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Social media gives each of us enormous power to influence others for good or ill. But far too many Christians ignore the opportunities and undermine their own reputations through thoughtless words shared online. This book comes directly from the author's experiences as an attorney and a church leader and offers seven simple guidelines for exercising Biblical wisdom in soci Social media gives each of us enormous power to influence others for good or ill. But far too many Christians ignore the opportunities and undermine their own reputations through thoughtless words shared online. This book comes directly from the author's experiences as an attorney and a church leader and offers seven simple guidelines for exercising Biblical wisdom in social media.


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Social media gives each of us enormous power to influence others for good or ill. But far too many Christians ignore the opportunities and undermine their own reputations through thoughtless words shared online. This book comes directly from the author's experiences as an attorney and a church leader and offers seven simple guidelines for exercising Biblical wisdom in soci Social media gives each of us enormous power to influence others for good or ill. But far too many Christians ignore the opportunities and undermine their own reputations through thoughtless words shared online. This book comes directly from the author's experiences as an attorney and a church leader and offers seven simple guidelines for exercising Biblical wisdom in social media.

30 review for What Would Jesus Post?: Seven Principles Christians Should Follow in Social Media

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lance Lumley

    Brian D. Wassom's "What Would Jesus Post" is a hard book to write my first review on because it will make me want to judge other reviews based on this book, which I received via goodreads giveaway. This book is everything that I have seen lacking in Christian books lately. This book stick to it's topic without straying, is easy to read (I read the whole thing in less than two hours), and has honesty from the author. The author's voice is down to earth, not preachy or over the heads of the reader Brian D. Wassom's "What Would Jesus Post" is a hard book to write my first review on because it will make me want to judge other reviews based on this book, which I received via goodreads giveaway. This book is everything that I have seen lacking in Christian books lately. This book stick to it's topic without straying, is easy to read (I read the whole thing in less than two hours), and has honesty from the author. The author's voice is down to earth, not preachy or over the heads of the reader. The book asks the question "Am I honoring God with how I use social media" along with "What effect are these sites having on me as a person?" (page 3). This is something that church goers need to consider in today's age of social media and the internet. The 7 Basic Principles discussed in the book are not just for church goers or Christians, so don't let that distract any new readers to the book, although it is filled with Bible scriptures that back up the points. Even though I am a Christian, simple things like stepping away from the computer during the week and just relaxing without the internet news feeds is great advice for anyone, as the author suggests later in his book (in fact read a book now and then in my opinion). I will not go in major depth of what the 7 Principles are (get the book to find out), but in one section that was very interesting was how Wassom discuss how our different accounts of different websites almost makes the person want to be a different person altogether, like going to a different school, which can limit our Christianity by pretending to boost ourselves to become someone the user is not. I have seen this in my own life, especially with Christians, either a preacher lying on his site about his resume or being a "Godly man" online but not living it in real life, or Christian musicians acting like rock stars online. Wassom's real life examples also add to the book, with some great C.S. Lewis and Star Trek references thrown in. In writing like this, Wassom made the book hard to put down (as mentioned before, I read it in under two hours). Even though this book can be read at one sitting, with it's easy to read print and chapters, I believe this book would be a great tool for a weekly Bible study or small group environment by going through each of the Principles every week. "What Would Jesus Post" takes a good and down to earth look at the way Christians are using the Internet, not just on social sites, but also how we use the Internet as well. This book , as mentioned before, would be a great study tool for small groups. This book was easy to read, but makes the reader think about the topic. This is a must read for Christians, especially since I have not seen much on this topic. Lance Lumley

