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American Monsters: A History of Monster Lore, Legends, and Sightings in America

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From pre-Columbian legends to modern-day eyewitness accounts, this comprehensive guide covers the history, sightings and lore surrounding the most mysterious monsters in America—including Bigfoot, the Jersey Devil, and more. Bigfoot, the chupacabra, and thunderbirds aren’t just figments of our overactive imaginations—according to thousands of eyewitnesses, they exist, in ev From pre-Columbian legends to modern-day eyewitness accounts, this comprehensive guide covers the history, sightings and lore surrounding the most mysterious monsters in America—including Bigfoot, the Jersey Devil, and more. Bigfoot, the chupacabra, and thunderbirds aren’t just figments of our overactive imaginations—according to thousands of eyewitnesses, they exist, in every corner of the United States. Throughout America’s history, shocked onlookers have seen unbelievable creatures of every stripe—from sea serpents to apelike beings, giant bats to monkeymen—in every region. Author, investigator, and creature expert Linda S. Godfrey brings the same fearless reporting she lent to Real Wolfmen to this essential guide, using historical record, present-day news reports, and eyewitness interviews to examine this hidden menagerie of America’s homegrown beasts.


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From pre-Columbian legends to modern-day eyewitness accounts, this comprehensive guide covers the history, sightings and lore surrounding the most mysterious monsters in America—including Bigfoot, the Jersey Devil, and more. Bigfoot, the chupacabra, and thunderbirds aren’t just figments of our overactive imaginations—according to thousands of eyewitnesses, they exist, in ev From pre-Columbian legends to modern-day eyewitness accounts, this comprehensive guide covers the history, sightings and lore surrounding the most mysterious monsters in America—including Bigfoot, the Jersey Devil, and more. Bigfoot, the chupacabra, and thunderbirds aren’t just figments of our overactive imaginations—according to thousands of eyewitnesses, they exist, in every corner of the United States. Throughout America’s history, shocked onlookers have seen unbelievable creatures of every stripe—from sea serpents to apelike beings, giant bats to monkeymen—in every region. Author, investigator, and creature expert Linda S. Godfrey brings the same fearless reporting she lent to Real Wolfmen to this essential guide, using historical record, present-day news reports, and eyewitness interviews to examine this hidden menagerie of America’s homegrown beasts.

30 review for American Monsters: A History of Monster Lore, Legends, and Sightings in America

