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Batman Detective Comics #27

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DC Entertainment presents this mega-sized issue featuring an all-star roster of Batman creators past and present! Don’t miss a modern-day retelling of The Dark Knight’s origin by the incredible team of writer Brad Meltzer and artist Bryan Hitch. Plus, all-new stories by Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy, Peter J. Tomasi and Guillem March, Paul Dini and Dustin Nguyen, Gregg Hurw DC Entertainment presents this mega-sized issue featuring an all-star roster of Batman creators past and present! Don’t miss a modern-day retelling of The Dark Knight’s origin by the incredible team of writer Brad Meltzer and artist Bryan Hitch. Plus, all-new stories by Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy, Peter J. Tomasi and Guillem March, Paul Dini and Dustin Nguyen, Gregg Hurwitz and Neal Adams, new art by legendary Batman writer/artist Frank Miller and more! Also in this issue, John Layman and Jason Fabok kick off the new storyline “GOTHTOPIA.”


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DC Entertainment presents this mega-sized issue featuring an all-star roster of Batman creators past and present! Don’t miss a modern-day retelling of The Dark Knight’s origin by the incredible team of writer Brad Meltzer and artist Bryan Hitch. Plus, all-new stories by Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy, Peter J. Tomasi and Guillem March, Paul Dini and Dustin Nguyen, Gregg Hurw DC Entertainment presents this mega-sized issue featuring an all-star roster of Batman creators past and present! Don’t miss a modern-day retelling of The Dark Knight’s origin by the incredible team of writer Brad Meltzer and artist Bryan Hitch. Plus, all-new stories by Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy, Peter J. Tomasi and Guillem March, Paul Dini and Dustin Nguyen, Gregg Hurwitz and Neal Adams, new art by legendary Batman writer/artist Frank Miller and more! Also in this issue, John Layman and Jason Fabok kick off the new storyline “GOTHTOPIA.”

30 review for Batman Detective Comics #27

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    This is a special mega-sized anniversary issue celebrating the 75 years since the appearing of the character of Batman in the original Detective Comics #27, published in 1939. This issue is also part of the regular run of the second volume of Detective Comics, part of the New52 line of comic books by DC Comics. Due the large quantity of pages (94), quite unusual for a regular comic book single issue, this one contains 7 different stories: The Case of the Chemical Syndicate (Re-imagined Story) Th This is a special mega-sized anniversary issue celebrating the 75 years since the appearing of the character of Batman in the original Detective Comics #27, published in 1939. This issue is also part of the regular run of the second volume of Detective Comics, part of the New52 line of comic books by DC Comics. Due the large quantity of pages (94), quite unusual for a regular comic book single issue, this one contains 7 different stories: The Case of the Chemical Syndicate (Re-imagined Story) This story is written by Brad Meltzer and illustrated by Bryan Hitch. The creative team took the original story from the first comic book where The Batman ever appeared, but making a re-imagined story, updating the art and storytelling format. This is a great experiment since while keeping most of the core of the original story, they added brilliant details from the live action movie Batman from 1989. It's already accepted that the original first story of The Bat-Man was copied from an earlier story of The Shadow, but luckily, they only copied that and from then, the lore of Batman and his gothic world have expanded and evolutioned enough to be by now a truly original character, one of the most populars nowadays in the genre of super-hero comic books. Old School This story is written by Gregg Hurwitz and illustrated by Neal Adams. This is a story with a good heart but a weak beating. The creative team tried to show how Batman has adapted along the years to survive and keeping its sales and being able to be still a popular character with the different generations. The intention is clear but I think that the presentation didn't fulfill all my expectations. Still is an amusing reading. Better Days This story is written by Peter J. Tomasi and illustrated by Ian Bertram. An engaging story where Bruce Wayne celebrates his 75th birthday party along with his closest friends where you can see an interesting merging of stuff featured before in Batman Beyond, with Barbara as the commissioner of police, but Damian Wayne as the current Batman. Also, you find Dick Grayson, still as Nightwing, and Tim Drake, very likely some sort of Red Robin, and incredibly you have Alfred (geez! Is he still alive when Bruce is 75 years older now?!) And what better way to celebrate your birthday but doing what you like to do best? ... Keeping safe the citizens of his beloved city. Hero or Rain (It must be a mistake in the index or in the page where the title is featured on) This story is written and illustrated by Francesco Francavilla. An enigmatic story, quite brief showing how Batman saves again a boy that if you keep attention, it's a child quite relevant in the first year of Batman, and in the future will provoke dangerous consequences. The Sacrifice This story is written by Mike Barr and illustrated by Guillem March. Thomas and Martha Wayne died in a dark alley and that it was the trigger for Bruce to dedicate his life to become Batman and to protect his city from the most insane criminals that the world ever seen. But was that all the sacrifice done in that dark alley? Gothopia (Part 1 of 3: "The Perfect Crime") This story is written by John Layman and illustrated by Jason Fabok. This is the first part of a story that it will be further developed in the following issues of the current run of Detective Comics. While it was an awesome first chapter, I honestly think that they should keep to publish this first part in the next issue and trying to do a stand-alone story here due being the 75th Anniversary issue. I understand the marketing mechanics behind of the intention to publish this first part of a story in this particular issue. However, understanding and to approve are two different things. I think that to pay almost $8 for a comic book issue was enough and including a story with a cliffhanger to push customers to buy at least the next two issues is something tasteless. Twenty-Seven (A totally original story) This story is written by Scott Snyder and illustrated by Sean Murphy. Gotham City will always needs a Batman, but Batman is Bruce Wayne, a human mortal being. In this great story you will find out the solution by Bruce to keep his protection over Gothan City for 200 years and on.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo

