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Second volume of two-volume biography of William Howard Taft.


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Second volume of two-volume biography of William Howard Taft.

30 review for The Life & Times of William Howard Taft: A Biography, Vol 2

  1. 4 out of 5

    Aaron Million

    Henry Pringle continues his caustic writing in the concluding volume on Taft's life. This book picks up about halfway through Taft's one-term presidency, right where the preceding volume ends. Even the page numbers continue, they do not reset. This book proves to be even more of a slog to get through than the first one did. Perhaps it is because I am ready to be finished with Pringle's dry, acerbic and impersonal writing style. Throughout both books, I get the simultaneous sense that Pringle bel Henry Pringle continues his caustic writing in the concluding volume on Taft's life. This book picks up about halfway through Taft's one-term presidency, right where the preceding volume ends. Even the page numbers continue, they do not reset. This book proves to be even more of a slog to get through than the first one did. Perhaps it is because I am ready to be finished with Pringle's dry, acerbic and impersonal writing style. Throughout both books, I get the simultaneous sense that Pringle believes that Taft has been misunderstood as a man and a president so he (Pringle) wants to correct the record, yet he also does not seem to like Taft very much so that correction comes with numerous asterisks attached to it. Many times while reading this book I asked myself the following question: “And I am reading this why?” That is not something I normally need to ask myself. Taft's personal life is almost totally absent here. His wife appears here and there, never for long. Ditto for his brother Horace. His two children are rarely mentioned; then suddenly they are trying to enlist in the Army in WWI. Charles goes to Europe and serves on the front, but we do not hear anything about his experiences there or Taft being thankful that he comes home alive and unscathed (actually, Pringle doesn't even say that, the reader has to infer that Charles returned safely due to the absence of anything to the contrary being written). Captain Archie Butt was a close personal aide to both Taft and Theodore Roosevelt. Butt was one of the unfortunate passengers on the Titanic. Pringle does not mention his death when it happens; he mentions it later and only in passing in regards to something else. There is not one word about how Butt's death, and the tragic event itself, impacted Taft. Pringle treats Taft's presidency as if it were a balance sheet, comprised of debits and credits. First come the credits, then the debits. What a boring and perfunctory way to review someone's time in that office. Once again, the ugly tariff appears to terrorize readers and it subsequently does so for many pages. The campaign and election of 1912 – a pivotal event in the country's history, chock full of interesting figures and drama – has all the excitement of reading about a local building ordinance being passed. In fact, once Taft seals the Republican nomination for president, Pringle dispatches with the election in just a few short pages. The overarching theme in this volume, if there is one, is Pringle's loathing of Theodore Roosevelt. It makes me think of a diehard football fan who has a favorite team, but also has a certain team that he despises, and if that team loses it provides almost as much enjoyment for him as if his own team wins. That is how I see Pringle's treatment of Roosevelt vs Taft. He seems to prefer concentrating on throwing darts at Roosevelt, than on writing about Taft. He even goes so far as to say that the injuries suffered by Roosevelt in an attempted assassination attempt were “not serious”. Quite the opposite. No, he did not die from the wounds, but it was a serious injury and he was forced off the campaign trail for a few weeks. I am personally not an admirer of TR, but I do want to see even-handed treatment of him, and anyone else who I read about. The final part of the book deals with Taft's tenure as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Dry! The end chapter speaks of Taft's failing health. Ironically, it is most personal chapter of the two volumes, and even then reads rather clinically. The book ends with a short sentence that begins “He died...” and then lists the date. No review of his life or his accomplishments. No discussion of his funeral or what remembrances or eulogies others said about him. This is really unfortunate that Pringle produced such an uninteresting biography of Taft. He had a very interesting life and was occupied two of the highest positions of power in this country (President and Chief Justice) – still the only man ever to do so. It is a shame that so little has been written about him. Even worse, I almost think it might have been better had Pringle decided not to write about him at all. Grade: F

