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An authorized biography of one of the most powerful women in the world sheds light on the person behind the politician With the Eurozone engulfed in an unprecedented crisis, one political figure looms largest of all, Angela Merkel, the leader of its most powerful economy. While foreign affairs have become the central issues of her chancellorship in this crucial election ye An authorized biography of one of the most powerful women in the world sheds light on the person behind the politician With the Eurozone engulfed in an unprecedented crisis, one political figure looms largest of all, Angela Merkel, the leader of its most powerful economy. While foreign affairs have become the central issues of her chancellorship in this crucial election year, the entire world is anxiously looking to Germany to play its part in Europe's rescue. From her youthful days of hitchhiking in Tbilisi to being the guest of honor at a White House state dinner, this book examines how a girl from East Germany rose to the highest echelons of European power. As well as explaining how Angela Merkel's world view was shaped and influenced by her background and ideology, this lively account discusses her personal relations with international counterparts such as David Cameron, Barack Obama, and Vladimir Putin, as well as her attitude towards the countries and cultures over which they rule.


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An authorized biography of one of the most powerful women in the world sheds light on the person behind the politician With the Eurozone engulfed in an unprecedented crisis, one political figure looms largest of all, Angela Merkel, the leader of its most powerful economy. While foreign affairs have become the central issues of her chancellorship in this crucial election ye An authorized biography of one of the most powerful women in the world sheds light on the person behind the politician With the Eurozone engulfed in an unprecedented crisis, one political figure looms largest of all, Angela Merkel, the leader of its most powerful economy. While foreign affairs have become the central issues of her chancellorship in this crucial election year, the entire world is anxiously looking to Germany to play its part in Europe's rescue. From her youthful days of hitchhiking in Tbilisi to being the guest of honor at a White House state dinner, this book examines how a girl from East Germany rose to the highest echelons of European power. As well as explaining how Angela Merkel's world view was shaped and influenced by her background and ideology, this lively account discusses her personal relations with international counterparts such as David Cameron, Barack Obama, and Vladimir Putin, as well as her attitude towards the countries and cultures over which they rule.