  1. 4 out of 5

    Miranda Sanders

    You can imagine my unbridled excitement on opening a book about American ghost stories. I’m a huge supernatural fan. Now imagine I run across an entry about MY tribe, where the name is attributed to another tribe and our history is pretty much erased. I was originally very excited to read this book, but was sorely disappointed. I am a Native American, Mvskoke Creek, to be exact. My ancestors traveled on the trail of tears from Tukabachee, Alabama to Tulsa, Oklahoma. I've heard the stories about Om You can imagine my unbridled excitement on opening a book about American ghost stories. I’m a huge supernatural fan. Now imagine I run across an entry about MY tribe, where the name is attributed to another tribe and our history is pretty much erased. I was originally very excited to read this book, but was sorely disappointed. I am a Native American, Mvskoke Creek, to be exact. My ancestors traveled on the trail of tears from Tukabachee, Alabama to Tulsa, Oklahoma. I've heard the stories about Omv Uekatcv, the water panther and Hcinto Sakto, the Horned Serpent. I grew up with stories about Isti Papa, the man eater and Pasekolv, the trickster. They are real to me. These are my gods and my stories. It is really frustrating and upsetting to me when non-natives try to write about our culture and completely screw it up. In the book, Godfrey talks about the origins of Tulsa, of MY people, and credits it to the Cree tribe. The Cree live in the Northern US and Canada. The CREEK (which is the name the WHITE settlers gave to us by the way. Our name is Mvskoke, Muskogee or Muscogee..all spellings are accepted), MY people, are the ones who settled in Tulsa. The 'Wi Katca' as she calls it (a misspelling because I can only assume a simple google search got her this information) is the Omv Uekatcv, and is a sacred deity to our people. As many of the 'monsters' she describes in this book actually are. When writing about 'Native American Monsters' people really need to actually go the the source and ask a real life native from that tribe about the information. Because google entries are often written by non-natives who have no fricking clue what they are talking about. I could not buy this book or even continue reading it after this part because I was so upset. To have my culture sited and then disrespected by the lack of research made me feel gross. If you are Native, you may want to steer clear of this book. I am sure the entry on my tribe is not the only incorrect information in there. Disgusting. If you want 'native american ghost stories', go to the source. Never go to a white person for something they know nothing about...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    I completely misunderstood this book. I bought it after reading a - well, not a review, exactly, but a summary, I guess, on a blog I follow. And I somehow got the impression that this was an analysis of belief in monsters in America. As in, sociologically, what function do these folk beliefs have. And what do the 'monsters' represent to us, that their myths are so persistent. Welp, I'm a doofus, and the book is nothing like this (check the fucking GR listing before you buy books, Emma.) It's a st I completely misunderstood this book. I bought it after reading a - well, not a review, exactly, but a summary, I guess, on a blog I follow. And I somehow got the impression that this was an analysis of belief in monsters in America. As in, sociologically, what function do these folk beliefs have. And what do the 'monsters' represent to us, that their myths are so persistent. Welp, I'm a doofus, and the book is nothing like this (check the fucking GR listing before you buy books, Emma.) It's a straightforward collection of monster sightings, culled, generally, from previously published collections of such stories. Godfrey states once or twice that she tried to contact an eyewitness for a followup, but couldn't, for one reason or another. So this leaves me all at sea in reviewing it. I don't believe 'monsters' exist, although I believe people can genuinely think they saw something strange, or even inexplicable. This book certainly wouldn't change my mind about this. The inexplicable part about the book, for me, is why there are no photographs. E.g. on page 57 Godfrey talks about a photo of a "Batsquatch," and says "the photo was included with the post at the URL noted in the above citation". The endnote gives the following URL: http://biofort.blogspot.co.nz/2006/10... you will notice there is no photo on this post. Even if there were, are we saying Godfrey's form of "investigation" is trawling blogs looking for random accounts of sightings to regurgitate? It's not entirely . . . rigorous, perhaps? I'm not rating, as I'm not the market for this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Niki

    I want to believe!! I don't believe in cryptids, as in They actually exist and they're among us, just hiding REAL well (especially when well-known ones like the Loch Ness monster have been debunked hard), but I like to believe there may be something.... more than us, bigger than us. I loved all the stories about people's recollections of encounters. Whether they can be explained or not (for example, one of the Bigfoot stories, the one about seeing a creature having killed your chickens/ running a I want to believe!! I don't believe in cryptids, as in They actually exist and they're among us, just hiding REAL well (especially when well-known ones like the Loch Ness monster have been debunked hard), but I like to believe there may be something.... more than us, bigger than us. I loved all the stories about people's recollections of encounters. Whether they can be explained or not (for example, one of the Bigfoot stories, the one about seeing a creature having killed your chickens/ running after it/ then coming back to find the chickens gone could have clearly been chicken-stealing, suit-wearing humans; stranger things have happened than humans concocting a ridiculous plan like that), or whether they're fabricated or not (there's never proof about any of the encounters, either the creature was too fast or the person was oh-so-conveniently not carrying a camera with them, even in stories in the 2010s), I still LOVE reading (and being told) an unexplained encounter/ folklore creature/ urban legend story. I gave the book a basic 3 stars because I enjoyed reading it, but it's nothing lifechanging or super well-researched, and nothing I'm going to revisit again in the future. It's fun to read in small chunks when you want a break from the other things you're reading, and you shouldn't think too hard about it, but that's about it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    I picked this up on a whim because it made me think of a novel I wrote for Nanowrimo several years ago that was going to involve a creature like the Jersey Devil. Unfortunately, the Jersey Devil segment took only a couple pages of this book. The book was separated into sections for each type of monster. You had creatures from the air (bird men, dinosaurs, chupacabras, and other flying beasts), water (giant squids, lake monsters, gatormen, etc.), and land (werewolves or "dogmen," cat-like creatur I picked this up on a whim because it made me think of a novel I wrote for Nanowrimo several years ago that was going to involve a creature like the Jersey Devil. Unfortunately, the Jersey Devil segment took only a couple pages of this book. The book was separated into sections for each type of monster. You had creatures from the air (bird men, dinosaurs, chupacabras, and other flying beasts), water (giant squids, lake monsters, gatormen, etc.), and land (werewolves or "dogmen," cat-like creatures, and Bigfoot). For the most part, these were very brief overviews of a variety of sightings loosely grouped based on their characteristics. Only a few of the sightings had any depth. Toward the end I began skimming... most of the creatures I wasn't really interested in. There was some tie-in to Native American and South American mythology. I guess I was hoping for more historical accounts of monsters in American (like the Jersey Devil). This was largely recent encounters. I was also hoping perhaps for some illustrations or something.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Astrid Yrigollen

