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A new understanding of ADD, along with practical information on how to recognize and treat the disorder A leading expert in the assessment and treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder dispels myths and offers reassuring, practical information about treatments. Drawing on recent findings in neuroscience and a rich variety of case stud A new understanding of ADD, along with practical information on how to recognize and treat the disorder A leading expert in the assessment and treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder dispels myths and offers reassuring, practical information about treatments. Drawing on recent findings in neuroscience and a rich variety of case studies from his own clinical practive, Dr. Thomas E. Brown describes what ADD syndrome is, how it can be recognized at different ages, and how it can best be treated.This is the first book to address the perplexing question about ADD: how can individuals, some very bright, be chronically unable to “pay attention,” yet be able to focus very well on specific tasks that strongly interest them? Dr. Brown disputes the “willpower” explanation and explains how inherited malfunctions of the brain’s management system prevent some people from being able to deal adequately with challenging tasks of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. His book is an authoritative and practical guide for physicians and psychologists, parents and teachers, and the 7 to 9 percent of persons who suffer from ADD/ADHD.


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A new understanding of ADD, along with practical information on how to recognize and treat the disorder A leading expert in the assessment and treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder dispels myths and offers reassuring, practical information about treatments. Drawing on recent findings in neuroscience and a rich variety of case stud A new understanding of ADD, along with practical information on how to recognize and treat the disorder A leading expert in the assessment and treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder/Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder dispels myths and offers reassuring, practical information about treatments. Drawing on recent findings in neuroscience and a rich variety of case studies from his own clinical practive, Dr. Thomas E. Brown describes what ADD syndrome is, how it can be recognized at different ages, and how it can best be treated.This is the first book to address the perplexing question about ADD: how can individuals, some very bright, be chronically unable to “pay attention,” yet be able to focus very well on specific tasks that strongly interest them? Dr. Brown disputes the “willpower” explanation and explains how inherited malfunctions of the brain’s management system prevent some people from being able to deal adequately with challenging tasks of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. His book is an authoritative and practical guide for physicians and psychologists, parents and teachers, and the 7 to 9 percent of persons who suffer from ADD/ADHD.

30 review for Attention Deficit Disorder: The Unfocused Mind in Children and Adults

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bean Delphiki

    This is definitely one of the best books out there on the topic of ADHD. And as someone diagnosed with the disorder in adulthood, believe me - I've read a lot. It might seem ridiculous that one of the best things I can say about this book is that it contains no misinformation that I could find. But while ADHD is one of the best-researched cognitive disorders, it is also probably the most misunderstood. I have, innumerable times, stood in a bookstore seething over some "definitive guide to ADHD" w This is definitely one of the best books out there on the topic of ADHD. And as someone diagnosed with the disorder in adulthood, believe me - I've read a lot. It might seem ridiculous that one of the best things I can say about this book is that it contains no misinformation that I could find. But while ADHD is one of the best-researched cognitive disorders, it is also probably the most misunderstood. I have, innumerable times, stood in a bookstore seething over some "definitive guide to ADHD" which is nothing of the sort, and which blithely repeats one common myth or another. There are a couple of other authors out there on the topic of ADHD that I would recommend, Dr. Edward Hallowell, and Dr. Russell Barkley. But with a caveat: neither is emotionally neutral on the subject. They are like a couple of Snow White's dwarfs. Happy Hallowell tends to downplay the difficulties of ADHD, while Bitter Barkley is unrelentingly negative and shoots down any displayed hint of a positive attitude about it. Dr. Brown, thankfully, is empathetic towards those with ADHD without suggesting it is anything but what it is - a disorder. His overview of the symptoms, common co-morbid conditions, and descriptions of how the disorder manifests over a lifespan is cogently presented and easy to read. His explanation of how ADHD differs from the moments of inattention everyone has is the sort of thing which few books spend enough time on, and which should hopefully help convince the skeptic in your family. Dr. Brown makes it clear that ADHD is a complex, multifaceted disorder, and not simply, "not paying attention." If you had only one book about ADHD on your bookshelf, I'd say it should be this one.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sassan