    On the first month of 2014, DC Comics released its Detective Comics #27 as a mega-sized edition to commemorate the 75th year of Batman and the original Detective Comics #27 from which the company took its name. It had a murderers' row of creators, giving us five tales about the Batman, his past, present and future. My favorite short story would be the the one written by Peter J. Tomasi and illustrated by Ian Bertram with colors by David Stewart. It's a story of Batman celebrating his 75th birthda On the first month of 2014, DC Comics released its Detective Comics #27 as a mega-sized edition to commemorate the 75th year of Batman and the original Detective Comics #27 from which the company took its name. It had a murderers' row of creators, giving us five tales about the Batman, his past, present and future. My favorite short story would be the the one written by Peter J. Tomasi and illustrated by Ian Bertram with colors by David Stewart. It's a story of Batman celebrating his 75th birthday with Bat-family. I like it because it has connections to both Grant Morrison's and The Dark Knight Returns, two Batman concepts I'm quite fond of. There's this splash page that homages The Dark Knight Returns that not at all grim and gritty. It's almost a genial, smiling Batman. It must be read to be believed. I like the twist in the story and how it feeds to the myth: Batman is still Batman.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Frank Eldritch

    Detective Comics celebrates the glorious and enduring symbol of the Batman in this special 75th anniversary issue with a tantalizing cover art by Greg Capullo. It's an image that we all have seen before countless of times; the ominous figure of the Dark Knight standing above a gargoyle statue as the bat-signal illuminates the sky. For his most devoted fans such as myself, it is not simply an iconic image-- it also speaks to a promise of better times ahead regardless of how strong the darkness ha Detective Comics celebrates the glorious and enduring symbol of the Batman in this special 75th anniversary issue with a tantalizing cover art by Greg Capullo. It's an image that we all have seen before countless of times; the ominous figure of the Dark Knight standing above a gargoyle statue as the bat-signal illuminates the sky. For his most devoted fans such as myself, it is not simply an iconic image-- it also speaks to a promise of better times ahead regardless of how strong the darkness had claimed our lives; a promise that has spanned across seven-plus decades in the pages of comic books and on-screen. Needless to say, the seven stories incorporated in this issue are not absolutely perfect nor could they be considered immediate classic tales. But each story had its heart in the right place, and they were written for this issue in service of what Batman represents, and to encapsulate the successful run of this immortal hero, and the qualities which defined his legacy and why he never fails to capture the imagination of his fanbase from the very beginning and to this very moment. Granted, a few of these stories could have been expounded or explored with a more nuanced approach if the purpose is to create groundbreaking stories for the 75th anniversary. But I think that would be an erroneous point of view because what truly matters for this particular issue is that it pays tribute to everything that Batman is all about. The Case of the Chemical Syndicate While in the middle of trying to apprehend a murder as it takes place, Batman examines the reasons why he is a vigilante. The constant phrase "I do it because (insert reason)" inner monologues did get old pretty quick but the message of the story was simply to echo what was already well-established about Bruce Wayne's childhood trauma which propelled him to put on a mask, and how this singular motivation kept him dedicated in ridding the streets of Gotham from crime and its other villains because no one else has the power or will to stand up for a greater good in the city. Old School Illustrated by the legendary Neal Adams, this was a befitting tribute to the evolution of Batman across the years. It almost serves as a post-modern commentary of the passage of time inside the Batman universe, and the