  2. 4 out of 5

    Judy Baker

    The Life and Times of William Howard Taft: vol 2 continued literally in the same vein in which the first began (literally, because the first chapter stated on page 557, where the first volume left off.) I do think that the title is misleading, as Theodore Roosevelt continued to be the major player in the biography and should have gotten some sort of billing. I suppose that in many respects that was reality. WHT truly was overshadowed by TR most of his life. Pringle depicts the fallout between TR The Life and Times of William Howard Taft: vol 2 continued literally in the same vein in which the first began (literally, because the first chapter stated on page 557, where the first volume left off.) I do think that the title is misleading, as Theodore Roosevelt continued to be the major player in the biography and should have gotten some sort of billing. I suppose that in many respects that was reality. WHT truly was overshadowed by TR most of his life. Pringle depicts the fallout between TR and WHT during election year of 1912 in all of its nastiness. It was not until after TR's death in 1920 and WHT was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court in 1921 that he finally came into his own. Pringle's writing continued to be confusingly non-chronological and the court case details he chose to expand upon dreadfully tedious. And, oddly enough for a biography that was 1082 pages long, he disclosed very little about Taft's home life, though his wife was apparently extremely influential in his decisions. I did not even realize he had any children until half way through the second book, and here they are, all grown up! His most concise description of WHT was that, while he could be a very hard worker when he felt comfortable in the milieu, he would procrastinate when out of his depth, and that the Presidency simply baffled him. It appears that this was so very true. The book ends rather abruptly with, "He died on Saturday night, March 8, 1930." I would seek out another title of many of the biographical authors I have read on this journey if time permitted. My choice for Pringle would be his biography of Teddy Roosevelt, which is described as humorous and for which he won a Pulitzer Prize. Being a young man and a newspaper correspondent during the early 20th century (and somewhat liberal in his views) would certainly have given him a far difference perspective that I got from Edmund Morris. The times are beginning to have a significant impact on politics and political parties. Travel, communication, and, as was evident in 1914, war are foisting the United States into world leadership. The myriad of poor workers who made a few men very rich are beginning to rise up. And the idyll agrarian world in which Thomas Jefferson and other Founding Father envisioned the Constitution playing out had evolved, and against that background has developed polarized views of the Constitution. Ugly debates over justice nominations such as we recently witnessed with Kavanaugh are nothing new, nor is the reality of justices hanging on to their jobs when they are too frail or old to be effective in them. I was glad that WHT finally achieved his dream of Chief Justice, not only for his own happiness, but because I have gained more insight into the Supreme Court, its purpose, and how it functions. Truly if there is anything I am realizing about government, politics, and American history in this little project of mine , it is that there is absolutely NOTHING new under the sun!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    The second half of Pringle’s set slogged through the details of the second half of Taft’s presidency and his decade on the Supreme Court, elaborating on tariffs, economics, labor disputes, and prohibition. Some details were repeated throughout the two books, not making them any easier to remain alert for the second and third time, and a few were even over Taft’s own head, it appears. The President-turned-Justice’s life in general was well recorded, save for sufficient mention of his wife, and ne The second half of Pringle’s set slogged through the details of the second half of Taft’s presidency and his decade on the Supreme Court, elaborating on tariffs, economics, labor disputes, and prohibition. Some details were repeated throughout the two books, not making them any easier to remain alert for the second and third time, and a few were even over Taft’s own head, it appears. The President-turned-Justice’s life in general was well recorded, save for sufficient mention of his wife, and nearly nothing at all about her in volume two. Taft’s split with his friend and mentor, Teddy Roosevelt, reaches its less-bitter end in this book, and nowhere does it mention anything about a bathtub (there is an unspoken-to photo of a tub Taft used in the Philippines in volume one, but the legend is apparently nearly baseless). Only a passing sentence is given to the demise of Taft's friend and aide Archie Butt--whose own numerous contributions of source material in volume one screech to a halt in volume two--who was a passenger returning to America on the Titanic. A common regret in my presidential biographies is how quickly some of them wrap up at the end, and this one is no exception, especially after 1,000 pages of law and legislation. His final illness is addressed on two or three pages, and the final sentence is little more than, “He died.” Ultimately, I think one lengthy book would have sufficed.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brian Bridgeforth