30 review for Angela Merkel: The Authorized Biography

  1. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    I like authorized biographies. We get spin and opinion from journalists all the time when analyzing a leader’s record, and often those journalists are judging from the outside what a leader is thinking. Here we have a writer who has a bit of access and can ask straightforward questions and get reasons for why a leader would choose one path over another. There may be some self-serving spin on the leader’s part, but many times the outcomes of decisions are not immediately known—it takes some time I like authorized biographies. We get spin and opinion from journalists all the time when analyzing a leader’s record, and often those journalists are judging from the outside what a leader is thinking. Here we have a writer who has a bit of access and can ask straightforward questions and get reasons for why a leader would choose one path over another. There may be some self-serving spin on the leader’s part, but many times the outcomes of decisions are not immediately known—it takes some time for them to play out in the European theatre—so we are looking at decision-making and rationale. Those are useful in judging the record of a leader. Kornelius knew Merkel since she got her first political job as spokesperson for the East German Democratic Awakening Party in 1989, before it was eventually absorbed into the West German Christian Democratic Union (CDU). He reports on foreign policy for the Süddeutsche Zeitung. This authorized biography felt constrained and thin to this outsider at the start when we are unsure whether or not to trust the author’s perceptions. After Merkel’s election as Chancellor in 2005, however, Kornelius uses his experience watching events in Europe to sketch dynamic relationships as they unfolded, adding government rationale and commentary on public reactions. Many of the relationships and people discussed in this 2013 book are still in office, making it absolutely relevant. It is commonly held opinion that years of crisis are good years for chancellors. Merkel’s first term saw the bankruptcy of Lehman Brothers the year before the general election, and from then on her main preoccupation would be the economy, the stability of the banks, the survival of a single currency, and a whole range of political issues that went with the euro crisis. Merkel’s approach to saving the banking system (tighten money supply) appeared to be opposite to what the Americans wanted to do (loosen money supply), and in fact there was a moment when Obama’s financial policy team led by then-U.S. Treasury Secretary Geithner almost derailed Merkel’s attempt to orchestrate a response to the Greek debt crisis. Merkel believes in American exceptionalism, and firmly believes in the necessity for the U.S. to involve itself redressing imbalances in the world power structure: she finds the notion of Russian or Chinese overreach troubling because their autocratic systems are not as free. However, she did not go along with the intervention in Libya (Germany abstained from the U.N. vote) because she “viewed the rebel movement in Libya and the rest of the Arab world with skepticism…She thought the political currents in these countries gave no clear indication of their likely future character as states.” Kornelius calls this decision one of the worst foreign policy blunders in her career. I wonder what he would say now, when in America the decision to intervene in Libya, urged by Hillary Clinton, is now considered one of the most ill-considered decisions of Obama’s two terms. Israel has a special place in Merkel’s list of countries important to Germany. She has felt their tied histories deeply, acknowledges a historical responsibility to the state of Israel and its “Jewish character,” and recognizes Israel’s place as a religious center for Jews, Christians, and Muslims. She has been a strong supporter of a two-state solution and when such an idea collapsed under Netanyahu’s decision to continue building new settlements on disputed land, she has distanced herself from that administration. “Relations cooled.” A discussion of Merkel’s relationship with Putin reveals a refusal to be bullied, each by the other. It is a relationship of uneasy balance, and wary distrust. Merkel had hopes for a Medvedev government, only to have her hopes collapse at the handover back to Putin. Merkel opposed Ukraine and Georgia being a part of NATO early in her chancellorship, despite heavy lobbying by the George W. Bush administration. She could see weakness in the governments there, unresolved conflict, and a fiscally-tied closeness to the Russian regime that spelled future trouble. The decision to refuse NATO status to Georgia under Saakachvili turned out to be a good one since three months later Saakachvili was testing Russian mettle and being soundly beaten for it. At the top of Merkel’s scale of values is freedom… “Freedom is the joy of achievement, the flourishing of the individual, the celebration of difference, the rejection of mediocrity, personal responsibility.” …Now, after over seven years as Chancellor, freedom is more than ever the leitmotiv if her foreign policy. The debt crisis in Europe tested not only the financial structures but the political ones as well. It called into question the nature of the European union. One possibility was for the EU to become, in essence, a United States of Europe, or a European superstate where power is transferred to Brussels. Another possibility was a union that worked in parallel with the EU, where states keep existing treaties and conclude new ones with each other and solve problems (labor laws, tax laws, budgets, social security) though intergovernmental solutions. Merkel believed it better for individual states to retain their sovereignty and coordinate with others. The social models and national sensitivities in member states were too different to allow for a single solution in these areas. But Merkel still firmly believes that globalization will sweep away individual states unless there is a new European economic order that allows Europe is to get “big” enough as a bloc to be able to compete with other huge economies. Her suggestion that there be more unity and control within the EU involved a new system of economic supervision, a Council, which would be a chamber to advise on and structure a program of economic and individual state reform with heads of government. It is an ambitious suggestion that perhaps only someone like Merkel would make, with her step-by-step solution to problems. The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TIIP) with the United States currently under scrutiny once again is another thing Merkel has been keen to finalize, despite hot debate in Germany. “Globalization” is a concept that was begun in the 1990’s and its efficacies have been called into question during the 2016 election in the United States. The debate rages in Europe at this time as well. Merkel's solutions for addressing weaknesses in Europe's position vis-à-vis a program of globalization may be enough to keep the system from being swept away wholesale. Merkel’s low key style does not highlight the important place Germany has assumed in the years since she became Chancellor. The turmoil surrounding the Syrian migrant crisis was not addressed in this book but is sure to be part of Merkel’s legacy. Merkel has said that she does not want another term, though there are no term limits on chancellorships and her predecessors often stayed for up to 16 years. It is always hard to imagine who could follow a figure who has had such an influence on the lives of so many. Kornelius did a good job covering a lot of ground. His book is just one of many needed to get a grip on the wide range of topics covered in this book. A lot happens in ten years and Kornelius wisely limited his scope to the crises in Europe which were in the forefront. I expect we will have many more detailed portraits of Merkel's time in office to come.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Breakingviews