    This book by Dr. Brown is a masterpiece. Dr. Brown goes through personal stories of young children suffering from attention deficit (hyperactivity) disorder as well as adults and helps one truly understand the disorder. As someone who suffered from ADHD as a child and still does, this book brought tears to my eyes. The reason that it did so is because I suffered from it from a very young age and people at that time (and even today) did not really realize what ADHD was and that it was not a probl This book by Dr. Brown is a masterpiece. Dr. Brown goes through personal stories of young children suffering from attention deficit (hyperactivity) disorder as well as adults and helps one truly understand the disorder. As someone who suffered from ADHD as a child and still does, this book brought tears to my eyes. The reason that it did so is because I suffered from it from a very young age and people at that time (and even today) did not really realize what ADHD was and that it was not a problem of motivation. This book is inspiring and a highly recommended read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. ok, so I'm going to include quite a number of excerpts from this book for those who are thinking about reading it. One thing I will say . . . I was frustrated when a psychologist told me that Jake seemed to have trouble with "executive brain functioning" but then failed to give me more information about what that was. Searching for that term failed to bring up any useful websites, and there aren't books just on that subject -- mostly because it's still a newish theory. Luckily I found this book, ok, so I'm going to include quite a number of excerpts from this book for those who are thinking about reading it. One thing I will say . . . I was frustrated when a psychologist told me that Jake seemed to have trouble with "executive brain functioning" but then failed to give me more information about what that was. Searching for that term failed to bring up any useful websites, and there aren't books just on that subject -- mostly because it's still a newish theory. Luckily I found this book, and it addresses the topic hand in hand with ADHD. Yay!!! "The first chapter poses the perplexing question of ADHD: How can apparently normal persons have chronic diffculty "maintaining focus" for tasks they see as important, while they are able to pay attention very well to less important tasks that interest them? Is this just a simple problem of "willpower?" I argue that, despite appearances, the core problem in ADHD is not lack of willpower, but chronic, often lifelong impairment of the "executive" or management functions of the brain." (preface, xiii) "Increasingly researchers are recognizing that the syndrome of ADHD symptoms overlaps with impairments in what neuropsychologists call 'executive functions.' . . . The concept of executive functions refers not to corporate activities of business executives, but to facets of the cognitive management functions of the brain. Although there is not yet an established consensus definition of executive functions, most researchers agree that the term should be used to refer to brain circuits that prioritize, integrate, and regulate other cognitive functions. Executive functions, then, manage the brain's cognitive functions; they provide the mechanism for 'self-regulation.'" (p. 10) The author seems to have very strong faith in using medication to treat ADHD. His view (with studies cited to back it up) seems to be that behavior modification isn't anywhere near as effective as medication. This is something I noticed all throughout the book. Sometimes I felt as if the author were trying to scare parents with the information about all the horrible things that might happen if children's ADHD ISN'T treated with medication. "This study, described with many others in Chapter 9, stands as powerful evidence that impairments of attention and memory associated with ADHD result primarily from malfunctions in parts of the brain's neural networks that depend on the chemicals dopamine and norepinephrine." (p. 18) On the other hand, I like that the author is compassionate and isn't a blame the patient kind of guy. He speaks of ADHD as part of an overall "executive brain functioning" problems, and repeatedly reminds the reader that "it is clear that impairments of executive functions, those brain processes that organize and activate what we generally think of as attention, are not the result of insuffcient willpower." (p. 19) "The executive functions impaired in ADD syndrome are not skills to be learned or aspects of willpower to be exercised, but natural activities of complex neural networks of the brain." (p. 59) "V. S. Ramachandran (1998) observed that a piece of brain the size of a grain of sand would contain one hundred thousand neurons, two million axons, and one billion synapses, all talking to each other. (p. 61) The in-depth descriptions of how the brain works leave me wondering how anyone gets anything done, ever! "If I don't stay on Joey constantly, talking him through every step of the morning routine, he'll never make his bus . . . Joey always gets involved in playing with his transformer toys and forgets what he is supposed to be doing. He'll still be sitting on the floor in just his underpants with one sock on when he needs to be walking out the door to catch his bus." (p. 95) Heh. Story of our lives. "Joseph Biederman, Timothy Wilens, and others (1998) have shown that individuals with ADHD not only have a twofold increased lifetime risk of substance use disorders than those without ADHD, but also tend to begin substance abuse earlier and continue it longer." (p. 128) "Among young adults with ADD syndrome, this lengthy process of developing commitment to a particular line of work appears often to be more protracted than for most of their peers. Many of these men and women find themselves having a hard time not only with making occupational choices, but also in dealing with the usual frustrations of getting started in a job. Their chronic impulsivity may lead to a long series of quick and sometimes unwise decisions to pursue other jobs that seem more interesting, have fewer frustrations, or offer greater potential rewards. Russell Barkley and colleagues (1996) compared young adults with ADHD to others of similar ages from the same community. They found that the average time on the job for the ADHD group was 9.3 months, compared to 21.5 months for controls." (p. 147) "Paul Burgess (1997) elaborated this same argument against trying to assess executive functions with simple tasks: Goethe's famous comment that dissecting a fly and studying its parts will not tell you how it flies could almost have been intended for the neuropsychology