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Hellboy: The Lost Army (Illustrated Novel) (Hellboy

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In 525 B.C., the Persian king Cambyses sent fifty thousand soldiers across the conquered Egyptian desert to take an oasis city not far from where the Libyan border stands today. According to Greek history, a hurricane-force sandstorm struck near the end of their six-hundred-mile trek. The army -- all fifty thousand men -- vanished without a single trace. Fast forward to 19 In 525 B.C., the Persian king Cambyses sent fifty thousand soldiers across the conquered Egyptian desert to take an oasis city not far from where the Libyan border stands today. According to Greek history, a hurricane-force sandstorm struck near the end of their six-hundred-mile trek. The army -- all fifty thousand men -- vanished without a single trace. Fast forward to 1986. A British archaeological team, sent to the edge of the Great Sand Sea to exhume evidence of the incident, has also gone missing. So the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense is sending the world's greatest paranormal investigator, Hellboy, to find the missing Brits and to discover what became of The Lost Army. Dark Horse is proud to present a milestone in the history of Hellboy. This illustrated novel is written by Christopher Golden, best-selling author of the book Of Saints and Shadows. Hellboy creator Mike Mignola has done sixty-eight black-and-white illustrations for the story, and those illustrations alone are worth the price of admission.


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In 525 B.C., the Persian king Cambyses sent fifty thousand soldiers across the conquered Egyptian desert to take an oasis city not far from where the Libyan border stands today. According to Greek history, a hurricane-force sandstorm struck near the end of their six-hundred-mile trek. The army -- all fifty thousand men -- vanished without a single trace. Fast forward to 19 In 525 B.C., the Persian king Cambyses sent fifty thousand soldiers across the conquered Egyptian desert to take an oasis city not far from where the Libyan border stands today. According to Greek history, a hurricane-force sandstorm struck near the end of their six-hundred-mile trek. The army -- all fifty thousand men -- vanished without a single trace. Fast forward to 1986. A British archaeological team, sent to the edge of the Great Sand Sea to exhume evidence of the incident, has also gone missing. So the Bureau for Paranormal Research and Defense is sending the world's greatest paranormal investigator, Hellboy, to find the missing Brits and to discover what became of The Lost Army. Dark Horse is proud to present a milestone in the history of Hellboy. This illustrated novel is written by Christopher Golden, best-selling author of the book Of Saints and Shadows. Hellboy creator Mike Mignola has done sixty-eight black-and-white illustrations for the story, and those illustrations alone are worth the price of admission.

30 review for Hellboy: The Lost Army (Illustrated Novel) (Hellboy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Christopher Golden's first collaboration with Mike Mignola. Golden really gets Hellboy. This thing reads exactly like a Hellboy comic. Plus, he gives Hellboy a sex life. You gotta love it. Hellboy heads to Libya to help an old flame. A group of archaeologists have vanished in the desert while searching for a lost Persian army. Hellboy parachutes in to investigate. In his typical stone-fisted way, he uncovers an ancient sorcerer who's trying to bring a god to our reality. Along the way he fights z Christopher Golden's first collaboration with Mike Mignola. Golden really gets Hellboy. This thing reads exactly like a Hellboy comic. Plus, he gives Hellboy a sex life. You gotta love it. Hellboy heads to Libya to help an old flame. A group of archaeologists have vanished in the desert while searching for a lost Persian army. Hellboy parachutes in to investigate. In his typical stone-fisted way, he uncovers an ancient sorcerer who's trying to bring a god to our reality. Along the way he fights zombies, giant spiders and krakens. Mignola provides 50 or so illustrations as well.

