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The Complete Works of Mark Twain: The Novels, short stories, essays and satires, travel writing, non-fiction, the complete letters, the complete speeches, and the autobiography of Mark Twain

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This carefully crafted ebook: “The Complete Works of Mark Twain” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. This is The Complete Works of America’s favourite storyteller Mark Twain. The eBook contains over 60 novels and shorter texts (short stories, essays, letters, speeches). Twain began his career writing light, humorous verse, but evo This carefully crafted ebook: “The Complete Works of Mark Twain” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. This is The Complete Works of America’s favourite storyteller Mark Twain. The eBook contains over 60 novels and shorter texts (short stories, essays, letters, speeches). Twain began his career writing light, humorous verse, but evolved into a chronicler of the vanities, hypocrisies and murderous acts of mankind. At mid-career, with Huckleberry Finn, he combined rich humor, sturdy narrative and social criticism. Twain was a master at rendering colloquial speech and helped to create and popularize a distinctive American literature built on American themes and language. Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835 – 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. He wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called "the Great American Novel."


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This carefully crafted ebook: “The Complete Works of Mark Twain” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. This is The Complete Works of America’s favourite storyteller Mark Twain. The eBook contains over 60 novels and shorter texts (short stories, essays, letters, speeches). Twain began his career writing light, humorous verse, but evo This carefully crafted ebook: “The Complete Works of Mark Twain” is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. This is The Complete Works of America’s favourite storyteller Mark Twain. The eBook contains over 60 novels and shorter texts (short stories, essays, letters, speeches). Twain began his career writing light, humorous verse, but evolved into a chronicler of the vanities, hypocrisies and murderous acts of mankind. At mid-career, with Huckleberry Finn, he combined rich humor, sturdy narrative and social criticism. Twain was a master at rendering colloquial speech and helped to create and popularize a distinctive American literature built on American themes and language. Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835 – 1910), better known by his pen name Mark Twain, was an American author and humorist. He wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and its sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885), the latter often called "the Great American Novel."

30 review for The Complete Works of Mark Twain: The Novels, short stories, essays and satires, travel writing, non-fiction, the complete letters, the complete speeches, and the autobiography of Mark Twain

  1. 4 out of 5

    J. Kahele

    Glorious If only I could write as clever as Mark Twain. Whenever I read his works I am utterly amazed and a lot of the time I can imagine him pausing with thought as he writes down his words.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ken Consaul

    What's not to like about Mark Twain? His humor is as apropos today as when written. His anecdotes are great and his characters speak with unique and easily recognizable voices. I'll admit some of the travel books can run on with unrelated details but the glimpses of travel in another era are wonderful. I'm going to fault this volume only because the table of contents is awkward to use. Don't just read Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. Try Roughing it and some of the others. Great Value, too

  3. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Mark Twain's short stories are moving, funny, clever and poignant. He is a master of the humorous story.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sjervey

    The Innocents Abroad - not the whole collection It almost feels superfluous to review Twain. The book is a sharply observed travelogue of a sea trip from New York via many European and middle eastern stops to the Holy Land. Adventures include a meeting with the Emperor of Russia who was vacationing on the Black Sea, a humble man much admired by Twain. It's funny and penetrating, sarcastic and profound. Perhaps the only worthwhile thing to be included in this review is a warning about Twain's prej The Innocents Abroad - not the whole collection It almost feels superfluous to review Twain. The book is a sharply observed travelogue of a sea trip from New York via many European and middle eastern stops to the Holy Land. Adventures include a meeting with the Emperor of Russia who was vacationing on the Black Sea, a humble man much admired by Twain. It's funny and penetrating, sarcastic and profound. Perhaps the only worthwhile thing to be included in this review is a warning about Twain's prejudices. This author who gave us Huckleberry Finn and Puddin'head Wilson was nevertheless prejudiced against ethnic groups whom he took to be lazy and shiftless.He assumes that the people he sees frittering away their time could be improving their lots, but he makes no effort to determine whether that is true. My observation is that people who can improve their own lots do, but wshen the fruits of their labors will be given to others, they can't be bothered. When we remember that Twain is ahead of his times in many respects, we should forgive him for the lapses of ignorance and enjoy a thoroughly entertaining picture of a world not so long past.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Revsing

    Impossible to find content This book has no real table of contents. There is no dedicated page for it. Using the sidebar function of my tablet gave me a list of book titles and stuff like chapter one, or appendix and so on. I am really disapointed. I couldn't find Tom Sawyer in a ten minutes long search. So I finally gave up.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    What can I say?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erika

    Wanted to read the literary offenses of James Fenimore Cooper I wanted to read the essay The literary offenses of James Fenimore Cooper. I had been reading Ambrose Bierce's piece on The Waltz and my thoughts jumped to some of Twain's essays I'd read in university. Delphi has done a great job of gathering Twain's works in one place and I look forward to reading more.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Pat Cummings

