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X-Men Legacy, Volume 4: For We Are Many

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One of Legion's most troublesome personalities threatens to annihilate an alien species! S.W.O.R.D. director Abigail Brand is on the case - but will she be able to work with David to solve this extraterrestrial conundrum? Odd couple adventures ensue as David and Brand team up to stop the destructi on before it begins! Collecting: X-Men Legacy 19-24 One of Legion's most troublesome personalities threatens to annihilate an alien species! S.W.O.R.D. director Abigail Brand is on the case - but will she be able to work with David to solve this extraterrestrial conundrum? Odd couple adventures ensue as David and Brand team up to stop the destructi on before it begins! Collecting: X-Men Legacy 19-24


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One of Legion's most troublesome personalities threatens to annihilate an alien species! S.W.O.R.D. director Abigail Brand is on the case - but will she be able to work with David to solve this extraterrestrial conundrum? Odd couple adventures ensue as David and Brand team up to stop the destructi on before it begins! Collecting: X-Men Legacy 19-24 One of Legion's most troublesome personalities threatens to annihilate an alien species! S.W.O.R.D. director Abigail Brand is on the case - but will she be able to work with David to solve this extraterrestrial conundrum? Odd couple adventures ensue as David and Brand team up to stop the destructi on before it begins! Collecting: X-Men Legacy 19-24

30 review for X-Men Legacy, Volume 4: For We Are Many

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo

    Writer Si Spurrier ended his little X-book with an ending that punished the apathetic X-fan for missing out on what could be the Gaiman's Sandman of that family of titles. It's not hyperbole and it's not bandied around as much as how fans describe Gillen's Journey Into Mystery but it's really easy to explain why. The writer made it so that this version of Legion or David Haller co-terminated with his stay on the book and it's a shame because it was the best take ever on the character and it beca Writer Si Spurrier ended his little X-book with an ending that punished the apathetic X-fan for missing out on what could be the Gaiman's Sandman of that family of titles. It's not hyperbole and it's not bandied around as much as how fans describe Gillen's Journey Into Mystery but it's really easy to explain why. The writer made it so that this version of Legion or David Haller co-terminated with his stay on the book and it's a shame because it was the best take ever on the character and it became more nuanced as the series progressed. The Gaiman parallel was in how Spurrier approached the character's multiple personalities and their respective power sets; what if each rogue personality had its own story and David Haller is just another aspect formed by the fractious mind of the real David Haller. There was also this story, included in this volume, of how a lie, which is essentially a story tricked the manipulative Legion into learning a little humility. Another Sandman comparison is raised with the incredible Del Mundo covers that border on fine art, just as how Dave McKean's mixed media masterpieces made their mark on the comic book industry. If you did not read this series when it was out, you deserve to to have to look for the out-of-print trades in second hand bookstores, or for the single issues in the back issue bins. This was a short-lived but sublime X-Men series; something that is all too rare in this post-MCU world.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Terence

    A part of David is on the loose and he's using Blindfold's brother Luca's powers as well as some of David's. David struggles to get his mind in order before it can destroy the world. No matter how strong a story may be, the ending is generally what cements it's legacy good or bad. Unfortunately for comic books, all too often endings either perfectly fix things or the ending is practically swept away by future events. That is one thing that has always bothered me about comics, very little is perma A part of David is on the loose and he's using Blindfold's brother Luca's powers as well as some of David's. David struggles to get his mind in order before it can destroy the world. No matter how strong a story may be, the ending is generally what cements it's legacy good or bad. Unfortunately for comic books, all too often endings either perfectly fix things or the ending is practically swept away by future events. That is one thing that has always bothered me about comics, very little is permanent good or bad. X-Men Legacy's ending left me unsatisfied. I should have seen it coming, but I guess I was too focused on what I wanted to happen. For We Are Many just didn't do it for me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    A strong ending to the series, and an improvement from the previous volume. The end isn't at all what I expected, and that's good. That twist will be one of the most memorable parts of the entire series to me. I kind of worry that the ending will be screwed with by later writers. Given that Spurrier (view spoiler)[didn't kill David, he altered reality so that he never existed at all (hide spoiler)] I don't know how it'll stick. No, that didn't affect my enjoyment of this book, but it's a definit A strong ending to the series, and an improvement from the previous volume. The end isn't at all what I expected, and that's good. That twist will be one of the most memorable parts of the entire series to me. I kind of worry that the ending will be screwed with by later writers. Given that Spurrier (view spoiler)[didn't kill David, he altered reality so that he never existed at all (hide spoiler)] I don't know how it'll stick. No, that didn't affect my enjoyment of this book, but it's a definite possibility.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    Just way too far out for me. It did lead to a somewhat satisfying ending, but you have to travel through a lot of weirdness to get there. If you like really far out comics (Shade the Changing Man from Vertigo and Morrison's Doom Patrol come to mind) you'll probably like this. Or if you are a hardcore X-Men fan. Otherwise this probably isn't for you. Just way too far out for me. It did lead to a somewhat satisfying ending, but you have to travel through a lot of weirdness to get there. If you like really far out comics (Shade the Changing Man from Vertigo and Morrison's Doom Patrol come to mind) you'll probably like this. Or if you are a hardcore X-Men fan. Otherwise this probably isn't for you.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Travis Duke

