counter The Mammoth Book of Best War Comics - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

The Mammoth Book of Best War Comics

Availability: Ready to download

Over 25 of the finest war comics and short graphic novels This huge and varied collection brings together the classics of early war comics with exciting modern work. More than 25 brilliantly drawn, self-contained masterpieces and rare gems are presented in one volume, from the widest possible range of sources. This is a collector's dream. Conflicts covered include Vietnam, t Over 25 of the finest war comics and short graphic novels This huge and varied collection brings together the classics of early war comics with exciting modern work. More than 25 brilliantly drawn, self-contained masterpieces and rare gems are presented in one volume, from the widest possible range of sources. This is a collector's dream. Conflicts covered include Vietnam, the First World War, the Gulf War, the Second World War, Falklands, the Russo-Finnish War and Colombian guerrilla warfare. ☆ The original of Keiji Nakazawa's classic account of Hiroshima, I Saw It! ☆ Will Eisner's superb semi-autobiographical Last Day of Vietnam. ☆ Raymond Briggs's scathing account of the Falkland War, The Tin-Pot Foreign General and the Old Iron Woman. ☆ The first ever episode of Pat Mill's seminal Charley's War. Plus decades worth of stirring earlier comics from Blazing Combat, Battle Picture Weekly and Combat Picture Library.


Compare

Over 25 of the finest war comics and short graphic novels This huge and varied collection brings together the classics of early war comics with exciting modern work. More than 25 brilliantly drawn, self-contained masterpieces and rare gems are presented in one volume, from the widest possible range of sources. This is a collector's dream. Conflicts covered include Vietnam, t Over 25 of the finest war comics and short graphic novels This huge and varied collection brings together the classics of early war comics with exciting modern work. More than 25 brilliantly drawn, self-contained masterpieces and rare gems are presented in one volume, from the widest possible range of sources. This is a collector's dream. Conflicts covered include Vietnam, the First World War, the Gulf War, the Second World War, Falklands, the Russo-Finnish War and Colombian guerrilla warfare. ☆ The original of Keiji Nakazawa's classic account of Hiroshima, I Saw It! ☆ Will Eisner's superb semi-autobiographical Last Day of Vietnam. ☆ Raymond Briggs's scathing account of the Falkland War, The Tin-Pot Foreign General and the Old Iron Woman. ☆ The first ever episode of Pat Mill's seminal Charley's War. Plus decades worth of stirring earlier comics from Blazing Combat, Battle Picture Weekly and Combat Picture Library.

49 review for The Mammoth Book of Best War Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Manish

    Last month I found myself travelling on my birthday and what better way to commemorate the event than picking up a book from the airport bookstore. But little did I know then that what I landed upon would open up a whole new world for me - the world of the graphic novel. My only previous tryst with the form was Joe Sacco's Journalism and a vague familiarity with Art Spiegellman's Maus. But after reading through the 25 odd stories in this collection and exploring the resources available on the ne Last month I found myself travelling on my birthday and what better way to commemorate the event than picking up a book from the airport bookstore. But little did I know then that what I landed upon would open up a whole new world for me - the world of the graphic novel. My only previous tryst with the form was Joe Sacco's Journalism and a vague familiarity with Art Spiegellman's Maus. But after reading through the 25 odd stories in this collection and exploring the resources available on the net, my task for the days to come has been cut out. Will Eisner, Alan Moore, Don Lumax, Pat Mills, Keiji Nakazawa and the rest of their ilk will no longer be mere names but artists whose works are to be hunted and devoured. My 30th birthday will forever be special - for bringing me to a medium which I first explored through Uncle Pai and then abandoned somewhere down the line due to Sidney Sheldon and the other usual suspects. Hoping that this new found enthusiasm for comics and the more serious graphic novel will keep me younger than my biological age...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Soobie's scared

