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The Greek Myths: (Classics Deluxe Edition)

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The gold standard in Greek mythology, in a dazzling Graphic Deluxe Edition with a new introduction by the bestselling author of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series From the creation of the world out of Chaos and the birth of the Olympians to the Trojan War and Odysseus's return, Robert Graves's superb retelling of the Greek myths has long been acclaimed as the defini The gold standard in Greek mythology, in a dazzling Graphic Deluxe Edition with a new introduction by the bestselling author of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series From the creation of the world out of Chaos and the birth of the Olympians to the Trojan War and Odysseus's return, Robert Graves's superb retelling of the Greek myths has long been acclaimed as the definitive edition. Graves draws on sources scattered throughout ancient literature, using a novelist's skill to weave a crisp, coherent narrative of each myth and providing commentaries with cross-references, interpretations, and explanations based on solid scholarship. The result is a classic volume of many of the greatest stories ever told—stories of the gods, heroes, and extraordinary events that inspired Homer, the Greek tragedians, and so much of subsequent European literature.


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The gold standard in Greek mythology, in a dazzling Graphic Deluxe Edition with a new introduction by the bestselling author of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series From the creation of the world out of Chaos and the birth of the Olympians to the Trojan War and Odysseus's return, Robert Graves's superb retelling of the Greek myths has long been acclaimed as the defini The gold standard in Greek mythology, in a dazzling Graphic Deluxe Edition with a new introduction by the bestselling author of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series From the creation of the world out of Chaos and the birth of the Olympians to the Trojan War and Odysseus's return, Robert Graves's superb retelling of the Greek myths has long been acclaimed as the definitive edition. Graves draws on sources scattered throughout ancient literature, using a novelist's skill to weave a crisp, coherent narrative of each myth and providing commentaries with cross-references, interpretations, and explanations based on solid scholarship. The result is a classic volume of many of the greatest stories ever told—stories of the gods, heroes, and extraordinary events that inspired Homer, the Greek tragedians, and so much of subsequent European literature.

30 review for The Greek Myths: (Classics Deluxe Edition)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    The Greek Myths, Robert Graves The Greek Myths (1955) is a mythography, a compendium of Greek mythology, with comments and analyses, by the poet and writer Robert Graves, normally published in two volumes, though there are abridged editions that present the myths only. Each myth is presented in the voice of a narrator writing under the Antonines, such as Plutarch or Pausanias, with citations of the classical sources. The literary quality of these retelling's is generally praised. Myth, from a phen The Greek Myths, Robert Graves The Greek Myths (1955) is a mythography, a compendium of Greek mythology, with comments and analyses, by the poet and writer Robert Graves, normally published in two volumes, though there are abridged editions that present the myths only. Each myth is presented in the voice of a narrator writing under the Antonines, such as Plutarch or Pausanias, with citations of the classical sources. The literary quality of these retelling's is generally praised. Myth, from a phenomenological point of view, narrates the creation, emergence, and history of the ancient gods, the worldview, and the destiny of nations, and nations. The myth of Minoan history, and the cosmic sacred, and the very mysterious, and the living truth, which took place in the beginning, and since then, has placed the world and the destiny of human beings under its wing and full of influence. Myth has eternal characters, which appear as primitive patterns, and are timeless, and sometimes impossible and borderline. Mythological narrations, therefore, do not fit into the word, but express themselves in the works of "painting, and image", "song, and music", "mirrors, and beliefs". Every myth contains a narrative of a creation. Which expresses the root of that creation. And narrates the order of "natural phenomena" and "cosmic forces". The book of essays is selected from "Myths of the World", which has been compiled and written by famous mythologists. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز هفتم ماه 2015میلادی عنوان: جهان اسطوره ها؛ نویسنده: رابرت گریوز و دیگران؛ مترجم: ابوالقاسم اسماعیل پور؛ تهران، جامی؛ 1393؛ در 720ص، مصور؛ واژه نامه دارد، شابک 9786001761119؛ موضوع: اساطیر یونانی - سده 20م اسطوره، در دیدگاه پدیدارشناسی، روایتگر آفرینش، پیدایش، و سرگذشت خدایان باستان، جهان‌ بینی، و فرجام شناسی اقوام، و ملتهاست؛ اسطوره تاریخ مینوی، و مقدس کیهانی، و بسیار راز آمیز، و حقیقتیست زنده، که در دوران آغازین رخ داده، و از آن پس، جهان و سرنوشت آدمیان را، زیر بال و پر تأثیر خویش، قرار داده است؛ اسطوره، شخصیت‌هایی ازلی دارد، که به‌ صورت الگوهایی آغازین، جلوه گر می‌شوند، و بی‌زمان، و گاه بی‌مکان و کرانه هستند؛ از این‌روی روایات اساطیری، در کلام نمی‌گنجند، بلکه خود را در آثار «نقاشی، و تصویری»، «آهنگ، و موسیقی»، «آیین‌ها، و باورها»، به نمایش می‌گذارند؛ هر اسطوره، دربر دارنده‌ ی روایت از یک آفرینش است؛ که به بیان ریشه ی آن آفرینش می‌پردازد؛ و روایتگر نظم «پدیده‌ های طبیعت»، و «نیروهای کیهانی» است؛ کتاب جستارهایی، برگزیده از «اساطیر جهان» است، که توسط اسطوره‌ شناسان نامدار، گردآوری و تالیف گردیده است تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 23/07/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lynne King