    "The things that stay with you forever. Are the things that come to an end."A great final volume from Spurrier, he took some risks with the ending and it paid off in my opinion. It all builds up to this volume where David has been trying to control his mind. He has been subdued by S.w.o.r.d and also misled using some of his own tactics. He finally takes control of all his personalities except for the mysterious gold man who escaped last volume. Still, the nightmare that him and Blindfold saw com "The things that stay with you forever. Are the things that come to an end."A great final volume from Spurrier, he took some risks with the ending and it paid off in my opinion. It all builds up to this volume where David has been trying to control his mind. He has been subdued by S.w.o.r.d and also misled using some of his own tactics. He finally takes control of all his personalities except for the mysterious gold man who escaped last volume. Still, the nightmare that him and Blindfold saw coming becomes reality and the are forced with the decision to fight. Skip past the spoilers, and David must now choose where it all ends. The ending was great, Spurrier admits it's not going to please everyone but giving the nature of the series it's the best scenario in my opinion. The series had some slow moments but ramped up nicely in the end.The art is on par with the writing, it is better than average but not top notch. I would recommend it for anyone looking for a little bit of crazy. Spoilers below___________________________________________ David merges and becomes Gestalt battling the gold man who turns out to be his own anger. once that personality merges it creates the nightmare monster that him and Blindfold feared. they both knew if that happened they would have to fight. The gold man had Luca's eyes so once he was defeated Blindfold regained her missing powers and became Destiny. Just when David is about to lose he sees the weaver who never would communicate with him, turns out it's his true self and helps he see everything with the help of a last message from his dad saying he's proud of him. These two moments give David the strength to regain control and actually reverse time. he struggles when to stop rewinding time and ultimately makes the big sacrifice to stop his birth. Although we find out he still lives on in blindfolds mind.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    Totally wild and esoteric. I loved it. This is an ending with some major emotional impacts, and I can confidently say that this series is unlike any other Marvel series I’ve ever read. Was if confusing at times? Certainly... but the emotional gravity and passion, as well as the conversations it opens up more than makes up for the twists and turns (some of which are welcome.) I highly recommend this series for people who truly want to witness a different and unique Marvel mutant story.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anna Wylie

    When I started Legacy volume 1, I was intrigued, curious and a little confused. So naturally, I checked out volume 2. These feelings persisted. Then I read volume 3 and the confusion lessened slightly and the story really started to grab me emotionally. Those three volumes, however, did not fully prepare me for the greatness that is volume 4. These volume is full of existential crisis, wonderful philosophical musings by David, tons of amazing panels, and an ending that I did not suspect but fully When I started Legacy volume 1, I was intrigued, curious and a little confused. So naturally, I checked out volume 2. These feelings persisted. Then I read volume 3 and the confusion lessened slightly and the story really started to grab me emotionally. Those three volumes, however, did not fully prepare me for the greatness that is volume 4. These volume is full of existential crisis, wonderful philosophical musings by David, tons of amazing panels, and an ending that I did not suspect but fully applaud and appreciated. This series will, without a doubt, go down as one of my favorites!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    The conclusion of a series which somehow used the little-loved, marginal X-Man Legion to tell rather a moving tale about self-determination and identity, while also getting heavily meta with regards to the expectations and failings of mainstream superhero comics - a genre to which this nominally belongs, even if in practice it looked more like an action movie derived from Hewligan's Haircut. Far better than it had any right to be. The conclusion of a series which somehow used the little-loved, marginal X-Man Legion to tell rather a moving tale about self-determination and identity, while also getting heavily meta with regards to the expectations and failings of mainstream superhero comics - a genre to which this nominally belongs, even if in practice it looked more like an action movie derived from Hewligan's Haircut. Far better than it had any right to be.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brent