    I love to re-read a favorite. In this collection, I bypassed the familiar Mississippi novels, and went straight to the tale of 19th-century Americans abroad in Europe, The Innocents Abroad. In 1972 when I first read this travel novel, it was a paperback bought for a dime at a yard sale. We took turns, my spouse and I, reading it aloud on a long bus trip, in between extracts from two volumes of Will and Ariel Durant's The Story of Civilization. As a result, my memories of it are mingled with horro I love to re-read a favorite. In this collection, I bypassed the familiar Mississippi novels, and went straight to the tale of 19th-century Americans abroad in Europe, The Innocents Abroad. In 1972 when I first read this travel novel, it was a paperback bought for a dime at a yard sale. We took turns, my spouse and I, reading it aloud on a long bus trip, in between extracts from two volumes of Will and Ariel Durant's The Story of Civilization. As a result, my memories of it are mingled with horror over the barbarism of Merovingian Franks and awe at the artistry of Asian civilizations. Clearest in my recollection of Twain's Innocents is the reaction of the American couples to the historical sites and sights they were presented with in France, Italy and Spain. These raw newcomers to the historical grandeur of Europe were nevertheless accustomed to living "great men." In America, it was common that great works of engineering and art had been accomplished by someone currently living, someone with whom Twain could sit down in the beer-hall and stand to a round. Imagine the dismay, and growing disgust, at the idea that every great accomplishment was from the past; that "glory days" could only be remotely behind one. Every artist, every builder, every great statesman they hear touted is deceased. Each statue celebrates an ex-personage. Eventually, Twain and his companions begin preempting the expected declaration. After waiting "as long as we can hold out, in fact," they ask their guides (each of whom Twain names "Ferguson"), "Is... is he dead?" This is side-splittingly funny, especially when they make the same inquiry about an Egyptian mummy or an ancient rebel hung by his chin from mouldering castle walls. Twain's observations are dead-on, as always. It is not only the hapless Europeans he pinions, but also Old Travelers; tourists like themselves whose experience is just that hair broader that Twain's companions' and his own. These folks speak from the elevation of their knowledge to tell monstrous lies. There is the doctor, whose attempts to speak French are doomed by the lack of that tongue in the peasant he addresses. She turns out to be English. Still, the travelers do get some thrills from their trip: We recognized the brown old gothic pile (the Cathedral of Notre Dame) in a moment; it was like the pictures.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marc Joenz

    As a young man, I read the adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer, falling in love with the simplistic, yet complex writings of Mark Twain. Being raised on the classics, his writing style was unlike any I had encountered before. Then I fell in love with his short stories, especially The Jumping Frog. The visions that danced in my head would often make me laugh out loud. I could see the scenes as clear as the moonlight that peered through my bedroom window as I held a flashlight underneath As a young man, I read the adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer, falling in love with the simplistic, yet complex writings of Mark Twain. Being raised on the classics, his writing style was unlike any I had encountered before. Then I fell in love with his short stories, especially The Jumping Frog. The visions that danced in my head would often make me laugh out loud. I could see the scenes as clear as the moonlight that peered through my bedroom window as I held a flashlight underneath my bed sheets to sneak in a few more pages before I fell asleep, flashlight still on. As an adult, I began to realize what an important author this man whose pen name was based on a marking of water depth really was. His musings on politics, race, religion and relationships, are as pertinent in the present as they were when he wrote them. To this day, when I feel the need to take a break from my favorite living writers, which are many, and go to a place where the past merges with the present, where politicians are mocked, jumping frogs are cherished, and the mighty Mississippi rolls, I pull out my well worn copy....and dive in.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    I have never read anything by Mark Twain and this proved to be a good choice. This audio collection was wonderful,with an old man, a middle aged man, and a young boy telling different stories. Some of the first stories were about boating on the Mississippi and they wereabout as slow as the boats themselves. After the first CD the stories got better and better. I was captivated when Twain described coming across the Mormon Pioneers, and an experience with Governor Boggs from Missouri in his stori I have never read anything by Mark Twain and this proved to be a good choice. This audio collection was wonderful,with an old man, a middle aged man, and a young boy telling different stories. Some of the first stories were about boating on the Mississippi and they wereabout as slow as the boats themselves. After the first CD the stories got better and better. I was captivated when Twain described coming across the Mormon Pioneers, and an experience with Governor Boggs from Missouri in his stories. Half the time I felt like he was telling the stories to me personally because the voice seemed to match his portrait so well. I now understand why and how he is such a celebrated author. I really enjoyed this experience.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patty

    I've always been a big fan of Twain, but it has been years since I read anything of his. I'm so glad I got this wonderfully produced audiobook. Twain dictated this in 1906-1907 so it's written as if he's talking to you rather informally. Consequently it's perfect as an audiobook. He tells you right off the bat that he's going to tell you this bits from his life as they occur to them rather than with any specific structure which makes it feel even more like you're sitting around with him as he thi I've always been a big fan of Twain, but it has been years since I read anything of his. I'm so glad I got this wonderfully produced audiobook. Twain dictated this in 1906-1907 so it's written as if he's talking to you rather informally. Consequently it's perfect as an audiobook. He tells you right off the bat that he's going to tell you this bits from his life as they occur to them rather than with any specific structure which makes it feel even more like you're sitting around with him as he thinks about his life. A lot of it is inspired by excerpts from his daughter, Susy's "biography" of him that she wrote as a child. Therefore, a lot of it is sweet nostalgic memory of family life. I'm definitely motivated to read more of his literature now.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kent Lundgren