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    *I received this book in a First Reads giveaway in exchange for an honest book review. First of all, I want to say that while this is a religious book, it also sort of isn't. Yes, there are Bible verses quoted throughout, but it is also a practical book filled with great advice on navigating the social media of our world. You don't have to be Christian to read this book. This isn't a book attempting to drill religion into your head. I didn't have the feeling that the author was seeking to convert *I received this book in a First Reads giveaway in exchange for an honest book review. First of all, I want to say that while this is a religious book, it also sort of isn't. Yes, there are Bible verses quoted throughout, but it is also a practical book filled with great advice on navigating the social media of our world. You don't have to be Christian to read this book. This isn't a book attempting to drill religion into your head. I didn't have the feeling that the author was seeking to convert anybody. He was simply using teachings from the Bible that apply directly and very aptly to the 7 principles he was addressing. There were so many parts of this book where I found myself saying "Yes! Exactly!" It's a lot of the stuff so many of us already know: *The anonymity of the online world leads many people to behave as they wouldn't in real life. *People use Facebook/Twitter/social media to vent and it often backfires. *Social media influences us in more ways than we care to think about. ..."the act of constantly fueling our desires has consequences for our inner peace." *The speed and fast pace of the internet leaves us impatient since all information is delivered quickly and painlessly with minimal effort. ..."On the internet, there is no such thing as waiting; there is no such thing as stillness. There is a constant churning." *Social media very easily becomes a huge time-waster, distracting us from our actual real life. *In most cases, online "friends" aren't actually friends at all. Reading it all in black and white reinforces the reasons why I gave up Facebook 6 months ago. I was checking out to check my newsfeed. I just felt annoyed reading people's glossy, rose-colored statuses. I felt tiny pangs of jealousy over things I didn't even truly feel jealous about. All of these are subjects addressed in this book. But all the lessons addressed in this book don't just apply to Facebook or only social media, they actually apply to many instances in life. The Bible verses shared throughout the text are applicable to many areas of life. The author doesn't pretend like he is above all these life lessons. He states himself that he has made the same mistakes - wasted time, wanted to lash out at someone for a rude comment online - just like everyone else. This book is almost a refresher in the Golden Rule. Treat others like you would want to be treated. If you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all. Put people and relationships first. (And from a Christian perspective, God first.) While it was a very quick read, it was a well put-together and thought-out book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Élizabeth

    This book was sent to me through First Reads for an unbiased review. I must say I was surprised and caught off guard. By the book title (making me think about how the hip youth WWJD movement became rather superficial and cheesy), I was not sure I would like this book or find it biblical and missional. I was somehow expecting a shallow attempt at developing a Christian perspective of social media. I'm so glad I was wrong. This book has so much depth and meaning. I also loved the illustrations! Th This book was sent to me through First Reads for an unbiased review. I must say I was surprised and caught off guard. By the book title (making me think about how the hip youth WWJD movement became rather superficial and cheesy), I was not sure I would like this book or find it biblical and missional. I was somehow expecting a shallow attempt at developing a Christian perspective of social media. I'm so glad I was wrong. This book has so much depth and meaning. I also loved the illustrations! The only thing missing is the link between social media and the gospel; not necessarily proclamation (although I'd certainly think this alone would at least be worth a chapter in the book), but how the gospel is the foundation of our social media lives. Otherwise, it's too easy to apply Scripture to our lives "because it's moral/right", instead of "because of what Jesus has done". In other words, the guidelines in the book aren't shown to be visibly flowing from the cross although they certainly are. This is my only critique. Nevertheless, this is a needed and timely book in our age. I am recommending this book to all teenagers and young adults I know and will quote from this book in the future.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dave Milbrandt

    I received this book through the Goodreads First Reads program. What Would Jesus Post is a great reminder of the way Christians should be acting in their online lives. While much of what is contained here is commonsense wisdom, it still bears repeating in a world of instant communication often executed with little fore- or afterthought. This book would be excellent for teens/college groups or as a training tool for Christian organizations. A set of discussion questions at the end of the book wou I received this book through the Goodreads First Reads program. What Would Jesus Post is a great reminder of the way Christians should be acting in their online lives. While much of what is contained here is commonsense wisdom, it still bears repeating in a world of instant communication often executed with little fore- or afterthought. This book would be excellent for teens/college groups or as a training tool for Christian organizations. A set of discussion questions at the end of the book would have been nice, but that can be handled by a competent pastor or organizational leader.