    This messy windup is full of pseudo psychology and metaphorical transference, now superhero mutant tropes. I do not much recommend it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John

    One of the strangest X-books comes to a big finish with great slabs of existentialist monologing set against a surreal backdrop of a splintered personality. The fake-outs and con games that marked earlier volumes are here, and little is ever what it seems before a reversal recontextualizes pages prior. Subtract one star for going to the long-dry "to me, my x-men" well. Time to go read everything Simon Spurrier writes. One of the strangest X-books comes to a big finish with great slabs of existentialist monologing set against a surreal backdrop of a splintered personality. The fake-outs and con games that marked earlier volumes are here, and little is ever what it seems before a reversal recontextualizes pages prior. Subtract one star for going to the long-dry "to me, my x-men" well. Time to go read everything Simon Spurrier writes.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Lanter

    If you don't mind the weirdness that leads all the way up until the end, then X-Men Legacy pays off in a big way in the 4th and final volume. I really enjoyed how it ended and also whenever Agent Brand and her psychic were "on screen" I knew there would be clever/funny writing. More than anything else, it is awesome that Marvel put this out and Simon Spurrier gave us something very different than a traditional superhero story. If you don't mind the weirdness that leads all the way up until the end, then X-Men Legacy pays off in a big way in the 4th and final volume. I really enjoyed how it ended and also whenever Agent Brand and her psychic were "on screen" I knew there would be clever/funny writing. More than anything else, it is awesome that Marvel put this out and Simon Spurrier gave us something very different than a traditional superhero story.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Derek

    Not been thrilled about the whole Legion arc, never really got into it, despite Legion being quite an interesting character. Now, I'm just glad this is over. Could've been done better, especially the writing. Not been thrilled about the whole Legion arc, never really got into it, despite Legion being quite an interesting character. Now, I'm just glad this is over. Could've been done better, especially the writing.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Loki

    Did not see that coming. Awesome conclusion to the fantastic series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cicada

    This has been the most uplifting and inspiring metaphor for dealing with mental illness that I have ever read. Made me feel so much better. Simply be. Simply do. I rule me. I rule me.

  15. 4 out of 5

    C

    Continuing the great x-read of 2017/18... Oh. Oh my. I have enjoyed this series, sometimes really enjoyed it. But I didn't think that it would build to such an immensely satisfying conclusion. But here we are. I am giving 5 stars to a graphic novel (which is a rarity for me). This volume builds on everything from the first three. It leaves the status quo changed(while explaining how it doesn't matter if these stories do...), it has ramifications, both in the story and for the reader as well. It has Continuing the great x-read of 2017/18... Oh. Oh my. I have enjoyed this series, sometimes really enjoyed it. But I didn't think that it would build to such an immensely satisfying conclusion. But here we are. I am giving 5 stars to a graphic novel (which is a rarity for me). This volume builds on everything from the first three. It leaves the status quo changed(while explaining how it doesn't matter if these stories do...), it has ramifications, both in the story and for the reader as well. It has depth, it is meta (in the most delightful, fourth-wall breaking of ways). It deals with mental illness in complicated ways that do not diminish. Often, when superhero books attempt stories of this depth and resonance they fall flat on their faces (I've even read other Spurrier stories that haven't quite managed it) but Spurrier absolutely knocks it out of the park here. This is one of the most satisfying culminations of a book that I have read in a very long time. I saw another reviewer compare it to Sandman and I'm not sure that I disagree with them. This is just that good.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    At the end of this volume, Spurrier pontificates about whether or not his Legion story will have any impact on future X-boo0ks, wondering if "Perhaps they'll just ignore these adventures." I certainly hope so. I didn't enjoy this series from the beginning. The tone felt off. The dialog forced. All of the characters felt like alternate universe version of the X-Men, which ..... might be your thing. I also have a list of endings that make me want to throw a book across a room, and Mr. Spurrier hit o At the end of this volume, Spurrier pontificates about whether or not his Legion story will have any impact on future X-boo0ks, wondering if "Perhaps they'll just ignore these adventures." I certainly hope so. I didn't enjoy this series from the beginning. The tone felt off. The dialog forced. All of the characters felt like alternate universe version of the X-Men, which ..... might be your thing. I also have a list of endings that make me want to throw a book across a room, and Mr. Spurrier hit one of those walls at full speed. The cover art for this whole series was excellent, and I wish they had been used for a better story. I don't recomment this series. I'm adding his name to the Scott Lobdell Hall Of X-Writers To Actively Avoid.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Roman Colombo