    This review is for both volumes. This is probably the most detailed biography of Taft, if not the most recommended. But there are not that many biographies available on Taft. The latest one at the time of this review, which I have not yet had a chance to read, is by Jeffrey Rosen and is just over 200 pages. Other biographies are still less than 300 pages. At times this biography seems more of a biography on Teddy Roosevelt, and at times excessively so, to highlight Roosevelt's influence on Taft's This review is for both volumes. This is probably the most detailed biography of Taft, if not the most recommended. But there are not that many biographies available on Taft. The latest one at the time of this review, which I have not yet had a chance to read, is by Jeffrey Rosen and is just over 200 pages. Other biographies are still less than 300 pages. At times this biography seems more of a biography on Teddy Roosevelt, and at times excessively so, to highlight Roosevelt's influence on Taft's political fortunes. Overall, I did enjoy reading both of Pringle's volumes and am happy to have it in my personal library of presidents. This biography was first published in the 1930's, and a fresh and detailed biography is long overdue.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Brent Ecenbarger

    Over a thousand pages on William Howard Taft between the two volumes of Pringle’s biography, and not one mention of a bathtub. Before I started this presidential biography journey, I could have told you about the bathtub and the Supreme Court, and what century he was president, but that was about it. Reading a biography on Teddy Roosevelt filled in a lot of the other details, but it was pretty great reading one about Taft and getting the other side of the story. Although Roosevelt kind of towers Over a thousand pages on William Howard Taft between the two volumes of Pringle’s biography, and not one mention of a bathtub. Before I started this presidential biography journey, I could have told you about the bathtub and the Supreme Court, and what century he was president, but that was about it. Reading a biography on Teddy Roosevelt filled in a lot of the other details, but it was pretty great reading one about Taft and getting the other side of the story. Although Roosevelt kind of towers over Taft in stature (whether because of years in office or literally towering on a mountain face), the two men are very much connected both in their rises to power and their falls. I’d argue Taft actually came out better in the end (at least during their lifetimes) but both were flawed men whose political careers magnified some of their shortcomings. My impression of Taft throughout the book was he was a politician who wanted to be a judge. Although Taft liked to claim he was consistent in his views, when election time came around all bets were off. Although always a Republican, and not a radical like Roosevelt (in the end), Taft would fluctuate within the party and even towards the Democrats depending on who the candidates were. This included his position on getting involved with World War I and his overall evaluation of Woodrow Wilson. He was better as a judge, but the author still pointed out times he appeared to contradict his earlier stated positions on major labor policy issues. He also greatly benefitted from privilege, both in name recognition and location. I have a hard time seeing why he got his judge, solicitor general, or governor positions based on what’s in the book and those directly led to him becoming president. He performed the jobs all adequately, taking advantage of every opportunity presented to him. Here’s some other stuff I found interesting: Born into – Taft was born in Ohio. While Virginia is technically the leader with eight presidents, Ohio is right behind at 7 and more of those are modern presidents (4 of the first 5 presidents are from Virginia, of the 8 from Ohio six came after Ulysses Grant). That’s a pretty good head start on its own. Taft’s dad was also a lawyer, then a judge, and even served in Grant’s cabinet. He also had the connections and finances to attend Yale for college (where he was the Salutatorian) and Cincinnati Law School. I’d say that’s a great head start in life. 1 out of 5 Pre-President – After law school, Taft’s first public job was as a reporter. He followed that with jobs as a prosecutor and internal revenue collector. His biggest case as an attorney was trying to discipline a defense attorney who kept getting murderers off. He was unsuccessful at that and also all the other big cases spotlighted in book. He was appointed judge at the young age of 29; nobody seems to know why. Apparently he was well liked and his family name helped a lot. When an opening for the Supreme Court became available that same year, Taft threw his own hat in the ring but was passed over. He was given the position of Solicitor General as a consolation prize (still at 29). After a few years in that role, became a Circuit Court judge where he was interested in policy and seemed to do a nice job. His career took an odd turn at that point when he was appointed head of the Phillipines governing group following the Spanish American War. The explanation by the author is McKinley was looking for somebody from Ohio that was also trustworthy. This was the best section of either book, with Taft learning Spanish and give his best effort to do a good job. By most accounts, his only major misstep was in stifling a political party that didn’t support a permanent relationship with United States leading to additional strife in the islands. Taft next got sent to Europe to deal with a Catholic Church controversy where Spanish Friars were removed from the Philippines