    I actually was surprised when I found this at the library. English-language comics are a bit rare in this latitude... I borrowed it because there was Keiji Nakazawa's short story in it. The rest... well, I didn't know most of the name that are represented in this anthology. So it was a sort of discovery reading. 1. I Saw It, by Keiji Nakazawa (1982): ★★★ That's probably the main reason why I borrowed the anthology: I wanted to read the autobiographical account of Nakazawa after the bombing of Hiro I actually was surprised when I found this at the library. English-language comics are a bit rare in this latitude... I borrowed it because there was Keiji Nakazawa's short story in it. The rest... well, I didn't know most of the name that are represented in this anthology. So it was a sort of discovery reading. 1. I Saw It, by Keiji Nakazawa (1982): ★★★ That's probably the main reason why I borrowed the anthology: I wanted to read the autobiographical account of Nakazawa after the bombing of Hiroshima. I read Barefoot Gen as a project for uni and... well, I didn't like it at all. I didn't like the attitude that Gen shows throughout the ten volumes and reaching the end was very difficult. Nonetheless, Gen remains a must-read for all manga-fan. Here there is the same attitude and remembering the series didn't help me. In addition the art isn't really my thing. 2. The Tin Pot Foreign General and the Old Iron Lady, by Raymond Briggs (1984): ★★★ This was weird. I mean, the plot was a bit fuzzy (too much symbolism I didn't understand) but the art was very beautiful and the ending very sad, but true. 3. Charley's War, by Pat Mills (script) and Joe Colquhoun (art) (1979): ★★ I read the first volume of Charley's War. It was hard at first with so much text and very heavy panels. Moreover, in this anthology it seems that the panels have been somehow reduced and reading the English cursive was sooo hard. In addition the four-panel layout was kind of slow. Later the authors moved to a three-plate layout and my reading improved a lot. Of course, these are four plates of a 10-volume series... Maybe it's a bit too little to get to know Charley. 4. Snow, by Askold Akishin (1989): ★★ Well... Is this all? It may have tickled my interested because of the Finnish setting but... it's too short!!! OK, the editor said that all the inserted stories have an ending but when it comes to four-plate story... SIGH! 5. Desert, by Carol Swain (2003): ★★ Again, nice idea but way too short to even start to appreciate the author. 6. Lone Hawk, by Archie Goodwin (script) and Alex Toth (art) (1966): ★★★ Too bad that the font was almost unreadable: it was a sort of very small cursive. Seeing the print results, I do wonder if the original was in color, though. The structure of this short story is perfect: it's composed of seven plates in which the authors describe Bishop's life, an ace during WW1. The last panel of each plate, instead, honors a real ace killed in action during the Great War, such as the Red Baron. That was a really effective way of carrying a message, still the story seems more like a form of propaganda. 7. The Landings in Sicily, by unknown (1969): ★ This one is wrong in so many ways... First of all, almost half of the Italian names are misspelled: for example, Pandeleria instead of the correct Pantelleria; maffioso with two F's is ridicoulous because one F is usually enough; Unione siciliane is made of a feminine singular word and a feminine plural word and it should have been Unione siciliana... Moreover, Antonella is kidnapped and taken to Salerno according to the author but Salerno is close to Naples, while Palermo is in Sicily... I was getting so mad while I was reading. All it took was an atlas to get the names right. In addition, the fact that a mob man like Tommy could have played such a great role in the war... Why do people have to make mafia so interesting? It's like plague! OK, weird enough there were women in this story but they were more or less accessories... And the ending is unbelievable. The plates seem like photocopies... Some of them are even bent... You know, like when you're photocopying a page of a book and the inside part is always a bit round because you can't fully open the book. 8. Landscape, by Archie Goodwin (script) and Joe Orlando (art) (1966): ★★★★ This one is a bit confused both for what the plot and the art are concerned. It has a powerful anti-militaristic message, though. It shows the Vietnam War from the point of view of a poor Vietnamese rice farmer. 9. 5.56 Blues, by Don Lomax (1990): ★★ Back in Vietnam, but from the American point of view. There are too many words in the balloons for it to be enjoyable. And the soldiers are just complaining because the new Army-issued rifle is not as good as the previous one. But the Army never does anything wrong. 10. Souvenirs, by Archie Goodwin (script) and John Severin (art) (1966): ★★ An American soldier sees the war as a means of becoming rich: for this reason he steal the dead soldiers' golden teeth. At least he's going to pay for that. I don't like the art that much but the story is interesting and yeah... it explains that also the good guys can be rotten inside sometimes. 