milestones that he had to overcome in order to be the hero we know and love. He was joined here by Robin and his infamous rogue's gallery in an almost topsy-turvy chase where his change of costume designs in the process was also symbolic of how he must keep up with the dynamic social climate both in and out of the fictional constraints of his writers and readers. It's also very pleasant to look at Neal Adams' art again. Better Days Penned by Peter J. Tomasi, what started as a tongue-in-cheek situation where a retired Bruce Wayne celebrates his 75th birthday surrounded by Barbara Gordon, Alfred, Dick Grayson, Damian Wayne and Tim Drake (with cake) easily turned into a comedic yet still a heartfelt homage as to how a hero never truly puts away his mask when the city he loves and sacrificed so much for still needs him. Hero This really short piece is a reference to Scott Snyder's earlier Batman work, The Black Mirror which will only confuse readers who haven't read it. I admit that I was dumbfounded the first time I read it before it finally clicked. Though astoundingly drawn, the story is far too alienating because of its obscure reference. The Sacrifice This is easily my most favorite piece of all the stories. In a very Dickensian fashion, The Phantom Stranger takes Batman into an alternate reality where his parents were never killed, but the cost of that fulfillment of a happy, normal life for Bruce Wayne is the absence of Batman which Gotham City desperately needs. This stirred my emotions viscerally. I almost wept. However, I do believe that five pages are not enough to tell the story with bolder, more vibrant strokes. It felt real enough to wound me and bring tears to my eyes, but I would have preferred at least 3 or 4 more pages to really craft the piece into perfection because there's more to it than meets the eye. Gothopia This is the first part of three issues as stated at the end credits of the story. In this scenario, Gotham City is apparently the safest place in America and that alone is enough to send chills in my spine if not make me laugh out loud because it felt wrong to even read that on page. And only rightly so because, as it turns out, someone is playing with the strings and making everyone believe that Gotham is crime-free--including Batman himself. The story ends in a cliffhanger because you have to read the next installments later on. I suppose I understand adding this story into the anniversary mix and it has certainly piqued my interest. It does, however, feel out of place for this issue. Twenty-seven The last story left me confounded but in the most thrilling sense. A sci-fi take that even surpasses the Batman Beyond storyline, this one offers us a glimpse to a more complex way of how Batman operates as a crime fighter, and what steps he took to ensure that he will be able to keep up with the changing times. It's a rather viable concept, considering how obsessively driven Bruce Wayne is originally so the twist, though surprising, is not unexpected. I don't want to give any more hints about this story because I'd like you to read it yourself and enjoy it as much as I did. I certainly want a sequel! OVERALL I would also like to commend the fantastic full-paged artwork found inside. Despite the limitations in length, most of the stories stuck to their landing in the best way they can, with only one or two out of seven that are instantly stellar exceptions. For an anniversary special, Detective Comics #27 had been a great ride teeming with the numerous, unforgettable things that we have always loved and enjoyed the most about Batman. RECOMMENDED: 8/10 DO READ MY BATMAN COMICS REVIEWS AT:

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    We all know that the original Detective Comics 27 was the issue where the Caped Crusader debuted. This new #27 honors that with a handful of delightful Batman stories in this rather large issue. I bought this issue mainly because of its value. My personal favorites are Old School and Twenty-Seven. Old school provides us a meta-commentary of Batman surviving the different eras of comics while Twenty-Seven shows us the future of Batman. The other stories are quite good too.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gonzalo Oyanedel