and the question became how to either replace the friars or purchase their land. No satisfactory resolution occurred while Taft was there. Taft finished his Philippines work prior to Roosevelt’s bid for reelection in 1904, and became Secretary of War as part of cabinet. As cabinet member, he was Roosevelt’s right hand man. He also filled in for the Secretary of State when needed, and was even acting president when Roosevelt was out of country. During this time he aided in Roosevelt’s triumphs (Panama Canal) and pitfalls (Brownsville incident where entire company of black soldiers was permanently discharged over murky evidence of violent incident). Roosevelt pointed to Taft as his successor to the Republican party where there was no real competition. Like every Republican of that era, he ran against William Jennings Bryant who sabotaged his own chances by advocating the government take over the railroad lines. Taft avoided most controversies on campaign tail. He got some grief for being unitarian in religion (believed in God, not in divinity of Christ). He also supported making it a requirement of showing where candidates got their financial contributions (but not until after his election). He won his election handily, but the victory was also over half as small as Roosevelt’s had been four years earlier. 4 out of 5. Presidential Career – Taft filled his cabinet with lawyers, drawing criticism but he was happy with the selections. His first strife with Roosevelt was Taft saying he would keep Roosevelt’s cabinet and then not keeping all of it. Throughout his term he battled over tariffs with other Republicans; on one major issue Taft held out and got his way on a lumber issue and made some enemies in the party. (Later even more so when he called it the best bill ever passed by Republicans.) One large scandal to the public involved a government employee in Alaska who was purported to have rigged the system so lands with coal would go to certain businesses. The book spent a lot of time on this and author suggested nothing was really improper on this and it didn’t result in any major issues aside from the controversy. Another break with Roosevelt was on conservation, where Taft felt Roosevelt’s conservation measures exceeded legality by the Executive branch and he didn’t continue/extend on those matters. The Supreme Court was a revolving door while he was president and he appointed SIX justices during his four years. Another slight scandal occurred when Taft pardoned Charles W. Morse, a financial crook, on grounds that he was about to die in prison. Taft likely just relied on bad medical evidence, as Morse outlived Taft by three years and continued to defraud people after his release. One area where Taft was consistent with Roosevelt policies was the busting up of monopolies, taking on Rockefeller’s oil and many others. The author points out that Taft was lenient on the banking monopoly of JP Morgan however, which contributed to disaster of stock market crash and great depression. Not alone in his dealings with other countries, Taft’s strategy of dollar diplomacy was unsuccessful, particularly regarding Mexico. The rift with Teddy Roosevelt was major issue for Taft. Author argues for Taft it was based on Roosevelt going beyond what the Constitution allowed and Roosevelt becoming radical when he ran for office again. Taft was often emotional about the conflict with his former best friend and mentor, and initially refused to respond or criticize him. During the election, Taft finally broke down and decided to confront the things Roosevelt was saying about him. Roosevelt blamed party bosses for getting Taft the Republican party nomination, and there is some evidence to support that but not to the extent that Roosevelt was claiming. When the election was held, Roosevelt ran as 3rd party, and Taft only won 2 states, Vermont and Utah. Dramatic events during the campaign were the Titanic sinking (and conspiracy that Taft had sent messenger on it to court Catholic voters at Vatican) and Roosevelt being shot. 2.5 out of 5. Vice President – V.P James Sherman was only mentioned twice in the book. He was a compromise pick at the Republican convention, specifically: “So Sherman, of New York, a conservative political hack distinguished chiefly for his nickname “Sunny Jim,” was nominated. Pg. 355 He was mentioned again when died in office just before Taft’s reelection bid. According to Wikipedia, he’s the first VP to fly in an airplane or throw out a first pitch at a baseball game. 1 out of 5. First Lady – Taft married Nellie Herron, a woman he was very sweet on who made him wait a long while first to date and then to marry. She provided strong support for her husband any time the advancement of his career was a possibility, and was not afraid to confront him on who she believed his enemies were. The book doesn’t discuss his parenting or children much but she was the mother to three children, one of whom became a senator. 2.5 out of 5. Post Presidency – Taft was cordial with Wilson on his way out the door and soon after got a job as a professor of Law at Yale after leaving office. Taft and Roosevelt even kind of patched up toward the end of the 1910’s, as they both were critical of Wilson and worked together to support the Republican party in that time. His first foray back to Washington was serving as judge on national labor board disputes. He continued to let it be known he would accept a Supreme Court seat if it were the Chief Justice. President Harding made that come true, appointing Taft who served with such titans as Brandies and Oliver Wendell Holmes. Taft was very conservative, facing major issues like prohibition and taxes. While he didn’t support prohibition, he upheld its legality and even authored the opinion that allows vehicles to be searched. He also weighed in on minimum wages (against), child labor laws (sometimes against) and government regulation (it depends). Taft was critical of judges that dissented, often wanting unanimous decisions and judges to now draw the attention to themselves instead of the law. He died at the age of 70, still Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. 