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At the beginning of history, God established a foundational enmity between the seed of the woman and the seed of the serpent. This is an antithesis that cuts across all areas of human life, including education. Christian parents are left with only two options for the training of their children: faithful education or unbelieving education. Though the right choice seems obvi At the beginning of history, God established a foundational enmity between the seed of the woman and the seed of the serpent. This is an antithesis that cuts across all areas of human life, including education. Christian parents are left with only two options for the training of their children: faithful education or unbelieving education. Though the right choice seems obvious, many Christian parents do not see the antithesis. In this little book, Douglas Wilson presents the case for providing a faithful, Christian education for all Christian kids, and explains why we even have to make that case to begin with.


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At the beginning of history, God established a foundational enmity between the seed of the woman and the seed of the serpent. This is an antithesis that cuts across all areas of human life, including education. Christian parents are left with only two options for the training of their children: faithful education or unbelieving education. Though the right choice seems obvi At the beginning of history, God established a foundational enmity between the seed of the woman and the seed of the serpent. This is an antithesis that cuts across all areas of human life, including education. Christian parents are left with only two options for the training of their children: faithful education or unbelieving education. Though the right choice seems obvious, many Christian parents do not see the antithesis. In this little book, Douglas Wilson presents the case for providing a faithful, Christian education for all Christian kids, and explains why we even have to make that case to begin with.

30 review for Why Christian Kids Need A Christian Education

  1. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Vilas Boas

    Gostei muito. Bastante provocativo, ótimos argumentos. Interessante como não precisa de muito para mostrar o quanto a igreja (não instituição, mas também) se perdeu em suas prioridades quanto a educação de crianças. Esse livro me fez lembrar uma conversa que eu tive com um orientador de pesquisa da área de matemática. Ele amava muito a matemática e eu o admirava demais por isso. Um dia perguntei: professor, a matemática foi descoberta pelos homens ou inventada por eles, e ele respondeu que foi i Gostei muito. Bastante provocativo, ótimos argumentos. Interessante como não precisa de muito para mostrar o quanto a igreja (não instituição, mas também) se perdeu em suas prioridades quanto a educação de crianças. Esse livro me fez lembrar uma conversa que eu tive com um orientador de pesquisa da área de matemática. Ele amava muito a matemática e eu o admirava demais por isso. Um dia perguntei: professor, a matemática foi descoberta pelos homens ou inventada por eles, e ele respondeu que foi inventada. Para mim a resposta foi uma decepção, porque como pode o homem inventar tanta ordem, completude, etc. Mas essa era a resposta de um homem incrédulo. A resposta de um cristão seria a de que a matemática apenas reflete a ordem, a completude, de um Deus perfeito e de ordem, e essa é a digital dele encontrada em tantas outras áreas.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Aitken

    If your goal is simply to write a basic worldview book, say so. Most of this book is generic worldview stuff, and even though it is by Doug Wilson, it isn't technically wrong (well, it is but for different reasons). Because of Christian worldview or something, Christian kids need a Christian education. On one level, that's fine. In terms of making a case for a distinctively Christian education, Wilson is less than persuasive. I understand that this is a pamphlet and was meant to be read in under If your goal is simply to write a basic worldview book, say so. Most of this book is generic worldview stuff, and even though it is by Doug Wilson, it isn't technically wrong (well, it is but for different reasons). Because of Christian worldview or something, Christian kids need a Christian education. On one level, that's fine. In terms of making a case for a distinctively Christian education, Wilson is less than persuasive. I understand that this is a pamphlet and was meant to be read in under an hour. I also realize that Wilson has written larger treatises for a Christian education. Nonetheless, we must still examine whether he makes his case. In a way he does make the case for a Christian education, but he makes himself look silly in the process. My initial review was openly hostile and I attacked Wilson for failing to prove his case for a classical education. To be fair, that wasn't his thesis, so I have modified some things. Of his general definition of education I have no problem with. Education is a passing down from one generation to another. The rest of the first half of the book is worldview talk. Take it or leave it for what it is. I do think he sometimes confuses "neutral" (which is bad) with "common" (which is good). Around page 39 he starts to torpedo his own project. Wilson is committed to "biblical absolutism," which sounds great. After mocking old earth Christians, he then walks into a trap he set for himself. The larger context is God's two books, Bible and Nature. The Bible should interpret nature. That sounds great. Wilson then raises the question (which he fails to answer), "What about geocentrism, since the bible clearly speaks of a stationary earth?" He says the clear should interpret the unclear. That's great, but it tells me nothing on who gets to determine what is clear and what isn't. In fact, the more I reread page 41 I couldn't see any reason to suppose that Wilson isn't a geocentrist. It's rare that you get to watch an author shoot himself in the foot. The next chapter on covenant nurture could read as a defense of homeschooling, which is odd since Wilson isn't really a fan of homeschooling. Around page 56 he hints at a defense of classical education: you have to have a classical education because other models are sectarian. That's rich, coming from Moscow. Classical education, by contrast, offers a robust Trinitarian education. I'm not sure why he thinks classical alone gives that. He says Christian education is too important to be relegated to the edge of town (56). I'm not sure what that has to do with the price of tea in China. He ends with a great quote from Eric Hoffer that is so rich in irony that I will just leave it as it is: "First you have a movement, then a business, then a racket." Indeed.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Becky Pliego

