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Caring for young children is one of the most challenging tasks an adult will ever face. No matter how much you love your child, there will be moments filled with frustration, anger, and even desperation. There will also be questions: Why does my four-year-old deliberately lie to me? Why won’t my three-year-old listen to me? Should I ever spank my preschooler when she is di Caring for young children is one of the most challenging tasks an adult will ever face. No matter how much you love your child, there will be moments filled with frustration, anger, and even desperation. There will also be questions: Why does my four-year-old deliberately lie to me? Why won’t my three-year-old listen to me? Should I ever spank my preschooler when she is disobedient? Over the years, millions of parents just like you have come to trust the Positive Discipline series and its commonsense approach to child-rearing. Now completely updated to report the latest research in child development and learning, Positive Discipline for Preschoolers will teach you how to use methods to raise a child who is responsible, respectful, and resourceful. You’ll find practical solutions for how to:- Avoid the power struggles that often come with mastering sleeping, eating, and potty training - See misbehavior as an opportunity to teach nonpunitive discipline—not punishment - Instill valuable social skills and positive behavior inside and outside the home by using methods that teach important life skills - Employ family and class meetings to tackle behavorial challenges - And much, much more!This revised and updated third edition includes information from the latest research on neurobiology, diet and exercise, gender differences and behavior, the importance of early relationships and parenting, and new approaches to parenting in the age of mass media. In addition, this book offers new information on reducing anxiety and helping children feel safe in troubled times.


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Caring for young children is one of the most challenging tasks an adult will ever face. No matter how much you love your child, there will be moments filled with frustration, anger, and even desperation. There will also be questions: Why does my four-year-old deliberately lie to me? Why won’t my three-year-old listen to me? Should I ever spank my preschooler when she is di Caring for young children is one of the most challenging tasks an adult will ever face. No matter how much you love your child, there will be moments filled with frustration, anger, and even desperation. There will also be questions: Why does my four-year-old deliberately lie to me? Why won’t my three-year-old listen to me? Should I ever spank my preschooler when she is disobedient? Over the years, millions of parents just like you have come to trust the Positive Discipline series and its commonsense approach to child-rearing. Now completely updated to report the latest research in child development and learning, Positive Discipline for Preschoolers will teach you how to use methods to raise a child who is responsible, respectful, and resourceful. You’ll find practical solutions for how to:- Avoid the power struggles that often come with mastering sleeping, eating, and potty training - See misbehavior as an opportunity to teach nonpunitive discipline—not punishment - Instill valuable social skills and positive behavior inside and outside the home by using methods that teach important life skills - Employ family and class meetings to tackle behavorial challenges - And much, much more!This revised and updated third edition includes information from the latest research on neurobiology, diet and exercise, gender differences and behavior, the importance of early relationships and parenting, and new approaches to parenting in the age of mass media. In addition, this book offers new information on reducing anxiety and helping children feel safe in troubled times.

30 review for Positive Discipline for Preschoolers: For Their Early Years - Raising Children Who Are Responsible, Respectful, and Resourceful