  5. 4 out of 5

    i found my husband he just ran off with a younger girl

    Honestly, I have never read a more #relatable Godly book. My 65 year old husband left me 2 years ago, and this book has given me the spirit to Ouiji board his ghost. #god #lovelaughlive #ouijiboard #whoyougonnacall #ghostbusters #ghostsarereal #instamodel #bestbookeva #jesusknowsbest #sugarbaby #inspirational #takemetochurch #hozier #spirit #worship #fyp

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dann

    What Would Jesus Post? Good question, no? Author Brian D. Wassom presents seven principles that Christians should follow when posting on social media accounts, such as think before you post, be a peacemaker, and build genuine community. Wassom advises social media users to be aware of the difference between using social media and being used by social media, and to guard against the traps of the platforms. The main thesis is that social media should be an extension of one’s Christian walk and not What Would Jesus Post? Good question, no? Author Brian D. Wassom presents seven principles that Christians should follow when posting on social media accounts, such as think before you post, be a peacemaker, and build genuine community. Wassom advises social media users to be aware of the difference between using social media and being used by social media, and to guard against the traps of the platforms. The main thesis is that social media should be an extension of one’s Christian walk and not something separate. And also that social media should not be a substitute for person-to-person fellowship, only a supplement. A lawyer by trade, Wassom offers a number of examples of how seemingly innocuous or thoughtless posts can comeback to do harm. He also provides various bible verses to illustrate the behaviors and values we as Christians should be exemplifying. It doesn’t offer any real specifics, but What Would Jesus Post? Seven Principles Christians Should Follow in Social Media is a good general guide that’s helpful in making Christians aware of the dangers and opportunities that this new medium affords.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Laura (Book Scrounger)

    I found this to be a very timely book, and appreciate and agree with the concepts that the author puts forth. Lists are very popular these days, and I get the feeling that this book may have started out as a blog post that just really needed to be longer. If that was the case, then I'm glad this topic was elaborated on, because this is a subject that I have not read much substantial on, but sorely needs to be discussed. While never explicitly answering the question of what Jesus would post (thoug I found this to be a very timely book, and appreciate and agree with the concepts that the author puts forth. Lists are very popular these days, and I get the feeling that this book may have started out as a blog post that just really needed to be longer. If that was the case, then I'm glad this topic was elaborated on, because this is a subject that I have not read much substantial on, but sorely needs to be discussed. While never explicitly answering the question of what Jesus would post (though it is certainly implied by the end), the author points out that we as Christians have principles we should follow no matter where we are interacting, but in each point, he elaborates on the different ways that social media complicates things and can make it more difficult to choose the right way to interact or respond. I appreciate that the author is clear that entities like Facebook are morally neutral. He is certainly not "against" any particular social site and clearly understands their purposes and uses, so this is not a rant or manifesto against the "evils of modern technology." Instead, he offers words of explanation and caution, and balances them with encouragement and an exploration of the many different ways that we can use social media to interact positively with others - to be peacemakers, and not stir up trouble. He uses lots of verses from Proverbs, but when applicable ties them in with things Jesus said as well. I felt that one of the strongest sections of the book was the one about peacemakers - chapter 6 - where the author covers the topic of politics and how things can turn ugly on social media, even (especially?) among Christians. And I know, because I've made those mistakes too. Really, an entire book could probably be written on this one subject. The author really nails it when he lays out some possible reasons behind why this happens. He points out that Christianity is based on several faith-based concepts that we have to have strong certainty of in order to believe (Jesus is the son of God, etc.). Then he says: "The trouble comes when we expand that "blessed assurance" (as an old hymn calls it) to include beliefs that are less certain and not necessary to our faith in Christ. In other words, just because we believe in an absolute truth doesn't mean that every single thing you or I believe is absolutely true." That's not an angle I'd really considered before, but it really is true. Politics are not inerrant, but we get into the mindset that our politics are. Overall, while there wasn't anything in this book that surprised, shocked, or shook me up, it put into words many of the things I have noticed or sensed while interacting online, but just hadn't really analyzed or put my finger on - so I appreciated this reminder of these things "spelled out," and the real-life examples and experiences that were shared as well. This was not a long book at all. I read it in a couple hours - and I have a toddler! This would be a great read for any Christian who interacts on the Internet, but especially teenagers or anyone who is essentially "new to the Internet." If I had teens, I would definitely have them read it. Honestly, its accessibility is a huge pro, but I almost wish it had been longer - or that there was perhaps a longer version available that fleshed things out a bit more. Many of these points could be elaborated on even more without seeming overlong. (In compliance with FTC guidelines, I disclose that I received this book for free through GoodReads' First Reads. I was not required to write a positive review.)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Robert Durough, Jr.