of executive function . . . executive processing is called into play only when the activities of multiple components of the cognitive architecture must be coordinated. . . . Thus if a methodology is used where a task is broken down into its component parts, no deficit will be discovered in dysexecutive patients. (pp. 99–102) A person's ability to perform the complex, self-managed tasks of everyday life provides a much better measure of his or her executive functioning than can neuropsychological tests." (p. 181) "Psychiatric diagnoses are simply a set of categories, conceptual pigeonholes, for classifying complicated aspects of impaired human functioning. Currently the DSM-IV lists over two hundred separate diagnostic categories, each described as though it were a discrete entity. These categories divide up impairments of human cognitive, emotional, and behavioral functioning somewhat like the boundaries of nation-states divide up peoples of the world. Both are the product of committees subject to complex political pressures and shaped by the historical setting in which they were developed." (p. 204) Here's one of the passages that made me feel like the author is pushing for ALL those diagnosed with ADHD to be treated medically: "Results (of a study) showed an almost twofold reduction for risk of substance use disorders in individuals with ADHD who had been treated with stimulants, compared to individuals with ADHD who had not. In fact, those treated consistently during childhood and adolescence with stimulant medications had a rate of substance abuse and dependence not significantly different from the baseline rate in the population. Apparently there is something about living with untreated ADHD that increases the likelihood of abuse or dependence on drugs or alcohol. Multiple factors may be at work. For instance, impairments of the brain's reward system, described in Chapter 3 as an aspect of ADHD, a system managed primarily by dopamine networks, may cause a¤ected persons to seek out and repeatedly use addictive substances that tend to stimulate that section of brain. Medication treatment for ADHD may reduce that vulnerability while it alleviates symptoms of ADHD." (p. 225) Chapter 8 -- Disorders that may accompany ADD syndome -- is a fascinating look at the interaction and similarities between ADHD and other syndromes: "In the large Multimodal Treatment Study of Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (MTA Cooperative Group 1999), of children ages seven to nine years diagnosed with ADHD, 70 percent were found to have met DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for at least one other psychiatric disorder within the preceding year. These included: Oppositional-defiant disorder 40% Anxiety disorder 34% Conduct disorder 14% Tic disorder 11% Affective disorder (depression) 4% Mania, hypomania 2% (p. 201) "In TS (Tourette's syndrome) there is rarely the deliberate verbal aggression of ODD (oppositional defiance disorder) or criminal behavior that may be seen in CD (conduct disorder), yet TS too reflects significant impairment in the ability to modulate the expression of emotion by anticipating the emotional reactions of others. Thus all disorders in this group involve problems with using empathy to regulate one's actions." (p. 238) "Chapter 9 Medications and Other Treatments MYTH: Medications for ADD are likely to cause longer-term problems with substance abuse or other health concerns, especially when used by children. FACT: The risks of using appropriate medications to treat ADD are minimal, whereas the risks of not using medication to treat ADD are significant. The medications used for ADD are among the best researched for any disorder." (p. 246) "Throughout this book ADD syndrome has been described as a cluster of cognitive impairments that, in most cases, results from chemical problems in the brain, specifically malfunctions in the dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems that regulate most executive functions. Because ADD syndrome is essentially a chemical problem in the brain, it makes sense that, in the vast majority of cases, the most e¤ective way to alleviate its impairments is to change relevant aspects of the brain's chemistry. Additional treatments may be quite useful, but the most effective treatment for ADD syndrome is almost always well-managed medication." (p. 247)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I read this to complete CEU's for my nursing license renewal. I found it easy to read, fascinating and thorough. Although it does tend to lean toward medication as the best option, it does a good job of presenting alternative therapies as well. I read this to complete CEU's for my nursing license renewal. I found it easy to read, fascinating and thorough. Although it does tend to lean toward medication as the best option, it does a good job of presenting alternative therapies as well.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    This older book is available for a great price at a lot of bookstores, so if you want an overview and don't mind info that's a decade out of date, it's a good choice. Brown's smaller and more recent A New Understanding of ADHD in Children and Adults: Executive Function Impairments covers pretty much the same ground, but is more up-to-date. For example, he addresses the switch from the DSM-4 to the DSM-5, and why the latter is still flawed in dealing with adolescents and adults. Until the DSM-6 com This older book is available for a great price at a lot of bookstores, so if you want an overview and don't mind info that's a decade out of date, it's a good choice. Brown's smaller and more recent A New Understanding of ADHD in Children and Adults: Executive Function Impairments covers pretty much the same ground, but is more up-to-date. For example, he addresses the switch from the DSM-4 to the DSM-5, and why the latter is still flawed in dealing with adolescents and adults. Until the DSM-6 comes out, that's the one I'd aim folks at, although there's a vast variety available. Otherwise, my review for that newer book would also suffice for this one. Here's my original review for this one, which I'd read first: Good overview of the subject, although Brown doesn't seem to have a clear idea of his audience. Some parts are more scientific than necessary for a lay audience. For example, how many people want or need to know that dopamine is released by the ventral tagmental circuits of the limbic system (p. 73)? Given that many readers are going to be people who have ADD/ADHD, that's almost cruel. Given that there are substantial conflicts over ADD/ADHD, a broad scope is understandable, though.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lady Jane