    I was disappointed with this book as a long time reader and fan of Monster lore ( over 30 years of reading it). There is a lot of filler material pulled from other publications(with credit), and not enough eye witness accounts . She does not strictly stay in America either, though this book is supposed to be about American Monster Lore. Now I understand she is delving in to the history of a particular monster, so she writes about its origins. That is fine. But then she goes on to relate a experi I was disappointed with this book as a long time reader and fan of Monster lore ( over 30 years of reading it). There is a lot of filler material pulled from other publications(with credit), and not enough eye witness accounts . She does not strictly stay in America either, though this book is supposed to be about American Monster Lore. Now I understand she is delving in to the history of a particular monster, so she writes about its origins. That is fine. But then she goes on to relate a experience from another country with said monster that does not take place in the US then I start to wonder if this writer has anything new and fresh. She didn't. The writing is dull and I fell like I was slogging along at a snail's pace,instead of what I usually feel when I read about Monster lore ( excited, curious wonder) . But I will say, for the first time reader of the subject of monsters this might be a well rounded book and overview of the subject. For others who are well versed in global and native monster stories you might be more of a mind like me and think," There are no new monsters in this book for me, wah."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessie (Zombie_likes_cake)

    Sorry but no. No no no. With this type of book I think the writer either takes the serious route and questions the "monster" sightings and tries to give a scientifically established analysis of the facts given to her and when all has been ruled out gives in to the possibility of the supernatural, or she takes it very lighthearted and goes the slightly humorous path. Yet Godfrey is extremely serious without even thinking of questioning any of the eye-witness reports. Reports that according to her Sorry but no. No no no. With this type of book I think the writer either takes the serious route and questions the "monster" sightings and tries to give a scientifically established analysis of the facts given to her and when all has been ruled out gives in to the possibility of the supernatural, or she takes it very lighthearted and goes the slightly humorous path. Yet Godfrey is extremely serious without even thinking of questioning any of the eye-witness reports. Reports that according to her gain more credibility when a witness does not listen to metal music, observes weird lights in sky the same place he saw a creature or a sighting is proven good omen when the witness has something significant happening to shortly after. Sorry, no, to me this is not entertaining but at first silly and then plain frustration to read. I skim-read further and learned that a weird looking kangaroo-ish animal is naturally a gargoyle. I am out. Plus, her writing is extremely dull, too. I do admit my low rating is more my attitude towards such type of journalism than the book's fault but since my rating reflects my judgement and my enjoyment there is nothing but 1* to give.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Did not find this credible enough to read. No pictures, written like a gargantuan diary and, judging by the title, the whole thing is a farce. Title is American Monsters but seems to include many other countries too. Thousands of witnesses? Uh, no, don't think so. Did not find this credible enough to read. No pictures, written like a gargantuan diary and, judging by the title, the whole thing is a farce. Title is American Monsters but seems to include many other countries too. Thousands of witnesses? Uh, no, don't think so.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Court

    She wants to believe! And so do I.