    Conjunto de historias firmadas por diversos equipo creativos que (con diversos grados de emotividad) homenajean el legado del personaje.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Abhinav

    You can read the full review over at the blog: http://sonsofcorax.wordpress.com/2014... Less than a year since Detective Comics celebrated its 900th issue with New 52: Detective Comics #19, an anthology issue which brought together several different creators, we have New 52: Detective Comics #27, which celebrates the landmark issue of the original series that first introduced Batman to the world as Bat-Man, the caped crusader and dark knight of Gotham who solved the city’s crime with acts of vigil You can read the full review over at the blog: http://sonsofcorax.wordpress.com/2014... Less than a year since Detective Comics celebrated its 900th issue with New 52: Detective Comics #19, an anthology issue which brought together several different creators, we have New 52: Detective Comics #27, which celebrates the landmark issue of the original series that first introduced Batman to the world as Bat-Man, the caped crusader and dark knight of Gotham who solved the city’s crime with acts of vigilantism. And again, we have an anthology issue bringing together different creators, and telling some really different stories while also giving some bonus art to fans. I was really excited for this issue. I kind of missed the whole lead-up to Detective Comics #19 since I wasn’t reading the series at the time, but I am now. And one thing that happened this afternoon was that I was massively disappointed. This issue, in its first half, basically retells classic tales and does a hack-job. The second half, with original stories that will be carried over in future issues, is actually good. But the first half definitely bothered me, and it was the writing far more than the art that bothered me. Detective Comics 27First, there is something that I want to say. I am very, very disappointed that there are no female creators on this issue. This is a dude’s club through and through, same as Detective Comics #19. I could kind of forgive that previous issue to a degree, but DC really should have learned from that. They have several female writers working for them right now (Gail Simone, Marguerite Bennett, Ann Nocenti, Christy Marx, Amanda Conner) and a few female artists too (Becky Cloonan, Amanda Conner, Nicola Scott). So why are none of them on this issue? From the credits list, the only one I can make out is Laura Allred, who coloured a single page of pinup art by Mike Allred. One page of non-story material from 80. Very dreadful. Anyway, moving on. Brad Meltzer and Bryan Hitch’s The Case of The Chemical Syndicate is basically a retelling of Batman’s introductory story from Detective Comics #27. It could have been a decent story if the writing didn’t have plot holes and if the art was better. There’s one splashpage in one Batman is air-kicking at a bad guy and it is a full-on spine-breaker pose, or rather, hip-breaker. The way Batman kicks, is physically impossible as far as I can tell. And no, it is not a side-kick. There’s just no… heart to the story at all. Gregg Hurwitz and Neal Adams’ Old School is next and has a very classic art style with the dialogue reminiscent of the days of Adam West’s Batman from the 60s show. Once again, some really weird panel and story transitions prevent this story from being good. Full-on wacky and campy but without any heart. And the way it ends, completely confusing. Talk about breaking the fourth wall. Better Days by Peter J. Tomasi and Ian Bertram had a really good first half but the second half was somewhat terrible. and Bertram art doesn’t really help differentiate the different characters, compounded by the fact that the way Dave Stewart colours them makes it impossible to gauge how old the characters are. Bruce is 75, but how old are the others? And where’s Jason Todd in this reunion? Or Luke Fox? The absence of Stephanie Brown and Cass Cain I can understand since they are not a part of the current continuity, but the other two? I don’t get it. And Tim Drake and Richard “Dick” Grayson just flow into each other. They might as well be twins. Plus it doesn’t make sense that Dick is still Nightwing at this point while Damian Wayne has become Batman, given that Dick mentored Damian as Robin while Bruce was reportedly dead and missing for a long time in some pre-New 52 comics. So, another mess. Then we have Francesco Francavilla’s Hero (credit as Rain in the actual story), both written and drawn by him. Very little dialogue and the story relies almost entirely on the art, which is pretty fantastic, but that’s Francavilla for you, one of the best damn artists in the industry right now. If I’m right about who Batman saves in this story though, then that’s pretty major, given how that character ends up in the current New 52 continuity. I liked it. Mike W. Barr and Guillem March’s The Sacrifice is the retelling of an older story featuring the Phantom Stranger and is one where he basically snaps his fingers and lets Batman live a life where Bruce Wayne never became Batman and eventually had a family and a kid with his parents both being alive, but one where the criminals came to rule all of Gotham and where Commissioner Gordon is a broken man. The original story, I can’t remember the names of the creators, is actually really good, but Barr and March rush through the story here and end up ruining it. The penultimate story is Gothtopia, written by John Layman, drawn by Jason Fabok, coloured by Tomeu Morey and lettered by Jared K. Fletcher. This was definitely the best story here. This was a straight-up Elseworlds story, with an alternative Gotham where Batman is actually winning the war on crime in Gotham and has almost made it a utopia. But there are some great beats in this story and I loved it. I could have done without all the weird sounding names which prevented me from connecting these characters with the actual Earth 1 characters, but that’s about the only criticism I have of this. This is also the first story in a big crossover coming soon to the Bat-family titles and I can’t wait to see what’s in store next. Batman superstar Scott Snyder finishes off with Twenty Seven, which is drawn and coloured by his The Wake collaborators Sean Murphy and Matt Hollingsworth and was fantastic. This story was essentially a full-on science fiction romp with lots of great alternate, future takes on Batman and I enjoyed it because of the scope of the story, which is huge. Another Elseworlds style story but something very different still. I can’t wait to see where Scott and Sean go with this next. Overall, I’m very disappointed with this story. The good parts were not enough to outweigh the bad, sadly. And it definitely is not worth the $7.99 price tag. Detective Comics #19 was a far better issue and celebration in pretty much every single way. Rating: 6/10

