counter A Scene in Between: Tripping Through the Fashions of UK Indie Music 1980-1988 - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

A Scene in Between: Tripping Through the Fashions of UK Indie Music 1980-1988

Availability: Ready to download

The mid to late 1980s indie scenes in Britain--from C86 to Shoegaze--are a neglected moment in music history. There's been much coverage of punk, postpunk and the acid-house rave era of the early 90s, but the scene surrounding independent guitar-based music of the mid-80s has been largely overlooked. "A Scene In Between" looks at Britain's fashions, personalities and youth The mid to late 1980s indie scenes in Britain--from C86 to Shoegaze--are a neglected moment in music history. There's been much coverage of punk, postpunk and the acid-house rave era of the early 90s, but the scene surrounding independent guitar-based music of the mid-80s has been largely overlooked. "A Scene In Between" looks at Britain's fashions, personalities and youth cultures from that era. Bands featured include Television Personalities, My Bloody Valentine, The Jesus and Mary Chain, The Smiths, The Pastels, The Vaselines and more obscure bands such as The Shop Assistants, The Flatmates and countless others. Author Sam Knee has reconnected with a vast network of people and resources to unearth literally hundreds of previously unpublished photographs of the bands, fans, clubs and street fashion of the time. Taking a sartorial angle, he looks at anoraks, oversized jumpers, leather trousers, bowl-cut hairdos, blouse shirts, stripey tees and box jackets. Dave Conway of My Bloody Valentine and Douglas Hart of The Jesus and Mary Chain contribute reminiscences.


Compare

The mid to late 1980s indie scenes in Britain--from C86 to Shoegaze--are a neglected moment in music history. There's been much coverage of punk, postpunk and the acid-house rave era of the early 90s, but the scene surrounding independent guitar-based music of the mid-80s has been largely overlooked. "A Scene In Between" looks at Britain's fashions, personalities and youth The mid to late 1980s indie scenes in Britain--from C86 to Shoegaze--are a neglected moment in music history. There's been much coverage of punk, postpunk and the acid-house rave era of the early 90s, but the scene surrounding independent guitar-based music of the mid-80s has been largely overlooked. "A Scene In Between" looks at Britain's fashions, personalities and youth cultures from that era. Bands featured include Television Personalities, My Bloody Valentine, The Jesus and Mary Chain, The Smiths, The Pastels, The Vaselines and more obscure bands such as The Shop Assistants, The Flatmates and countless others. Author Sam Knee has reconnected with a vast network of people and resources to unearth literally hundreds of previously unpublished photographs of the bands, fans, clubs and street fashion of the time. Taking a sartorial angle, he looks at anoraks, oversized jumpers, leather trousers, bowl-cut hairdos, blouse shirts, stripey tees and box jackets. Dave Conway of My Bloody Valentine and Douglas Hart of The Jesus and Mary Chain contribute reminiscences.

30 review for A Scene in Between: Tripping Through the Fashions of UK Indie Music 1980-1988

  1. 4 out of 5

    Martyn

    In the summer of 1984 I worked my one and only year in a busy fish and chip shop on the Esplanade of an English seaside town. One day I walked into the kitchen and heard a song playing on the radio that stopped me dead. Unusually for me, being a criminally shy and hopeless 14 year old, I asked "What is that song?" The guy who owned the cassette said "Reel Around the Fountain" and the rest of my cultural life fell immediately into place. I don't doubt that I would have discovered The Smiths by oth In the summer of 1984 I worked my one and only year in a busy fish and chip shop on the Esplanade of an English seaside town. One day I walked into the kitchen and heard a song playing on the radio that stopped me dead. Unusually for me, being a criminally shy and hopeless 14 year old, I asked "What is that song?" The guy who owned the cassette said "Reel Around the Fountain" and the rest of my cultural life fell immediately into place. I don't doubt that I would have discovered The Smiths by other means had I not worked in that restaurant at that time, but it would have been much later and far messier. And when I think what that one question led to in terms of my outlook on music, literature, politics and the arts...well let's just say that I picked a good time to open my mouth for once. This book let me dive right back to the start again and visualize my teen years in an extremely direct way - this book is essentially my formative years on paper. My only regret is that the first band I was in, the one where I played guitar and wrote the music while my friend, who understood everything because we both loved the same music, wrote the lyrics and sang, did not last. Maybe we could have been in this book? Maybe. But the ones who are here got me through that time and are still favorites now.

