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Manga: The Pre-History of Japanese Comics

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The influence of manga on international comics had grown considerably over the past two decades. The origins of manga can be traced back to the Edo Period (1600 to 1868) of Japanese history, specifically to popular type of books using ukiyo-e, Japanese woodblock prints. These books contained humorous content and featured humans, fantastical creatures and even references to The influence of manga on international comics had grown considerably over the past two decades. The origins of manga can be traced back to the Edo Period (1600 to 1868) of Japanese history, specifically to popular type of books using ukiyo-e, Japanese woodblock prints. These books contained humorous content and featured humans, fantastical creatures and even references to celebrities of the period. As literacy rose in Japan throughout the 18th Century (part of the Edo Period) and into the 19th and early 20th Century (the Meiji Period), these kind of illustrated novels became popular and it is from here that we actually get the first recorded use of the term manga to describe a words-and-pictures based story. This book includes those kinds of origin works of manga dated from 17th to early 20th Century. It is a great source book for graphic designers as well as comic book artists, and also Japanese art lovers who can find some great works of well-known ukiyo-e artists such as Kuniyoshi Utagawa, Hokusai Katsushika, and Yoshitoshi Tsukioka. The book will present works in chronological order.


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The influence of manga on international comics had grown considerably over the past two decades. The origins of manga can be traced back to the Edo Period (1600 to 1868) of Japanese history, specifically to popular type of books using ukiyo-e, Japanese woodblock prints. These books contained humorous content and featured humans, fantastical creatures and even references to The influence of manga on international comics had grown considerably over the past two decades. The origins of manga can be traced back to the Edo Period (1600 to 1868) of Japanese history, specifically to popular type of books using ukiyo-e, Japanese woodblock prints. These books contained humorous content and featured humans, fantastical creatures and even references to celebrities of the period. As literacy rose in Japan throughout the 18th Century (part of the Edo Period) and into the 19th and early 20th Century (the Meiji Period), these kind of illustrated novels became popular and it is from here that we actually get the first recorded use of the term manga to describe a words-and-pictures based story. This book includes those kinds of origin works of manga dated from 17th to early 20th Century. It is a great source book for graphic designers as well as comic book artists, and also Japanese art lovers who can find some great works of well-known ukiyo-e artists such as Kuniyoshi Utagawa, Hokusai Katsushika, and Yoshitoshi Tsukioka. The book will present works in chronological order.

43 review for Manga: The Pre-History of Japanese Comics

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ben Wong

    As some important content is written in jap and i dont understand it, im sure im missing out on a lot. But taking it as a picture book and enjoying the journey through history, which was how i enjoyed it, can be therapeutic as you appreciate the beautiful art style of ancient japan.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kate (Looking Glass Reads)

    This book looked absolutely fascinating, and by rights it is. Gorgeous full color images adorn every page and the art historian within me loved just flipping through. On most pages the original Japanese text sits beside the English translation. Except for some pages where there is no English translation. This made reading the book more of a flip through in some places which was a shame. I think this book would be best appreciated by those who might already have some knowledge of the artistic hist This book looked absolutely fascinating, and by rights it is. Gorgeous full color images adorn every page and the art historian within me loved just flipping through. On most pages the original Japanese text sits beside the English translation. Except for some pages where there is no English translation. This made reading the book more of a flip through in some places which was a shame. I think this book would be best appreciated by those who might already have some knowledge of the artistic history of Japanese comics or can read some Japanese. Still, it was fun to flip through.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Adan

    A pretty good bilingual account of Japanese art forms that directly or indirectly led to manga. My favorites were miburi-e (humans mimicking animal behavior), yose-e (using multiple contorted human bodies to make a face; like an optical illusion of sorts), and emoji (using Japanese words and characters as part of the art). I was unhappy that not all Japanese was translated into English, though, and I feel like I missed some pretty important information and context. I did learn some pretty interes A pretty good bilingual account of Japanese art forms that directly or indirectly led to manga. My favorites were miburi-e (humans mimicking animal behavior), yose-e (using multiple contorted human bodies to make a face; like an optical illusion of sorts), and emoji (using Japanese words and characters as part of the art). I was unhappy that not all Japanese was translated into English, though, and I feel like I missed some pretty important information and context. I did learn some pretty interesting things though: raccoon dogs apparently have enormous scrota that they can use as boats, umbrellas, fish nets, etc.; the Japanese used to think earthquakes were caused by catfish angry at politicians and then thrashing about too violently in the waters; and an image of farting men was so well-known that it was used in many puzzle quizzes called hanji-e.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Vegetable Person

    excellent primer on the pre-history of Japanese comics. Beautiful full-color pictures and layout -- great attention to visual details, which is obviously important in a book about visual art. The English translation is rocky, though, and there are parts where it's left out entirely. I sort of wish that more context and explanation had been included -- as it is, it's organized by term/style without much historical context, and connections aren't drawn to modern manga styles. But still, really del excellent primer on the pre-history of Japanese comics. Beautiful full-color pictures and layout -- great attention to visual details, which is obviously important in a book about visual art. The English translation is rocky, though, and there are parts where it's left out entirely. I sort of wish that more context and explanation had been included -- as it is, it's organized by term/style without much historical context, and connections aren't drawn to modern manga styles. But still, really delightful book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lulu

    This title features foundational works of manga dating from the 17th to the early 20th

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  7. 5 out of 5

    Evgeniy

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jeannette

  9. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  10. 5 out of 5

    Grzegorz

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bas vdL

  12. 4 out of 5

    Iris Ang

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mereca

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

  15. 5 out of 5

    S.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Noran Miss Pumkin

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chiara

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alara

  19. 4 out of 5

    Joe Hill

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mitch Cerda

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Peter Van genderen

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  26. 5 out of 5

    Azza

  27. 5 out of 5

    Luis

  28. 4 out of 5

    Donald Forster

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra Kiss

  30. 4 out of 5

    Imdelmo

  31. 4 out of 5

    Fatma Al-Adsani

  32. 4 out of 5

    ruyi

  33. 5 out of 5

    Francesca Viliani

  34. 5 out of 5

    Soile Kokkonen

  35. 5 out of 5

    Vita

  36. 4 out of 5

    Daken Howlett

  37. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne

  38. 4 out of 5

    Katie Pooparnthong

  39. 4 out of 5

    Sapphire Ng

  40. 4 out of 5

    rêveur d'art

  41. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  42. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  43. 5 out of 5

    Blanca Rituerto

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