11. A Bullet For Me, by Darko Macan (script) and Edvin Biuković (art) (2005): ★★★★ The plot is really, really good with an excellent twist. I didn't like the art that much. Being a hero is the easiest way to meet a bullet with your name on it.12. Combat zone, by Darko Macan (script) and Edvin Biuković (art) (2005): ★ Confused plot and bad art: I couldn't even recognize the characters. Luckily it was very short. 13. The Legions of Charlies, by Tom Veitch (script) and Greg Irons (art) (1971): ★ Totally YUCK! Ugly art and absurd plot. I don't mind gory but this was disgusting. And I didn't even bother to read the three full-text pages at the end. YUCK!! 14. You Only Lose Once, by Sam Glanzman (script), artist unknown (1965): ★ One of those the-war-is-beautiful-even-if-it-hurts comics. A bunch of brave pilots doing everything for their country. Jeez, it was even in colors. 15. Breakouts!, by Sam Glanzman (script), artist unknown (1963): ★ Again a propaganda comics. It was so boring that I immediately lost track of what was happening. A lot of strategy to conquer a little piece of French territory. 16. Pearl Harbor, by Sam Glanzman (script), artist unknown (1963): ★★ Again propaganda comics. The Japanese general is seen as a crazy head but the description of the attack is quite good. However, the stress on how normal that Sunday was, was a bit exaggerated. 17. You Luck Just Ran Out, by Alexey Malakhov (2006): ★★ The art was OK but I'm not sure I understood the ending. And as usual, it was too short. 18. Last Day in Vietnam, by Will Eisner (2000): ★★ This was the first time I've read something by Will Eisner. It was weird! I mean, there aren't balloons and the story is practically a monologue by a major who's spending his last day in Vietnam. He was so garrulous that he was very annoying. 19. The Casualty, by Will Eisner (2000): ★★ Weird art again and no words altogether. The story teaches the reader that bad things can happen if you only reason with your penis. 20. The Road to Glory, by unknown (1971): ★ Another propaganda comics. (view spoiler)[The protagonist is picked up for a dangerous mission with no chance of survival. Against all odd, he survives and his own CO must go and take him down otherwise a big operation will go SNAFU. Waste one human life and save thousand of them... (hide spoiler)] Average art. 21. Sand, by Mark Chadbourn (script) and Nathan Massengill (art) (2001): ★ Weird art. Too conceptual, maybe. Didn't understand it. 22. Long Distance Runner, by Danijel Žeželj (2003): ★ Did I really see a winged elephant on one panel? Weird, dark and indistinct art. 23. Bowl of Rice, by ILYA (1998): ★ This was short and way too didactic. There was no plot and the author just wanted to make a point. Average art. 24. Slaughterhouse Safari, by Fabian Göranson (2003): ★ A Swedish delegation goes to Colombia for an international meeting but the meeting gets canceled. And the Swedish gets to know the FARC. There were this group of Swedish guys trying to fire weapons and posing as soldiers but nothing more. Basic art. 25. . School Essays of Berlin Kids About the Year 1945, by Ulli Lust, translated by Kai Pfeiffer (2003): ★★ Sometimes I read cursive English and I cry because I can't decipher what's written. And I work with children for a living (well, sort of...) and I can read most of their handwriting. English is a different matter: cursive always scares me because I'm not sure I'll be able to read it. Anyway, this was a clear cursive, or is this a contradiction in terms? There were some ridiculous spelling mistakes along the way and they were the sort of mistakes that don't make any sense. It was as if the translator tried to recreate the spelling mistakes of German children into English. In this comics, in fact, the author tries to put into drawing some school essays written by German children after the war. They describes their reality with no embellishment and they have a very matter-of-fact attitude. I think, however, that there was too much text on the plates and this distracted me from the art. The story was very interesting, though. 26. Casting Stones, by Eric Drooker (1988): ★★ Very weird. Not exactly war-related but nice. In total 49 stars for 26 short stories: the average is 1,88 stars per short story. That's kind of low, I guess. I mean, I don't understand why putting in the same anthology propaganda comics where war is epic and the other kind of comics, where war is a tragedy for everyone. I think that these two genres have a very different public: I usally like the somber war comics were war is bad, but I don't like all the stories with a dolce-et-decorum-est-pro-patria-mori attitude. I don't buy it. Anyway. I was glad I've read this one. But I was even gladder that I've borrowed it from the library and I didn't have to spend my money on it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Miroku Nemeth

