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Christmas with Grandma Elsie

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The holidays have arrived in Dinsmore household and Grandma Elsie has gathered together her large and extended family. There are snowball fights and sleigh races going one. Children play charades and enjoy a magic lantern show and other amusement provided by family ventriloquist, Cousin Ronald. There is also a burglar, but this is a Christmas story.


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The holidays have arrived in Dinsmore household and Grandma Elsie has gathered together her large and extended family. There are snowball fights and sleigh races going one. Children play charades and enjoy a magic lantern show and other amusement provided by family ventriloquist, Cousin Ronald. There is also a burglar, but this is a Christmas story.

30 review for Christmas with Grandma Elsie

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katja

    5 stars & 5/10 hearts. This was a really good, fun book. I love seeing how happy and good Lulu is, and I love Captain Raymond and Max (I know, I say that every time…). I also love the lessons and the story. My favourite part, to be honest, was the ending…. haha! Yay for Lulu being liked at last! I also really loved the discussions on wealth and how it should be used, and I loved the practical examples!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    I've been reading Christmas stories the last few days, I bet you can guess why. Yesterday I finished the last one, and out of the four, I would probably read two of them again, the other two, maybe. Even the ones I didn't like as much wouldn't take long to read again, so who knows, perhaps next December I'll give them another try. I have 363 days to think about it. For now though I'll talk about the first book I read, Christmas with Grandma Elsie. This is on the maybe list. Christmas with Grandm I've been reading Christmas stories the last few days, I bet you can guess why. Yesterday I finished the last one, and out of the four, I would probably read two of them again, the other two, maybe. Even the ones I didn't like as much wouldn't take long to read again, so who knows, perhaps next December I'll give them another try. I have 363 days to think about it. For now though I'll talk about the first book I read, Christmas with Grandma Elsie. This is on the maybe list. Christmas with Grandma Elsie was written in 1888 by Martha Finley, I never heard of her, I never heard of her book either, but from reading it I found out a few things about the author. It seems that she was a teacher and a writer of numerous works for children. She is most remembered (if she is) for the 28-volume Elsie Dinsmore series which was published over a span of 38 years. This lady wrote 28 books about Elsie and I've never seen a single one of them before now. If they were popular then, they aren't anymore. It seems that Elsie entered the book world as a eight year old girl living with her grandfather in the American South. If I'm supposed to remember which part of the American South, I don't. Elsie starts her book career in Elsie Dinsmore , a very sensible name for the first book, in 1867, and finishes up with Elsie and Her Namesakes in 1905. I'm assuming she's still alive in the 1905 book, but I'm not sure about it. About half way through all this the entire family winds up at the house of Elsie, now a Grandmother for Christmas, and I was there too, for a day or so. The story was about what you would expect it to be about from a Christmas book written long ago, there is this big family, there is always a big family, and they all show up, of course. There are the Fairview family, and the Woodburn family, and the Raymond family, the Dinsmore family, and the Travilla family. We have Elsie, Lulu (she seems to be our main character if there is one), also, Rosie, Walter, Gracie, Violet, Zoe, Edward, Evelyn, Sydney, Maud and Max. You get the idea, split them up into any family you want, I can't remember who is who anymore. And we all show up at Grandma's house, which better be a mansion, in time for Christmas. And while at Grandma's house, they go skating, and sleigh riding, they have snowball battles with snow forts and all, they play all sorts of games indoors when the snow is falling too fast to be outside, games such as Table croquet,' 'Parlor Quoits,' 'Parlor Ring Toss,' and Jack-straws whatever that is. The Christmas holidays were wonderful, and that's what bugged me a little about this book, these people were perfect. Everyone loved each other all the time, no one ever said a mean word to anyone else, no one ever even thought such a thing. Things like this: "Home again, and it's nice to get home!" exclaimed Lulu, skipping up the steps of the veranda and across into the wide hall where all was light and warmth and beauty. Violet and Grace had preceded her and her father was following with little Elsie in his arms. "I am glad to hear you say that; glad my daughter appreciates her home," he said in a cheery tone. "I'd be a queer girl, papa, if I didn't appreciate such a home as this is," she returned with warmth, and smiling up into his face. "Don't you say so, Max?" catching sight of her brother who, riding his pony, had arrived some minutes ahead of the carriage and was now petting and fondling his dog at the farther end of the hall. "Yes, indeed!" he answered; "I think if we weren't happy and contented in this home we oughtn't to have any at all. Papa....... "Dear Lu, you're just as good to me as can be!" sighed Grace in tender, grateful accents. "I really don't know what I'd ever do without my nice big sister." "Somebody else would take care of you," said Lulu, flushing with pleasure nevertheless. "There now, I'll go and put both our things in their right places."................ "Oh yes," cried Lulu, "it would be just splendid to give them a good time!