    Brian D. Wassom tried to find a book that answered questions like, “Am I honoring God with how I use social media?” and, “What effect are these sites having on me as a person?” all from a Biblical perspective. When he couldn’t, he wrote What Would Jesus Post? In this short book he addresses “Seven Principles For Using Social Media” that he admits “are arbitrary ways of subdividing and explaining the on basic principle that underlies them all: ‘Fear God and obey his commands’ [Ecclesiastes 12 Brian D. Wassom tried to find a book that answered questions like, “Am I honoring God with how I use social media?” and, “What effect are these sites having on me as a person?” all from a Biblical perspective. When he couldn’t, he wrote What Would Jesus Post? In this short book he addresses “Seven Principles For Using Social Media” that he admits “are arbitrary ways of subdividing and explaining the on basic principle that underlies them all: ‘Fear God and obey his commands’ [Ecclesiastes 12:13].” The principles: 1) Think before you post, 2) To your own self be true, 3) Guard your heart, 4) Don’t miss the forest for the trees, 5) Don’t be a stumbling block, 6) Be a peacemaker, 7) Build genuine community. Wassom appropriately applies these (some secular or misapplied) statements through a biblical context to one more specific, encouraging readers to seriously consider how the interact with social media. Wassom does not waste time or words. He’s concise and aptly applies scripture, life experience, and wisdom to his points. He makes no claim that his principles are exhaustive, but they are enough to get anyone thinking in a Christian manner before and during their interaction with social media. His observation that Christians are often the worst when it comes political posts, often confusing their belief in an absolute truth and what they believe to be absolutely true, is spot on. This is the kind of honest dialogue one should expect, and the kind we should all have as we hold one another accountability in social media. I thoroughly enjoyed What Would Jesus Post?, and would recommend it to anyone. I received an e-book copy, which I found to be well done and easy to use. *Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  9. 5 out of 5

    Callie

    Several months ago I shared the story of the time I got off Facebook. When I decided to give up Facebook those few months, it was because I had become suddenly aware of how social media (particularly Facebook) was affecting me and my relationships in a negative way. I eventually got back on, but not until I had thought long and hard about what kind of boundaries I needed to establish. When I saw the book What Would Jesus Post by Brian D. Wassom, I was very interested in reading it, because the s Several months ago I shared the story of the time I got off Facebook. When I decided to give up Facebook those few months, it was because I had become suddenly aware of how social media (particularly Facebook) was affecting me and my relationships in a negative way. I eventually got back on, but not until I had thought long and hard about what kind of boundaries I needed to establish. When I saw the book What Would Jesus Post by Brian D. Wassom, I was very interested in reading it, because the subtitle “Seven Principles Christians Should Follow In Social Media” reminded me of how I had set up boundaries for myself to make sure my online sharing and interactions were in a healthy place. I was curious to see how Wassom’s “seven principles” would match up with my thoughts on the subject. I have to say, I agreed with every one of his points! He covers everything from thinking before you post, to guarding your heart against the negative effects social media can have, to building relationships online and handling online conflict. Many of the principles he discussed were conclusions that I had already come to myself, and I love how he addressed everything not just from a practical perspective, but from a biblical one. A couple of the sections also gave me knew things to think about with regards to my social media interactions (I'm not perfect, after all). I actually came away from this book with a lot of new insight (and maybe even a few post ideas, since I never really followed up on my “giving up Facebook” story). This book is a practical guide for how to use social media to glorify the Lord, and I think it would be helpful for any Christian to read! It is short (could easily be read by anyone in one day), which I think makes it especially useful because it’s not hard to review the material. I think I will definitely be using it as a reference, and if I could I’d have every Christian who is involved in social media read this! Note: I received this ebook for free from BookLook in exchange for this review. This is my honest opinion.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Caitlynn Day