  1. 5 out of 5

    Susanne

    Because you can’t highlight in a library book: - Children have four basic needs: 1) a sense of belonging and significance, 2) perceptions of capability, 3) personal power and autonomy, 4) social and life skills. pg. 9 - Let children calm down and catch their breath before trying to solve a problem. "Children do better when they feel better." pg. 21 - "Mistakes are opportunities to learn" for both children and adults. pg. 36 - "If you want your child to be truthful, you must be willing to listen, to Because you can’t highlight in a library book: - Children have four basic needs: 1) a sense of belonging and significance, 2) perceptions of capability, 3) personal power and autonomy, 4) social and life skills. pg. 9 - Let children calm down and catch their breath before trying to solve a problem. "Children do better when they feel better." pg. 21 - "Mistakes are opportunities to learn" for both children and adults. pg. 36 - "If you want your child to be truthful, you must be willing to listen, to refrain from shaming or punishing, and to work with her to develop her skills and understanding as problems arise. " pg. 45 - "Children learn best in the context of relationships... and through active involvement that engages their senses: sight, smell, hearing, taste, and touch. They also need opportunities to connect what they already know to new information as they construct their understanding of the world." pg. 66 - "Children 'listen' to kind, firm and consistent action more than they listen to words." pg. 84 - "Children will develop thinking skills, judgment skills, problem-solving abilities, and initiative when adults ask them curiosity questions: "What happened? What were you trying to do? Why do you think this happened? How do you feel about it? Why do you think this happened? How do you feel about it? How could you fix it? What else could you do if you don't want this to happen again?" pg. 91 - A way to determine if a comment is "praise" or "encouragement" is if it can be said only to that person at that time. Praise is general, like "Good job" and encouragement is specific, like "Look how high you built that tower! It's taller than you!" Praise gives authority to the adult, encouragement gives ownership to the child. pg. 93 - When your child is speaking to you, LISTEN. If you can’t give them your FULL attention, ask them to wait a moment while you finish what you were doing, and then look them in the eye while they speak. Imagine how you would feel if the person you were talking to was multi-tasking! - Ask about happiest and saddest moments of the day. pg. 108 - “Children usually know when something in the family is amiss, and without enough information, they assume they have done something wrong.” pg. 135 - “Before you can help your child choose different behavior, you must first understand why your child is behaving this way, and what he is trying to accomplish with his behavior.” pg. 140 - Mistaken Goals: 1) undue attention seeking, 2) misguided power, 3) revenge, and 4) assumed inadequacy. pg. 166 - The 3 A’s of Special Time: attitude, attention, alone. Believe that time alone with your child is valuable and give it your full attention. pg. 149 - “Children usually expect adults to provide constant entertainment and diversion, but if adults comply, children may never learn how to occupy quiet moments or cure boredom for themselves. “ pg. 158 - “Preschoolers often involves opposites – the learn one skill and its opposite at the same time. In the case of friendship, this means that connection through friendship also brings a negative side – exclusion.” pg. 192 - “Children who are successful at social relationships often learn to watch a game I progress and then join in my creating a role for themselves. For example, after a few moments of watching playmates play house, offering to make ‘bake cookies’ for the others.” Pg. 199 - If your children are arguing, you have three choices: 1) Beat it: leave the area, 2) Bear it: stay in the same room without jumping in to stop the fight or fix the problem, 3) End the Bout or Boot ‘Em Out: send children to cool off or go outside to continue their fight where it doesn’t effect everyone else. pg. 204 - Let child help in making and/or illustrating a routine chart for morning time, transitions, and bedtime. They often follow the chart better than the parents’ directions. pg. 219 - “Choosing clothing the night before will eliminate at least one potential morning power struggle.” pg. 221 - “Listen to your mealtime comments and ask yourself if you would say the same time to an adult.” pg. 234 - “Sugar can disrupt the body’s natural craving for good foods.” pg. 234 - To encourage healthy eating habits: 1) When they eat isn’t as important as what they eat, 2) Simple is best, 3) Allow choices, including some fun foods, 4) Hunger is a better guide to eating than the clock. pg. 238 - “Giving your children a way to contribute encourages the growth of their sense of initiative, teaches them life skills, invites them to see themselves as contributing members of the family and builds their sense of belonging.” pg. 242 - “A child who is having difficulty defecating my loosen up and relax his muscles if he blows bubbles while sitting on the toilet. It is difficult to squeeze and blow at the same time! Playing a harmonica offers the same benefits.” pg. 252 - “Teach him to clean up any mess he makes. With a kind and firm tone of voice say, ‘You’ll need to clean that up. Would you like my help or do you want to do it by yourself?’ If he resists, say, ‘Would a hug help you feel better? I know you will want to take care of this problem when you feel better.’” pg. 257 - …”The research confirmed that the children who attended academic preschools did know more numbers and letters than the children who went to play-oriented preschools. However, by age five, the kids from the play-oriented preschools had caught up, while those attending academic preschools felt less positive about school.” pg. 264 - “Does this mean academics should be eliminated during the first three years? No. The key is to follow the interests of children. …Be aware of what your child is learning and how he feels about it.” pg. 265 - “The best way to deal with the effect of video and television violence on your child is to limit his exposure and to do lots of teaching. Watch programs or games with him and be sure you model for him the values you want him to adopt. Television viewing encourages passivity; critical thinking and learning occur only when dialog takes place.” pg. 303 - “It is difficult to limit your child’s exposure to TV, video games, and the computer when you never turn them off yourself.” pg. 304 - “You are your child’s most important role model; be sure you practice the values you expect your child to learn. pg. 304