—nice things to eat and to wear, and toys too. I'll talk to papa about it, and he'll tell us what to give them and how to give it." "And there are a number of other families in the neighborhood probably quite as poor and forlorn," said Lora Howard. "Oh I think it would be delightful to get them all together somewhere and surprise them with a Christmas tree loaded with nice things! Lets do it, girls. We all have some pocket money, and we can get our fathers and mothers to tell us how to use it to the best advantage, and how to manage the giving."....................... At that moment Violet joined them. "The babies were unusually wakeful and troublesome to-night," she remarked, "but have at last fallen asleep and so released mamma from attendance upon them." "To our great content," added her husband, gently putting Lulu off his knee and rising to give his wife a seat, while Max sprang up and gallantly placed a chair for her; selecting the most comfortable and placing it close beside his father's. She thanked him with one of her sweetest smiles, the captain remarking, "Max was too quick for me that time." "Like his father, he is extremely polite and attentive to ladies," said Violet. "How cozy you are here! and you two children have been having a pleasant time, no doubt, with papa all to yourselves." "We have missed you, my dear," said her husband; "at least I may speak for myself." "And would have been glad if you could have come to us sooner," added Max. "And we have good times all the time since we have a home of our own with our dear father in it," remarked Grace, taking his hand and carrying it to her lips, while her sweet azure eyes looked up lovingly into his face. An emphatic endorsement of that sentiment from both Max and Lulu. Then the captain, smiling tenderly upon them, said, "I dearly love to give you pleasure, my darlings, my heart's desire is for my children's happiness in this world and the next; but life can not be all play; so lessons must be taken up again to-morrow morning, and I hope to find you all in an industrious and tractable mood." "I should hope so indeed, papa," returned Max; "if we are not both obedient and industrious we will deserve to be called an ungrateful set." See? These people are perfect. Also, I'm not sure what I would think if conversations were always like this: It was about the middle of November. There had been a long rain storm, ending in sleet and snow, and now the sun was shining brightly on a landscape sheeted with ice: walks and roads were slippery with it, every tree and shrub was encased in it, and glittering and sparkling as if loaded with diamonds, as its branches swayed and tossed in the wind. At Ion Mrs. Elsie Travilla stood at the window of her dressing-room gazing with delighted eyes upon the lovely scene. "How beautiful!" she said softly to herself; "and my Father made it all. 'He gives snow like wool: he scattereth the hoar frost like ashes. He casteth forth his ice like morsels.' "Ah, good morning, my dears," as the door opened and Rosie and Walter came in together. "Good morning, dearest mamma," they returned, hastening to her to give and receive the affectionate kiss with which they were accustomed to meet at the beginning of a new day. "I'm so glad the long storm is over at last," said Rosie; "it is really delightful to see the sunshine once more." "And the beautiful work of the Frost king reflecting his rays," added her mother, calling their attention to the new beauties of the ever attractive landscape spread out before them........ Then sitting down he drew Lulu into his arms. "Has it been a happy day with you, dear child?" he asked. "Yes, papa, very; just full of pleasure; and now that night has come, I'm so glad that I have my own dear papa to hug me up close, and that he's going to sleep in the next room to Gracie and me." "I'm glad too," he said. "Yes, we have a great deal to be thankful for—you and I. Most of all for God's unspeakable gift—the dear Saviour whose birth and life and death have bought all our other blessings for us. "My child, try to keep in mind always, even when engaged in your sports, that you are his and must so act and speak as to bring no disgrace upon his cause; make it your constant endeavor to honor him in all your words and ways."......... "Try, my children, to remember what I have been telling you about it; but most of all let your thoughts dwell upon the lesson to be drawn from its close clinging to the rock. "God is often spoken of in the Scriptures as his people's rock, because he is their strength, their refuge, their asylum, as the rocks were in those places whither the children of Israel retired in case of an unexpected attack from their foes. "David says; 'The Lord is my rock and my fortress…. Who is a rock save our God?' "Jesus is the rock on which we must build our hope of salvation; any other foundation will be as the sand upon which the foolish man built his house; 'and the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell; and great was the fall of it.' "The limpet is wiser; it never trusts to the shifting sand, but holds firmly to the immovable rock. Be like it in resisting all attempts whether of human or spiritual foes, to drag you from your Rock." "Papa," said Max, slowly and with some hesitation. "I wish to do so—I think it is my settled purpose—but I—I feel afraid that sometime I may let go. I'm a careless, heedless fellow you know, and—and I'm afraid I may forget to hold fast to Jesus, and be overcome by some sudden and great temptation." "There is danger of that, my boy," the captain returned with feeling, "yet I should have greater fear for you if I heard you talk in a self-confident and boasting spirit. Trusting in ourselves we are not safe, but trusting in Jesus we are. We are safe only while we cling to our sure foundation, the Rock Christ Jesus; but our greatest security is in the joyful fact that he holds us fast and will never let us go; if we have indeed given ourselves to him. "He says, 'My sheep hear my voice and I know them, and they follow me; and I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand.'" "Such