  2. 5 out of 5

    TK421

    Let me say that I am big big big fan of Hellboy. I love the story, the concept, even the character in movie and book and comic format. But HELLBOY: THE LOST ARMY did nothing for me. I found it rambled in too many spots and the story was just a jumbled mess. I understand where Golden was trying to take this, and I can appreciate that, but if he would have simplified the storyline and remained true to the character of Hellboy, then this would hav come out much better. Perhaps this "novel" was mere Let me say that I am big big big fan of Hellboy. I love the story, the concept, even the character in movie and book and comic format. But HELLBOY: THE LOST ARMY did nothing for me. I found it rambled in too many spots and the story was just a jumbled mess. I understand where Golden was trying to take this, and I can appreciate that, but if he would have simplified the storyline and remained true to the character of Hellboy, then this would hav come out much better. Perhaps this "novel" was merely an experimental project for a next Hellboy movie. I admit, I would watch that. WASTE OF TIME

  3. 4 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    Hellboy and the Mignolaverse is just so dense and amazing that no matter the format the stories takes, if the writers understand it and respect it, you will have a wonderful story. I've never read Christopher Golden's books, I've never even heard of him before this, but when Mignola announced that he would be writing HB's first novel format story I was very much intrigued. This is actually the third time I've read this book (so yes, expect me to say that it's pretty damn good) and every time I re Hellboy and the Mignolaverse is just so dense and amazing that no matter the format the stories takes, if the writers understand it and respect it, you will have a wonderful story. I've never read Christopher Golden's books, I've never even heard of him before this, but when Mignola announced that he would be writing HB's first novel format story I was very much intrigued. This is actually the third time I've read this book (so yes, expect me to say that it's pretty damn good) and every time I read it I am reminded of how much Golden understands what makes HB and his world a fun place to explore: World: Golden right from the start understands what HB's world is about. It's about mythology, monsters, the occult and weird and unexplained stuff...and it's about how HB bashes all of them with his right hand. How does Mignola's world translate without his iconic art? Fear not, for throughout the book you will find Mignola art showing key moments, characters and settings, it's a good little added bonus that makes this novel awesome. That's not to say that Golden needs those picture to world build, cause he does not, he understands this world and his writing is descriptive enough but not to the point of being an info dump, it's well realized. One little thing that could have been better was the amount of mythology, if there was a smidgen more it would have been awesome. Story: Straight forward and to the point, there is no subtlety here, there is not deeper meaning, this is simply 1) HB is called in to investigate supernatural phenomenon 2) supernatural phenomenon starts killing people 3) HB solves it by fighting said phenomenon by beating it into submission. This is a HB story to the core, it is a ride and that's what it is. I did however, find the action which Mignola is known for (the big spectacle fights) to be a bit bland, it's just the nature of the different format, but it's a little thing. I don't complain there is too much action in the comic book but the amount of action in the novel actually kinda made me bored. Oh well. I also would have liked a bit more mythology and more mustache twirling by the villain explaining his story but also oh well. It's solid and it's fun. Characters: Wow, HB has a sex life, good for him! The characters are quirky, not really deep and it's fine, it's an action book, it's about HB bashing things and the people around him just need to be deep enough for you to care. Honestly, other than Anastasia all the other characters are paper thing and it's fine. I did like the added pages and words for HB's internal dialogue as it takes advantage of this format's strength. It was a fun read, if you like the HB comic books you will like the novel, it has the same DNA but with a different face, it's just different enough to be fresh and just the same enough for people who like the comic books to also enjoy this. Good stuff! Onward to the next book!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Martin Pinkerton

    The BLUFF: Fun enough, wouldn't read again but don't regret reading it, will likely read the sequel (since we already own it) Equivalent of: reading an comic book with mature content Ideal for: fans of the character and/or sci-fi occult stories, not young kids This book was enjoyable enough. It's about a comic book character and read like a text version of a comic book. The original artist/creator drew the illustrations so that's a plus. I had bought it and its sequel for my oldest son years ago. I The BLUFF: Fun enough, wouldn't read again but don't regret reading it, will likely read the sequel (since we already own it) Equivalent of: reading an comic book with mature content Ideal for: fans of the character and/or sci-fi occult stories, not young kids This book was enjoyable enough. It's about a comic book character and read like a text version of a comic book. The original artist/creator drew the illustrations so that's a plus. I had bought it and its sequel for my oldest son years ago. I like occulty sci-fi and needed a book to read when Littleman was reading his Star Wars books so I figured why not. It was fun jaunt if not fairly predictable. It does have some mature concepts so i wouldn't recommend it for younger children.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Leila Anani