    By Olaf Storbeck Angela Merkel is usually described as an utterly pragmatic politician, lacking either strong convictions or a grand political vision. Stefan Kornelius, foreign editor of Germany’s Sueddeutsche Zeitung, takes issue with this view. In his biography of the German chancellor, published in English on the eve of the Sept. 22 German elections, he claims that Merkel has a bold blueprint of Europe’s future. She just stays mum about it in public. According to Kornelius, Merkel was quite sin By Olaf Storbeck Angela Merkel is usually described as an utterly pragmatic politician, lacking either strong convictions or a grand political vision. Stefan Kornelius, foreign editor of Germany’s Sueddeutsche Zeitung, takes issue with this view. In his biography of the German chancellor, published in English on the eve of the Sept. 22 German elections, he claims that Merkel has a bold blueprint of Europe’s future. She just stays mum about it in public. According to Kornelius, Merkel was quite sincere when she said she wanted “more Europe” at the height of the euro crisis. She is in favour of more centralisation of economic policies - taxes, budgets and social-security systems. However, she does not want a United States of Europe based on an ever more powerful Brussels bureaucracy. Rather, Merkel prefers a new layer of inter-governmental cooperation between individual countries which retain their sovereignty but coordinate their policies more closely. “Member states should make their own arrangements,” Kornelius summarises Merkel’s thoughts. “The chancellor wants a parallel organisation, one that will coordinate individual nations’ requests, with a supervisor who might work in the President of the Council’s office and supervise the implementation of treaties concluded between individual states.” Up to a point, Merkel’s idea of a more inter-governmental Europe resembles David Cameron’s European vision. But there is an important difference. While the British prime minister wants Brussels to give back some existing powers to EU members, the Germans’ thoughts refer merely to future integration. Is this theory of a grand European vision plausible? Kornelius acknowledges that Markel “would never openly admit that she has a master plan to rescue the European Union.” Her silence might suggest that the biographer is misreading the data. But the reticence corresponds with his subject’s pragmatism - “Angela Merkel will only get involved in an argument if she knows that she will win in the end” - and with the lessons learned in her youth in East Germany. There, “learning when to keep quiet was a great advantage… It was one of our survival strategies,” as Merkel later recalled. Kornelius stresses that red lines and overarching principles guide Merkel’s policies. The survival of the euro is one of them. “If the euro fails, Europe will fail,” he cites a cornerstone of Merkel’s reasoning. And he stresses that this statement should not be taken lightly. “Merkel always means what she says.” Besides European integration, the chancellor regards German special liaison with the United States and Israel as part of its “raison d’état” that must not be questioned. It is nevertheless difficult to assess how hard Merkel will be pushing for her vision of Europe in the coming years. As Kornelius points out, the chancellor has earned a lot of political capital since she took office in 2005. “She is aware of that. At some point she might be tempted to give it up, to take a risk, stake everything on a single card.” That, however, would be a very non-Merkelian move.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Simpson