  9. 5 out of 5

    ellis

    each monster only gets a paragraph or two. i was hoping for origin stories and ties to native American mythology, instead it was mostly sightings, with not a whole lot of info.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    https://geekpronblog.blogspot.com/201... https://geekpronblog.blogspot.com/201...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aurora Dimitre

    This was like, okay. I thought some parts were interesting, but it's not the best cryptid-type book I've read. I haven't read many, but this is not the best. This was like, okay. I thought some parts were interesting, but it's not the best cryptid-type book I've read. I haven't read many, but this is not the best.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Baker

    Because I am a staunch horror fan, a part of me believes some monsters in our lore might be real. Bigfoot is a perfect example of this. There have been way too many sightings and photos to deny something exists out there in the woods…it might not be what we think, but there’s something there. It’s this fact-based optimism that drives author Linda S. Godfrey’s latest book, AMERICAN MONSTERS: A HISTORY OF MONSTER LORE, LEGENDS, AND SIGHTINGS IN AMERICA. Chocked full of information and fact with on Because I am a staunch horror fan, a part of me believes some monsters in our lore might be real. Bigfoot is a perfect example of this. There have been way too many sightings and photos to deny something exists out there in the woods…it might not be what we think, but there’s something there. It’s this fact-based optimism that drives author Linda S. Godfrey’s latest book, AMERICAN MONSTERS: A HISTORY OF MONSTER LORE, LEGENDS, AND SIGHTINGS IN AMERICA. Chocked full of information and fact with only a hint of speculation, this tome is a cryptozoologist’s dream. I’ve studied some of the more common monsters known in American folklore, however Godfrey introduces several in this book that I am not familiar with. I love this aspect, as it opened my eyes to new mysteries of the unknown. But in addition, she gives a few fresh takes on some existing creatures as well. This diversity is a big part of the draw for this title and one of the biggest points for its promotion. AMERICAN MONSTERS is written well. It is not stiff and dry like a text book, but instead is presented more like short tales from a storyteller. This informal tone makes the book a much more enjoyable read, and it helps present the information in a lighter manner. The book is broken up into three sections: Monsters By Air, Monsters By Sea, and Monsters By Land. Each section is then spliced into several smaller chunks, which are based on specific creatures and/or regions in which the creature is located. My favorite area in this book is the Monsters By Sea section. Sea sightings seem to be older and have more witnesses than any other type of sighting. For this reason, I find they are the most plausible. AMERICAN MONSTERS is a definite win for me, and I recommend picking it up. Whether you are a veteran cryptozoologist or just a hobby reader, chances are this book will enlighten you in some form or fashion. It is available now in a variety of formats.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Fox

    This book truly sums up a lot of my frustration with Linda S. Godrey's work. While she is very coherent and informative in interviews, and even in some of her blog posts delves deep into lore, her books for the most part are shallow rather than informative. She tells of encounters of various beasts but rarely goes deep into their history, what such a monster might need in order to live, and the history of such encounters in anything other than passing. I would love to read more history of the f This book truly sums up a lot of my frustration with Linda S. Godrey's work. While she is very coherent and informative in interviews, and even in some of her blog posts delves deep into lore, her books for the most part are shallow rather than informative. She tells of encounters of various beasts but rarely goes deep into their history, what such a monster might need in order to live, and the history of such encounters in anything other than passing. I would love to read more history of the folklore she is telling, as well as more musing as to what might cause X to be, rather than the simple throwaway mentions she gives. This book, admittedly, was rather ambitious in its breadth of topics covered. It is divided into Monsters of the Sky, Monsters of the Water, and Monsters of the Land. The Water section deals with most of the scaly beasts one would imagine, although she admits many monsters would fit more than one of those categories. It was perhaps a bit too ambitious a project, as she shines best when zeroing in on a single monster or monster 'type'. The stories, thus, are maybe one or two pages - the longest story in this book is also the best, that of the Florida Gator-Man, which I also might begin referring to my husband as. Overall this book would have been more fun to dip in and out of than read straight through. It is a great book of monster encounters, or fun true stories to tell around the campfire. I would have much rather read something with more substance, though, and I wish Linda S. Godfrey would put out something that would really allow her to flex her folkloric and monster history chops. She could do much better! Her Coast to Coast interviews prove that.