    This ticks a lot of my boxes: Hellboy, Ancient History/Myth, Zombies, tentacle monster, metamorphosis... and it gives Hellboy a love interest, but somehow it wasn't nearly as good as it should have been. I think part of the reason is that this takes Hellboy out of his element and puts him on a solo mission with completely new characters - So there's hardly any Abe, Liz, professor Bruttenholm and no Nazi or steampunk elements and I'm sorry but these trappings are as much as what makes Hellboy grea This ticks a lot of my boxes: Hellboy, Ancient History/Myth, Zombies, tentacle monster, metamorphosis... and it gives Hellboy a love interest, but somehow it wasn't nearly as good as it should have been. I think part of the reason is that this takes Hellboy out of his element and puts him on a solo mission with completely new characters - So there's hardly any Abe, Liz, professor Bruttenholm and no Nazi or steampunk elements and I'm sorry but these trappings are as much as what makes Hellboy great as the HB himself. So his archaeologist ex calls him out into the desert where a previous team is missing and indeed it seems there have been many more disappearances going right back to 525BC where Cambysis II managed to lose an entire Persian Army. The army of course make a sand zombie reappearance and HB and co have to work out what's reanimating them an stop it. Other than the utterly brilliant premise - What happened to Cambysis' Lost Army? The story is rather uninteresting and unoriginal. The novel also spends much of its time harping back to Hellboy's previous relationship with Anastasia. This romance never gets rekindled and I was getting sick and tired of the novel reiterating all the time that they were now just friends but still cared deeply for each other - Now this came out well before the first movie so I think it was the first time HB was given any kind of love interest but since the films came out his relationship with Liz has become so part of the HB mythos that having him with someone else just feels wrong somehow. the personal elements also really mess with the pace of what would have otherwise been a fun pulp action story. Far from my favourite foray into the Hellboy universe but still OK.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    The Lost Army by Christopher Golden is the first Hellboy novel, based on the comic book series of the same name. The book includes illustrations by series creator Mike Mignola. While I’ve enjoyed prose Hellboy stories from a couple of anthologies by now, this was my first venture into a full novel about the character. Since this was published in 1997 there have been nine other Hellboy novels and four anthologies. Interestingly, only a handful of this material is considered to be in continuity wi The Lost Army by Christopher Golden is the first Hellboy novel, based on the comic book series of the same name. The book includes illustrations by series creator Mike Mignola. While I’ve enjoyed prose Hellboy stories from a couple of anthologies by now, this was my first venture into a full novel about the character. Since this was published in 1997 there have been nine other Hellboy novels and four anthologies. Interestingly, only a handful of this material is considered to be in continuity with the comic book series proper, which understandably takes precedent. This novel, along with other books and stories by Golden, are considered within canon. Knowing that that character’s primary story arc takes place within the comic book series, it was easy to deduce that this book would be similar to the short stories I’ve already read. Namely, that this would be a self-contained story following Hellboy on another one of his adventures investigating the paranormal. I really like this as an idea, as it reminds me of the type of pulpy novels and stories that influenced Mignola in the first place. It helps make these books feel like less of a commitment too. I intend to eventually read them all, but it’s not a continuous series that I might feel bad for setting aside for longer periods. In my review of the anthology Odd Jobs I mentioned that I went in expecting the stories to be a fun novelty but nothing remarkable. While I was fortunately impressed with how that