler of Russia, reduced religious persecution and enlarged Russia's boundaries. Marie Antoinette: Queen of France, fashionista, helped poor, upset the rich and the poor both. Ended up losing her head. Queen Victoria: Queen of England, 7 attempts on her life, anti-racism. Against women voting. After the death of her husband was into seances. Harriet Tubman: Black slave who escaped and managed to lead around 300 more slaves from the South to safety. Tz 'u-hir: Chinese Empiress. Gertrude Bell:Explorer, spoke 7 languages, helped found Iraq. Jeanette Rankin: First women elected to Congress, supported women's voting rights. Only against the U.S. entering World War I. Eleanor Roosevelt: Didn't divorce FDR even though he cheated on her. Against the mistreatment of Japanese Americas at the start of the war. Definitely anti-racist (helped get the Tuskegee Airmen going). Had an effect on political appointments. Golda Meir: Worked on getting Israel to be a separate nation. Prime Minister. Indira Gandhi: Prime Minister of India, well educated,. Eva Peron: Wife of Argentina's ruler Juan Peron. Got women the right to vote. Died at an early age. Willma Mankiller: Chief of Cherokee nation, women's advocate. Aung San Suu Kil: Won 1991 Novel Peace Prize, kept under house arrest by military. Rigoberta Menchu: Had to flee Guatemala military. A Mayan. Won 1992 Nobel Peace Prize. Outspoken human rights activist. More detail is given about each of the women.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ngaosy-ong

    It was interesting to see the different great women who was in power and what they achieve throughout their lives. There are some women in the book that I never heard of and was really surprised when I read about them. This books is really good for children to read and to see how different women did something amazing or beyond anyone's expectation. It was interesting to see the different great women who was in power and what they achieve throughout their lives. There are some women in the book that I never heard of and was really surprised when I read about them. This books is really good for children to read and to see how different women did something amazing or beyond anyone's expectation.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    A brief book giving quick introductions to 20 extraordinary ladies. Some of these ladies I didn’t know, such as Jeannette Rankin who was the only woman to give women the right to vote and stated if she could live her life over she’d be nastier. She was my favorite story, but they are all good ones. Just wish there was more information included.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    I've loved this book since I was a kid! It also inspired my recent blog post on Jeannette Rankin, the first woman elected to Congress: https://wp.me/pafNQ7-1h Entertainingly written, with fun illustrations about these bad-ass women! I've loved this book since I was a kid! It also inspired my recent blog post on Jeannette Rankin, the first woman elected to Congress: https://wp.me/pafNQ7-1h Entertainingly written, with fun illustrations about these bad-ass women!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tressa

    It was nice to take my time reading this book. I had (embarrassingly) never heard of several of the women who were featured. I also love the author’s gentle approach to sharing the tougher parts of the lives of these women.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Jones

    Perhaps a little out of date on some entries (Aung San Suu Kyi is still under house arrest) but overall a good, if very brief, introduction for young people to some of the most famous and infamous women of history and modern times.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Desirae

    3.5 Stars

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Definitely a good book but I want more information! Doesn’t feel like there was enough. Granted, it’s a children’s book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dionne

    Short bios on some amazing women.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    I did not find this totally accurate, and once the discrepancies continued to mount I lost interest. The drawings were cute.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Hillyer

    Good book. Short summary of who they were. Good for kids.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cris

    I found the tone to be rather condescending. The individual entries are overly simplistic and frequently focus more on trivialities than accomplishments.

  17. 5 out of 5

    H.W. Hoyt

    I liked learning more about history in the first part, but the whole second part was completely uninteresting and I'm probably not going to remember any of it. I liked learning more about history in the first part, but the whole second part was completely uninteresting and I'm probably not going to remember any of it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lexi

    A good introduction for youngsters. A bit dated. Not particularly nuanced.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    An overview of a bunch of different women. A good launching point to learn about further women.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Antonella

    short nonfiction with facts some known and unknown about twenty historical women figures

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anna Lewis

    Genre: Biography Awards: None Audience: 5th-8th Grade A. This is a collective biography and each person's biography is only partial. B. This is a fictionalized biography and I know this because there are no documents that are from the people being written about. Also, the story is based partly on fact and then enhanced by the author's imagination. C. Why did they only do women? What do they really look like? Genre: Biography Awards: None Audience: 5th-8th Grade A. This is a collective biography and each person's biography is only partial. B. This is a fictionalized biography and I know this because there are no documents that are from the people being written about. Also, the story is based partly on fact and then enhanced by the author's imagination. C. Why did they only do women? What do they really look like?