    I was given a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Before I start this review, I should note that I am in no way religious nor have I ever been. I'm not one of those awful Athiests that denounce all Christians or anything like that. If you choose to be religious, cool. I respect that. I was just raised differently. I entered to win this book because I thought it would be interesting to read something like this written in a Christian's point of view. This is a religious book, bu I was given a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Before I start this review, I should note that I am in no way religious nor have I ever been. I'm not one of those awful Athiests that denounce all Christians or anything like that. If you choose to be religious, cool. I respect that. I was just raised differently. I entered to win this book because I thought it would be interesting to read something like this written in a Christian's point of view. This is a religious book, but it doesn't really feel like one honestly. There are bible verses spread out through the book and Wassom does tie all of his 7 principles in with religious values, but the principles he mentions can apply to anyone, religious or not. In my opinion, these principles for the most part are good to follow in life. The only principle I had any problem with was the 5th one mentioned - don't be a stumbling block - in which Wassom says basically that a person shouldn't post anything that may make another Christian question their faith or life choices, such as anything involving alcohol. Along with this, he also mentions that his wife was uncomfortable with him posting where he was when he was away from the family because then people would realize that she was home alone with their children. Those are their life choices and that's fine, but I don't believe everyone should follow this. If someone has a problem with what you choose to post, that's their problem and they can easily unfriend you. But that's just my opinion. There were a few specific parts to this book I enjoyed and for the most part, I would consider this to be a good book to read, especially if you are religious. Some of the points he makes I feel were more or less common sense, but he does make some valid points. It'd possibly make for a good book to give to your preteen child. Preteens, and even teenagers tend to be irresponsible with what they post, not realizing the future consequences. This book may make them think about what they post (aka principle #1 of this book).

  11. 5 out of 5

    Liz Terek

    Arguably, more people communicate via the internet than any other way. Instantly, we’re connected to others worldwide. When it comes to social Medias, are we posting random thoughts, gossip, or even things we know we shouldn’t? In ‘What Would Jesus Post’, Brian D. Wassom tackles the title’s question. Whether or not we’re on-line, Christians should be kingdom-minded & careful to not be a stumbling block for others. From how we react to a criticism to what we tweet, all things media should glori Arguably, more people communicate via the internet than any other way. Instantly, we’re connected to others worldwide. When it comes to social Medias, are we posting random thoughts, gossip, or even things we know we shouldn’t? In ‘What Would Jesus Post’, Brian D. Wassom tackles the title’s question. Whether or not we’re on-line, Christians should be kingdom-minded & careful to not be a stumbling block for others. From how we react to a criticism to what we tweet, all things media should glorify God. Most of the 7 principles provided could be considered as common sense. Obviously, Christians shouldn’t spread lies or gossip. We shouldn’t participate in hate speech, etc. Some would say these principles should also apply to anyone- Christian or not- who’s on-line. I agree wholeheartedly that the internet should be used to spread God’s Word & love to others. True, being on-line is also a great way to connect with scattered family & friends. Many grandparents only ‘see’ their grandkids on Facebook. Also, I agree that our entire world or even day shouldn’t be based around Pinterest or tweeting. My main concern for this book is that many readers will pass it up due to its simplicity. Perhaps it would be more successful as a series of articles in a Christian magazine or YouTube videos. With the economy the way it is, I don’t see readers investing money in books that tell them what they already know. In fact, it isn’t even that we simply know these things. It’s more that we don’t practice these principles. As for the actual writing of the book, the author is often redundant as if he’s lost for words. Veering off topic frequently, he sites good examples, but they aren’t enough to make this work a winner. Honestly, I’d say it’s a 3 out of 5 star piece. As always, give it a try & make your own decision. I received an eBook in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are mine.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scott Haraburda

    Goodreads First Reads Giveaway Book. ------------------------------------ What Would Jesus Post?: Seven Principles Christians Should Follow in Social Media is a book with an interesting title that contains seven short essays with common sense information about using the Internet. Short enough to be read in about an hour, this nearly seventy-page book, with large print and several figures, is intended for readers interested in controlling their use of internet social media sites such as Facebook, L Goodreads First Reads Giveaway Book. ------------------------------------ What Would Jesus Post?: Seven Principles Christians Should Follow in Social Media is a book with an interesting title that contains seven short essays with common sense information about using the Internet. Short enough to be read in about an hour, this nearly seventy-page book, with large print and several figures, is intended for readers interested in controlling their use of internet social media sites such as Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Twitter. The author, Brian D. Wassom, is a partner in a law firm and writes a blog on the legal aspects of social media. As for the words in the book, it contains several grammatical errors and in some sections lack sufficient logic to argue his points, usually being redundant in his examples and deviating off topic frequently. Further, although he uses biblical verses to argue his points, his seven suggestions are really common sense and could be applied in secular situations, not solely for Christian reasons. Further still, these suggestions aren’t just limited to social media, but would be applicable for our actions in any social situation. WWJP is just a short book with some common sense suggestions linked to some biblical verses, and is a useful quick read for those not knowing where to start with controlling their social media posts. If you don’t read this book, anyone, Christian or not, should just apply the one principle I use, which doesn't require biblical verses – before posting your words, ask yourself if you want it printed on the front page of the “New York Times.”