  2. 5 out of 5

    David

    One question: where are 'the kids'? So, this is a book that purports to be about the [anti]fashions of UK indie music of the 1980s; in actual fact, it's a scrap-book of photographs of a handful of the author's favourite bands. The fans - the indie kids themselves - are completely absent. True, I suppose there was very little distance between the '80s indie band and its audience, so what's the diff, you might say; but to ignore the youth tribe in a book supposedly about their style feels like a g One question: where are 'the kids'? So, this is a book that purports to be about the [anti]fashions of UK indie music of the 1980s; in actual fact, it's a scrap-book of photographs of a handful of the author's favourite bands. The fans - the indie kids themselves - are completely absent. True, I suppose there was very little distance between the '80s indie band and its audience, so what's the diff, you might say; but to ignore the youth tribe in a book supposedly about their style feels like a great missed opportunity to me. The most fascinating parts of Morrissey's "Hulmerist" film now are the lengthy shots of the fans - all those mini-Mozzers - congregating around the venue before his debut solo gig in 1988, with their 1988 haircuts and Doc Martens and everything. What this book needed was some of that. '88 happens to be the year that author Sam Knee sniffily cuts off the time-frame for A Scene In Between, due to his disdain of the "ghastly" advent of the dance-inflected Madchester. Like all scene gatekeepers, he keeps a tight check on who is deemed worthy of examination, and, by-and-large, only the jangliest and 'shambling' of the C-86-ish guitar bands make the cut. So, The Pastels, The Vaselines, Orange Juice, The Shop Assistants, and so on, are all here, captured in hazy snapshots and posed band photos; glowering sullenly from under thick fringes of hair or moodily staring off into space. Of course no-one is smiling. There are a few short, though not especially insightful selection of interviews and captions and bits of text. Mainly, though, it's just the photographs. Fittingly, these are often barely above photocopied fanzine level, which makes admiring the bands' cool threads a little difficult at times. Fortunately there are a enough good pics not to make the book a complete bust (all the ones featuring The Pastels, Strawberry Switchblade, Talulah Gosh, and The Jesus and Mary Chain are worth a look), and someone unearthed a few previously unseen ones of The Smiths, which provided the book with a decent scoop (they're all over the Internet now though - check yr Tumblr feed.) Sam Knee of course repeats the canard that the charity-shop chic of 1980s indie was a reaction to the flashy clobber of the New Romantics and the severely shoulder-padded Thatcherites. That he also wants to celebrate this scruffy look in this glossy coffee table book is quite funny and also oddly touching. The core look for girls, it seems, echoed a kind of kitchen-sink drama/Rita Tushingham/Cathy McGowan 1960s; for boys it was basically Hamburg or Rubber Soul era Beatles, with leather jackets for those who wanted to try and dilute their inherent nerdiness, or anoraks for those who decided, fuck it, I'll embrace it and try and make a virtue of it. Later on in the decade, and post Psychocandy, a Velvet Underground darkness falls over the scene just as the music becomes more intense. It's this section, towards the end of the book, when the likes of Loop, My Bloody Valentine, and Spacemen 3 show up, that things get a bit more interesting. Maybe that's my own personal nostalgic fondness for the end of the decade talking, but I do find it a shame that Sam Knee closes the book here. If I had anything about me I would compile a further volume myself, covering the bands - and the fans! - of 1988-1993 (stopping short of the ghastly Britpop years, obviously).

  3. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    Cool book recounting British C86 like pop from 1981-1988. Sam Knee includes great photos and interviews from band members as well.

  4. 5 out of 5

    K.

    So many leather trousers! Orange Juice with their guitars round their sternums The hair of Debsey from Dolly Mixture The hair of Bobby Gillespie Morrissey has atrocious handwriting

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris Browning

    A little too interested in the clothes and styles of the eighties indie bands and their noisier proto shoegaze friends at the end of the decade to fully resonate with me but a fascinating snapshot of a scene I still find endlessly interesting. I’d like a book on the more mundane bands and fans as a comparison, but it’s still a vital and hugely enjoyable book