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Vinther

    I just couldn't bring myself to finish this one. Hoping to go back and give it another go in the future. I knew it would be a bunch of experiences from people who claimed to have seen the creatures featured in the book, but it became repetitive quickly and the author didn't really offer anything to keep me interested. I'm interested in the subject, even if it is just for fun. The authors writing style, and her little attempts to make jokes or "be cute" got on my nerves more as the book went along I just couldn't bring myself to finish this one. Hoping to go back and give it another go in the future. I knew it would be a bunch of experiences from people who claimed to have seen the creatures featured in the book, but it became repetitive quickly and the author didn't really offer anything to keep me interested. I'm interested in the subject, even if it is just for fun. The authors writing style, and her little attempts to make jokes or "be cute" got on my nerves more as the book went along. Also, I understand that she's a believer, but her willingness to jump to huge conclusions to connect the dots was a bit much. I want to believe too, but when you write something or connect things that have me rolling my eyes, that's not a great sign. I'm hoping it was just me, and I just wasn't in the mood for this one at this time, and when I give it another go I'll enjoy it much more the second time around. I just know that when I had a chance to pick a book up and read for awhile, I had little to no desire to it with this book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Max

    I definitely wanted to like this book, seeing it as a good follow up to Occult America. Where that volume discussed some of the spiritual and magical weirdness of the US, it looked like this one would explore a lot of the monsters. Which it did, but I hoped for some history of the phenomena of monsters as a whole in America, some exploration of why we see and love the cryptids we do. Instead this is a very enthusiastic and credible series of accounts of all sorts of beasts, from Bigfoot to biolu I definitely wanted to like this book, seeing it as a good follow up to Occult America. Where that volume discussed some of the spiritual and magical weirdness of the US, it looked like this one would explore a lot of the monsters. Which it did, but I hoped for some history of the phenomena of monsters as a whole in America, some exploration of why we see and love the cryptids we do. Instead this is a very enthusiastic and credible series of accounts of all sorts of beasts, from Bigfoot to bioluminescent pteranodons. And that’s not totally a bad thing. The author’s enthusiasm clearly comes through strongly, especially since the audiobook reader is quite good. She’s clearly very into every single strange tale she has to tell, and that can be infectious - while I don’t know I believe in the more outre stories about bipedal canines (especially those in which the wolfmen are as bulletproof as their film counterparts), I can’t help but be curious to learn more. I do plan to check out Godfrey’s book devoted to the subject. And she also makes me a bit interested in Bigfoot for all that I think it’s clearly nonsense. I appreciate that Godfrey is willing to put her money where her mouth is in the form of the final chapter, where she details some of her own encounters with strange creatures. It’s a nice touch that adds to this book. But I think part of the problem is simply that reading it straight through may not have been the best thing to do. Alas I had no other option with my audiobook, since Hoopla seems to lack a table of contents, at least in this case. I found some of the chapters interesting, including those on pterodactyls, wolfmen, reptoids, and Mothman, gut there was a lot of stuff I didn’t really care about and often the book failed to get me interested. This was especially a problem going into the middle section on waterborne monsters. While it wasn’t as dominated by river monsters as I had expected, there still was a fair bit I didn’t much care about. Plus I’m still adjusting to listening to audiobooks while working, which definitely doesn’t help with something like this where my interest level varies heavily from chapter to chapter. Overall this did have some interesting parts, and I could see myself reading more by this author. But when it comes to the subject of cryptids and monsters in the US, I suggest you keep looking if you’re hoping for a good intro that explores the why as much as the what.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Horror DNA