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    A great book, but a little too redundant. Could have been much shorter, especially since its written for parents of preschool children who generally don't have a lot of time. The general idea and theory in the book is very positive and focused on loving your child and seeing through their mind. The reading is a little too light at times. I would have liked more scientific reasoning behind why children do what they do and think how they think. I think this book is a very good addition to Dr. Sear A great book, but a little too redundant. Could have been much shorter, especially since its written for parents of preschool children who generally don't have a lot of time. The general idea and theory in the book is very positive and focused on loving your child and seeing through their mind. The reading is a little too light at times. I would have liked more scientific reasoning behind why children do what they do and think how they think. I think this book is a very good addition to Dr. Sears "Attachment Parenting" and "The Discipline Book" as it has the same concepts but is written in a way that drills then into your head. The only thing I absolutely did not like about this book is that in every example they give of a child that is dealing with both a preschool teacher and their parent, the preschool teacher is always right. The authors need to give parents more credit as to their innate abilities to take care of a raise their children. The examples in the book send the message that parents aren't as capable as "trained professionals." The truth is that a child's parent is the most trained professional to raise and care for them. There is no one else that a child looks to more for love and knowledge than their parents. And as parents we need to tune in to our children's wants and needs by listening to our instincts and believing in our capabilities to raise them.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jessie

    I like the concept that one of the biggest things you can do for your child to help discipline them and help give them self-confidence and independence is to teach them skills. The more your child is able to do without your help, the happier they are because they feel more autonomous and less reliant on others. I've absolutely seen this with with my son - this is a huge reason why parenting him has become easier the older he's gotten (he was 2.5 years when I read this book). Him being verbal and I like the concept that one of the biggest things you can do for your child to help discipline them and help give them self-confidence and independence is to teach them skills. The more your child is able to do without your help, the happier they are because they feel more autonomous and less reliant on others. I've absolutely seen this with with my son - this is a huge reason why parenting him has become easier the older he's gotten (he was 2.5 years when I read this book). Him being verbal and not needing me to translate so much, when he potty trained, when he learned how to put his pants on without my help, etc., all of these things have made him glowingly happy. Ultimately, I don't like this author, and this is the 2nd book by Jane Nelsen that I've read. It's hard to say that, because I like her much better than more mainstream books of authoritative discipline. It's not a strong dislike. It's hard for me to even pinpoint what exactly I don't like... so here it is - she is positive discipline. Not gentle discipline, although she does have some gentle discipline techniques mixed in there. She's all about using positive reinforcement in order to get your kid to do what you want them to do. This includes verbal praise, sticker charts, rewards, etc. I find some of her methods to be manipulative, and I don't think it's as effective as methods from, say, Playful Parenting (where you find ways to make daily struggles like getting dressed & brushing teeth fun for your kid through pretend, and also making a better connection with them in the process). Part of it is just the attitude I read that seems a little talking down to children, and I don't like labels like "big girl/boy". It would be easier to use her books if she weren't so wordy and repetitive. As it is, it takes many pages for her to make little points or to get one good example... and then I have to think about the intent of the example to decide if it's one I think that will fit in with my own philosophies or not. I will be avoiding this author in the future. This is the 2nd book of hers that I did not finish. I started reading, then started skimming, then looked up just certain topics, and eventually just returned it to the library. I do like that she's very straightforward in: "If you're doing any of these: spanking, yelling, shaming, etc. - STOP and stop doing it now" because that's something I agree with very much. Not only philosophically, but in practice - as those behaviors make parenting your child more difficult because your kid will be more aggressive, will yell to get your attention, etc.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Baley Whary