    This is informative but reads like it was written for 4th graders (albeit 4th graders who know what Eurobonds are). It's nice to get a better grasp on who Angela Merkel is and what makes her tick, given her reticent behavior in public, at the same time, given this is an "authorized biography" there's not a lot of dirt (although maybe Angela doesn't have any) and it reads like a longer Wikipedia page to Merkel. Oh and the biggest freaking problem, the mistranslations. Knowing that this was origin This is informative but reads like it was written for 4th graders (albeit 4th graders who know what Eurobonds are). It's nice to get a better grasp on who Angela Merkel is and what makes her tick, given her reticent behavior in public, at the same time, given this is an "authorized biography" there's not a lot of dirt (although maybe Angela doesn't have any) and it reads like a longer Wikipedia page to Merkel. Oh and the biggest freaking problem, the mistranslations. Knowing that this was originally published in German/Germany makes some of the errors egregious (Frank-Walter Steinmeier is SPD not FDP) while others are purely stylistic/grammatical nightmares. Kind of a let down, but an quick informative read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Gourab Ghatak

    First part was a bit boring because it delved too much into the domestic political history of Germany, although it shapes the readers mind regarding the persona of Merkel. The second half with the geopolitical scene, specially the chapter on relations with Israel, Russia and China were engaging. In my opinion, the chapter on the Euro crisis is a masterpiece. Overall, a good read if only one can have a bit of patience with the initial half.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Adri Nurellari

    This biography is well-written and very informative and provides insightful information not only on the life of Merkel but also on current affairs.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cherrie

    This is more of a compiled wikipedia plus news headlines or perhaps papers about her. Not exactly her thought or how she process but more on a third party point of view. Still great book tho

  7. 4 out of 5

    Audrey Wong

    An easy and informative read, great for a first introduction to one of the top female Politicians today.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Felicity Terry

    Not nearly as dry (dare I say as boring?) as I had feared it might be. As it turns out this, the official biography of Germany's first female Chancellor, was actually an interesting and illuminating read though I personally would have preferred to read a little more about Angela Merkel the woman as opposed to Angela Merkal the politician. A well written, and what I felt was a fairly unbiased read that, not too heavy going, combines the story of Merkel's life as a child and student to what is desc Not nearly as dry (dare I say as boring?) as I had feared it might be. As it turns out this, the official biography of Germany's first female Chancellor, was actually an interesting and illuminating read though I personally would have preferred to read a little more about Angela Merkel the woman as opposed to Angela Merkal the politician. A well written, and what I felt was a fairly unbiased read that, not too heavy going, combines the story of Merkel's life as a child and student to what is described as her 'meteoric ascent to the senior ranks in German politics' to her time as Chancellor with a look as to what might follow post-chancellorship. Copyright: Tracy Terry @ Pen and Paper. Disclaimer: Read and reviewed on behalf of publishers, Alma Books, I was merely asked for my honest opinion, no financial compensation was asked for nor given.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Poor Angela. She was committed to a long term consideration of global problems while other leaders pursued short-term expedient solutions to domestic issues. Hard to draw too many conclusions from an authorised biography, but you can certainly get a feel for how she sees herself.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sonali Ekka

    Angela Merkel seems to be a quiet woman in public, known more for her active role and decisions in European politics, rather than personal ideologies and rhetorics. No wonder then, that any biography or document about this lady would always offer an additional insight into the life of an otherwise private person. And yet, it seems to present the professional side of Merkel, with only those parts of her personal life which heavily influenced her job. There is a relatively shorter mention of her ea Angela Merkel seems to be a quiet woman in public, known more for her active role and decisions in European politics, rather than personal ideologies and rhetorics. No wonder then, that any biography or document about this lady would always offer an additional insight into the life of an otherwise private person. And yet, it seems to present the professional side of Merkel, with only those parts of her personal life which heavily influenced her job. There is a relatively shorter mention of her early years in East Germany, her family, education, upbringing, marriage and entry into politics. Even these have been mentioned to explain the role they played, especially her childhood and youth in East Germany, on her worldview and political stand all her life. Most of this biography focuses on her political career growth from a party leader to environment minister to eventually Germany's Chancellor. The initial chapters talk about her early years in East Germany, her entry into politics and her slow but strong personal development in this field. Several chapters are dedicated to her relationship with leaders of individual countries like Israel, Russia, China, UK and the later chapters cover her leadership over the issue of the Euro. This book stresses more on her leadership style, analytical thought process and a problem - solving approach. It also mentions her weaknesses as well as how she has managed to compensate for those weaknesses with her strengths. There isn't much personal emotional stories which are typical to many biographies, especially about women. What I loved most about this book is that it so feminist without tooting any feminist horns. It doesn't make those typical feminist statements of how Merkel broke gender barriers or how she manager her work and life and marriage. And yet, it has covered all these aspects in a way which would appeal and relate with readers of all genders. Readers may find it a little dry, cold and clinical. But then that is what Merkel and her Germany are traditionally seen as. Maybe that's intentional, or maybe that's all there is really to one of the most significant women of our world. Whatever it may be, it is an interesting book for a closer observation of Angela Merkel and Germany. Of course if someone follows her and German politics closely throughout the span of her leadership, then this book may not be that appealing.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Natan Cieplinski