    Author Linda S. Godfrey makes it very clear upfront that this book is not about the human monsters that stalk our daily lives and the nightly news. This book is about the myriad of mysterious beasts that have been spotted stalking the Americas, or what she chooses to call the New World. If you were hoping to keep your monsters inside the continental United States, watch out. They're all over North and South America. Sasquatches, batsquathes, chupacabras, dog men, moth men, man bats, you name it. Author Linda S. Godfrey makes it very clear upfront that this book is not about the human monsters that stalk our daily lives and the nightly news. This book is about the myriad of mysterious beasts that have been spotted stalking the Americas, or what she chooses to call the New World. If you were hoping to keep your monsters inside the continental United States, watch out. They're all over North and South America. Sasquatches, batsquathes, chupacabras, dog men, moth men, man bats, you name it. The new world is a veritable melting pot of monstrosities. American Monsters is broken into different sections detailing the types of lusus naturae, not the geographical locations. Apparently these legendary beasts like to move around. A lot. You've got your Land, Air and Sea Monsters, and there's a surprising amount of crossover here. Moth men and batsquatches are all over the damn place, some by land, some by air, and technically some by sea too. Godfrey does a great job of keeping track of all of these cryptids and goes a step beyond the eyewitness accounts presented here to draw on Native American history and mythology. Her writing and cataloging are top notch. The book comes with an extensive bibliography and index as well. You can read Ron's full review at Horror DNA by clicking here.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hew La France

    As a longtime enthusiast of cryptozoological studies, I found this book to be QUITE informative. Reading other reviews of this book, it seems people start reading it with an idea of what it is, and are then sourly disappointed when it isnt that. So let me break it down like this: What This Book Is 1. A list of cryptids across America that OCCAISONALLY references creatures in other countries for comparison. 2. A relation of at least 1 prominent encounter per creature. 3. A detailment of what some hy As a longtime enthusiast of cryptozoological studies, I found this book to be QUITE informative. Reading other reviews of this book, it seems people start reading it with an idea of what it is, and are then sourly disappointed when it isnt that. So let me break it down like this: What This Book Is 1. A list of cryptids across America that OCCAISONALLY references creatures in other countries for comparison. 2. A relation of at least 1 prominent encounter per creature. 3. A detailment of what some hypothesize the creatures being seen might actually be. 4. The author's own view on the hypothesis and why it does and does not make sense. 5. The author's theory on these monsters. 6. An open ended question asking the readers to consider that it is POSSIBLE these creatures are real, and not to close-mindedly say, "no they're definately not" or "yes they most certainly are". What This Book Is Not 1. A Cryptozoological Field Guide. 2. A transcription of every encounter with a creature ever. 3. A deep scientific study into the believability of these creatures 4. An attempt at providing backstories for every monster (when "backstories" from myths and legends were available, they are included.) 5. An attempt to convince YOU, the reader, that all of these monsters are real. Overall, this was a really well-written book, and I look forward to checking out what other writings this author has to offer.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carol Cassada

    I previously read Godfrey’s book Real Wolfman about the history and encounters of werewolves. When I found American Monsters, the supernatural enthusiast in me wanted to read it. I’ve always been fascinated by these mystical creatures, and Godfrey list just about every monster imaginable. From monsters of the sea to the sky to the land, Godfrey delves into the history of these beings. She also adds in stories from eyewitnesses, and shared her own eerie encounters. Godfrey does a good job in expl I previously read Godfrey’s book Real Wolfman about the history and encounters of werewolves. When I found American Monsters, the supernatural enthusiast in me wanted to read it. I’ve always been fascinated by these mystical creatures, and Godfrey list just about every monster imaginable. From monsters of the sea to the sky to the land, Godfrey delves into the history of these beings. She also adds in stories from eyewitnesses, and shared her own eerie encounters. Godfrey does a good job in explaining the origins of the monsters along with their appearance. I enjoyed reading about werewolves, Bigfoot, Mothman, dragons, and Chessie. But I also learned more details about creatures such as the Lizard Man, the zealous Cat, and Wisconsin’s Man Bat. Some chapters ran longer than others, but I know the author wanted to include as much information as she could. A few chapters, were short and I felt they could’ve been elaborated on more. But aside from that, this was an informative read for monster enthusiasts.