collection turned out, this novel fit those expectations far more closely. The mystery and paranormal aspects within are bog standard, especially as someone who has read a lot of the series already. An ancient evil wants to break through the veil into our realm, a less ancient sorcerer wants to use Hellboy to facilitate that. There’s an undead army, tentacle monsters, and strange inhuman beings. These aspects weren’t uninteresting, but weren’t framed in a way that made them particularly interesting either. There were a few stand-out moments though, including a man turning into a giant spider while the group is trapped on the web of another. I liked how Golden imagined this particular idea because the webs are so sticky and strong—as they’d need to be to successfully trap people—that trying to simply rip the webs off will tear your skin. This definitely made for one of the better horror sequences in the novel. A significant factor introduced in this story is Hellboy’s love life, which is something largely absent from the series proper. Here we learn he once had a relationship with an archaeologist named Dr. Anastasia Bransfield, who has called him to the site of her current expedition in the Sahara Desert as a favour. While it was a little interesting to see a facet of Hellboy’s life that I haven’t before now, the writing around it was not all that great. General concern for one another and small acts of intimacy were apparent, but there was mostly a lot of narration hammering home that each is someone the other cares about very much. I was told about their history and feelings a lot more than I was actually shown how they feel toward one another. At the onset their relationship is a thing of the past and by the end that is where it remains, without any real hiccups along the way. This is the unfortunate case with all of the interpersonal relationships in the story; they pretty much stay in the same place, unless one of the characters dies. I was disappointed further with the use of an MI5 agent named Creaghan, who butts heads with Anastasia over control of the expedition and is disdainful of Hellboy for not being human. While Hellboy, Anastasia, and others probe the subterranean source of all the horrors, Creaghan plays a fairly big role as he is left on the surface to deal with the titular lost army. Despite being featured so much, by the end he unceremoniously departs. No debriefing with the others once the dust settles, nor any olive branches recognizing a job well done. It isn’t often that I see characters intolerant of Hellboy’s presence as a point of note in a story. I wish Golden had explored it a little more. Another character, Arun Lahiri, has feelings for Dr. Bransfield and cannot help being disgusted when he finds out about her past history with Hellboy. After finding an unusual amulet these feelings are driven to the point of crazed lust and violence urges. These moments were a little heavy-handed on their own, but what made matters worse was this conflict never comes to a head in a way that meaningfully addresses the tension between the characters. All of these moments had the potential to add a lot more depth to the story, and certainly seem set up that way, but never delivered on anything by the end. Despite my disappointments, The Lost Army is not a bad novel. In a lot of ways it’s exactly what I was looking for; something fun and easy to get through in a relatively short amount of time. A reprieve from denser reading material. I’m not sure it was meant to be anything more than pulpy fun, and as a novel that could only really be a side-story it’s not a bad first outing either. The character had only debuted about four years before this novel, yet this material still feels consistent with the character even after everything that has come afterwards. I’d recommend it more to existing fans, but there is enough context introduced at the beginning of the novel that a curious reader could easily start here too to dip their toe in the water and see how they like the character. It’s a fun adventure into paranormal mystery and pulpy horror, with some great illustrations supplementing it all. Just don’t expect a lot of character development. Review originally posted on my blog here.