    Breaks down AD/HD-- an impairment of the brain's Executive Function-- in laymens' terms, using many helpful anecdotes. In every chapter Dr. Brown addresses AD/HD facts, based on current research, and dispels myths and outdated theories. He spells out how AD/HD impacts people in childhood, adolescence and adulthood, identifies ancillary disorders that routinely accompany AD/HD, depicts treatment modalities and addresses common emotions relating to AD/HD. I think this book would be helpful to anyo Breaks down AD/HD-- an impairment of the brain's Executive Function-- in laymens' terms, using many helpful anecdotes. In every chapter Dr. Brown addresses AD/HD facts, based on current research, and dispels myths and outdated theories. He spells out how AD/HD impacts people in childhood, adolescence and adulthood, identifies ancillary disorders that routinely accompany AD/HD, depicts treatment modalities and addresses common emotions relating to AD/HD. I think this book would be helpful to anyone seeking current, research-based, basic information about AD/HD.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ngoc Tram

    Solid academic reading, based on multiple research. I appreciate the scientific basis of the book, but there's too much focus on medication treatment and insufficient discussion on lifestyle changes/organization mgmt. required by people with this disorder. However, I recommend this reading to everyone with some ties to ADHD, because it gives comprehensive understanding of the disorder, which is important and helpful as a first step. Solid academic reading, based on multiple research. I appreciate the scientific basis of the book, but there's too much focus on medication treatment and insufficient discussion on lifestyle changes/organization mgmt. required by people with this disorder. However, I recommend this reading to everyone with some ties to ADHD, because it gives comprehensive understanding of the disorder, which is important and helpful as a first step.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Volo