  19. 4 out of 5

    George

    Just finished "American Monsters". It's about sightings of American cryptoids, you know, giant prehistoric birds, seamonsters, lake monsters, wolfmen, mothmen, sasquatch... It was interesting till about halfway through, when it suddenly turned into a supernatural version of Monty Python's cheese shop sketch. Because in spite of all the numerous"sightings" there never seems to be a working camera or any kind of physical evidence. Unsubstantiated anecdotes do not equal evidence. It never really de Just finished "American Monsters". It's about sightings of American cryptoids, you know, giant prehistoric birds, seamonsters, lake monsters, wolfmen, mothmen, sasquatch... It was interesting till about halfway through, when it suddenly turned into a supernatural version of Monty Python's cheese shop sketch. Because in spite of all the numerous"sightings" there never seems to be a working camera or any kind of physical evidence. Unsubstantiated anecdotes do not equal evidence. It never really delivers the meat, so to speak. It also at least partly explains the current political situation. If people actually believe this stuff, it's no wonder they can also believe that "45" is a great president and a decent human being.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Godfrey discusses the monsters of America that people have reported seeing. Most of the accounts are in the 1940-2010 with heavier emphasis on the 1970s-1980s. She only resorts to Native American legends and first white settlers to prove that what modern people have seen has historical precedent. Why I started this book: Halloween is the perfect time to read about monsters. Why I finished it: This was not what I was expecting at all. I wanted more about the myths and legends and a lot less of the Godfrey discusses the monsters of America that people have reported seeing. Most of the accounts are in the 1940-2010 with heavier emphasis on the 1970s-1980s. She only resorts to Native American legends and first white settlers to prove that what modern people have seen has historical precedent. Why I started this book: Halloween is the perfect time to read about monsters. Why I finished it: This was not what I was expecting at all. I wanted more about the myths and legends and a lot less of the eye-witness accounts... This book was full of monster chases, could they be real, you decide.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jo

    In the Mood for Monsters First of all, I love Linda Godfrey's books. I'm 58 and have been an avid reader of the strange and paranormal since childhood. But I haven't read any cryptid books in a while, so I decided to re-read some of Linda's books. She does such great research and covers a lot of cases I've never heard of. More than a few of the stories gave me the shivers. I can't imagine encountering the creatures described in the pages of her books! But after reading her personal account of a c In the Mood for Monsters First of all, I love Linda Godfrey's books. I'm 58 and have been an avid reader of the strange and paranormal since childhood. But I haven't read any cryptid books in a while, so I decided to re-read some of Linda's books. She does such great research and covers a lot of cases I've never heard of. More than a few of the stories gave me the shivers. I can't imagine encountering the creatures described in the pages of her books! But after reading her personal account of a cryptid encounter, I'm convinced that there's something out there.