  22. 4 out of 5

    Susan Scott

    Krull, K., & Hewitt, K. i. (2000). Lives of extraordinary women: rulers, rebels (and what the neighbors thought). Harcourt. Citation by: Susan Scott Type of Reference: Biographical Reference Call Number: 920 ISBN: 0-15-200807-1 Brief Description: This book, which is geared towards upper elementary students, depicts the lives of several famous women throughout the course of history. Emphasis is placed on their contributions to society. Content/Scope: This book is geared towards students in grades 4-7 Krull, K., & Hewitt, K. i. (2000). Lives of extraordinary women: rulers, rebels (and what the neighbors thought). Harcourt. Citation by: Susan Scott Type of Reference: Biographical Reference Call Number: 920 ISBN: 0-15-200807-1 Brief Description: This book, which is geared towards upper elementary students, depicts the lives of several famous women throughout the course of history. Emphasis is placed on their contributions to society. Content/Scope: This book is geared towards students in grades 4-7. This ninety-five page book summarizes the lives of several women of varying ethnicities and their contributions throughout history. This book is arranged chronologically starting with Cleopatra and concluding with Guatemalan leader Rigoberta Mench. There is an absence of some key famous women including Margaret Thatcher and Benazir Bhutto, but the book does offer more obscure biographical choices like Aung San Suu Kyi. Accuracy/Authority/Bias: This book was published by Hartcourt, a well-known and respected publisher in education. The author tries to present a balanced approach in her publication, giving biographical details of women across time and culture. The reviewer cautions that there is some gossip in the book, like Isabella I of Spain only took two showers in her lifetime. This is gossip, not factual information. Arrangement and Presentation: This book is arranged chronologically. There are caricatures that introduce each biography character followed by a summary of their life. There are also "ever after" sections which note the contributions each woman had on society. There are also bibliographic references and illustrations included throughout the book. Relation to similar works: There are not currently any biographical reference materials in the library. This book would provide comprehensive materials related to women's history. Accessibility/Diversity: This book contains several illustrations and pictures which makes it accessible to most visual learners. Additionally, many women that are featured are from various cultures and ethnicities. Cost: $21 Professional Review: Callaghan, A. C. (2000). Lives of extraordinary women: Rulers, rebels (and what the neighbors thought). School Library Journal ,46(10), 250.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mandolin

    We learn from history, but how hard it is to interest today's youth in long-dead people when the biographies often included in textbooks are ones laden with dates and boring facts that seem to have little relationship to today's world. Even the lives of queens and powerful female rulers hold little interest when portrayed in that gray light. How refreshing it is, then, to read this book by Kathleen Krull and learn about the much spicier aspects of the lives of various women, ranging from a few o We learn from history, but how hard it is to interest today's youth in long-dead people when the biographies often included in textbooks are ones laden with dates and boring facts that seem to have little relationship to today's world. Even the lives of queens and powerful female rulers hold little interest when portrayed in that gray light. How refreshing it is, then, to read this book by Kathleen Krull and learn about the much spicier aspects of the lives of various women, ranging from a few obscure personalities often forgotten by standard textbooks to those more prominent ones known by most. Women who dressed as boys and led armies (Joan of Arc), who were the original Paris Hiltons of their day, starting fashion trends with each new change of wardrobe (Marie Antoinette), who remained single all their lives but had hordes of suitors (Elizabeth), who had full rooms dedicated to their extensive wardrobes (Eva Peron) and who kept their thrones by killing off their siblings (Cleopatra.) Admittedly, the book is full of more sensational and "fluffy" tidbits about these amazing women, but isn't that just what is needed to entice girls (and boys!) to want to learn more about them? Though this aspect has been criticized by several reviewers, I don't believe the book was meant to be a compilation of serious biographical sketches like those found in textbooks but rather a conglomeration of snapshots like those you'd find in one of today's celebrity magazines. If given the choice, which do you think a normal teenager today would choose to read? If I were a teacher, I'd be glad if my students at least began with this book to whet their appetites for more in-depth study! I certainly enjoyed it and would recommend it to adults and teens alike.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Miriam Shaw