    Just a couple chapters in and reading on with interest. I've argued my own adult ADD case using Brown's research and have benefited in many situations from the medical treatment advocated by Brown. I love relating to the mind through attention related terminology and have found ADD-research valuable in adopting such terminology. However, Brown's view of ADD strongly appears to tied to the behavioural, totally missing the more fuzzily conceptualized and mapped but no less efficacious aspects of t Just a couple chapters in and reading on with interest. I've argued my own adult ADD case using Brown's research and have benefited in many situations from the medical treatment advocated by Brown. I love relating to the mind through attention related terminology and have found ADD-research valuable in adopting such terminology. However, Brown's view of ADD strongly appears to tied to the behavioural, totally missing the more fuzzily conceptualized and mapped but no less efficacious aspects of the mind. Brown describes selective difficulties in attending in a sustained, efficient, organized manner despite apparent motivation and intention to attend. Here lies the gate to further causes, but so far Brown shows no intention to head through. The gate leads to the realm of emotions, self-image, social dynamics, schemas and modes, parts, and the whole wide and overlapping jargon of psychotherapies. So, I'm curious and hope to revise my review soon. Foremost I'm looking forward to read mentions of internalised demands and inner critics plus avoidance related concepts. Avoidance has been mentioned, so there's slight evidence Brown might be on to something.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nick Mason

    Fascinating book that has transformed my understanding of ADD. The author does a great job debunking the myths and common misunderstandings related to ADD. What is fascinating from a personal level is how ADD symptoms has been misunderstood as learning disabilities. ADD goes beyond just inability for attention but a much more complex syndrome effecting multiple areas. The book introduced me to executive functioning which details the different areas that ADD effects which goes beyond what is comm Fascinating book that has transformed my understanding of ADD. The author does a great job debunking the myths and common misunderstandings related to ADD. What is fascinating from a personal level is how ADD symptoms has been misunderstood as learning disabilities. ADD goes beyond just inability for attention but a much more complex syndrome effecting multiple areas. The book introduced me to executive functioning which details the different areas that ADD effects which goes beyond what is commonly understood as in attentiveness. ADD is a complex syndrome that is a legitimate neurological disorder which must be medically treated as such it cannot be willed away. Although, the book touches upon controversial areas that are widely accepted and still need clinical work but, it does point to the need for more research in this area. It can later lead to earlier diagnosis and more treatment options with people effected by this.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Beth A.

    This book is informative, extremely complete, accurate and well thought out. It describes the whys of the sometimes contradictory behaviors of ADD. (Short answer, it’s more of a problem regulating attention than a complete inability to focus. Therefore a child might hyper-focus on something interesting to them, say, legos, for hours, but be unable to focus on something less interesting, say spelling words.) It contains a great description of the many different and sometimes unexpected ways ADD a This book is informative, extremely complete, accurate and well thought out. It describes the whys of the sometimes contradictory behaviors of ADD. (Short answer, it’s more of a problem regulating attention than a complete inability to focus. Therefore a child might hyper-focus on something interesting to them, say, legos, for hours, but be unable to focus on something less interesting, say spelling words.) It contains a great description of the many different and sometimes unexpected ways ADD affects individuals and explains what Brown believes is happening and why. The phrases “working memory”, and “executive functions” are important. While not extremely difficult to understand, this isn’t an easy read and is not a self help book. It’s geared toward explaining the problem not presenting new solutions.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Theo