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephen London

    I received this book in exchange for an honest review. First the good: I did enjoy this book. It is definately worth reading. Brian Wassom is tackling a subject that is very important to most of us. I know that I spend quite a bit of time on social media, and I appreciate his concern that Christians use this in a way that is kingdom building rather than in a way that dishonors Jesus. His seven guidelines are very common sense, but as we have all seen in the past, common sense doesn't always trans I received this book in exchange for an honest review. First the good: I did enjoy this book. It is definately worth reading. Brian Wassom is tackling a subject that is very important to most of us. I know that I spend quite a bit of time on social media, and I appreciate his concern that Christians use this in a way that is kingdom building rather than in a way that dishonors Jesus. His seven guidelines are very common sense, but as we have all seen in the past, common sense doesn't always translate into actual practice. He does a great job of taking the principles and clarifying them with stories from his own journey with social media and some stories from others as well. He also does a good job of sprinkling bits of popular culture that would resonate well with most people who use social media. All in all, this is a good book on how to conduct yourself honorably and well using social media. What I wanted to see: The title is What Would Jesus Post? but in fact the book is much more about what Jesus wouldn't post. And that part is quite good. But I did want to see discussion on how we can use social media to proclaim the gospel in helpful and interesting ways, to increase dialogue and community around Christian truth. Because what Jesus would post is the Good News of God in Christ, and I would love to see Wassom's thoughts on how this could be done well. Maybe that is the next book! Recommended.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Lee

    Thankfully the book was not as legalistic as the title hinted it could potentially be. The first section of the book provided many practical nuggets of advice that any social media savvy person would probably find useful. However I felt that the author was trying to write more chapters than what would have necessary. if Wassom were to cut out the fluffy chapters in the middle, this would have easily gotten 4 or even 5 stars (even with the many shortcomings that I am about to discuss in a moment) Thankfully the book was not as legalistic as the title hinted it could potentially be. The first section of the book provided many practical nuggets of advice that any social media savvy person would probably find useful. However I felt that the author was trying to write more chapters than what would have necessary. if Wassom were to cut out the fluffy chapters in the middle, this would have easily gotten 4 or even 5 stars (even with the many shortcomings that I am about to discuss in a moment). Perhaps if marketed as a secular book, it could reach a larger audience. After all, the author makes many references to pop culture and general trivia, which probably will not be the average's Christian reader's area of interest. Also, the references to the bible were far too little if the author wants to support a thesis that is worded with Jesus' name. While the WWJP title seems to be rather catchy or attention grabbing, the author really have invested a bucket load more effort into citing passages from the gospels (or any other part of the bible) to explain what Jesus would post on social media. I would recommend reading this book (especially if a friend or a library would lend you one) but I do not think that it is a book that you would want to keep on your bookshelf for time eternal. I received this ebook from the Harpercollins’ Booklook Bloggers Program in exchange for this review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Brian D. Wassom What Would Jesus Post? Social media gives each of us enormous power to influence others for good or ill. But far too many Christians ignore the opportunities and undermine their own reputations through thoughtless words shared online. This book comes directly from the author's experiences as an attorney and a church leader and offers seven simple guidelines for exercising Biblical wisdom in social media. “Am I honoring God with how I use social media? What effect are these sites ha Brian D. Wassom What Would Jesus Post? Social media gives each of us enormous power to influence others for good or ill. But far too many Christians ignore the opportunities and undermine their own reputations through thoughtless words shared online. This book comes directly from the author's experiences as an attorney and a church leader and offers seven simple guidelines for exercising Biblical wisdom in social media. “Am I honoring God with how I use social media? What effect are these sites having on me as a person? How could I use this technology to be a better friend to the people in my life?” Brian D.Wassom presents his thoughts with seven Biblical principles: Think before you post To your own self be true Guard your heart Don’t miss the forest for the trees Don’t be a stumbling block Be a peacemaker Build genuine community “With great power comes great responsibility.” … And make no mistake: social media gives us great power indeed. Studies show that as many as --% of american between the ages of 18-24 already use at least one social media site? Brian D. Wassom What Would Jesus Post? is a wonderful well written 4 stars book. I received this book through the Goodreads First Reads program.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I seriously think anyone on any social media site should read this book and take every lesson to heart. Me included! I am awful when it comes to social media. The things I post, the things I like, retweet, re-pin, the comments I make. And oh, the distractions! But how can we as Christians act appropriately when we are being slammed on every side and then some, with social media? In the seven lessons the author puts forth, he backs th I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I seriously think anyone on any social media site should read this book and take every lesson to heart. Me included! I am awful when it comes to social media. The things I post, the things I like, retweet, re-pin, the comments I make. And oh, the distractions! But how can we as Christians act appropriately when we are being slammed on every side and then some, with social media? In the seven lessons the author puts forth, he backs them up with numerous related Bible quotes that really make each of these hit home. It is so easy to get caught up in the idea that we are both in our insulated little worlds, and yet wanting to reach out to the greater world as the social creatures God has made us. It is so easy to forget our words, likes, tweets, can do permanent damage to others, even in our most innocent of interactions. I have found myself in the last few days trying to put these lessons into action on my social media accounts. I think if everyone who read this book, would make a concerted effort to follow these lessons, perhaps we might reach out into social media land and make a positive influence.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jeff LeMaster