sweet words, papa, aren't they?" Lulu said softly. "Yes, words that have been an untold comfort and support to many of God's dear children on their way Zionward. The sword of the Spirit with which they have fought Satan's lying assertion that they might yet be lost in spite of having fled for refuge to Him who died on Calvary." "Is it those words the Bible means when it speaks of the sword of the Spirit, papa?" asked Max. "Not those alone, but all the word of God. And in order to be prepared to wield that sword we must store our memories with the word, we must hide it in our hearts. David says, 'Thy word have I hid in mine heart, that I might not sin against thee.' "Christ is our pattern; we must strive to follow his example in all things; and it was with the sword of the Spirit he repelled every temptation of the devil there in the wilderness—beginning each reply to the evil suggestions with 'It is written.'"........ At length, "Papa," she asked half hesitatingly, "are you very rich?" "Rich?" he repeated, coming suddenly out of his reverie and looking smilingly down into her eyes, "yes; I have a sound constitution, excellent health, a delightful home, a wife and five children, each one of whom I esteem worth at least a million to me; I live in a Christian land," he went on in a graver tone, "I have the Bible with all its great and precious promises, the hope of a blessed eternity at God's right hand, and that all my dear ones are traveling heavenward with me; yes, I am a very rich man!" There is much more like this. While I agree with most of it, I'm having trouble believing how often our Lord is brought into each and every conversation, but it is what made me curious to perhaps read more of the Elsie books to see if I ever do get used to Jesus coming into every conversation, even every thought. I almost wish I could do that. Then there are strange things like this: In the parlor the older people were conversing on somewhat similar topics: first discussing plans for the entertainment and gratification of their children and other young relatives, during the approaching holidays, then of the needs of the poor of the neighborhood, and how to supply them; after that they talked of the claims of Home and Foreign Missions; the perils threatening their country from illiteracy, anarchy, heathenism, Mormonism, Popery, Infidelity, etc., not omitting the danger from vast wealth accumulating in the hands of individuals and corporations; also they spoke of the heavy responsibility entailed by its possession. They were patriots and Christians; anxious first of all for the advancement of Christ's kingdom upon earth, secondly for the welfare and prosperity of the dear land of their birth—the glorious old Union transmitted to us by our revolutionary fathers. It was a personal question with each one, "How can I best use for the salvation of my country and the world, the time, talents, influence and money God has entrusted to my keeping." They acknowledged themselves stewards of God's bounty, and as such desired to be found faithful; neglecting neither the work nearest at hand nor that in far distant lands where the people sit in great darkness and the region and shadow of death, that on them the "Sun of righteousness might arise with healing in his wings."........ "You know mamma always gives thousands of dollars every year to home and foreign missions, and other good causes, and she says that this time she will let each of us choose a cause for her to give a thousand to." "I like that!" exclaimed Zoe. "Many thanks, mamma, for my share of the privilege. I shall choose to have my thousand go to help the mission schools in Utah. I feel so sorry for those poor Mormon women. The idea of having to share your husband with another woman, or maybe half a dozen or more! It's simply awful!" "Yes; and that is only a small part of the wickedness Mormonism is responsible for," remarked Grandma Rose. "Think of the tyranny of their priesthood; interfering with the liberty of the people in every possible way—claiming the right to dictate as to what they shall read, where they shall send their children to school, with whom they shall trade, where they shall live, or ordering them to break up their homes, make a forced sale of their property, and move into another state or territory at their own cost, or go on a mission." "Their wicked doctrine and practice of what they call blood atonement, too," sighed Grandma Elsie. "And the bitter hatred they inculcate toward the people and government of these United States," added Zoe. "Oh I am sure both love of country and desire for the advancement of Christ's cause and kingdom, should lead us to do all we can to rescue Utah from Mormonism........ "You all know, of course, that I refer to the negroes, who were forcibly torn from their own land and enslaved in this. We must educate and evangelize them: as a debt we owe them, and also for the salvation of our country, whose liberties will be greatly imperilled by their presence and possession of the elective franchise, if they are left to ignorance and vice." "Grandpa, what do you mean by the elective franchise?" asked Walter going to the side of the old gentleman's chair. "The right to vote at elections, my son. You can see, can't you, what harm might come from it." "Yes, sir; they might help to put bad men into office; some of themselves maybe; and bad men would be likely to make bad laws, and favor rogues. Oh yes, sir, I understand it!" "Then perhaps you may want to help provide for the instruction of the colored race as well as of the Indians?"........... I wonder if the author actually believed what she was writing. And those are my thoughts on the book. I liked the idea of the entire family gathering together for Christmas without it turning into a family feud, I like the warmth, the games, the skating and sledding. I like their Christmas, I just wish they wouldn't have talked so much. Happy reading.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tarissa

