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60 Black Women in Horror Fiction

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February is African American History Month here in the United States. It is also Women in Horror Month (WiHM). In 2013, as an Ambassador for Women in Horror Month. This list of black women who write horror was compiled at the intersection of the two. The booklet also includes interviews with nine of the women. The electronic (eBook) edition contains the following bonus mate February is African American History Month here in the United States. It is also Women in Horror Month (WiHM). In 2013, as an Ambassador for Women in Horror Month. This list of black women who write horror was compiled at the intersection of the two. The booklet also includes interviews with nine of the women. The electronic (eBook) edition contains the following bonus materials: four short stories, and an essay, not found in the paperback. Includes: 60 Black Women in Horror Interview with Linda Addison Interview with Darlene Black Interview with Valjeanne Jeffers Interview with Jemiah Jefferson Interview with Briana Lawrence Interview with Nnedi Okorafor Interview with A.L. Peck Interview with Eden Royce Interview with Sumiko Saulson There is an associated print edition that does not include the following bonus materials found in the eBook: David Watson article: On L.A. Banks and Octavia Butler Short Story: Amber’s New Friend by Crystal Connor Short Story: The Last by Sumiko Saulson Short Story: Rhythm by Eden Royce Short Story The Funeral by Annie J Penn


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February is African American History Month here in the United States. It is also Women in Horror Month (WiHM). In 2013, as an Ambassador for Women in Horror Month. This list of black women who write horror was compiled at the intersection of the two. The booklet also includes interviews with nine of the women. The electronic (eBook) edition contains the following bonus mate February is African American History Month here in the United States. It is also Women in Horror Month (WiHM). In 2013, as an Ambassador for Women in Horror Month. This list of black women who write horror was compiled at the intersection of the two. The booklet also includes interviews with nine of the women. The electronic (eBook) edition contains the following bonus materials: four short stories, and an essay, not found in the paperback. Includes: 60 Black Women in Horror Interview with Linda Addison Interview with Darlene Black Interview with Valjeanne Jeffers Interview with Jemiah Jefferson Interview with Briana Lawrence Interview with Nnedi Okorafor Interview with A.L. Peck Interview with Eden Royce Interview with Sumiko Saulson There is an associated print edition that does not include the following bonus materials found in the eBook: David Watson article: On L.A. Banks and Octavia Butler Short Story: Amber’s New Friend by Crystal Connor Short Story: The Last by Sumiko Saulson Short Story: Rhythm by Eden Royce Short Story The Funeral by Annie J Penn