    This book is excellent. It provides a comprehensive foundation to ADD/ADHD. Including the current understanding of underlying causes, the effects on people who suffer from it (The book has many stories from those who actually suffer, providing a closer connection for the reader), frameworks to better understand the effects, interventions, and addressing common myths and misconceptions. The book has provided me an excellent foundation and understanding of ADD/ADHD. The only thing I was seeking tha This book is excellent. It provides a comprehensive foundation to ADD/ADHD. Including the current understanding of underlying causes, the effects on people who suffer from it (The book has many stories from those who actually suffer, providing a closer connection for the reader), frameworks to better understand the effects, interventions, and addressing common myths and misconceptions. The book has provided me an excellent foundation and understanding of ADD/ADHD. The only thing I was seeking that is not provided is more specific information on how behavioural and environment interventions could be designed. This being said though, I believe I am in a much better place to assess the effectiveness of such interventions from reading this book.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Luiz Fabricio Calland Cerqueira

    Clearly the research is extensive. The study cases help very much in understanding the role played by ADHD. The author believes the most effective treatment strongly relies on medicine, mostly stimulants, and shows the research to back up this view.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    Read in 2 days. How's that for ADD? Read in 2 days. How's that for ADD?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Karen Hesson

    If you have any questions about learning difficulties, this is the book to read. Easy and interesting. Glad I stumbled on it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jane Pearson

    Lots of good, scientifically sound backed with research & data and strong examples.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Since my son was diagnosed with ADHD this spring, I have read three books on the topic (and many many more to go). The first two were by Dr. Hallowell, and I am happy they were. He has a very upbeat view of the condition; I liken his style to Tigger. Dr. Brown is more of an Eyore. That being said, one needs both in life, although I was very happy to encounter Tigger first before hitting some cold, hard facts. This book was amazing in that it has a ton of useful information, and also provided me Since my son was diagnosed with ADHD this spring, I have read three books on the topic (and many many more to go). The first two were by Dr. Hallowell, and I am happy they were. He has a very upbeat view of the condition; I liken his style to Tigger. Dr. Brown is more of an Eyore. That being said, one needs both in life, although I was very happy to encounter Tigger first before hitting some cold, hard facts. This book was amazing in that it has a ton of useful information, and also provided me with wonderful, clinical studies to support my choices as a parent (these have been useful in arguments with my family). Highly recommended.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Euclides Jitsukawa

    Considero esse o livro mais importante e esclarecedor da minha vida. Ler ele foi uma das experiências mais impactantes. Ele joga luz e torna possível entender o Transtorno de Déficit de Atenção, um problema muito mal compreendido e que afeta muitas pessoas. Todos os relatos dos pacientes do autor ressoavam exatamente com as minhas experiências e a vida da minha família, e tudo é descrito e discutido de maneira muito tocante. São também explicadas as causas e problemas associados com esse transtorn Considero esse o livro mais importante e esclarecedor da minha vida. Ler ele foi uma das experiências mais impactantes. Ele joga luz e torna possível entender o Transtorno de Déficit de Atenção, um problema muito mal compreendido e que afeta muitas pessoas. Todos os relatos dos pacientes do autor ressoavam exatamente com as minhas experiências e a vida da minha família, e tudo é descrito e discutido de maneira muito tocante. São também explicadas as causas e problemas associados com esse transtorno e os tratamentos possíveis. Sinto que depois de ler tenho uma visão muito diferente e sou uma pessoa melhor, e por isso sou muito grato ao autor (Thomas E. Brown).