    This was a wonderful Elsie book with many thrills in it. Again, like the last few books, the story centers on Lulu Raymond---Elsie's granddaughter. The holidays have arrived and all of the family has grouped together at Grandma Elsie's house for the fun. There's snowball fights, sleigh rides, charades, stories, and other amusement provided by ventriloquist, Cousin Ronald. There's even quite a bit of suspense! The book closes after some of the most dramatic events draw to an end. But I'm left longin This was a wonderful Elsie book with many thrills in it. Again, like the last few books, the story centers on Lulu Raymond---Elsie's granddaughter. The holidays have arrived and all of the family has grouped together at Grandma Elsie's house for the fun. There's snowball fights, sleigh rides, charades, stories, and other amusement provided by ventriloquist, Cousin Ronald. There's even quite a bit of suspense! The book closes after some of the most dramatic events draw to an end. But I'm left longing to continue into the next book. I enjoyed each and every chapter, as something new is always happening. This is one of my favorites!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This series is a bit Calvinistic in its theology, and it's also a bit uber-Christian; i.e., the Christians are really, really good and the non-Christians are really, really bad. The further into the series you get, the more boring the books get because there are too many historical lectures in the later books rather than actual plots. This series is a bit Calvinistic in its theology, and it's also a bit uber-Christian; i.e., the Christians are really, really good and the non-Christians are really, really bad. The further into the series you get, the more boring the books get because there are too many historical lectures in the later books rather than actual plots.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Meadow Frisbie