  7. 4 out of 5

    Krishna Naidoo

    Batman is 75 years old! So we've been treated to a 'Mega-Sized Anniversary Issue' to celebrate 75 years of, arguably, the greatest superhero character there has ever been and to celebrate the second run of Detective Comics reaching that historical issue 27 (Where Batman made his first ever appearance all those years ago in the original run... technically if we forget the reboot this is actually issue 908). This issue contains 6 standalone stories and 1 which will continue into the normal run of t Batman is 75 years old! So we've been treated to a 'Mega-Sized Anniversary Issue' to celebrate 75 years of, arguably, the greatest superhero character there has ever been and to celebrate the second run of Detective Comics reaching that historical issue 27 (Where Batman made his first ever appearance all those years ago in the original run... technically if we forget the reboot this is actually issue 908). This issue contains 6 standalone stories and 1 which will continue into the normal run of this comics. Cover By Capullo and fco. Capullo tends to adopt a simplistic but bold style to the covers he draws and the same is true here. It works. We usually see Batman perched on a gargoyle but here he stands and looks upwards at the Bat signal. It’s as if Batman here is doing a bit of self-reflection which is what this issue really is, a reflection of what Batman is and what he has become. In that sense the cover sums up what this book is about which is a rarity. Cover art: 9/10 The Case of the Chemical Syndicate Written by Brad Meltzer Art by Bryan Hitch This is a short story about Batman saving one of four company board members, one of which is set on killing the rest. The story serves as an interesting back drop for what’s going on in Batman’s head. The narration accompanying it originates from Bruce Wayne’s first Journal entry as the Batman. It’s an interesting read, the message is clear, chilling even but honest. It’s a fitting comic to begin what is in effect a dissection of this character. I can’t say much about the art, it’s not that’s it terrible it’s just not my style, it’s rather simplistic and not very gritty for my liking. Story: 7/10 Art: 5/10 Old School Written by Gregg Hurwitz Art by Neal Adams The book begins in an artistic and written style which reflects the style of the classic comics which this character originally spawned from. It’s interesting to see Batman’s literal transition within this book and the references to the fact that this story is occurring within a comic book all make out for an interesting introspective. The story points out the faults of the medium whilst also showing how far this character has come in its 75 year history. Rather sadly it also points at Batman’s rather sad destiny. In this medium Batman can never move on, destined to carry on fighting villains continuously and to forever be tormented by the early traumas of his life but what this medium allows for is unparalleled depth in its characters non so is a truer example of that than Bruce Wayne. In effect Batman has to be the hero he is to work in this medium. The medium is equally responsible for what he has become. And because of it he will never really have closure. Story: 8/10 Art: 8/10 Better Days Written by Peter J. Tomasi Art by Ian Bertram This treads similar ground as the previous story. Batman even in his later years will never truly be finished. And even here while he celebrates his 75 birthday he can’t help but get back into the thick of it. This artistic style however really doesn’t suit me. Story: 7/10 Art: 5/10 Hero Story and Art by Francesco Francavilla This is the shortest piece in the book. The art is breath taking. The sharp contrast of bright and dark tones really makes the first few pages of this story very striking and all it depicts is Batman saving I believe a young James Gordon Jr (or just a random kid) from a car crash. Story: 7/10 Art: 10/10 The Sacrifice Written by Mike