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zdzich

    The book is written in a very clever way covering all the crucial sides of the issue. Although I personally do not hold either the view of those scientists advocating the existence of ADD or the approach to the development of one’s personality based almost entirely on genes, I have still found this book quite informative.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bastard Travel

    Dry. Exhaustive, by every definition of the word. It's full of good information, but mining it is a hassle. The take home is that, if it's actually ADHD, taking medication for it is the best way to go in the same common sense way that you wear glasses for poor eyesight, and anyone who tells you different is a Scientologist. Dry. Exhaustive, by every definition of the word. It's full of good information, but mining it is a hassle. The take home is that, if it's actually ADHD, taking medication for it is the best way to go in the same common sense way that you wear glasses for poor eyesight, and anyone who tells you different is a Scientologist.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Polynerdery

    Heavily promotes medication, but then again, the evidence presented is pretty compelling.

  21. 4 out of 5

    εїз*♥Karla♥*εїз Dennise

    Attention Deficit Disorder: The Unfocused Mind in Children and Adults By Thomas E. Brown, Ph.D. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, September, 2005 Myths about Attention Deficit Disorder abound. This disorder often goes unrecognized, and even when diagnosed may be inadequately treated. In this up-to-date and clearly written book for the general public as well as professionals in medicine, mental health and education, Dr. Brown describes his new way of understanding ADD. Drawing on recent findings Attention Deficit Disorder: The Unfocused Mind in Children and Adults By Thomas E. Brown, Ph.D. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, September, 2005 Myths about Attention Deficit Disorder abound. This disorder often goes unrecognized, and even when diagnosed may be inadequately treated. In this up-to-date and clearly written book for the general public as well as professionals in medicine, mental health and education, Dr. Brown describes his new way of understanding ADD. Drawing on recent findings in neuroscience and a rich variety of case histories from his clinical practice, he describes what ADD syndrome is, how it can be recognized at different ages, and how it can best be treated. This is the first book to address the perplexing question about ADD: how can individuals, some very bright, be chronically unable to "pay attention," yet be able to focus very well on specific tasks that strongly interest them? Dr. Brown challenges the "willpower" explanation and explains how inherited malfunctions of the brain's management system prevent some people from being able to deal adequately with challenging tasks of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. His book is an authoritative and practical guide for physicians and psychologists, parents and teachers, and the 7 to 9 percent of persons who suffer from ADD or ADHD.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was an interesting (jam packed with clinical and and technical info) "read" and the narration was decent. The "mile-high" summary is that medication is the best treatment (helping over 80% of patients) and he sites studies to support this statement. If you or someone you are responsible for needs treatment, keep in mind that this is an audiobook version of a book written in 2005, so the medications and treatment options may have changed a bit since the book was originally written. This was an interesting (jam packed with clinical and and technical info) "read" and the narration was decent. The "mile-high" summary is that medication is the best treatment (helping over 80% of patients) and he sites studies to support this statement. If you or someone you are responsible for needs treatment, keep in mind that this is an audiobook version of a book written in 2005, so the medications and treatment options may have changed a bit since the book was originally written.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    Excellent overview of Attention Deficit Disorder symptoms and treatment by a leading expert.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kris

    I actually never finished this book. I found the anecdotes interesting, but didn't find it overly enlightening... I actually never finished this book. I found the anecdotes interesting, but didn't find it overly enlightening...

  25. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    dumb. thats really all there is to say.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Edelhart Kempeneers

    Ik heb veel bijgeleerd over deze aandoening. Leerrijk boek.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    Not sure if there is any ADD in the family, but I thought this was a great nonfiction read for those who want to know more about this disorder.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    This book was quite useful but also, at times, laborious.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Extremely informative. I've no doubt I'll be revisiting this book again. My only small complaint is that I'd like to of seen more non-medicine treatments discussed. Extremely informative. I've no doubt I'll be revisiting this book again. My only small complaint is that I'd like to of seen more non-medicine treatments discussed.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Beverly

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