    I do love how they incorporate the distant family and watch as it continutes to grow. But I'm stopping this series...becuase the family is just to perfect. They can't say hello without thirty sentences about how they want to be good and can be good with His help and how much they love each other............AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAH. I do love how they incorporate the distant family and watch as it continutes to grow. But I'm stopping this series...becuase the family is just to perfect. They can't say hello without thirty sentences about how they want to be good and can be good with His help and how much they love each other............AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAH.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cecil

    If you want a sermon, read this book. If you want to be entertained, skip it. What a bunch of dribble.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    I have an older copy (judging by the illustrations, from the 30's). I'm not sure if modern copies are watered down, but this early copy has a more classical/complex writing style that is probably inaccessible to most kids today. It also reads like a Bible. I got this at a second hand shop for a dollar, I love old books and the idea of a Victorian Christmas intrigued me. For some reason I pictured that it would be like Meet Me in St. Louis, with sleigh rides, and candle lit affairs, something who I have an older copy (judging by the illustrations, from the 30's). I'm not sure if modern copies are watered down, but this early copy has a more classical/complex writing style that is probably inaccessible to most kids today. It also reads like a Bible. I got this at a second hand shop for a dollar, I love old books and the idea of a Victorian Christmas intrigued me. For some reason I pictured that it would be like Meet Me in St. Louis, with sleigh rides, and candle lit affairs, something wholesome and decadent. Instead what I found was a book with almost no plot, largely hampered by it's obnoxious, preachy, holier-than-thou Christian agenda. Everyone is either worse off than these people or a heathen. I know that the book is dated but it had no redeeming qualities to make up for the author's completely offensive prejudices. It's also so cloyingly sweet and perfect it's downright unbelievable. I feel bad for Lulu, the little girl who only wants a ring and is made to feel shame for being selfish and for not wanting to help the heathens, instead. Her father tells her that having the ring would spoil her. She challenges her father by pointing out that both her step mother and grandmother have fine ornate jewellery sets, to which he explains that they're old enough to make decisions for themselves (it doesn't really answer her question at all, he just shuts her down, which is exactly the kind of BS I've come to expect from this book). You would think that the family isn't rolling in dough and that there's a good moralistic lesson to be had here, but within the next chapters the step mother discusses with her children that she will donate a thousand dollars per child (living and dead) to the church. I couldn't find an inflation calculator that would go as far back as 1888 when the book was published, so I just used 1930 instead, and that would put her donation at roughly $125,000. It's so unbelievably over the top. And they can't afford to give the little girl one measly diamond ring?! Everything about this family is annoyingly perfect. I can't recommend this book for anyone, unless you're a Christian and a bigot, or you love Victorian literature so much that you can overlook these faults.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Christmas with Grandma Elsie I stumbled upon this novel when looking for a Christmas book to read and is the first of this series I have read. If you have not read any of the previous books in the series, it is a little rough to figure out the characters at first, but not impossible. The story has a good Christian message and is a good read. Though as others have pointed out, the characters can seem somewhat unrealistic as they are very good and modeling the “perfect Christian”. Overall a good st Christmas with Grandma Elsie I stumbled upon this novel when looking for a Christmas book to read and is the first of this series I have read. If you have not read any of the previous books in the series, it is a little rough to figure out the characters at first, but not impossible. The story has a good Christian message and is a good read. Though as others have pointed out, the characters can seem somewhat unrealistic as they are very good and modeling the “perfect Christian”. Overall a good story and I would recommend if you have read and enjoyed the other novels in the series.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn

    Old Fashioned but Good While this is an old fashioned story told in some old language, it was delightful. The family makes many plans for Christmas and New Years and enjoy their time together playing games, ice skating etc. Much time is spent in teaching the children God's Word and Biblical truths by their father as well as school lessons. Two burglars get into this sweet home and almost get away, but for the oldest girl, Lulu. She is her father's child and testifies about the crime. Good story. I Old Fashioned but Good While this is an old fashioned story told in some old language, it was delightful. The family makes many plans for Christmas and New Years and enjoy their time together playing games, ice skating etc. Much time is spent in teaching the children God's Word and Biblical truths by their father as well as school lessons. Two burglars get into this sweet home and almost get away, but for the oldest girl, Lulu. She is her father's child and testifies about the crime. Good story. If we raised our children today like these our country would be much better off. I enjoyed the Scriptures shared.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Donna Peake

    Never read any of these stories before. Found it to be quite sweet with some morals mixed in.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    It’s clever, interesting, and very appropriate for children to read today.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Holly