    The Folio Society published this rather splendid two volume book of The Greek Myths by Robert Graves in 1996. I purchased it then but I basically only looked at it from time to time when I wanted to know about certain myths or gods, and thus there was always something that I could look up which would give me pleasure. This is not a book for the faint-hearted as, well to me anyway, it is an excellent reference book that I will pick up from time to time and browse through it or look for further inf The Folio Society published this rather splendid two volume book of The Greek Myths by Robert Graves in 1996. I purchased it then but I basically only looked at it from time to time when I wanted to know about certain myths or gods, and thus there was always something that I could look up which would give me pleasure. This is not a book for the faint-hearted as, well to me anyway, it is an excellent reference book that I will pick up from time to time and browse through it or look for further information. I don’t think that I could actually have sat down and read this from cover to cover as there is too much factual information and some of the names can be quite confusing. Also there were certain facts that I had in my head that I certainly proved to be wrong here. Little things I know but I always thought that it was Pandora’s box and not the jar and I had never even heard of The Sprites until I arrived at this part of the book. Also the Minotaur, well my own interpretation of that was completely wrong. But when you think about the Greek Myths, it wasn’t until I went through this introduction that I found out the following: The Romans, who annexed Greece in the second century BC, modified the Olympian religion to include their own local gods and practices, but otherwise simply took Greek stories over lock, stock and barrel. Sometimes names were changed (as when Aphrodite became Venus or Odysseus Ulysses); sometimes they were actually spelled differently (as when Asclepius became Aesculapius); sometimes no changes at all were made, so that stories with a particular Green location (such as the spring of Hippocrene near Thebes, created when the winged horse Pegasus stamped his hoof on a rock) were accepted quite happily by people who had never otherwise heard of, or seen, the originals.” So really all one can do about this rather complicated book as I’ve done is to concentrate on for example, Pandora, as she fascinates me, to begin with and find out who she’s related to (which in itself is like being on an odyssey) and working out from there as if I were a spider on the web awaiting my next “kill”. The Greek God Hermes (Mercury to the Romans and the son of Zeus), I have a particular fondness for. Many years ago I was in a garden centre in England and I saw this lovely little bronze statue of Mercury. I paid a lot more for it than I should have done but I knew that a pay cheque was around the corner and now it sits in my lounge. Perhaps it should be in the garden but I like to be reminded of it. So Mercury, sorry Hermes, I stand corrected. Strange really but Hermes is one of my favourite perfumes. My only fault with this book lies with the two volumes, the index is at the end of the second one which is fair enough but it is still annoying when searching for an individual and then finding that it spans the two books. This is a delightful book and will give me pleasure for many years. So try it, if you haven’t already. You may like it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    This is one of the gems I discovered, and purchased for a pittance, during my professional college days (1980-85). The old "Current Books" bookshop was an institution in Thrissur. It was located in a very old building, with rows and rows of shelves and books arranged in no particular order. There were rooms leading to rooms leading to rooms, dark and musty rooms filled with the wonderful smell of old books. An ideal place to spend a Saturday afternoon, digging through the piles and piles of jumbl This is one of the gems I discovered, and purchased for a pittance, during my professional college days (1980-85). The old "Current Books" bookshop was an institution in Thrissur. It was located in a very old building, with rows and rows of shelves and books arranged in no particular order. There were rooms leading to rooms leading to rooms, dark and musty rooms filled with the wonderful smell of old books. An ideal place to spend a Saturday afternoon, digging through the piles and piles of jumbled books, your mouth going dry with excitement when a treasure suddenly pops up. Ah, halcyon days. (Sadly, the shop is no more. The corporation demolished it - rightly - because it was unsafe. They now have an air-conditioned store where the books are arranged alphabetically in neat rows, and you can enquire for a particular tome and it will pop up on the computer. All the luxuries of modernity, but it does not work for me; no sirree.) One of the saddest pictures in the world - a favourite bookshop in the process of getting demolished. This was such an opportune find. I did not know who the hell Robert Graves was at the time - I was captivated by the covers of the Penguin India edition (it was in two volumes), and I was nuts over mythology, so I immediately bought it. It opened a whole new vista for me. Graves analyses mythology in strict historical context. No psychological or philosophical musings here. But his depth and breadth of coverage are fantastic. Each short chapter first presents the story, then analyses it in detail through notes, with secondary references provided wherever required. It is a book to savour at leisure, and justifies multiple readings if you want to get the maximum out of it. I would recommend it to any fan of mythology.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lee Broderick