  6. 5 out of 5

    emma

    i literally cannot express how excited this book made me ***wow***. 80's*, indie, bands, THE FASHION. like wow. read it today. was slightly disappointed, mostly bc i expected the text to be on fashion. so this is what it was::: :the little text there is, is always on the band/music, (which was actually cool, fleshing out my music education...) UNLESS :it's one of the couple interviews with a band member, in which case there is a bit about the clothes :to get the fashion side, you have to look at the p i literally cannot express how excited this book made me ***wow***. 80's*, indie, bands, THE FASHION. like wow. read it today. was slightly disappointed, mostly bc i expected the text to be on fashion. so this is what it was::: :the little text there is, is always on the band/music, (which was actually cool, fleshing out my music education...) UNLESS :it's one of the couple interviews with a band member, in which case there is a bit about the clothes :to get the fashion side, you have to look at the pictures. and maybe take notes on what you observe and like. the photos ARE the BOOK. and the photos are so fun. love them. i am even more expired by 80s* fashion now than i was before. (and like really i am. my mom regularly says that her teenage (in the 80s) self would be so jealous of my wardrobe. hip hip hurray) *i realize that when you hear '80's' you are probably thinking about a huge buttload of UGLY. when i think 80's, i think Denise Huxtable and big sweaters and skinny jeans and combat boots. a huge buttload of cool. which this book is more geared towards.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Gary Fowles

    It'll only take you a couple of hours to read, but you'll spend way more time than that pouring over the (largely) unpublished photographs of various indie 'stars' and never weres. With a bias towards the floppy fringed, annorak wearing, '60s throwback children of the British '80s Indie scene, you'll be disappointed if you were expecting any pictures of Goths, Psychobillys etc. But by staying focussed and true to itself the book works a treat. The Smiths, Mary Chain, MBV and Pastels pictures in It'll only take you a couple of hours to read, but you'll spend way more time than that pouring over the (largely) unpublished photographs of various indie 'stars' and never weres. With a bias towards the floppy fringed, annorak wearing, '60s throwback children of the British '80s Indie scene, you'll be disappointed if you were expecting any pictures of Goths, Psychobillys etc. But by staying focussed and true to itself the book works a treat. The Smiths, Mary Chain, MBV and Pastels pictures in particular are a scream. I'd love to see a volume two taking in the period '89-'94, since that's when I was drinking snakebite and watching bands in sticky-floored venues. One can but dream.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    A Scene in Between is fantastic, a real trip down memory lane. I'm an American who moved to England in 1985 when I was 20. As an Anglophile I would try to cop the looks of bands I'd see in NME and Melody Maker but when I moved to England I took my obsession to a whole new level, fully immersing myself into the scene. I can't tell you how many fashions and haircuts I ripped off from kids and bands like the ones portrayed in Knee's book. To this day I still rock Chelsea books and skinny jeans and A Scene in Between is fantastic, a real trip down memory lane. I'm an American who moved to England in 1985 when I was 20. As an Anglophile I would try to cop the looks of bands I'd see in NME and Melody Maker but when I moved to England I took my obsession to a whole new level, fully immersing myself into the scene. I can't tell you how many fashions and haircuts I ripped off from kids and bands like the ones portrayed in Knee's book. To this day I still rock Chelsea books and skinny jeans and my favorite bands remain the Jesus and Mary Chain, Primal Scream, Loop, Spacemen 3 etc.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Umi

    Many thank yous to Stevie who made me aware of this volume and to Dominic who remembered me pointing it out to him at Rough Trade East one day and kindly bestowed it upon me on the day of my birth this year. Up there with other forever fave Forming: The Early Days of LA Punk for perennial source of inspiration and just being such a well assembled little book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    P

    "Mode over music" pretty much sums up this superficial coffeetabler. Morrissey and Bobby Gillespie, as always, steal the sartorial show, while Stephen Pastel in his goddamn anorak twee-grins himself into complete wankery. Besides, I always quite liked the subsequent Madchester baggy-era look (and, you know, music). Can't listen to your C86 cassette forever, man.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Simply super.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marcy

    Drooling. Falling in love w/someone on every page.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Schulman

    porn for wimmen

  14. 4 out of 5

    Giovanni Bello

  15. 4 out of 5

    Thera

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rob Lee

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tim

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ingrid Kohtla

  20. 5 out of 5

    Babalon

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jess

  22. 4 out of 5

    Emma O’Donnell

  23. 5 out of 5

    cjs

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ramona Ezra

  25. 5 out of 5

    Niklas Pivic

  26. 4 out of 5

    Darlene

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Langley

  28. 5 out of 5

    Emma

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Kozak

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.