    For some mysterious reason I had not read this little book which was sitting on a shelf. And I’m glad I did because it didn’t disappoint. Read it and then, do all that is in your power to give your kids a thorough Christian education. (We will never regret having done so with our 4 children).

  4. 4 out of 5

    Josiah Brown

    A great, quick read filled with lots of wisdom and common sense. Christian kids do NOT belong in the public school system.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Matt Chapman

    Two of my favourite excerpts: The first is on the importance of not treating history like a string of unconnected events, but seeing it for what it really is. God's own ongoing story and plan. A story that is still being written: "We refuse to separate history from story, an evil suggestion from the dragon, and, if we told more of the right kind of story, we would know what to do with dragons." The second on why it's the Christian imagination captured and enthralled by God's word that goes on to wr Two of my favourite excerpts: The first is on the importance of not treating history like a string of unconnected events, but seeing it for what it really is. God's own ongoing story and plan. A story that is still being written: "We refuse to separate history from story, an evil suggestion from the dragon, and, if we told more of the right kind of story, we would know what to do with dragons." The second on why it's the Christian imagination captured and enthralled by God's word that goes on to write the very best stories of all. This was also like a shout-out to some of my very favourite stories: "The Christian imagination cannot be free until it is captured by the Scriptures and by the Spirit of God. When it is, the world will stand back in amazement. This is because, at bottom, Christians are the only people with a genuine story. Christian students in Christian schools have to be taught how to tell it. The story line is this: grace, envy, sin, promise, sacrifice, resurrection, and fulfillment. We have Eden, the Fall, Cain, the coming Messiah, the Cross, the Resurrection, and Glory. We have Faithful dying in Vanity Fair. We have the Stone Table and the shorn mane. We have the battle of Helm’s Deep. We have Ransom calling down the powers of deep heaven. We have Roland and St. George, Beowulf and Dante. We have Br’er Rabbit, and we have the man who was Thursday."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mark Jr.

    Truly excellent. One gets the feeling that a great many more books could be a great deal shorter if authors had as clear an idea of what they wanted to say as Doug Wilson does here.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Josiah Richardson

    The title made me think that Wilson would be giving a robust argument as to why Christian children should be educated in a Christian manner. But this actually was an argument for why we need to answer the question of "If Jesus is the Lord over everything, does that include education?" And if it does indeed mean that, then we are left with no other option other than to pursue a Christian education for our children and *not* a public schooling option for our children. And so Wilson Wades through t The title made me think that Wilson would be giving a robust argument as to why Christian children should be educated in a Christian manner. But this actually was an argument for why we need to answer the question of "If Jesus is the Lord over everything, does that include education?" And if it does indeed mean that, then we are left with no other option other than to pursue a Christian education for our children and *not* a public schooling option for our children. And so Wilson Wades through this premise and so an alternative title for this short book could be "Why Christianity being true necessitates a Christian education for Christian kids."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Peter Jones