5 out of 5. Book itself – Between the two volumes, 1100 pages, there was probably about 75 pages I had a tough time getting through. Most of that dealt with republican policy on tariffs and regulations. I would have loved if that was replaced with writing on his family. I also don’t feel I have a great idea about his positions on race or gender equality, as the author didn’t spend much time on either topic. I came away admiring many traits of Taft but also seeing many flaws which in my view is a successful biography covering a well rounded person. (That’s not a fat joke, to come full circle to the bathtub). 4 out of 5.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    The second volume of Henry Pringle's life of William Howard Taft takes us from the midterm elections of 1910 until his death in 1930. Taft has now irrevocably broken with the progressive wing of the Republican Party and Robert LaFollette of Wisconsin is making noise like he wants to challenge him for the nomination in 1912. Waiting in the wings is former President Theodore Roosevelt just itching to get back into the White House. Taft's complete lack of political skills and acumen were responsible fo The second volume of Henry Pringle's life of William Howard Taft takes us from the midterm elections of 1910 until his death in 1930. Taft has now irrevocably broken with the progressive wing of the Republican Party and Robert LaFollette of Wisconsin is making noise like he wants to challenge him for the nomination in 1912. Waiting in the wings is former President Theodore Roosevelt just itching to get back into the White House. Taft's complete lack of political skills and acumen were responsible for the pickle he was in. As Roosevelt took over the progressive movement eclipsing LaFollette he made his try at the Republican convention then bolted and formed the Progressive Party. Taft's biggest joy was the law and fortune enabled him in his 4 years in the White House to make 7 Supreme Court appointments of the nine. One if the things that Roosevelt ran on was recall of Supreme Court Justices and to Taft that was anathema. It was the reason he ran, he did not want TR in the White House with such campaign promises. 1912 was a unique year with one former, one incumbent president running and the future president Woodrow Wilson as the Democrat who ran right up the middle between the split Roosevelt and Taft created. After he left the White House Taft moved to Connecticut and taught law at Yale Law School. Pringle gives him high marks saying that Taft could have commanded huge corporate fees had he gone into private practice. It was not something he was interested in. What he was interested in was the Supreme Court and in 1921 Warren Harding appointed Taft as Chief Justice. It was his life's dream fulfilled. Taft became leader of the conservative bloc on the Court and usually was locking horns with liberal dissenters Oliver Wendell Holmes and Louis Brandeis. Taft's biggest achievement was getting the Supreme Court a building of its own. Sad he didn't live to see its opening during the New Deal years. The problems of old age and a lot of weight eventually did Taft in. He died March 8, 1930. Henry Pringle comes from the left of the political spectrum yet he likes and respects Taft for his honesty and integrity. I believe the reader will come away feeling the same.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    The only thing bigger than President Taft is this two-volume monstrosity on his life. While I enjoyed reading, there were several not-so-pleasant parts. The last quarter of the second volume left a sour taste in my mouth. It goes into excruciating detail of cases Taft ruled on while Chief Justice. It was tedious and unnecessary. Page after page of information that did not forward my knowledge on Taft. This is not the only time the author goes off on unnecessary tangents. He does it several other The only thing bigger than President Taft is this two-volume monstrosity on his life. While I enjoyed reading, there were several not-so-pleasant parts. The last quarter of the second volume left a sour taste in my mouth. It goes into excruciating detail of cases Taft ruled on while Chief Justice. It was tedious and unnecessary. Page after page of information that did not forward my knowledge on Taft. This is not the only time the author goes off on unnecessary tangents. He does it several other times as well. The other uncomfortable part of the read was how the author jumps back and forth in time. Sometimes you read about a moment in time. A page or two later, as you read about another event, you realize that the ladder came before the former, without being warned ahead of time. Strangely though, you get to use to it after a while. So why 3 and not 2 stars? Because despite these two challenging things, the book was a good read. The biggest take away a reader will get from this book is that Taft's presidency was just a small part of a long list of accomplishment. In fact, I would argue that he was a failed president and is only remembered because of his size. He should really be remembered for his work in the Philippines, building the Panama Canal and sitting on the Supreme Court.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bill Pritchard