Barr Art by Guillem March This shows what the world would have become if those terrible events of Bruce’s early childhood had not occurred. Gotham is in ruins without Batman. It’s often said that his rogue’s gallery is a direct cause of his own theatrical actions; this story however takes another turn on this idea. Instead of highlighting that it focuses on the fact that Bruce does this from a sense of duty. Story: 8/10 Art: 6/10 Gothtopia Written by John Layman Art by Jason Fabok This story is the only story which is not a standalone with the current author of the series Layman and artist Fabok delivering the goods for this piece. It’s good entertainment but only time will tell whether this will actually turn out to be anything worthy of exploration. The art by Fabok is very impressive and is currently making me seriously consider catching up with this series just to look at the art but the problem with Layman’s work is it can be rather similar to other work in which case it can often feel rather ‘meh’. This however was entertaining. Story: 7/10 Art: 8/10 Twenty-Seven Written by Scott Snyder Art by Sean Murphy Scott Snyder. Sean Murphy. Need I say more? Murphy brings his very original scratchy and beautiful artistic style to the table. While Snyder delivers an intelligent story about the Batman’s of the future in particular one incarnation of a Batman in the making. They're all clones of Bruce and they all have a choice to leave fighting crime and end Batman’s omnipresence in Gotham but at the end of the day for Batman it’s “Never The End”. Story: 10/10 Art: 10/10 Overall: 8/10

  8. 4 out of 5

    Eladio Garro

    A solid anniversary celebration to the Dark Knight, something the upcoming issues, 1000 and 1027, failed spectacularly.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sr. Lado Brillante

    Vamos por partes. Tener a Frank Miller dibujando una portada alterna fue una bella forma de reconocer la rica historia que hay detrás de Batman. Horrible que tuviera libertad creativa y haya dibujado lo que sea ¿esa es Catwoman? ¿de que universo alterno? La historia de Layman, quién en ese momento era el escritor regular de la serie, es sin chiste y con un concepto gastado. Lo que sea que hayan intentado hacer Hurwitz y Adams es horrible. Barr, March y Francavilla salen tablas. Lo mismo pasa en l Vamos por partes. Tener a Frank Miller dibujando una portada alterna fue una bella forma de reconocer la rica historia que hay detrás de Batman. Horrible que tuviera libertad creativa y haya dibujado lo que sea ¿esa es Catwoman? ¿de que universo alterno? La historia de Layman, quién en ese momento era el escritor regular de la serie, es sin chiste y con un concepto gastado. Lo que sea que hayan intentado hacer Hurwitz y Adams es horrible. Barr, March y Francavilla salen tablas. Lo mismo pasa en la historia de Hitch, donde solo por tener su arte estamos hablando de ella, porque por lo demás nadie sabe si es canon, si es un sueño, si es una adaptación. Ahora lo bueno. Gran, gran, gran historia de Snyder y Murphy. Quiero una serie regular de eso. Quiero una película animada. Quiero lo que sea. Pero lo quiero. Sin haber terminado su run en Batman, Snyder sigue el consejo de Grant Morrison y escribe el final que a él le gustaría, el final de su historia. Y esa es una historia de legado. De un hombre escogiendo lo que es correcto. De sacrificio. Es una historia de Batman. Y al final el sentimiento. Peter Tomasi y Ian Bertram hacen el final más lógico y, quizás por eso, bello de Batman y toda la familia. Y lo hacen mezclando elemento de todos lados. Ahí estan homenajes a Dark Knight Returns, al run de Morrison, a Batman Beyond y Batman The Animated Series que es de donde toma toda la vibra nostálgica. Al final un clásico número de aniversario. Algo malo, algo para los fans casuales y algo para quienes recuerdan que todo comenzó hace muchos años en otro Detective Comics #27.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Centauri