    This was an interesting read about influential women. I loved that it was chronilogical and the women were from throughout history which gives a nice little glimpse into history. I also loved that it talked about women all over the world to give different culture aspect. It also covered women who influenced different things even though most of it was about politics. It does cover women who might not be the most moral so it gives the opportunity for the parent to have a nice discussion about that. This was an interesting read about influential women. I loved that it was chronilogical and the women were from throughout history which gives a nice little glimpse into history. I also loved that it talked about women all over the world to give different culture aspect. It also covered women who influenced different things even though most of it was about politics. It does cover women who might not be the most moral so it gives the opportunity for the parent to have a nice discussion about that. But over all I really enjoy it and the artwork really enhased the writing.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sara Thompson

    I am not really one who reads non-fiction cover to cover. I really prefer getting all my non-fiction via Discovery Channel. This book, however, is a great exception. Lives of Extraordinary Women covers the lives of 20 women who influenced history. Some are quite familiar such as Cleopatra and Joan of Arc but others are lesser known such as Wilma Mankiller and Jeannette Rankin. I was impressed by the cultural variety of the book as well as the realistic picture painted of these women. Some were n I am not really one who reads non-fiction cover to cover. I really prefer getting all my non-fiction via Discovery Channel. This book, however, is a great exception. Lives of Extraordinary Women covers the lives of 20 women who influenced history. Some are quite familiar such as Cleopatra and Joan of Arc but others are lesser known such as Wilma Mankiller and Jeannette Rankin. I was impressed by the cultural variety of the book as well as the realistic picture painted of these women. Some were not your fairy tale women who fought proudly - some were actually quite vile when it came to women's rights or the way they lived. I could really appreciate the work the author did. She even clarified some more fictional aspects of some of these women's lives. I really appreciated how she wrapped up their lives in a few short pages - giving enough detail to understand the woman's significance without droning on. It gave me a taste to learn more which is always a good thing. I don't think this is the ultimate report writing book but enough to give a child a chance to find someone of significance. The book is somewhat in chronological order since some of these women were alive at the same time. Some were in politics, some were political activists and others were explorers. I can't imagine there isn't someone in the book that won't strike a cord with every reader.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    The book consisted of 2-4 page vignettes on women from ancient times to modern. The author tells it like it is; she's irreverent and funny. For example, Cleopatra married her much younger brother, because it was expected of her. Yet she was probably responsible for at least 2 of her brothers' deaths. Eva Peron, knowing that Mr. Peron (forgot his name) had a girlfriend, made the bold move of having the girlfriend moved out and all of Eva's things moved in one day while Mr. Peron was at work. It we The book consisted of 2-4 page vignettes on women from ancient times to modern. The author tells it like it is; she's irreverent and funny. For example, Cleopatra married her much younger brother, because it was expected of her. Yet she was probably responsible for at least 2 of her brothers' deaths. Eva Peron, knowing that Mr. Peron (forgot his name) had a girlfriend, made the bold move of having the girlfriend moved out and all of Eva's things moved in one day while Mr. Peron was at work. It went without a hitch. Eleanor Roosevelt, after discovering her husband's unfaithfulness, dove into work that made her happy, stayed married so he could keep his career, but lived a loveless marriage. Details like that are prevalent. I learned about several very important women; we just don't learn about influential women, even today, in today's world, so it's a good book for that reason. The phrase in the title "and what the neighbors though" refers to how people reacted to bull-headed women with unusual habits, which describes most women who have "made a difference" in the world. Women, traditionally, have had to make greater sacrifices than men to make the same kind of difference in their world, and this book illustrates that as well.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elise

    “Lives of Extraordinary Women” is a very powerful book that outlines 20 strong and impactful women in history. When taught about history, many of the rulers and people of power that are discussed are men. This book brings light to the fact that many women throughout history held a lot of power and made a large influence. One of the stories in the book discusses Eleanor of Aquitaine. Just as many women in history were told they could not rule or hold any power, Eleanor was taught from a young age “Lives of Extraordinary Women” is a very powerful book that outlines 20 strong and impactful women in history. When taught about history, many of the rulers and people of power that are discussed are men. This book brings light to the fact that many women throughout history held a lot of power and made a large influence. One of the stories in the book discusses Eleanor of Aquitaine. Just as many women in history were told they could not rule or hold any power, Eleanor was taught from a young age that women were naturally inferior. However, Eleanor fought throughout her life to rule over England and be an independent women who makes a change. This is just one example out of the 20 in the book, but it encompasses the theme of the book of women triumphing over adversity to achieve greatness. All of the stories in the book are short enough that they keep the reader’s attention while still providing a lot of information on the woman. Many other biographies are very long, which makes it hard for people to retain the heavy amount of information, but this book divides the stories in a reasonable way. I would highly recommend this book for classrooms and students to read because it is so important for children to also be taught about the strong women leaders in history.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kelli Varich