    The idea of positive discipline sounds great. Unfortunately I didn't feel like the book was talking to "real" parents of "real" children. Some of the ideas were useful (learning how to avoid power struggles is a real life-saver), but I don't understand still what to do when my child just refuses to obey me, no matter how many choices I give her. Sometimes she's just going to disobey, and this book would have me basically ignore this bad behavior. I gave it 4 stars because it did give me a differ The idea of positive discipline sounds great. Unfortunately I didn't feel like the book was talking to "real" parents of "real" children. Some of the ideas were useful (learning how to avoid power struggles is a real life-saver), but I don't understand still what to do when my child just refuses to obey me, no matter how many choices I give her. Sometimes she's just going to disobey, and this book would have me basically ignore this bad behavior. I gave it 4 stars because it did give me a different way to think about my child's behavior. It helped me focus on routine (and why routine is so important for young children), and gave useful ideas for getting cooperation from my child. I read the e-book but would recommend the paperback for anyone trying to decide. The PDF's in the book were really hard to read, sometimes impossible, and it will be harder to refer back to important parts in the e-book versus a paperback version.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Bost

    This book contains a few actionable ideas to help parents guide their toddler(s) / pre-schoolers towards (eventual) responsible independence. I appreciated the numerous scenarios provided--realistically frustrating situations are a good way to demonstrate how to employ the various concepts after they are introduced. I also liked that there was time dedicated to single parents, kids with special needs, groups of children, and other often-overlooked scenarios. The author seemed to greatly respect th This book contains a few actionable ideas to help parents guide their toddler(s) / pre-schoolers towards (eventual) responsible independence. I appreciated the numerous scenarios provided--realistically frustrating situations are a good way to demonstrate how to employ the various concepts after they are introduced. I also liked that there was time dedicated to single parents, kids with special needs, groups of children, and other often-overlooked scenarios. The author seemed to greatly respect that, even though an underlying parenting philosophy is preferred, no two parenting/discipline circumstances can ever be identical. A couple of gripes, but nothing major. Frequently repetitive (as are many self-help books). The real-life scenarios didn't always seem very realistic to me (probably because of my own unique special snowflake).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Marci Antoniuk

    This book had a lot of helpful ideas. I appreciated learning what I can reasonably expect from my two year old and what will take more time to develop. I also liked the philosophy of looking at the end game, how my goal isn't to have a child who (grudgingly)follows rules to escape punishment, but to look at what traits I want my son to have as an adult, and work toward that end. Because of this idea I've stopped using time outs, and instead we have a sheet of cool down ideas on the fridge to hel This book had a lot of helpful ideas. I appreciated learning what I can reasonably expect from my two year old and what will take more time to develop. I also liked the philosophy of looking at the end game, how my goal isn't to have a child who (grudgingly)follows rules to escape punishment, but to look at what traits I want my son to have as an adult, and work toward that end. Because of this idea I've stopped using time outs, and instead we have a sheet of cool down ideas on the fridge to help him learn to manage his own emotions instead of me managing them. I also liked the emphasis on preventing misbehaviors by being proactive, instead of being reactive to attention-getting and then possibly giving A. the idea that he is a bad kid. The only thing I wished had been more clear is how to react when negative attention-getting does occur and he chooses not to use his calm down ideas. But Positive Discipline was a good starting-off point for this complex world of parenting a toddler!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Normalishmom