  7. 5 out of 5

    T. Blake

    I'm on the fence about the formatting and the story line. I think I liked it mostly because I read about 80% of it while sitting in the court house, waiting to see if I'd be called in to sit in as a Juror, and it helped kill the time. Take what you will from my snippet of input surrounding this book. I'm on the fence about the formatting and the story line. I think I liked it mostly because I read about 80% of it while sitting in the court house, waiting to see if I'd be called in to sit in as a Juror, and it helped kill the time. Take what you will from my snippet of input surrounding this book.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Avery Follett

    I loved this!! I am gripped by an intense urge to read every single Hellboy novel. This guy will always be my favourite character and, after having read all of the comics and graphic novels, I would love to read all the novels too in order to complete my psychological collection.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eric Evans

    I never really heard of Hellboy untill the movie came out and I wasn't a fan. So cruising the online library I stumbled across some novels. Researched to see where to start. To my surprise it was a very well done enjoyable book. I look forward to reading the others. I never really heard of Hellboy untill the movie came out and I wasn't a fan. So cruising the online library I stumbled across some novels. Researched to see where to start. To my surprise it was a very well done enjoyable book. I look forward to reading the others.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joe Lambert

    Fun, quick read with some genuinely creepy sequences. You can tell Golden really enjoys Hellboy as a character

  11. 5 out of 5

    John

    Audiobook version. Great story! FANTASTIC narration.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Set in Sahara. 50,000 Persian soldiers and an archaeological team (25) disappear. Queen's 2nd cousin Lady Catherine is among them. Anastasia, Hellboy's lover, sends for him Illustrated by Mignola. Set in Sahara. 50,000 Persian soldiers and an archaeological team (25) disappear. Queen's 2nd cousin Lady Catherine is among them. Anastasia, Hellboy's lover, sends for him Illustrated by Mignola.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dustin Riccio

    The plot did eventually come together but I found the prose pretty pedestrian. Hard not to wonder if Hellboy just works best as a comic character?

  14. 5 out of 5

    BookMarc

    I used to enjoy Hellboy prose novels more when they were published by Pocket Star Books. I don't know how much say a publisher has in choosing who will author their novels but overall the quality was far better with PSB than when the franchise moved over to Dark Horse Books. A good example of the better quality can be found in 'Hellboy: The Lost Army'. We start off the book with a foreword by Hellboy's creator Mike Mignola. Not being much of a fanboy when it comes to authors, artists, actors or a I used to enjoy Hellboy prose novels more when they were published by Pocket Star Books. I don't know how much say a publisher has in choosing who will author their novels but overall the quality was far better with PSB than when the franchise moved over to Dark Horse Books. A good example of the better quality can be found in 'Hellboy: The Lost Army'. We start off the book with a foreword by Hellboy's creator Mike Mignola. Not being much of a fanboy when it comes to authors, artists, actors or anyone else for that matter I'm not beyond criticizing even the guy who created one of my favorite characters. The issue I have is in the drawing he does. Now this story is a prose novel but Mignola did contribute some drawings that appear throughout this mass market paperback. That's unusual in itself and, quite frankly, so is Mignola's style of drawing. I'm not quite sure how to describe his style but, to me at least, it seems amateur and yet professional all at the same time. Hellboy looks good on the cover, and I would expect no less from a drawing by his creator, but the skeletons appear too cartoonish in a way. Yeah, "cartoonish" isn't a word so my writing is amateur and nowhere near professional but this blog is for my opinions you know and if I wish to make up words like "cartoonish" then so be it. If it's quality you're after go read one of my followers blogs. So the story begins with Hellboy having to beat the crap out of a "thing" with tentacles. He hates things with tentacles. So do most of my ex girlfriends but I swear I really do only have two hands...they just move around the female form like there's eight of them. Speaking of such things Hellboy has a love interest in this book. And she's a human female. Thankfully the author spares us any intimate details as even I had absolutely no desire to know how a cloven hoofed, red demon with a stone hand gets his freak on with a human English female. Having a love interest for Hellboy is certainly odd but it does allow for the storyline to play on the age old damsel in distress being saved by her hero subplot. The main plot revolves around the disappearance of a group of British archeologists along the edge of the Great Sand Sea. It wouldn't be much of a job for Red if it was a straight forward disappearance and it isn't as back in 525BC a fifty-thousand strong Persian army vanished in the same place...hence 'The Lost Army'. Golden is a huge fan of Hellboy and it certainly shows through in his writing. He knows Hellboy inside and out...actually I'm not sure if he really does know about Red's insides but it sounded like the correct thing to proclaim. What's for sure is that he knows the character well enough to bring him to life perfectly in the novel and add that to his as-per-usual excellent storytelling ability and what you have is an awesome Hellboy novel. The author even done a great job in making the love story between Hellboy and Anastasia believable and that took some doing as you just don't think about a red demon and sex in the same sentence. I don't anyway although it's obvious from looking at Hellboy's head that he's always horny. With an immortal sorcerer and The Lost Army to contend with this novel is certainly action packed and exciting. Our hero is portrayed wonderfully, particularly his sense of humour, and I couldn't put this book down once I had picked it up. Really, that's the last time I use crazy glue before reading a novel. Even though the "romantic" element was done well I could have done without it but that's being picky on what is an overall excellent novel. Highly recommended.