    This is probably not what a lot of people think it is. Pastor Wilson does not give a running list of why we should give our kids a Christian education. Instead he focuses on the presuppositions that would make us think government education is fine. He shows how the idea that Jesus is Lord of all demands that we view the world through a Christian lens and teach our children to do the same. This book will be most valuable for Christians who are thinking through what education is. Once the goal is This is probably not what a lot of people think it is. Pastor Wilson does not give a running list of why we should give our kids a Christian education. Instead he focuses on the presuppositions that would make us think government education is fine. He shows how the idea that Jesus is Lord of all demands that we view the world through a Christian lens and teach our children to do the same. This book will be most valuable for Christians who are thinking through what education is. Once the goal is fixed the means to that goal will become clear.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    About as punchy as seventy pages can be. Wilson begins at the crucial point of defining education and the impossibility of neutrality--all knowledge is taken captive to Christ or not. He then examines what American public education is designed to do, what it actually is doing, and what that means for our kids. Although excellent, I think this book assumes a lot at times and therefore will miss a large portion of Christians still supporting public schools.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Huff

    Succinct and oh so to the point. Very compelling case for a distinctly Christian education.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Leandro Texeira

    Mais um livro delicioso do Douglas Wilson para ler. Agora, sobre a necessidade das crianças cristãs terem educação cristã. Não se trata apenas de uma exposição de perguntas e respostas que as crianças devem saber de cor, nem mesmo de uma visão parcial de ensino religioso aos filhos; não, a questão é mais profunda, mais abrangente. É a educação cristã global, segundo a expressão do autor. Leia o livro. Faço coro com o autor: se você tem condições de tirar o seu filho do sistema educacional do gove Mais um livro delicioso do Douglas Wilson para ler. Agora, sobre a necessidade das crianças cristãs terem educação cristã. Não se trata apenas de uma exposição de perguntas e respostas que as crianças devem saber de cor, nem mesmo de uma visão parcial de ensino religioso aos filhos; não, a questão é mais profunda, mais abrangente. É a educação cristã global, segundo a expressão do autor. Leia o livro. Faço coro com o autor: se você tem condições de tirar o seu filho do sistema educacional do governo, FAÇA ISTO.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Martin

    Interesting. Though I may not completely agree with the author's final conclusion that Christian Kids need a Christian education, he HAS helped me see that I absolutely should take seriously the decision regarding how my children will be educated, and that a Christian education should be STRONGLY considered. So the seed has been planted for further research and investigation into our options down the road. Interesting. Though I may not completely agree with the author's final conclusion that Christian Kids need a Christian education, he HAS helped me see that I absolutely should take seriously the decision regarding how my children will be educated, and that a Christian education should be STRONGLY considered. So the seed has been planted for further research and investigation into our options down the road.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Aurora Grace

    A booklet length diatribe against public education

  14. 4 out of 5

    Deanna Weigel

    The case for a Christian education is laid out well.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    It's not that I didn't enjoy this book, I just appreciate the depth of his other "case for Christian education" books a bit more. This book is a mere foundation, as others have said, good building blocks. A great place for those who are questioning how they should educate their children. A great resource for people to give to friends who think that public school is neutral. It's a great way to get the conversation started. Basically, if you believe that Jesus is Lord over all it means the educati It's not that I didn't enjoy this book, I just appreciate the depth of his other "case for Christian education" books a bit more. This book is a mere foundation, as others have said, good building blocks. A great place for those who are questioning how they should educate their children. A great resource for people to give to friends who think that public school is neutral. It's a great way to get the conversation started. Basically, if you believe that Jesus is Lord over all it means the education of your children, too. It would be prudent to think on the ramifications of that. Plus, I also like Wilson's wit in certain places. One of the many things I admire about him.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jlnpeacock Peacock