    I've read Huckleberry Finn several times since high school 45 years ago, and it always comes through fresh. If you want to be an American writer and you have not read all, or most, of Mark Twain's writing you are not fully committed, you haven't done all your homework, for Twain shows us the possible. No commentary about the book is required, but I will observe that an American who has not read it, has a huge gap in his cultural literacy. HF is more than an engaging and amusing story, it is first I've read Huckleberry Finn several times since high school 45 years ago, and it always comes through fresh. If you want to be an American writer and you have not read all, or most, of Mark Twain's writing you are not fully committed, you haven't done all your homework, for Twain shows us the possible. No commentary about the book is required, but I will observe that an American who has not read it, has a huge gap in his cultural literacy. HF is more than an engaging and amusing story, it is first-rate commentary on mankind generally, and U.S. society in the 1850's. It contains astute and stinging observations still relevant to the nation and the individual today.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sally Tibbetts

    THE COLLECTED WORKS OF MARK TWAIN was really not what I expected after all the hoop-la about it. It's certainly interesting but it is spattered with tons of little notes and asides and writings that are, simply put, not that interesting unless you are a Twain scholar doing research and want to know what he said to his publishers etc. There are some good parts too--some unexpected insights. Did I think this would be a little more "juicy" ? Perhaps. However, there's no question the man was a wizar THE COLLECTED WORKS OF MARK TWAIN was really not what I expected after all the hoop-la about it. It's certainly interesting but it is spattered with tons of little notes and asides and writings that are, simply put, not that interesting unless you are a Twain scholar doing research and want to know what he said to his publishers etc. There are some good parts too--some unexpected insights. Did I think this would be a little more "juicy" ? Perhaps. However, there's no question the man was a wizard with his pen and had a rampant imagination and very very strong political and social opinions. There's enough to keep your interest but for me, it was rather slow-gong.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    Skip the first CD or so (the "on the Mississippi" part) till your hooked. Then I would recommend going back to it about half way through the rest so you can have a nice finish. My favorite parts are about Helen Keller, which we listened to while visiting her home, wonderful experience, his mother, and "The Blue Jay" (so wonderful to hear and beautifully read here by WALTER BRENNEN what a treat!) Loved having the different readers!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Donigian

    Fully complete novels, and everything, else you could imagine I would probably drop it to a three and a half because he repeated stories over again several times which was annoying maybe it was an editing issue because I thought those repeated stories should be removed. And he tried to speak some French and German and I don't speak either language. But if you restrict yourself to the novels and short stories you probably will do best.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Gear

    I love this book, even though the dialect is very difficult to follow. I usually can decode this kind of writing, easily, but I found that I had to go back several times and reread to understand some of the speech in the book, particularly Jim's. But the storytelling is top notch and just what I expect from Twain.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kyle K

    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer - The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - The Prince and the Pauper - Pudd'nhead Wilson - The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calveras County - The Stolen White Elephant - The £1,000,000 Bank-Note - The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg - The Connecticut Yankee at King Arthur's Court -

  18. 5 out of 5

    Counsel182

    I actually read a different version but it really was the first time I "seriously" read Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. Train of course remains a marvel. I especially liked some of his lesser known works...in particular the 1,000,000 pound note is something I don't believe was ever mentioned to me before and is a true delight.

  19. 5 out of 5

    charles hudson

    Am just now reading. Should have gotten this year's ago. It's too bad that there are not more like him today. It's apparent that DC could use a whole lot more like him. They take themselves far too serious. They don't even lie well ! They could have used lessons from MT to refine their feeble attempts.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    We should get a better copy.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kenn Prebilic

    I was looking for Huck Finn and found this volume -- can't beat an ebook version for $1.99 with all these Twain works in it. Read much of this before in days long gone by and wanted to read it again.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Black Pobble

    Excellent and very well read. A really good introduction to the author, it should encourage one to read further.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne Huston

    I am constantly amazed at the broad spectrum of Twains writings and how much of his wit and wisdom still apply today

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Forgot how much I loved Twain

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mary Leahy

    Some stories are better than others.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bradley McCann

    Reveals a gentle, kind and wise man.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bobby Garmon

    One of the greats in history

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bmankiewicz

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Fancy bound copy in green with gold foil. Possibly gift from paul

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cloyd Steiger

    Sam Clemmons is my hero. He was clearly way ahead of his time.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Robert Lewter

    He should have died rich. He is such a great author. All of his stories are wonderful but Huckleberry Finn is my all time favorite.

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