    Modern humanity is interconnected in ways that boggle the mind due to the power of social media. “What Would Jesus Post?” This book lays out seven guidelines to help Christians make the most of their digital reputation: Think before you post. To your own self be true. Guard your heart. Don’t miss the forest for the trees. Don’t be a stumbling block. Be a peacemaker. Build genuine community. Author Brian Wassom is a church lay leader, and this book grew out of the desire to help his church family Modern humanity is interconnected in ways that boggle the mind due to the power of social media. “What Would Jesus Post?” This book lays out seven guidelines to help Christians make the most of their digital reputation: Think before you post. To your own self be true. Guard your heart. Don’t miss the forest for the trees. Don’t be a stumbling block. Be a peacemaker. Build genuine community. Author Brian Wassom is a church lay leader, and this book grew out of the desire to help his church family navigate the social media minefield in a God-honoring way. This is proven advice, tested by real people. Though the advice is sound, this is a clunky read, lacking that extra ounce of inspiration and creativity that would multiply its potential impact. Please read my complete review at NoEndToBooks.com.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Kander

    **I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.** While this is obviously a Christian book, it offers a lot of good common sense for dealing with social media. The author provides some great real life examples,as well as quotes and pop culture references. All of those things together make this a quick, easy read. The seven principles the author chose to focus on in this book are as follows: Think before you post. To your own self be true. Guard your heart. Don't miss the forest for **I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.** While this is obviously a Christian book, it offers a lot of good common sense for dealing with social media. The author provides some great real life examples,as well as quotes and pop culture references. All of those things together make this a quick, easy read. The seven principles the author chose to focus on in this book are as follows: Think before you post. To your own self be true. Guard your heart. Don't miss the forest for the trees. Don't be a stumbling block. Be a peacemaker. Build genuine community If we all tried to follow these principles while on our social media sites, and in our everyday life, the world would be a much better place.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Hill

    First of all, this is probably an excellent book for young people to read. Much of what is contained within the pages is what I would call "common sense." As that seems to be particularly lacking in the younger generation, perhaps this book would save them from embarrassing themselves and possibly even participating in dangerous activities. I can't say that I learned anything within the pages of this book, but it was based on Scripture and written with young people in mind. I could have done wit First of all, this is probably an excellent book for young people to read. Much of what is contained within the pages is what I would call "common sense." As that seems to be particularly lacking in the younger generation, perhaps this book would save them from embarrassing themselves and possibly even participating in dangerous activities. I can't say that I learned anything within the pages of this book, but it was based on Scripture and written with young people in mind. I could have done with less lecture and more real life stories, but for quick reference, this would be perfect. I was sent a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. I was not financially compensated, and all opinions are 100 percent mine.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Stacie Wyatt