  15. 4 out of 5

    John

    A friend of mine talked me into reading this, though I was highly dubious whether Hellboy could successfully make the jump to prose novels. Underscoring my doubt was the fact that Christopher Golden's name was on the cover, since I believe he really dropped the ball in adapting the ALIENS and BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER franchises. (His UNCHARTED tie-in was OK.) That being said, HELLBOY: THE LOST ARMY quenched all doubts right from the get-go. Golden seems right at home in this storytelling environm A friend of mine talked me into reading this, though I was highly dubious whether Hellboy could successfully make the jump to prose novels. Underscoring my doubt was the fact that Christopher Golden's name was on the cover, since I believe he really dropped the ball in adapting the ALIENS and BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER franchises. (His UNCHARTED tie-in was OK.) That being said, HELLBOY: THE LOST ARMY quenched all doubts right from the get-go. Golden seems right at home in this storytelling environment, and Mike Mignola's occasional illustrations function like the juicy center inside a Black Forest Fruit Snack. For a long time, Golden manages to keep the story surprisingly grounded and believable (not to mention fun in an Indiana Jones sort of way) before eventually surrendering to total comic book silliness in the form of powerful wizards, gigantic spiders, underground cities, Persian zombie hordes, Lovecraftian Elder Gods, and other such nonsense. T'was a fun ride while it lasted, though.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Victor Espinosa

    Thumbs up for this book. Though it started off slow and choppy and it took me a while to like the characters, it really developed into a good story. Pros: Great action. Chris Golden writes in short choppy sentences that don't work well with descriptive scenes, but make action and combat scenes work perfectly. He has great vocabulary to describe things correctly the first time, and paces the novel well. There is hardly a moment in the story where it feels boring or lax. The action is awesome, the Thumbs up for this book. Though it started off slow and choppy and it took me a while to like the characters, it really developed into a good story. Pros: Great action. Chris Golden writes in short choppy sentences that don't work well with descriptive scenes, but make action and combat scenes work perfectly. He has great vocabulary to describe things correctly the first time, and paces the novel well. There is hardly a moment in the story where it feels boring or lax. The action is awesome, the plot twists and conflict that the characters go through is seriously cool. The villain is your typical take over the world with evil magic type of bad guy, but he's evil enough that you don't question anything he does. The ending is satisfyingly badass. You've been warned. Also, there is some original illustrations by Mike Mignola in there that help make the story pop. Cons: There are a few scenes that feel really forced. The conflict, the romance, the suspense, whatever. There are a handful of times that it just felt like the scene didn't need to happen, but was thrown in to make things edgier. The aforementioned choppy sentences were a real turn off for me. And by the end of the novel, Hellboy only speaks in bad puns. At that point it's like Chris Golden starts trying to get as many lame jokes in as possible. Could have done without that. Bottom line? If you like action, adventure, humor, or anything that can remotely be called "Cool", check out this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kevin C Steele

    I've had this one on my shelf for a couple of years and finally decided to read it when I was fiending for some Hellboy fun. I thoroughly enjoy the movies, as well as the occasional graphic novel. I've also been a long-time fan of pulp characters such as "The Spider" and "Doc Savage", so I figured Hellboy would be perfect for the "illustrated novel" treatment. Admittedly, this was my second attempt at this book, as it didn't hook me the first time. But, this time it got me and it was just what I've had this one on my shelf for a couple of years and finally decided to read it when I was fiending for some Hellboy fun. I thoroughly enjoy the movies, as well as the occasional graphic novel. I've also been a long-time fan of pulp characters such as "The Spider" and "Doc Savage", so I figured Hellboy would be perfect for the "illustrated novel" treatment. Admittedly, this was my second attempt at this book, as it didn't hook me the first time. But, this time it got me and it was just what I needed then, having recently journeyed through the "Song of Fire & Ice" novels. This book was light and fun, like Christopher Golden GM-ing me through a monster-of-the-week adventure in the Mignola-verse. Mike Mignola's art perfectly complimented the writing, adding the right dash of imagery to clearly envision what Golden was describing. Overall, it was entertaining and I will certainly read more of these novels.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Willow Redd