  22. 4 out of 5

    C

    2.5 I'm not a fan of monster stories per say, at least the kind of monsters depicted in this book. The main reason I read this book was because I like the authors work and there were a few stories relating to Wisconsin which was what I was most interested in. With all that said I did skim most of the book, only choosing to to read the stories that interested me. What I did read was interesting however and I would definitely recommend this to people who enjoy a good monster story. 2.5 I'm not a fan of monster stories per say, at least the kind of monsters depicted in this book. The main reason I read this book was because I like the authors work and there were a few stories relating to Wisconsin which was what I was most interested in. With all that said I did skim most of the book, only choosing to to read the stories that interested me. What I did read was interesting however and I would definitely recommend this to people who enjoy a good monster story.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    man, I'm bummed about this. I was enjoying it in a fictionalized kind of context - like nothing is really realistically backed up, but it's kind of fun to listen to someone who really does embrace monsters and bonkers theories about them wholeheartedly. but after skimming some reviews, it's really disappointing to see that flippancy/lack of research also extends to the indigenous cultures and stories the author portrays in the text. another strikeout for the spooky season reading list. man, I'm bummed about this. I was enjoying it in a fictionalized kind of context - like nothing is really realistically backed up, but it's kind of fun to listen to someone who really does embrace monsters and bonkers theories about them wholeheartedly. but after skimming some reviews, it's really disappointing to see that flippancy/lack of research also extends to the indigenous cultures and stories the author portrays in the text. another strikeout for the spooky season reading list.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bitchy Ghost

    There isn't much to day about this book. While the authored covered many different types of "monsters", they never went into great detail on any of them. The eye witness accounts were skimmed over, and it felt like a lot of details were left out. My suggestion? Read it to find out about the cryptids you don't know about, then find books that Go into greater detail on those you're truly interested in. There isn't much to day about this book. While the authored covered many different types of "monsters", they never went into great detail on any of them. The eye witness accounts were skimmed over, and it felt like a lot of details were left out. My suggestion? Read it to find out about the cryptids you don't know about, then find books that Go into greater detail on those you're truly interested in.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Good stories Ms. Godfrey does a good job in organizing and re-telling the many stories contained in this collection. My only beef is a lack of accompanying pictures. It is beyond irritating to have an author describe an encounter, refer to photos or drawings related to the encounter but not include those photos or drawings in the book. Don’t mention visual accompaniment if you aren’t going to provide it. Other than that personal quirk, it’s a good addition to the genre.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Bouren

    I listen to books like this when I go to sleep at night. I'm looking for something light and entertaining and this book fit the bill. It contains a lot of silly, but still interesting stories of eyewitness accounts of lots of creepy creatures. The author is clearly a believer, but the book never lapses into compete buffoonery and she strives to present all possible explanations. This book is exactly what I wanted it to be and that's why it gets 5 stars. I listen to books like this when I go to sleep at night. I'm looking for something light and entertaining and this book fit the bill. It contains a lot of silly, but still interesting stories of eyewitness accounts of lots of creepy creatures. The author is clearly a believer, but the book never lapses into compete buffoonery and she strives to present all possible explanations. This book is exactly what I wanted it to be and that's why it gets 5 stars.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Honesty

    An entertaining read, partially because the author's logic is so baffling. A bird migrating from Africa to America is unlikely, granted, but that doesn't make the idea that it's caught in a time loop or spat out from a portal any more likely. Godfrey is more likely to think unicorns than horses, it seems. An entertaining read, partially because the author's logic is so baffling. A bird migrating from Africa to America is unlikely, granted, but that doesn't make the idea that it's caught in a time loop or spat out from a portal any more likely. Godfrey is more likely to think unicorns than horses, it seems.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Dodge

    This book served as a good introduction to monster sightings in the United States. There were plenty of creatures that I had never heard of before and am curious to know more about. I laughed at the author claiming the future of monster sightings is likely because of the soon-to-be popularity of Google Glass. That didn’t age well (book was published in 2014) but almost everything else did.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I'd heard this book featured on several podcasts but must have misunderstood the premise – it's literally just a listing of creatures from myth and lore with a short description of each one. I'm sure someone out there will find it interesting, but it wasn't what I was expecting. I'd heard this book featured on several podcasts but must have misunderstood the premise – it's literally just a listing of creatures from myth and lore with a short description of each one. I'm sure someone out there will find it interesting, but it wasn't what I was expecting.

  30. 4 out of 5

    jedioffsidetrap

    Oh wow—didn’t realize til I finished that I’d started this before. It is kinda amusing but not convincing as either a true believer book or a sociological examination of folklore & how human societies create monsters. Breezy & superficial, I thought, but makes me want to dig deeper.

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