    Wow. Aside from Huat's art, everything about this volume is perfect. It is a great ending to the series, and the most fitting. Spurrier's writing is excellent. I wish there were more...but it feels like a well-contained story that more might hurt it. Wow. Aside from Huat's art, everything about this volume is perfect. It is a great ending to the series, and the most fitting. Spurrier's writing is excellent. I wish there were more...but it feels like a well-contained story that more might hurt it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ma'Belle

    4.5 stars This was simply an exceptional story in the over-populated world of mutant and superhero comics. Si Spurrier is definitely a writer I'm going to be looking out for intentionally now, and his art team did a phenomenal job throughout the whole series as well. 4.5 stars This was simply an exceptional story in the over-populated world of mutant and superhero comics. Si Spurrier is definitely a writer I'm going to be looking out for intentionally now, and his art team did a phenomenal job throughout the whole series as well.

  19. 5 out of 5

    James Speiker

    Finished off strong. The story, i thought, painted itself into a corner. I kept thinking how is it going to end? I wasn't disappointed and if you read it too and is a fan of Legion, you won't be either. Finished off strong. The story, i thought, painted itself into a corner. I kept thinking how is it going to end? I wasn't disappointed and if you read it too and is a fan of Legion, you won't be either.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    4 STARS

  21. 5 out of 5

    Book Nerd Shenanigans

    Clever and somewhat controversial way to end the series. Thoroughly engrossing and truly didn't want it to end. Now to hunt down more works by Simon Spurrier and any artwork by Mike Del Mundo. Clever and somewhat controversial way to end the series. Thoroughly engrossing and truly didn't want it to end. Now to hunt down more works by Simon Spurrier and any artwork by Mike Del Mundo.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Thebadwolf

    4 or 4.5 stars

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bobby Chapman

    One the best new age comics This comic series is wonderfully written. It will keep you on your edge and wanting more. It's a must read! One the best new age comics This comic series is wonderfully written. It will keep you on your edge and wanting more. It's a must read!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alina Arias

    this my favorite movie and book of all time

  25. 4 out of 5

    Wils Cain

    I just love this series. So glad they made the TV series telling this story as well. Even though not exactly the same story it was still good.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    An ok series with lots of monologuing and interesting ideas that weren't quite fleshed out enough for me to care. An ok series with lots of monologuing and interesting ideas that weren't quite fleshed out enough for me to care.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Joanna

    I liked this volume. Super trippy, and... it felt like it got to the point of the story. I loved it when Legion became Godlike. I think I just like that generally though, ha! Like Doctor Manhattan? love that. Legion portrayal: 4.5/5.

  28. 4 out of 5

    David Caldwell

    The conclusion of the series collects issues 19 -24. David Haller (Legion) is an extremely powerful mutant despite being insane. He has tried to come to grips with the feelings about his father (Professor X), his death (again), and his legacy. David is also trying to prevent a future where he destroys the world. David never really became a character that is easy to like or care for in this series. The artwork was a little too malleable for my tastes. The plot was had a tendency to wander. But what The conclusion of the series collects issues 19 -24. David Haller (Legion) is an extremely powerful mutant despite being insane. He has tried to come to grips with the feelings about his father (Professor X), his death (again), and his legacy. David is also trying to prevent a future where he destroys the world. David never really became a character that is easy to like or care for in this series. The artwork was a little too malleable for my tastes. The plot was had a tendency to wander. But what caused me from thinking of this as a decent but not great series was the ending. For me, the ending just made the entire series seem to feel like a waste of time.