    As a parent, I often find myself in the stressful situation of trying to figure out how to do this thing called...raising a child. Not only how to raise a chid but how to do it so your child is a decent human being and functioning member of society. The preschool years and early development are emphasized as crucial, to basically the rest of their life. That my friends, is why I gravitated towards this book. Every parent essentially chooses what is right for their family and a parenting style th As a parent, I often find myself in the stressful situation of trying to figure out how to do this thing called...raising a child. Not only how to raise a chid but how to do it so your child is a decent human being and functioning member of society. The preschool years and early development are emphasized as crucial, to basically the rest of their life. That my friends, is why I gravitated towards this book. Every parent essentially chooses what is right for their family and a parenting style that suits them. Whatever you decide in the long run I think this book is a great source for parents as well as educators. The book is broken down into so many subjects you can jump around to something you're particularly interested in at the moment. I actually found myself learning so much about a young child's emotions and perceptions. Things I definitely wanted to know, things I didn't know, things I'll need to know, its all in there. Pick it up, keep it on your nightstand for bedtime reading. It's definitely interesting and worth a look!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I take all parenting books with a grain of salt, but this one caused me to take pause and reconsider some of the things that I'm currently doing. Not saying that I'm doing a complete overhaul on my approach to civilize my children, but this book makes some great points that I agree with...I had a few light bulb moments! While I would recommend reading the whole book, at a minimum read Chapters 11-15 which focuses on the differences between punishment and discipline...most of us use the two words I take all parenting books with a grain of salt, but this one caused me to take pause and reconsider some of the things that I'm currently doing. Not saying that I'm doing a complete overhaul on my approach to civilize my children, but this book makes some great points that I agree with...I had a few light bulb moments! While I would recommend reading the whole book, at a minimum read Chapters 11-15 which focuses on the differences between punishment and discipline...most of us use the two words interchangably and they're really not at all the same thing. Both of them impact and effect our children and their development in profoundly different ways...wow. I also found their views on punitive vs. positive time-outs interesting. Please let me know what you think if you read it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I waffle between a 3 and 4 on this one. I found the perspective aligned with my ideals (not that I am always great about doing what I think I should!): children can learn to respect while being treated with respect themselves; children behave better when they feel better; children are misguided, not misbehaving. Sometimes I am the one that needs to go to timeout, and not the kids. What I still find myself wondering about at the end is how to encourage a 3-year old to "solve her own problems with I waffle between a 3 and 4 on this one. I found the perspective aligned with my ideals (not that I am always great about doing what I think I should!): children can learn to respect while being treated with respect themselves; children behave better when they feel better; children are misguided, not misbehaving. Sometimes I am the one that needs to go to timeout, and not the kids. What I still find myself wondering about at the end is how to encourage a 3-year old to "solve her own problems with her sibling" when her sibling is only 1. A 1-year old isn't the easiest one to reason with. I do feel like I came away with more "tools" for my parenting toolbox, and that the book itself was fairly easy to read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    I love all the positive discipline books, but this one is particularly special because it helps parents understand the stage of life preschoolers are in and how to relate to them. They are not mini-adults. They think totally differently, and I think the author does a good job of helping parents get in their kid's head. Also, I love the positive approach to trying to understand why a child is acting out instead of just using power to control the situation. I love all the positive discipline books, but this one is particularly special because it helps parents understand the stage of life preschoolers are in and how to relate to them. They are not mini-adults. They think totally differently, and I think the author does a good job of helping parents get in their kid's head. Also, I love the positive approach to trying to understand why a child is acting out instead of just using power to control the situation.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    I will definitely be incorporating some of these practices into my preschool program and the way I deal with my school aged kiddos. Sometimes we expect so much from these little ones forgetting that they are new to this world and aren't armed with all of the tools needed to deal with these new experiences. Our job is to give them these tools and watch them use them. I will definitely be incorporating some of these practices into my preschool program and the way I deal with my school aged kiddos. Sometimes we expect so much from these little ones forgetting that they are new to this world and aren't armed with all of the tools needed to deal with these new experiences. Our job is to give them these tools and watch them use them.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I think this book provides a lot of worthwhile strategies that I try to employ. My only critique is that some of the strategies aren't practical for a family with multiple kids or busy lives. Having a newborn and a preschooler doesn't always allow for the level of time and flexibility required to employ some of the strategies the authors outline. I think this book provides a lot of worthwhile strategies that I try to employ. My only critique is that some of the strategies aren't practical for a family with multiple kids or busy lives. Having a newborn and a preschooler doesn't always allow for the level of time and flexibility required to employ some of the strategies the authors outline.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sierra