    Here we have the first Hellboy novel, officially sanctioned by Mike Mignola (who also illustrates). It took me a while to get a hold of this, since I was silly enough to let it go out of print on me, but now I have it. This was also, I believe, the first appearance of Anastasia Bransfield, Hellboy's former love interest who calls when needed. Golden explores their story more in some of the other novels and stories he's written. The story has everything you'd expect from a Hellboy tale; a lost Pers Here we have the first Hellboy novel, officially sanctioned by Mike Mignola (who also illustrates). It took me a while to get a hold of this, since I was silly enough to let it go out of print on me, but now I have it. This was also, I believe, the first appearance of Anastasia Bransfield, Hellboy's former love interest who calls when needed. Golden explores their story more in some of the other novels and stories he's written. The story has everything you'd expect from a Hellboy tale; a lost Persian army brought back from the dead, evil sorcerers, underground civilizations, ancient tentacled evil, human-to-monster transformations, dismemberment, ghosts, and a ritual to bring some form of "ultimate evil" back into this plane of existence. And, of course, Hellboy is right in the middle of it. I really do enjoy the way Golden writes Hellboy. He really does seem to understand Mignola's world.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeb

    I don't have much to say about Hellboy: The Lost Army. It's about what you'd expect. Maybe a little less than, since I was expecting the writing to be a little stronger than it ended up being. Not that it needed to be a literary masterpiece--I just thought that some of the prose felt a little silly at times. The story is good enough, pretty gripping especially as you get to the end. The book poses some interesting questions about the Hellboy mythos, given that it's considered more or less canon, I don't have much to say about Hellboy: The Lost Army. It's about what you'd expect. Maybe a little less than, since I was expecting the writing to be a little stronger than it ended up being. Not that it needed to be a literary masterpiece--I just thought that some of the prose felt a little silly at times. The story is good enough, pretty gripping especially as you get to the end. The book poses some interesting questions about the Hellboy mythos, given that it's considered more or less canon, and getting a close third-person view of Hellboy both gives us a better understanding of the character and undermines some of what's special about him. I enjoyed the book, and might check out more of the Hellboy novels if I need something light and easy, but I would say this is for die-hards only. The illustrations from Mignola are fantastic.

  20. 4 out of 5

    gazoo

    Luv the character and give 'em hell boy name. My first novel on this comic commando. The storyline felt a little predictable with all the usual suspects a la the risen army of dead zombies (been there in Lord of the Rings, Pirates of the Caribbean and countless others). Actually enjoyed the writing but wish it was just a bit darker and descriptive like a Conan novel. What really rocked was the bad ass with horns getting heart burn from a female interest. Adds a nice dimension to his hellish pers Luv the character and give 'em hell boy name. My first novel on this comic commando. The storyline felt a little predictable with all the usual suspects a la the risen army of dead zombies (been there in Lord of the Rings, Pirates of the Caribbean and countless others). Actually enjoyed the writing but wish it was just a bit darker and descriptive like a Conan novel. What really rocked was the bad ass with horns getting heart burn from a female interest. Adds a nice dimension to his hellish persona and hope to see more of it in future books. The illustrative art was a bonus which should be a given in all upcoming novels.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tommy Demsky