    A collection of grim yet highly creative works dealing with man in the midst of war. The 25 selections begin with atomic bombing of Hiroshima survivor Keiji Nakashawa's narrative--powerful, horrifying, necessary history. Kendall includes many selections from actual veterans, and greats of comic history like Will Eisner. In truth, this anthology deserves a place in classrooms throughout the nation, for unlike the shallow and plastic patriotism that is fed to so many of our youth through ubiquitou A collection of grim yet highly creative works dealing with man in the midst of war. The 25 selections begin with atomic bombing of Hiroshima survivor Keiji Nakashawa's narrative--powerful, horrifying, necessary history. Kendall includes many selections from actual veterans, and greats of comic history like Will Eisner. In truth, this anthology deserves a place in classrooms throughout the nation, for unlike the shallow and plastic patriotism that is fed to so many of our youth through ubiquitous multiple institutional and advertising means, from recruiters who lie to military-sponsored video games where only the enemies die, these stories deal with the harsh realities of war. As the son of a decorated and thrice wounded Vietnam veteran and a professor who has taught many veterans over the years, I feel it is works like these that truly honor our soldiers through fostering an understanding of the complexity of the moral issues that they face in their hearkening to the call to "service".

  4. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    Ive read several of the Mammoth Comic Collections (Crime, Zombie, and Horror) and this one was surprisingly the best. I like war comics, but they are far from my favorite. But for whatever reason this collection was better than the others. Most of the stories selected don't glorify war, but instead offer a more real life perspective. It's really hard hitting and deep material, especially for the comic book format. The art is better than the average, and the narratives are very well done. If you e Ive read several of the Mammoth Comic Collections (Crime, Zombie, and Horror) and this one was surprisingly the best. I like war comics, but they are far from my favorite. But for whatever reason this collection was better than the others. Most of the stories selected don't glorify war, but instead offer a more real life perspective. It's really hard hitting and deep material, especially for the comic book format. The art is better than the average, and the narratives are very well done. If you enjoy war comics at all, or really just like war stories, you should check this book out. I was pleasantly surprised, perhaps you would be too.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hillingdon Libraries

    Find this book at Hillingdon Libraries Find this book at Hillingdon Libraries

  6. 5 out of 5

    George Marshall

    OK- some good things in here, especially interesting to see the early version of Barefoot Gen, but it is painful to read colour comics in black and white...one suspects that this Mammoth series is a money making scheme of cheap reprints of out of copyright material

  7. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    This is a good collection with an even mixture of some gung-ho old school war stories and some avaunt-garde anti-war ones.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Luke O'Neill

    some good comics

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aishe

  10. 5 out of 5

    PMP

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jaimit Doshi

  13. 4 out of 5

    Konish

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nayan

  15. 5 out of 5

    Moby-Nostromo

  16. 4 out of 5

    Neal Romanek

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emma Lake

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kritika Narula

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mohd Rizal

  20. 5 out of 5

    James Quinn

  21. 5 out of 5

    Neha

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nick Boldrini

  23. 5 out of 5

    Al

  24. 5 out of 5

    kevin s neidinger

  25. 4 out of 5

    John O'Brien

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rory

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dan

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nuno

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  30. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Callahan

  31. 5 out of 5

    Jayaprakash Satyamurthy

  32. 4 out of 5

    Josephus FromPlacitas

  33. 4 out of 5

    Randy

  34. 4 out of 5

    Michael Goodwin

  35. 4 out of 5

    Neil Birchall

  36. 5 out of 5

    Hurayrah

  37. 5 out of 5

    Robert Boyd

  38. 5 out of 5

    Vikas Datta

  39. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Godfrey-Meers

  40. 4 out of 5

    B.A. Dearsley

  41. 4 out of 5

    Chinmay Pangarkar

  42. 4 out of 5

    Tejas

  43. 5 out of 5

    Brian francis

  44. 5 out of 5

    Yinzadi

  45. 4 out of 5

    Valkyrie Knights

  46. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  47. 4 out of 5

    Therese

  48. 5 out of 5

    Running Press

  49. 5 out of 5

    Simo Sahlman

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.