43 review for 60 Black Women in Horror Fiction

  1. 5 out of 5

    David Watson

    This book is a compilation of interviews, essays and biographies of Black Women horror writers. Some of the writers featured in this book include Octavia Butler, L.A. Banks, Tananarive Due and many more. I feel this is an important book because it gives writers exposure. Writers have to work hard at their craft and its hard for them to get the attention they deserve. There are more writers out there than readers and it's too easy for a good writer to go unnoticed. 60 Black Women in Horror Fiction This book is a compilation of interviews, essays and biographies of Black Women horror writers. Some of the writers featured in this book include Octavia Butler, L.A. Banks, Tananarive Due and many more. I feel this is an important book because it gives writers exposure. Writers have to work hard at their craft and its hard for them to get the attention they deserve. There are more writers out there than readers and it's too easy for a good writer to go unnoticed. 60 Black Women in Horror Fiction shows that there are some great Black women horror writers out there. I only knew a handful of the writers in this book and after the in-depth interviews and short stories collected here, I found some new writers that I need to add to my to be read list. This book starts with biographies and pictures of several writers and then gets into interviews with Linda Addison, Jemiah Jefferson and Eden Royce to name a few. One of my favorites parts of this book was how some of the writers talk about how women horror writers get treated differently than their male counterparts and there aren't as many. In the case of A.L. Peck she states that she doesn't know why there aren't more female horror writers and she wants to change that. There is also a great interview with Jemiah Jefferson where she talks about the hardships of finishing a novel while putting up with health issues, a stressful job and financial issues. This book doesn't just give you a new perspective on what Black Women horror writers have to go through to get their work out to the public, it gives you a new appreciation for writers in general. 60 Black Women in Horror Fiction shows you what Black Women horror writers have to offer and gives a glimpse of what goes on in the mind of a horror writer.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    The section up front is a great resource. Several names are familiar, but more from Science Fiction and Fantasy than from Horror. I will be returning to this resource. But the big reason I picked this up was the short fiction. “Amber’s New Friend” by Crystal Connor is a haunting story that mostly adheres to the Jamesian guidelines. To frame this discussion, it is worth bringing in words from the Dean of the School of Ghost Stories, M. R. James. “Two ingredients most valuable in the concocting of The section up front is a great resource. Several names are familiar, but more from Science Fiction and Fantasy than from Horror. I will be returning to this resource. But the big reason I picked this up was the short fiction. “Amber’s New Friend” by Crystal Connor is a haunting story that mostly adheres to the Jamesian guidelines. To frame this discussion, it is worth bringing in words from the Dean of the School of Ghost Stories, M. R. James. “Two ingredients most valuable in the concocting of a ghost story are, to me, the atmosphere and the nicely managed crescendo. I assume, of course, that the writer will have got his central idea before he undertakes the story at all. Let us, then, be introduced to the actors in a placid way; let us see them going about their ordinary business, undisturbed by forebodings, pleased with their surroundings; and into this calm environment let the ominous thing put out its head, unobtrusively at first, and then more insistently, until it holds the stage. It is not amiss sometimes to leave a loophole for a natural explanation; but, I would say, let the loophoole be so narrow as not to be quite practicable.” “Another requisite, in my opinion, is that the ghost should be malevolent or odious: amiable and helpful apparitions are all very well in fairy tales or in local legends, but I have no use for them in a fictitious ghost story.” I was too distracted by the ghost being a central character and omnipresent for the atmosphere to work, and it was there full time throughout the story. I would have enjoyed more growing tension. The epilogue raised more questions for me than it answered. “The Last” by Sumiko Saulson starts right where Frankenstein ended. Unfortunately, I didn’t really care for Frankenstein, so this story was doomed to not work for me. “Rhythm” by Eden Royce is beautiful and lyrical in its unrelenting anger. “The Funeral” by Annie J. Penn was a bit too surreal complicated by what appeared to be format issues. These worked against being able to immerse myself in the story.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Serena Toxicat

    This is a book that was waiting to happen to the literary world and, really, beyond. There's nothing else in print that addresses these authors who have received far too little exposure and attention. I love this author's writing and she is my favorite black woman in horror!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sumiko Saulson

    I feel this is an important work. It's a list of biographies and interviews with black women who write horror. I won't give it a star rating since I'm the person who wrote the biographies and interviewed the other writers.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Magda

    Most of the stories were mediocre; only one really caught my attention and I really like it, so overall the book was just likeable but nothing more.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ann Harrell

  7. 4 out of 5

    Big

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shawna Garcia

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tox

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dusky Literati

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vicy Cross

  12. 4 out of 5

    Valjeanne Jeffers

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mia Redgrave

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nicola Fantom

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mc

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ratri

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brian Mossa

  18. 5 out of 5

    Betty

  19. 4 out of 5

    Donna Schubert

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jaideep Khanduja

  22. 5 out of 5

    Meryem Gahamou

  23. 4 out of 5

    Richard Hicks

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

  25. 4 out of 5

    Callie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

  27. 4 out of 5

    Silvia Cristina

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

  29. 4 out of 5

    Almira Rodrigues

  30. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  31. 5 out of 5

    Territsen

  32. 4 out of 5

    Janelea

  33. 4 out of 5

    Sonia

  34. 5 out of 5

    Jazz

  35. 4 out of 5

    Haven Gordon

  36. 5 out of 5

    Kim Coomey

  37. 5 out of 5

    Laureen

  38. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  39. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  40. 5 out of 5

    Janice

  41. 4 out of 5

    Karen Bainbridge

  42. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

  43. 4 out of 5

    Kanchan Pawar

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