    Eh. 2,5/5 I usually love action adventure historical/mythical pulp stories. Even in cases when they aren't anything deep or special. But here there were some character choices that REALLY got on my nerves in this book. The annoying 'nice guy' professor character was just... just bad and cringe. Which maybe was the point, but I don't know. I really disliked that whole arc. And then there was the fact that all the MI5 agents were just written as dumb brutes and nothing else, which felt so lazy. Ev Eh. 2,5/5 I usually love action adventure historical/mythical pulp stories. Even in cases when they aren't anything deep or special. But here there were some character choices that REALLY got on my nerves in this book. The annoying 'nice guy' professor character was just... just bad and cringe. Which maybe was the point, but I don't know. I really disliked that whole arc. And then there was the fact that all the MI5 agents were just written as dumb brutes and nothing else, which felt so lazy. Even tho ok, their boss got a few good scenes close to end of the book. So yeah, a mediocre little pulp novel.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    The first of the Hellboy novels, the Lost Army was very enjoyable. It contains everything you want from a Hellboy story, including a wide assortment of monsters! This volume includes Giant Spiders, Zombies, Ghosts, Werewolves, a Cthulhu tentacled creature as well as many more. Just a very well done novel, and if you enjoy the Hellboy comics I think you will love the novel. If you don't read comics, you should read this if you like horror and action as it has plenty of both, with some humor tosse The first of the Hellboy novels, the Lost Army was very enjoyable. It contains everything you want from a Hellboy story, including a wide assortment of monsters! This volume includes Giant Spiders, Zombies, Ghosts, Werewolves, a Cthulhu tentacled creature as well as many more. Just a very well done novel, and if you enjoy the Hellboy comics I think you will love the novel. If you don't read comics, you should read this if you like horror and action as it has plenty of both, with some humor tossed in for good measure.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    I believe this was the first Hellboy novelization, and it's certainly still one of the best. Golden does an excellent job of capturing the spirit of the comics, and all of the characters rang true to me. The plot is more complex and detailed than could be done in graphics form, and this edition includes many terrific illustrations. It's a real page-turner! I believe this was the first Hellboy novelization, and it's certainly still one of the best. Golden does an excellent job of capturing the spirit of the comics, and all of the characters rang true to me. The plot is more complex and detailed than could be done in graphics form, and this edition includes many terrific illustrations. It's a real page-turner!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Siona St Mark

    Actual rating: 4.75 stars. This was a really fun book. Towards the end, I was getting bored of the Creaghan chapters/perspectives, so I did skip them after about chapter 14 (so like the last five chapters in the book), this the actual rating. If you like Hellboy, I would definitely suggest giving this book a try. I don't think it quite lives up to the comics, but it is still a good book. Actual rating: 4.75 stars. This was a really fun book. Towards the end, I was getting bored of the Creaghan chapters/perspectives, so I did skip them after about chapter 14 (so like the last five chapters in the book), this the actual rating. If you like Hellboy, I would definitely suggest giving this book a try. I don't think it quite lives up to the comics, but it is still a good book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris Morrow

    Was a fun read, not particularly like the movie, but I'm not sure that's a bad thing. Enjoyed reading this though, I came at hellboy from the movie side of things, not being a comicbook reader until later in life. Was a fun read, not particularly like the movie, but I'm not sure that's a bad thing. Enjoyed reading this though, I came at hellboy from the movie side of things, not being a comicbook reader until later in life.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Danaleox Bongiovanni

    I read this in one week fun.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kione

    BAD-ASS!! Oh man. If this isn't the 2nd movie, it's GOTTA be the 3rd. BAD-ASS!! Oh man. If this isn't the 2nd movie, it's GOTTA be the 3rd.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dominique

    I did not enjoy this Hellboy novelization as much as I have the others. The story did not flow well, in my opinion.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Chris Golden is the man!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Norris

    A decent pulpy ride. Mignolia's illustrations are great but I wish he'd written it too. Golden's style gets stale near the end, but picks up again in the last few pages. A decent pulpy ride. Mignolia's illustrations are great but I wish he'd written it too. Golden's style gets stale near the end, but picks up again in the last few pages.

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