    More than a biography it's a collection of events in which Merkel was the protagonist. The chancellor is described from a third point of view and that means that the same information could be found searching interviews, articles and generally following politics. To me the most interesting part was on domestic politics (the first part) because I already follow European politics in general and the chapter on the European crisis and the possibility of Brexit contained nothing new to me. The writing More than a biography it's a collection of events in which Merkel was the protagonist. The chancellor is described from a third point of view and that means that the same information could be found searching interviews, articles and generally following politics. To me the most interesting part was on domestic politics (the first part) because I already follow European politics in general and the chapter on the European crisis and the possibility of Brexit contained nothing new to me. The writing style is very easy to read (said by a non native speaker) and events are described contextually (domestic politic, European crisis, relationship with Russia and others) instead of chronologically. For this reason there are a lot of jumps back and forth in time, but I thinks this is the best way to avoid confusion and especially overlap between different matters. I was a bit disappointed because I was expecting something more "personal" and with more personal insight like in Steve Jobs' biography. Nonetheless this book is interesting if you don't want to spend the time to find available material on your own, and I would recommend it if you are searching for a brief but comprehensive view of world politics seen by the eyes of the German chancellery more than by Merkel itself.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Guilherme Remor

    A very interesting view into the personality, character and choices of the German Chancellor. The book portraits the German leader a post-political politician. Someone that has passed beyond the ideological barrier of her own centre right conservative CDU party. Someone that prefers to focus on the meticulous analysis of the problems at hand and solve them one by one. Someone who encircles herself with modest, analytically-minded and reasonable advisers, rather than big speakers or orators. To s A very interesting view into the personality, character and choices of the German Chancellor. The book portraits the German leader a post-political politician. Someone that has passed beyond the ideological barrier of her own centre right conservative CDU party. Someone that prefers to focus on the meticulous analysis of the problems at hand and solve them one by one. Someone who encircles herself with modest, analytically-minded and reasonable advisers, rather than big speakers or orators. To sum up, someone that has not completely left its background as both the child of East Germany (GDR) and a physicist from training. A very interesting insight into the mind and attitude of the Chancellor.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed El-Serafy

    A good analysis of Merkel's first two terms in office. It gives an inside look at her past, which happens to color almost all her endeavors, her scientific background, the way she went up the food chain and how she stayed there. It highlights, more extensively, her foreign policy: in how she thinks about Europe, how she can build a consensus to tackle the crises that hit the Union after 2008, and her relationship with the United States under both Bush and Obama. The book also sheds light on her s A good analysis of Merkel's first two terms in office. It gives an inside look at her past, which happens to color almost all her endeavors, her scientific background, the way she went up the food chain and how she stayed there. It highlights, more extensively, her foreign policy: in how she thinks about Europe, how she can build a consensus to tackle the crises that hit the Union after 2008, and her relationship with the United States under both Bush and Obama. The book also sheds light on her standpoint from military combat such as in Libya, Iraq and Afghanistan. Lastly, her personal life and close advisors have been examined to help shape the bigger picture of her work.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Artemis