    As with all of Kathleen Krull's biographies, she goes into deep detail of the twenty women she covers in "Lives of Extraordinary Women." As the reader, we get to learn about some who are well known, and some who aren't, as well as amazing women in history such as Cleopatra, Joan of Arc, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Wilma Mankiller. In her introduction, Krull piques interest with alluring trivia that begs for the reader to continue in the book. She also mentions that not all of the women she writes abo As with all of Kathleen Krull's biographies, she goes into deep detail of the twenty women she covers in "Lives of Extraordinary Women." As the reader, we get to learn about some who are well known, and some who aren't, as well as amazing women in history such as Cleopatra, Joan of Arc, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Wilma Mankiller. In her introduction, Krull piques interest with alluring trivia that begs for the reader to continue in the book. She also mentions that not all of the women she writes about are role models -- which is important to remember. Krull also searches and finds information about these women that only those close to them, or their neighbors, would know about them, which makes these historical figures seem more realistic. The illustrations done by Kathryn Hewitt portray each woman in a way that reflects their biography. For example, Marie Antoinette's portrait includes two little pugs sitting on her dress, with one chewing through the fabric. In the biography, Krull talks about how she would let her dogs make a mess of her room, chewing through tapestries and gilded chairs. Between both the descriptions and illustrations, each woman in this book is well portrayed.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lauma

    Audio CD's: 2 hours, read by Melissa Hughes. I liked the audio version of this book about influential women in history including queens, warriors, prime ministers, first ladies, and revolutionary leaders. The author includes women who "were good, bad, and some who were both," such as Cleopatra, Nzingha, Marie Antoinette, Eleanor Roosevelt, Eva Peron, with a total of 21 profiles. Information on each famous woman is a brief 10 minutes of fun and fascinating facts, followed by an "Ever After" sectio Audio CD's: 2 hours, read by Melissa Hughes. I liked the audio version of this book about influential women in history including queens, warriors, prime ministers, first ladies, and revolutionary leaders. The author includes women who "were good, bad, and some who were both," such as Cleopatra, Nzingha, Marie Antoinette, Eleanor Roosevelt, Eva Peron, with a total of 21 profiles. Information on each famous woman is a brief 10 minutes of fun and fascinating facts, followed by an "Ever After" section that gives a more historical significance of their lives. I think middle school girls would particularly like this book because it provides facts, trivia and gossip about these remarkable women--more personal information than is found in traditional history books. The descriptions are short, concise, and entertaining. I would not consider it a serious read about these famous women's lives, but I do think that the short profiles would lead some readers to do further research.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    A nice multi-cultural variety of famous female leaders with playful illustrations by Kathryn Hewitt. Krull really tries to paint a whole and very human picture of her subjects. Rather than vilifying or lionizing these women, each is given a short (2-3 p) objective bio. It's just enough to pique one's interest without overwhelming the reader. This book is at about a seventh grade reading level and is age appropriate in its approach of historically controversial issues (for example, it gives menti A nice multi-cultural variety of famous female leaders with playful illustrations by Kathryn Hewitt. Krull really tries to paint a whole and very human picture of her subjects. Rather than vilifying or lionizing these women, each is given a short (2-3 p) objective bio. It's just enough to pique one's interest without overwhelming the reader. This book is at about a seventh grade reading level and is age appropriate in its approach of historically controversial issues (for example, it gives mention to Catherine the Great's numerous lovers, but does not dwell on or emphasize this aspect of her life). I would recommend this book to high level readers in upper elementary and definitely to middle school students. This would also be a fun book to use in a classroom to spotlight famous women throughout the year. Favorite bios were: Nzingha, Gertrude Bell, Harriet Tubman, and Aung San Suu Kyi.

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