    Not to try to get into a power struggle with a two year old.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wilmington

    A friend recommended this book to me, or at least the 'Positive Discipline' series. On the plus side, the book is very easy to read and the aim of the book is exactly was I was looking for. The early chapters deal with development and personality traits of preschoolers, including the differences of attitudes based on birth order. So far so good. The first weakness of the book comes with the behavioural problems. I have experienced some of them with my boys, but the solutions suggested are much t A friend recommended this book to me, or at least the 'Positive Discipline' series. On the plus side, the book is very easy to read and the aim of the book is exactly was I was looking for. The early chapters deal with development and personality traits of preschoolers, including the differences of attitudes based on birth order. So far so good. The first weakness of the book comes with the behavioural problems. I have experienced some of them with my boys, but the solutions suggested are much too vague to be of any use. Throughout the book the authors keep repeating that children need love, encouragement, attention and hugs. That's all very well, but most people already know that, and that is not enough to solve a lot of common problems. For example, around the age of three, my eldest child started going to bed very late, and during a few months he wouldn't sleep until 11 pm to midnight. He would scream and cry for hours if forced to go to bed. We have tried everything, but nothing worked. Then suddenly, around the age of four, everything returned to normal, and he went to bed at reasonable hours all by himself. The same situation happened with the second boy, who always slept very easily until the age of two, and even asked to go to bed when he was tired. Within a few weeks he changed radically and we just couldn't get him to sleep until 11 pm. None of the methods in 'Positive Discipline' helped even a little bit. I think that there are just phases of development when children are more difficult to go to bed, seek undue attention or engage in power struggles. In my experience all of these have resolved by themselves without any change required in our behaviour towards the children. It's like adolescence. It comes and goes. Unfortunately the authors failed to admit that this was the case and basically say that if a child misbehaves it must be because the parents do something wrong. Since their only tips are to give them more love, attention, encouragement and hugs, they are making the parents feel guilty about no 'giving' enough, when in fact sometimes overprotected kids turn out to be the more problematic ones. Furthermore, the authors are strongly opposed to television, computers and video games for preschoolers, explaining that it causes them to become more violent, limit their language development, and weaken their attention span. In my experience, all of this is false. My eldest boy watched in average one hour of TV per day since he was one year old and he now has an amazing attention span. He can concentrate for hours on drawing or solving puzzles. He is very well behaved (not violent) and has a large vocabulary for his age. He actually learned to read his first words by navigating video games menus at the age of three. The important thing is that children watch age-appropriate programmes that are both fun and educational. We don't let the kids watch the news or any adult programme. As for video games, there are plenty of them that aren't violent, like most sports game or Nickelodeon games for preschoolers. A recent study by the Max Planck Institute (Kühn et al., 2013, Mol Psychiatry) found that video games actually help brain development, increasing spatial orientation, memory formation, strategic planning and fine motor skills. People playing video games regularly have more grey matter and a bigger right cerebral hemisphere than people who never or rarely play. The authors are just not up-to-date with modern lifestyle and technologies, and reject what they don't know. The other main criticism I have against this book is that they didn't bother to adapt it to the British or European market. This series has been translated in many languages, and adapted to the local culture along with the translation. But there isn't a British version. Most of the examples about food, age-appropriate tasks and choosing a preschool are so American that they are irrelevant and useless to non-American readers. There were also chapters that didn't apply to us, like preschoolers who still can't go on the potty, or how lonely parents should seek help with their church community. That only leaves half of the book dealing with interesting subjects, but unfortunately, not much in that half either that I didn't already know or that is actually useful.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Lots of good info on reasons for particular behaviors and positive ways to react to it, specifically for preschool age children. Helpful charts, and each chapter ends with "Questions to Ponder" related to the topic just covered. There was an entire chapter and portions in other places geared towards teachers and childcare professionals on issues that come up in those situations (how kids act around other kids and for a non-parent adult). The book also included chapters focused on sleep, food, po Lots of good info on reasons for particular behaviors and positive ways to react to it, specifically for preschool age children. Helpful charts, and each chapter ends with "Questions to Ponder" related to the topic just covered. There was an entire chapter and portions in other places geared towards teachers and childcare professionals on issues that come up in those situations (how kids act around other kids and for a non-parent adult). The book also included chapters focused on sleep, food, potty training, picking childcare, special needs, and technology. I found the ideas to be helpful and have already implemented some with my 4 year old. The writing style was easy to understand and I felt had a positive tone. I received an ARC of the revised 4th edition in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Finding My Star