    A book which lets us see Angela Merkel a tiny bit closer, though from the sounds of it she may not approve of that. I would probably have found the book more interesting had I read it back when it was released, as it is, a lot has happened since then. Also, the author quoted Kissinger who commented on how Britain apparently hasn't expanded like other European countries because they're pragmatic? That's, a weird series of choices to make, given ya know, colonization is a historical fact. I did enjoy A book which lets us see Angela Merkel a tiny bit closer, though from the sounds of it she may not approve of that. I would probably have found the book more interesting had I read it back when it was released, as it is, a lot has happened since then. Also, the author quoted Kissinger who commented on how Britain apparently hasn't expanded like other European countries because they're pragmatic? That's, a weird series of choices to make, given ya know, colonization is a historical fact. I did enjoy the read otherwise though. Makes you see the human behind the politician.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Luciano Elementi

    I sincerely enjoyed the book, the way it is organized throughout the years, and the ways Stephan introduces the multifaceted character of Angela. A lady with strong convictions and wide influence with patience and intelligence. Angela transpires as a model leader of the modern era, she is admired and courageous and honorable. The authorized puts in the book the extra weight that a reading about Angela deserves

  16. 5 out of 5

    David Parker

    Madam is not pleased so shut up and sit down Very informative read. I did not know much about Frau Merkel’s personal history or personality. I’m only sorry that it ended in 2013 and is dated. What about England leaving the EU, the refugees in Europe, and the rise of Nationalism in Europe? Angela Merkel will always be Angela Merkel – tactical, cautious, ready to take risks only when these have ceased to be risks.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Rainey

    Just an okay read for me. I don’t have a strong understanding of German politics, so some sections were over my head. I liked the background on Merkel and specifically her upbringing in East Germany as well as the descriptions of Merkel’s relationships with other foreign leaders. It was a short read so no complaints.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sabeen

    Angela is analytical thinker,she has an appetite for sarcasm, love the cafe culture of France, speaks Russian, greatly admire America etc. Book is full of german politics and its place in European Union - the 2013 german manoeuvring for Euro.

  19. 5 out of 5

    elys

    light read, probably too light for those highly knowledgeable in german politics but a good window into merkel's thought processes for the uninitiated and those who want simply to get a feel of who merkel is as a person without delving too deep into the political scene light read, probably too light for those highly knowledgeable in german politics but a good window into merkel's thought processes for the uninitiated and those who want simply to get a feel of who merkel is as a person without delving too deep into the political scene

  20. 4 out of 5

    Marzia Della Corte

    Well written with good insights of her past in an eloquent manner.

  21. 4 out of 5

    June Ding

    Quite dry for a biography.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hem

    "The Zeitgeist changes and the time runs out!" "The Zeitgeist changes and the time runs out!"

  23. 4 out of 5

    Johanna

    Interesting and fascinating biography of an impressive figure in todays Europe.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Holzmann

    Decent biography, but provides too much of an outsider perspective.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Zaklina Grgic

    Informative, but was expecting a bit more than just dry politics. There are parts that are not consecutive and mixing between times (eg. going back to same event multiple times in the book).