    In this brief book, Wilson provides a concise summary of the importance of a Christian education for children of Christians. He clearly defines the problems that often cause parents to think education is neutral, and it is not necessary to expend the funds and/or the time on a Christian education. He also explains what is actually meant by the term Christian education. The book is certainly helpful to those already educating children and would be a good book to introduce the topic to those who h In this brief book, Wilson provides a concise summary of the importance of a Christian education for children of Christians. He clearly defines the problems that often cause parents to think education is neutral, and it is not necessary to expend the funds and/or the time on a Christian education. He also explains what is actually meant by the term Christian education. The book is certainly helpful to those already educating children and would be a good book to introduce the topic to those who have never considered it seriously.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Micah Neely

    Great concise discourse on the foundational issues that get in the way of this discussion. It's wonderful that the book is able to do this without too much cheerleading for classical education specifically. Though I believe our context does beg that truly Christian education (not just a reset to 1950's public education) does demand something like classical Christian education. Buy it for your friends. Borrow (steal) it from me if you're in the area. *full disclosure: I contract teach for the publ Great concise discourse on the foundational issues that get in the way of this discussion. It's wonderful that the book is able to do this without too much cheerleading for classical education specifically. Though I believe our context does beg that truly Christian education (not just a reset to 1950's public education) does demand something like classical Christian education. Buy it for your friends. Borrow (steal) it from me if you're in the area. *full disclosure: I contract teach for the publisher that the author helped found--but not the publisher of this book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Will

    This book is really good! Take the hour to read it. My favorite part is the anaolgy he makes of education to a wheel with 4 spokes. 1. Our answers to Ultimate questions. 2. How do we live, our lifestyle. 3. Who are you, your Narritive. & 4. Liturgy, how do you ritualize your commitments. Children absorb means thru which they will fill these basic pieces of humanity. The way in which (or the form in which) it will be poured means everything.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Becca Garber

    For me, Douglas Wilson is a tough guy to love. However, I do appreciate the case for a strong Christian culture and also that the most important work you have in this life is raising your children in an environment where they witness God's work in history and goodness in their lives, that they might love and know him always. Not sure that means you avoid "government schools" entirely, though. For me, Douglas Wilson is a tough guy to love. However, I do appreciate the case for a strong Christian culture and also that the most important work you have in this life is raising your children in an environment where they witness God's work in history and goodness in their lives, that they might love and know him always. Not sure that means you avoid "government schools" entirely, though.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Boomershine

    Excellent summary apologetic for Christians to insist on a godward education for their children. Must read for all families. 71 stirring pages. "How is it possible for men to claim that they believe that He did in fact come back from the tomb, and yet subsequently argue that this does not change absolutely everything?" Excellent summary apologetic for Christians to insist on a godward education for their children. Must read for all families. 71 stirring pages. "How is it possible for men to claim that they believe that He did in fact come back from the tomb, and yet subsequently argue that this does not change absolutely everything?"

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brad Veach

    Clear, concise, and correct. A blessing of a book that helps parents make decisions about their children's education with more wisdom. Even if you've already decided to pursue Christian education, equip yourself with this book. Clear, concise, and correct. A blessing of a book that helps parents make decisions about their children's education with more wisdom. Even if you've already decided to pursue Christian education, equip yourself with this book.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Grindberg

    It was a clear and concise denunciation of the Government schools and an excellent affirmation of Christian education. Would be helpful for someone considering these matters for the first time.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Micah Lugg

    I loved reading this. Like a sniper, Wilson hones in on the precise issues that Christian parents need to think through when it comes to education. Highly recommend.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Austin Hoffman

    Pithy and persuasive.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Josh Shelton

    For what it aimed to be: it was great. I especially enjoyed the "story" aspects; how different stories engender different beliefs and interpretations. For what it aimed to be: it was great. I especially enjoyed the "story" aspects; how different stories engender different beliefs and interpretations.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sean Higgins

    This introduces Christian education like concrete blocks hold up a house. It's short, stocky, and hurts if you fall into it with your worldview face first. This introduces Christian education like concrete blocks hold up a house. It's short, stocky, and hurts if you fall into it with your worldview face first.

  27. 5 out of 5

    William Duff

    Short, to the point, informative, possibly life-changing for you and your kids.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Graciously terse with the necessary depth to deal with the root issues and objections. Arthroscopic surgery is done here—minimal incision for deep healing.

  29. 4 out of 5

    David Scholes

  30. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Palumbo

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