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The Griffin Poetry Prize 2014 Anthology: A Seletion of the Shortlist

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The highly anticipated annual anthology of the best Canadian and international poetry. Each year, the best books of poetry published in English internationally and in Canada are honoured with the Griffin Poetry Prize, one of the world’s most prestigious and richest literary awards. Since 2001 this annual prize has acted as a tremendous spur to interest in and recognition of The highly anticipated annual anthology of the best Canadian and international poetry. Each year, the best books of poetry published in English internationally and in Canada are honoured with the Griffin Poetry Prize, one of the world’s most prestigious and richest literary awards. Since 2001 this annual prize has acted as a tremendous spur to interest in and recognition of poetry, focusing worldwide attention on the formidable talent of poets writing in English. And each year The Griffin Poetry Prize Anthology features the work of the extraordinary poets shortlisted for the awards, and introduces us to some of the finest poems in their collections. Royalties generated from The 2014 Griffin Poetry Prize Anthology will be donated to UNESCO’s World Poetry Day, which was created to support linguistic diversity through poetic expression and to offer endangered languages the opportunity to be heard in their communities.Shortlist to be announced: April 8, 2014 Readings: June 4, 2014 Prizes awarded: June 5, 2014


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The highly anticipated annual anthology of the best Canadian and international poetry. Each year, the best books of poetry published in English internationally and in Canada are honoured with the Griffin Poetry Prize, one of the world’s most prestigious and richest literary awards. Since 2001 this annual prize has acted as a tremendous spur to interest in and recognition of The highly anticipated annual anthology of the best Canadian and international poetry. Each year, the best books of poetry published in English internationally and in Canada are honoured with the Griffin Poetry Prize, one of the world’s most prestigious and richest literary awards. Since 2001 this annual prize has acted as a tremendous spur to interest in and recognition of poetry, focusing worldwide attention on the formidable talent of poets writing in English. And each year The Griffin Poetry Prize Anthology features the work of the extraordinary poets shortlisted for the awards, and introduces us to some of the finest poems in their collections. Royalties generated from The 2014 Griffin Poetry Prize Anthology will be donated to UNESCO’s World Poetry Day, which was created to support linguistic diversity through poetic expression and to offer endangered languages the opportunity to be heard in their communities.Shortlist to be announced: April 8, 2014 Readings: June 4, 2014 Prizes awarded: June 5, 2014

30 review for The Griffin Poetry Prize 2014 Anthology: A Seletion of the Shortlist

  1. 4 out of 5

    Magdelanye

    The best books of poetry published in English internationally and in Canada are honoured with the Griffin Poetry Prize, one of the world’s most prestigious and richest literary awards. 539 books were read to come up with this shortlist of outstanding poets for 2014. I liked the inclusion of 10 poems from each of the finalists which gives a much better feel for their range. And I was extremely pleased to be introduced to the international poets in the first section, especially Brenda Hillman who h The best books of poetry published in English internationally and in Canada are honoured with the Griffin Poetry Prize, one of the world’s most prestigious and richest literary awards. 539 books were read to come up with this shortlist of outstanding poets for 2014. I liked the inclusion of 10 poems from each of the finalists which gives a much better feel for their range. And I was extremely pleased to be introduced to the international poets in the first section, especially Brenda Hillman who has many titles to track down. The visible is frayed; starlight streams into you, wild and invisible. The invisible is unafraid. from Brenda Hillman p 27 & the tents went back up It was a pleasure to play at reading the original Polish given along with the translation of the sonnets of Tomasz Rozycki by Mira Rosenthal. Since it is lucky you are strange and I am strange, together we will shock the world. opening lines of Creoles, Mestizos p47 The three Canadian finalists are more familiar to me. I will never get Anne Carson and Anne Michaels mixrf up again~ I have already tried to get the books exerted here, but I guess poetry books do not have a long library shelf life. Even though she has an impressive backlist of poetry,I was only able to order Sue Goyettes novel. I loved the excerpts from her poem cycle Ocean which are full of startling juxtapositions bringing the cosmic home. Why is it so hard to trust something that leaps, disappears and then reappears spouting more light? When had our hearts become badly behaved dogs we had to keep the screen door closed to? from fifty six p88 Also appreciated were Robert Bringhursts preface and editorial comments although I would have liked more biography. Sure, there's a spell the leaves can make, shuddering, and in their lying suddenly still again- flat, and still, like time itself when it seems unexpectedly more available.... But to look up from the leaves, remember, is a choice also.... from My Meadow, My Twilight p39 by Carl Phillips