    The Positive Disciple books came highly recommended to me but I never got around to reading any. I was very excited to have the opportunity to read this one. I love that is book isn't about punishment, instead it looks into the child's development and provides techniques that help continue having a strong bond with your child. I also like how it has a section on parenting children with special needs. So many books provide techniques for children that are typically developing but nothing for thos The Positive Disciple books came highly recommended to me but I never got around to reading any. I was very excited to have the opportunity to read this one. I love that is book isn't about punishment, instead it looks into the child's development and provides techniques that help continue having a strong bond with your child. I also like how it has a section on parenting children with special needs. So many books provide techniques for children that are typically developing but nothing for those that have (or in my case work with) children with special needs. Overall I found this book very helpful and look forward to checking out more the the Positive Discipline books.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anuradha Baliga

    A wonderful book on how to respectfully parent and ways to discipline kids . Jane Nelsen also goes into detail about why kids behave certain way and how we can provide appropriate response under these situations. The approach and techniques struck the right notes and seemed practical to me . This is a book I will be going back to again and again as just one read is not enough to understand the nuances . Must read parenting book if you want to follow respectful parenting

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tin

    I actually skipped a lot of parts in this book. It is very comprehensive and has detailed sections on common concerns when it comes to caring for a preschooler, like choosing a good daycare, potty training, use of technology, etc. The sections that were related to our situation, particularly the first half of the book about positive discipline were very insightful. A really good book for parents with kids aged 6 and below.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kasey

    This book is absolutely invaluable for parents. Like with most parenting books, it seems common sense to do these things, but they can be so hard in practice. This book helps by providing constructive actions to take and example scenarios. I'll definitely be booking up the others as my daughter gets older. This book is absolutely invaluable for parents. Like with most parenting books, it seems common sense to do these things, but they can be so hard in practice. This book helps by providing constructive actions to take and example scenarios. I'll definitely be booking up the others as my daughter gets older.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Katie Proctor

    I enjoyed this book- it was easy to read and full of good strategies and parenting philosophy. I like that they discussed showing children respect as a way of modeling the respect they should give others and the way they include even young children in making decisions for the family and themselves.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    I think this is a great intro to positive discipline, but if you've read any other parenting book on this method before, this won't give you anything new. So, not especially helpful for me, but I'm glad it exists in the world. I think this is a great intro to positive discipline, but if you've read any other parenting book on this method before, this won't give you anything new. So, not especially helpful for me, but I'm glad it exists in the world.

  22. 5 out of 5

    J.D. DeHart

    A fascinating look at the notion of positive discipline with young children. I would recommend this book as an early grades methods book and would be interested to compare it to discipline ideas for older children.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ginger

    Common sense approach.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    Very informative. I recommend it often.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kassy

    While I don’t agree with everything in this book, there were lots of good tips that I’ll use as a preschool teacher and I’m sure the same tips will be very helpful as a parent.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ching Li Shan

    suitable for parent this books provides children needs from many aspects. good knowledge. But as a preschool educator, it is only partly useful.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Angela Howe-stemrich

    Good basic information for interacting with preschoolers; overall pretty basic though and seemed to be written at a third grade level. Nonetheless, it is a worthwhile quick read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Katieknous

    Some really good tips - but nothing life changing. There are still some issues that I felt the book did not address.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Riley

    I love it when I find a parenting book that aligns with our family values. So many great suggestions for raising respectful and responsible kids without punishing them.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ileana

    Didn't take away as much as I hope from this book. Didn't find it to be applicable in real life unfortunately. Didn't take away as much as I hope from this book. Didn't find it to be applicable in real life unfortunately.

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