    After finishing Volume 2 of the Life and Times of William Howard Taft - I can share how sad I feel for this remarkable, gentle man. His large heart and large intellect - he is still the only President in U.S. History to hold both the Presidency and to be appointed to the Supreme Court (Chief Justice) points to his one fatal flaw - he followed Teddy Roosevelt. Roosevelt was so much larger than real life that anyone and everything was lost in the shadows of his brilliance... to have been unfortuna After finishing Volume 2 of the Life and Times of William Howard Taft - I can share how sad I feel for this remarkable, gentle man. His large heart and large intellect - he is still the only President in U.S. History to hold both the Presidency and to be appointed to the Supreme Court (Chief Justice) points to his one fatal flaw - he followed Teddy Roosevelt. Roosevelt was so much larger than real life that anyone and everything was lost in the shadows of his brilliance... to have been unfortunate to follow TR and then to become the focus of his attempts to win back the White House were too much for him to overcome. He was a man who was honestly happy to not have won a 2nd term. Recommended to those who wish to dive deeply into our Presidents - this two volume series is about as comprehensive as I could find.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Pete Iseppi

    The second of two volumes is just about like the first. Boring in spots, interesting in others. If your not a presidential history geek like I am, that you'll want to pass on this one. The second of two volumes is just about like the first. Boring in spots, interesting in others. If your not a presidential history geek like I am, that you'll want to pass on this one.

  10. 4 out of 5

    David Hill

    This review covers both volumes. American Political Biography Press republishes a series of books - single volume, whole life biographies, of American presidents. Although these Taft books are definitely two volumes on my shelf, they are a part of this series. Perhaps they've done this because the first page of the second volume is page 557 and Chapter XXX. The second volume contains the bibliography and index for both books. (My books are the Farrar & Rhinehart first editions.) As president, Taft This review covers both volumes. American Political Biography Press republishes a series of books - single volume, whole life biographies, of American presidents. Although these Taft books are definitely two volumes on my shelf, they are a part of this series. Perhaps they've done this because the first page of the second volume is page 557 and Chapter XXX. The second volume contains the bibliography and index for both books. (My books are the Farrar & Rhinehart first editions.) As president, Taft was in the shadow of Theodore Roosevelt. Without TR, we'd almost certainly not had a President Taft, and I find it doubtful that we'd have had a Chief Justice Taft without having had a President Taft. Most biographies, in my experience, begin well before their subjects, sometimes many generations before. They also tend to have a bit of a denouement, covering the funeral and often some aftermath. This work pretty much starts and ends with Taft. The final words (other than "the end") are "Taft died on Saturday night, March 8, 1930." Published just nine years later, perhaps the author felt insufficient time had passed for him to add any more. The book is pretty much exclusively devoted to Taft. Many of the presidential biographies I've read spent a fair number of pages telling us about the man's family. Here we get very little, not much more than sketches. This is fine by me - I'm generally more interested in what these men did, their actions and policies, than their families. Here I think Pringle did a fine job of putting Taft in the context of his times. We get the key cases of his tenure as Sixth Circuit Judge, his policies as governor of the Philippines and Cuba, and his activities as Secretary of War, as President, and his affect on the Supreme Court as Chief Justice.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mr. V

    Very informative biography. It would appear more suited to the court then presidency. I found myself disagreeing with him and T.R. extensively. They were the initial driving force for the Progressive movement in this country.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brian Sauer

  13. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rory

  15. 5 out of 5

    Robert

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jason Renfrow

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brian Lee

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mark Moeller

  19. 5 out of 5

    Forest

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jwb8314

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael Walker

  22. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  23. 5 out of 5

    Marvin Boswell

  24. 4 out of 5

    Frank J

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chris Carson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mark Sherman

  27. 5 out of 5

    Betsy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  29. 5 out of 5

    Linda

  30. 5 out of 5

    John Scribner

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