    I read What would Jesus Post in exchange for honest review from BookLook Bloggers. I finished post of the book in less than an hour. I loved the book. The book teaches people how their behaviors online affect their reputation and relationship with God. What we post doesn't affect us only. We need to think about what we post before we post. We also need to consider how our actions can affect others' behaviors. We can lose a job over social media based on what we post. We can lose friends based on I read What would Jesus Post in exchange for honest review from BookLook Bloggers. I finished post of the book in less than an hour. I loved the book. The book teaches people how their behaviors online affect their reputation and relationship with God. What we post doesn't affect us only. We need to think about what we post before we post. We also need to consider how our actions can affect others' behaviors. We can lose a job over social media based on what we post. We can lose friends based on what we post. We can lead others to fall based on what we post. We also may become more accepting of ungodly things, based on what we see and comment on social media. While social media is a good thing, we can't control how people will interpret our statuses and pictures. This was a great read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bianca Smith

    I have three possible leads to start this review. Meh, I'll skip them. This is a great, and very short book helping you decide how you should behave. It uses Jesus and the Bible as a model, but really, it is 100 pages of breaking out the "do no evil" mantra. It's focussed on how we behave online with social media, but branches into offline life too. If you find yourself getting caught in drama online and need a reminder of what to do, grab this book. All claims are relevant and supported by scri I have three possible leads to start this review. Meh, I'll skip them. This is a great, and very short book helping you decide how you should behave. It uses Jesus and the Bible as a model, but really, it is 100 pages of breaking out the "do no evil" mantra. It's focussed on how we behave online with social media, but branches into offline life too. If you find yourself getting caught in drama online and need a reminder of what to do, grab this book. All claims are relevant and supported by scripture. I also love the supplemental research.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I won a copy of this book in exchange for my honest reviews of the book. I think that people including myself need to think before reacting. Over the years, I have learned that once you say or do something that isn't nice, then it's a reflection on you. And it can't be reversed without a lot of explaining to do. That includes what is typed/texted online where everyone can see it. So, I believe that this book is a reminder to me that I need to stay focused on what I do and/or what I want to say w I won a copy of this book in exchange for my honest reviews of the book. I think that people including myself need to think before reacting. Over the years, I have learned that once you say or do something that isn't nice, then it's a reflection on you. And it can't be reversed without a lot of explaining to do. That includes what is typed/texted online where everyone can see it. So, I believe that this book is a reminder to me that I need to stay focused on what I do and/or what I want to say without hurting others!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katy Sauer

    I really enjoyed this book for a variety of reasons. It didn't talk down to me and it was a quick read that really got me thinking. Unlike some Christian literature, it was easy to understand and I could automatically see the link the scripture which was quoted. I'd like to thank BookLookBloggers for providing me with a free galley of this book in exchange for my honest review. I really enjoyed this book for a variety of reasons. It didn't talk down to me and it was a quick read that really got me thinking. Unlike some Christian literature, it was easy to understand and I could automatically see the link the scripture which was quoted. I'd like to thank BookLookBloggers for providing me with a free galley of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Thank, Brian D Wassom, for the free give away through Goodreads First Reads. Not only are the seven principles mentioned in Wassom's book perfectly written, I appreciate the order he placed each principle. It is difficult for me to go to church due to my having so many disabilities, but I sure enjoy reading & watching services/sermons. I really enjoyed reading your book! :) Thank, Brian D Wassom, for the free give away through Goodreads First Reads. Not only are the seven principles mentioned in Wassom's book perfectly written, I appreciate the order he placed each principle. It is difficult for me to go to church due to my having so many disabilities, but I sure enjoy reading & watching services/sermons. I really enjoyed reading your book! :)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Lindsley

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ike

  27. 4 out of 5

    Angel

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tamara C Jones

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cliff

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kenny Cheeseman

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