    CHRISTMAS WITH GRANDMA ELSIE is #14 in the series and the last, great Elsie book. It deals with a Christmas party that Elsie holds for her large extended family, where the children play charades and enjoy a magic lantern show. A fascinating glimpse into late nineteenth-century life. And later, Lulu emerges as a true heroine who rescues her family from burglars! This book has a "modern" feel, very different from earlier Elsie titles, and is exciting and fast-paced throughout. Highly recommended. CHRISTMAS WITH GRANDMA ELSIE is #14 in the series and the last, great Elsie book. It deals with a Christmas party that Elsie holds for her large extended family, where the children play charades and enjoy a magic lantern show. A fascinating glimpse into late nineteenth-century life. And later, Lulu emerges as a true heroine who rescues her family from burglars! This book has a "modern" feel, very different from earlier Elsie titles, and is exciting and fast-paced throughout. Highly recommended. But sadly, after #14, the series deteriorates. Author Martha Finley became obsessed with the desire to teach history to her readers, probably in emulation of didactic writers like Jacob Abbott. Subsequent Elsie books are mainly travel logs, describing trips that the family take around the continents of North and South America. Captain Raymond degenerates into a long-winded bore, giving us page after page of lecturing on historical events. Not much of dramatic interest happens...and that's why many, many readers tune out after CHRISTMAS WITH GRANDMA ELSIE. SPOILER ALERT!!!************************************************************ If you plan to read titles beyond #14, then don't look at my next comments which are spoilers... SPOILER ALERT! ********************************************************* To save people time, I am summarizing the rest of the series (volumes 15-28) in just a few words. Sadly, I can do this because so little of importance happens after CHRISTMAS WITH GRANDMA ELSIE. The spoilers are as follows: *Elsie grows older but remains beautiful and pious and good. She has surgery at about the age of 50 and recovers completely. Her horrible father lives on too, and continues to dote on her. *Edward and Zoe live happily ever after and have twins, a boy and girl. *Captain Raymond and Violet live happily ever after and buy a yacht in which they travel extensively. *Harold and Herbert Travilla become successful doctors and practice medicine together. Harold ends up marrying Grace Raymond! *Rosie marries a rich young man and lives happily ever after. *Walter becomes a minister, much to his mother's joy. *Max joins the navy, marries Evelyn and has a daughter. *Lulu's life is threatened by Perry Davis (the burglar whom she sent to jail) but she's rescued by her true love Chester Dinsmore, whom she later marries. They have a son. There. Now you know what happens without having to plough through thousands of pages of boring historical meanderings! I've done my good deed for the day...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    This story is not badly written but a true period piece which I was willing to let go in places when it spoke about Christmas and family but it is very disturbing in others. Elsie is a high born girl whose father is a former captain in the military. They have land and the family behaves very well to each other. The black servants know their place and the Bible guides the treatment of them. They children are expected to treat animals very well. The ending is an enigma to me. Elsie on Christmas ev This story is not badly written but a true period piece which I was willing to let go in places when it spoke about Christmas and family but it is very disturbing in others. Elsie is a high born girl whose father is a former captain in the military. They have land and the family behaves very well to each other. The black servants know their place and the Bible guides the treatment of them. They children are expected to treat animals very well. The ending is an enigma to me. Elsie on Christmas eve traps burglars in the house and dad calls the police. Elsie's last lesson is that she did right by protecting the community. The tramp is not so poor and was fired for mistreating animals. I thought it was a bit much to put the burglars in. Everything in the book ie referred back to the Bible.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Melody Newberry

    Pleasant continuation of the story of Elsie Continuation of the story of Elsie, with the focus on Lulu, now eleven years old, as she strives to conquer her furious temper. She shows love and bravery when the unexpected happens after New Year's day. Pleasant continuation of the story of Elsie Continuation of the story of Elsie, with the focus on Lulu, now eleven years old, as she strives to conquer her furious temper. She shows love and bravery when the unexpected happens after New Year's day.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kim Justice

    A Classic. And one that reminded me of our Christmas' when I was growing up. One of my grandma's To read more: Breath of Life A Classic. And one that reminded me of our Christmas' when I was growing up. One of my grandma's To read more: Breath of Life

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

    A very nice Christmas story. This audiobook version is played many times every December holiday season at our house.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    I think it is sweet and nice!!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Cornwell

    An enjoyable read. I've always enjoyed the Elsie Dinsmore series (the originals are far better than the modern versions), so I also enjoyed this one. Halfway through the series now! An enjoyable read. I've always enjoyed the Elsie Dinsmore series (the originals are far better than the modern versions), so I also enjoyed this one. Halfway through the series now!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ariane

  20. 5 out of 5

    Leah

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sue

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amy Erickson

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nicole G.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bettie G

  25. 4 out of 5

    Meredith Groman

  26. 4 out of 5

    Abby

  27. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth McBride

  29. 4 out of 5

    McKenna

  30. 4 out of 5

    Marv

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