  2. 4 out of 5

    Edwin Lang

    The Griffin Poetry Prize shortlists a number of poets from whom a selection of poetry – about eleven poems each – is taken to form the anthology, in this case for 2014 for which seven poets had been chosen. A highlight for me, after I had spent some time with a poet's work is to listen to the poet read one or two poems from their award-winning book from which the selection had been taken, seeing them in person but especially to listen to how they recite their own poetry. The poets this year (201 The Griffin Poetry Prize shortlists a number of poets from whom a selection of poetry – about eleven poems each – is taken to form the anthology, in this case for 2014 for which seven poets had been chosen. A highlight for me, after I had spent some time with a poet's work is to listen to the poet read one or two poems from their award-winning book from which the selection had been taken, seeing them in person but especially to listen to how they recite their own poetry. The poets this year (2014) includes Rachael Boast, Brenda Hillman, Carl Philips and Tomasz Rozycki, and from Canada, Ann Carson, Sue Goyette and Ann Michaels. The poets I enjoyed the most were Carl Philips and Sue Goyette. And possibly Tomasz Rozycki, although I wished I could understand Polish because while I am sure the translation was excellent there seemed something about the poems (which the anthology included in both the English translation and in their Polish original) that seemed special in the original. We all understand loss, and Carl Philips’ poems were an ode to a loss of a relationship. Recently I attended the funeral of a forty-eight year old woman who passed away from brain/lung cancer, two months after the diagnosis: one could imagine her life, married with three children (boys 15 and 11 and a girl, 9), working, busy, busy, harried busy, too busy to notice any symptoms, and the loss of course was palpable, even a month later when they memorialized her death. Philips poetry were clear and understandable and resonated with the pain of loss. Sue Goyette’s Ocean was a little more abstract, but as I read her poems on the beach in Cuba in the breaking dawn I found her work creative and entertaining, sometimes humorous. We had an all-day rainstorm yesterday (it’s Canada so we should have been up to our necks in snow) and this morning when I walked the dog in the conservation area not too far from our home I took pictures of the flooding, some due to the frozen ground that could not absorb the rain but most due simply to the volume of water. It is always neat to see nature in action, how imperative and implacable is its will and how independent, and Goyette’s poetry gives one the sense of that. She concludes one with “And then the ocean would be calm. It would sleep. Our mistake was thinking we were making it happy”. I came across a review of one of the Canadian poets in Walrus magazine, a Canadian periodical: Is Ann Carson the First Poet with more Fans than Readers?. It was not appreciative of her poetry, not because her poetry was not good but perhaps finding it too abstract, technical and complex. It was, the review suggested, poetry written for the experts, for other poets and professors and their English Literature students. I thought her poetry on Heracles was understandable, and in some cases moving. What I did agree on though was how tough poetry can be. It is no accident that it took me one year and nine months to get through this anthology. As I struggled with the second poet Brenda Hillman, I decided to search for help and came upon a book by Edward Hirsch (which apparently is a classic) titled “How to Read a Poem and Fall in Love with Poetry”. I guess it helped at least in making me understand what hard work it is. I liked Rozycki overall and in particular his poem Cannibals, where he describes how tortuous it is to be a writer. I was also reading Charles Bukowski at the time, whom many might dismiss as a hack, but even he too struggled - as did his character Hank Chinaski – writing at night and tortured with the remains of that struggle during the day. It is hard to create, and one of my favourite quotes is from Victor Hugo: ‘when a man seeks greatness, he does it alone. There is no teamwork, at least not in the beginning’. As Tomasz Rozycki writes, “… an unmade bed, the entrails of night. Signs of a struggle, deserted. Someone left traces on these cups, this carpet, someone bled out from self-inflicted wounds”. Edwin

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cee Spind

    Lots of you. Hillman, rozycki. Weird copywriting rant at the beginning. Wish these notes were still in my little black book of everything I read that I've lost three times. Instead of in the great everywhere-nexus-of-nether. Lots of you. Hillman, rozycki. Weird copywriting rant at the beginning. Wish these notes were still in my little black book of everything I read that I've lost three times. Instead of in the great everywhere-nexus-of-nether.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    "Time compared to the wild fantastic silence of the stars." "And what comes across, half-said Into all that space, is that it's enough To love the air we move through." "Time compared to the wild fantastic silence of the stars." "And what comes across, half-said Into all that space, is that it's enough To love the air we move through."

  5. 4 out of 5

    AR

  6. 4 out of 5

    Greg

  7. 5 out of 5

    Luke

  8. 5 out of 5

    David

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lily Falk

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  11. 4 out of 5

    Erin

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Hackley

  15. 4 out of 5

    House of Anansi and Groundwood Books

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andrea McDowell

  17. 4 out of 5

    Annette LeBox

  18. 5 out of 5

    Harvey

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl Andrews

  20. 4 out of 5

    Liisa Ladouceur

  21. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Baird

  22. 5 out of 5

    Toni Callihoo

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

  24. 5 out of 5

    Erin Bedford

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kezia Gledhill

  26. 5 out of 5

    xio

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anna R

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jas

  30. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

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