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    This book was written in German and I would like to say I read that version, but I didn't, as it has been translated into English. The authorised biography of the German Chancellor and de facto leader of the free world... perhaps. I say perhaps because one of the things that comes over clearly in this excellent and in depth biography is that Merkel herself is an anglophile and always looked to the UK and America for leadership. That this has changed is no doubt a matter of profound regret to Merk This book was written in German and I would like to say I read that version, but I didn't, as it has been translated into English. The authorised biography of the German Chancellor and de facto leader of the free world... perhaps. I say perhaps because one of the things that comes over clearly in this excellent and in depth biography is that Merkel herself is an anglophile and always looked to the UK and America for leadership. That this has changed is no doubt a matter of profound regret to Merkel, although this book was written before Britain abdicated its position of leadership in Europe and America turned inwards. This is billed as an authorised biography but Kornelius does not stop short of pulling up Merkel on mistakes and missteps she made. He also sometimes presents an image of a leader who was not decisive enough and pulled along by events - although that would surely be true of any leader. We do, however, learn a lot of the East German scientist, and how she came to dominate German politics. We also find out about people she did not get on with. That she had no time for Silvio Berlusconi should be no surprise. The man was the paradigm that Trump copied, after all. Still it was interesting to read how she felt about him on several occasions, put bluntly and clearly. Ultimately this portrait is of a leader who is not perfect, and not without controversies, but ultimately is the kind of politician you would wish every country had. Not because we would all agree with all her politics, but because she has strong beliefs, understands the importance of an evidence base, of consensus, of honesty and compassion in politics. These are things that are sorely missing in many places right now.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Allan

    A sympathetically written biography with little really critical analysis of Angela Merkel's policies, decisions and general approach. I enjoyed reading about her early life and influences and her meteoric rise in German politics at the time of unification. I found some of the detail of the German political scene a bit dense to get through as an English reader with little knowledge of the issues and characters involved. The chapter purporting to be about her beliefs was tantalising in not really A sympathetically written biography with little really critical analysis of Angela Merkel's policies, decisions and general approach. I enjoyed reading about her early life and influences and her meteoric rise in German politics at the time of unification. I found some of the detail of the German political scene a bit dense to get through as an English reader with little knowledge of the issues and characters involved. The chapter purporting to be about her beliefs was tantalising in not really offering a great deal apart from the fact that she values discretion highly (and by definition has not given a lot of airplay to her core convictions!). I found the chapter on Israel particularly fascinating with an insight into a special connection between her and Israel and suggested reasons for this- something that I hadn't appreciated until reading this book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rani

    An intersting insight into one of the most powerful woman in the world. Like any biography of a politician (or any text really) one has to be cautious while reading this. You don't want to take one man's analysis of a public figure as gospel. Still, Stefan Kornelius is not under the impression that Angela Merkel is perfect and he spends some time acknowledging her poor decisions as well as her strong ones. He is admiring but not fawning. The biography isn't liner and can jump around in time a lot An intersting insight into one of the most powerful woman in the world. Like any biography of a politician (or any text really) one has to be cautious while reading this. You don't want to take one man's analysis of a public figure as gospel. Still, Stefan Kornelius is not under the impression that Angela Merkel is perfect and he spends some time acknowledging her poor decisions as well as her strong ones. He is admiring but not fawning. The biography isn't liner and can jump around in time a lot, which can be a bit jarring. You can see why Kornelius chose to write it the way he did though, especially in chapter that focus on a particular theme like Israel or Russia. On the whole I thought it was really informative and I learned a lot about Merkel and Germany that I didn't know before.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Fajar Prasetya

    Market's ideology on no linear progression is still resonating in my head. She might be right that politics is a zero-sum game, where an accumulation of positives and negatives, a constant stringing-together of success and failure. Market's ideology on no linear progression is still resonating in my head. She might be right that politics is a zero-sum game, where an accumulation of positives and negatives, a constant stringing-together of success and failure.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    Fascinating biography of one of the most powerful leaders in the world today. Germany is lucky, indeed. Each section introduced me to a broader view and greater understanding of world issues: from America's wars, the EU crisis, the Holocaust, to Germany itself. I found Angela's personal commitment to Israel based on Germany's involvement in the Shoah (her preference for naming the Holocaust - the Hebrew word for great catastrophe) insightful. Fascinating biography of one of the most powerful leaders in the world today. Germany is lucky, indeed. Each section introduced me to a broader view and greater understanding of world issues: from America's wars, the EU crisis, the Holocaust, to Germany itself. I found Angela's personal commitment to Israel based on Germany's involvement in the Shoah (her preference for naming the Holocaust - the Hebrew word for great catastrophe) insightful.

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