    I just could not get into any of the stories. I admit, the first one of the issue with the dynamic duo seemingly morphing into all the versions since the beginning was intriguing, and the ending was decent, but nothing "wow" or "inspiring" aside from plot there were other issues that made me regret I spent any coin on this issue: speech bubbles went to wrong characters, art was off & difficult to follow, pacing was rushed & forced, and too much jumping around, interrupting a comfortable flow to an I just could not get into any of the stories. I admit, the first one of the issue with the dynamic duo seemingly morphing into all the versions since the beginning was intriguing, and the ending was decent, but nothing "wow" or "inspiring" aside from plot there were other issues that made me regret I spent any coin on this issue: speech bubbles went to wrong characters, art was off & difficult to follow, pacing was rushed & forced, and too much jumping around, interrupting a comfortable flow to anything.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    The celebratory, bumper-sized iconic numbered issue has some decent stories in it but the art is by far the best part of it. From Neal Adams returning to draw Batman once again to work from Jason Fabok, Sean Murphy, Mike Allred, and more, the anniversary comic glories in everything Batman! Read the full review here! The celebratory, bumper-sized iconic numbered issue has some decent stories in it but the art is by far the best part of it. From Neal Adams returning to draw Batman once again to work from Jason Fabok, Sean Murphy, Mike Allred, and more, the anniversary comic glories in everything Batman! Read the full review here!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marc

    I was never a Batman fan in terms of comics, I'm still not. Although, I have my respect for the franchise, Brad Meltzer and Neal Adams, I could not help but to grab this book. It was pretty good. The Art was wonderful and the stories were well written. I didn't lose interest until I got to the actual comic storyline. It was a little flat. I was never a Batman fan in terms of comics, I'm still not. Although, I have my respect for the franchise, Brad Meltzer and Neal Adams, I could not help but to grab this book. It was pretty good. The Art was wonderful and the stories were well written. I didn't lose interest until I got to the actual comic storyline. It was a little flat.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Britt Freeman

    The Scott Snyder story "Twenty-seven" is worth the price of admission. Not so much because of the writing, the art does most of the heavy lifting on conveying the story. but Matt Hollingsworth's colors are what really shines here. It would make Lynn Varley proud! The Scott Snyder story "Twenty-seven" is worth the price of admission. Not so much because of the writing, the art does most of the heavy lifting on conveying the story. but Matt Hollingsworth's colors are what really shines here. It would make Lynn Varley proud!

  14. 5 out of 5

    mike andrews

    Kingsize issue commemorating where it all began in Detective Comics #27 (1939). Has some retelling of classic stories and begins the current Gothtopia arc.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ethan Harrison

    5 Stars due to the last story by Scott Snyder and Sean Murphy! Fantastic. The rest was nice to see everyone collaborate and celebrate Batman history!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    $8 for some very short stories that aren't very interesting. Main story 'Gothtopia' of course finishes in other books, old trick to get you to buy books you don't read. $8 for some very short stories that aren't very interesting. Main story 'Gothtopia' of course finishes in other books, old trick to get you to buy books you don't read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Yevgeny Tarabanov

  18. 4 out of 5

    David Cummins

  19. 4 out of 5

    Oisin

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ashleigh Marie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kiril

  22. 4 out of 5

    Haley

  23. 5 out of 5

    Gilles Callens

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brian Purcell

  25. 4 out of 5

    Xaanua

  26. 5 out of 5

    Francisco Colmenares

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chuck Ozment

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chris Wakefield

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rolando Marono

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ken Karcher

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