  29. 5 out of 5

    James

    Si Spurrier wraps up his X-men Legacy run in a way that feels a bit more like a sermon than a story. The vocabulary gets a bit thick in this last volume, with lots of high-density narration in the "psi-scape" to pad out the plot. As we start, a rogue piece of David Heller's multiple personalities, possessed by a murderer, has escaped into the world at large, where he's using psychic powers to inspire hate around the world. (Sort of like those old Hate-Monger storylines I used to read about in my Si Spurrier wraps up his X-men Legacy run in a way that feels a bit more like a sermon than a story. The vocabulary gets a bit thick in this last volume, with lots of high-density narration in the "psi-scape" to pad out the plot. As we start, a rogue piece of David Heller's multiple personalities, possessed by a murderer, has escaped into the world at large, where he's using psychic powers to inspire hate around the world. (Sort of like those old Hate-Monger storylines I used to read about in my Official Handbooks when I was a kid.) After a "scared straight" session in space, David yet again gains control over his powers thanks to a renewed focus and goes after the monster. In conquering it, though, he becomes a monster himself, one that may doom all mankind, as prophesied. Our protagonist ends up consuming mutant spirits and devastating the countryside, sparking the long-foreshadowed showdown with his psychic girlfriend, junior X-men member Blindfold (aka Ruth). The problem, though, is that the plot developments pile up to the point where they feel meaningless. David's powers make something happen, and then something else happens, and before too long the events in the story are detached from any kind of relevant causal chain. It might as well be magic. Ruth and David's relationship is also a focus, but that's not very satisfying either, as it doesn't feel like the connection between the two is ever fully earned. Spurrier wraps things up well, with a neat bit of cleverness, but the story leading up to that point seems like a massive build-up for a little payoff. The art, shared by Tan Eng Huat and Khoi Pham, is decent enough, although the figures can be a little blocky for my tastes. But it wasn't long into the trade that I was reading for the finish, which is never a good sign. Read digital issues.

  30. 5 out of 5

    M

    Legion's story comes to an unsatisfying conclusion in the fourth and final volume of the X-Men: Legacy title. Having been imprisoned after his attack ploy on the X-Men, David Haller is being sentenced for his multiple crimes. The alien Aarkus, having been prematurely left a vegetable in their previous encounter, returns as judge, jury, and executioner at the direction of the space agency SWORD. As Aarkus mentally devours David's personalities, Legion is forced to unite them all together under hi Legion's story comes to an unsatisfying conclusion in the fourth and final volume of the X-Men: Legacy title. Having been imprisoned after his attack ploy on the X-Men, David Haller is being sentenced for his multiple crimes. The alien Aarkus, having been prematurely left a vegetable in their previous encounter, returns as judge, jury, and executioner at the direction of the space agency SWORD. As Aarkus mentally devours David's personalities, Legion is forced to unite them all together under his command. The effort is revealed to be a scheme to help David become whole and strong, so that he may confront his own worst enemy and prevent a mutant apocalypse. Vanquishing the threat causes David to absorb all mutants into his gestalt form; Blindfold must confront Legion in order to save everyone for his eventual self-destruction. As the saga comes to a head, David chooses to remove himself from the equation, and thus avert any possibility of destruction from occurring. The emphatic art styles of Tan Eng Huat and Khoi Pham are used well in the dream-like battle sequences, and add the extra energy needed to push this volume to its conclusion. Sadly, Simon Spurrier opts for the reset button to finish his storyline. Negating David Haller essentially tells readers that the past 23 issues have not mattered; in fact, the book concludes with a one-page letter Spurrier writes to convince fans otherwise. The final chapter closes the book on Legion and the X-Men: Legacy title, and despite its many possibilities, it ends on one bad note.

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