    My edition came with an introduction by Kenneth McLeish which mentioned the importance of this book in re-establishing the Greek myths as suitable reading for adults. It also went on to highlight Robert Graves's extensive reading but McLeish was forced to acknowledge some weaknesses in Graves's scholarship. The legends themselves are very dry, descriptive accounts redolent of an essay on the story at hand rather than a retelling. It's clear that the author carried out very thorough reading on the My edition came with an introduction by Kenneth McLeish which mentioned the importance of this book in re-establishing the Greek myths as suitable reading for adults. It also went on to highlight Robert Graves's extensive reading but McLeish was forced to acknowledge some weaknesses in Graves's scholarship. The legends themselves are very dry, descriptive accounts redolent of an essay on the story at hand rather than a retelling. It's clear that the author carried out very thorough reading on the subject but was too determined to fit in every alternative version when sketching the tales (and he does sketch them - the characters never come to life and the stories are mere accounts); 'according to some' and 'others say' are phrases which occur frequently throughout the book and sometimes even lists of alternative names are provided in this manner. Such details have their place - in the footnotes where the interested reader can find them if they wish. The footnotes themselves are of perhaps greater concern. Graves may have read widely but probably selectively and certainly not critically. He was clearly greatly influenced by Margaret Alice Murray and her theories on religion. Even at the time, Murray's work was widely criticised by other academics and little has changed in that regard since - if anything the academy has become more entrenched in its criticisms of her. Although Graves makes use of folkloric, ethnographic, historic and archaeological sources in interpreting the myths they all appear to have already been out of date in the 1950's (when he wrote this book) and, worse, the sources themselves are not referenced. Since Graves was happy to present his own ideas in the footnotes as well and all the supporting evidence and theories he uses are not referenced it's impossible to sort his own fancies from others'. It's also notable that all of the sources he does present conform to his own ideas - a further sign of his writing to an agenda (Murray influenced or not).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Emer (A Little Haze)

    When this edition says it's the complete and definitive edition of the Greek Myths it truly means it!! Well worth the hefty price tag and a book I will be consulting over and over and over again. When this edition says it's the complete and definitive edition of the Greek Myths it truly means it!! Well worth the hefty price tag and a book I will be consulting over and over and over again.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lucy Langford

    This was a great overview of Greek myth- it delves quickly into the gods and the heroes, as well as some other characters. As this is an overview it does not include ALL Greek myth, but the main ones that are quite popular. My only issue was that this book really delves into family lines but didn’t have family tree diagrams to accompany this, leaving me sometimes confused as to who is who/ how someone is related. This was interesting as I learned some new things and was able to make some connecti This was a great overview of Greek myth- it delves quickly into the gods and the heroes, as well as some other characters. As this is an overview it does not include ALL Greek myth, but the main ones that are quite popular. My only issue was that this book really delves into family lines but didn’t have family tree diagrams to accompany this, leaving me sometimes confused as to who is who/ how someone is related. This was interesting as I learned some new things and was able to make some connections between the family lines, or names I had heard from other retellings of the myth- I loved discovering something new! In all my years living near London/going into London, I have never visited the British Museum- this edition contained photos of relics from Ancient Greece depicting these myths and stories, available to be seen at the museum. I must go at some point !! (Once COVID and lockdown eases in the UK ... 🌝 ).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    3.5 Stars - Great book This book is great for someone who's interested in Greek myths, as the title may imply (or scream). This book is not a commentary on or a history of the myths. It is simply the myths, wonderfully organized and beautifully told. As someone who loves order, the organization of this book is a dream. Graves divided the book into seven sections and within those sections he titles every myth. This is all laid out in the table of contents. Only want to read about Io? Or The Vengea 3.5 Stars - Great book This book is great for someone who's interested in Greek myths, as the title may imply (or scream). This book is not a commentary on or a history of the myths. It is simply the myths, wonderfully organized and beautifully told. As someone who loves order, the organization of this book is a dream. Graves divided the book into seven sections and within those sections he titles every myth. This is all laid out in the table of contents. Only want to read about Io? Or The Vengeance of Orestes? No problem, just find it in the contents and and get reading. This also means that you can pick and choose what you want to read without having to flip through the whole book - ideal for people only interested in certain characters/myths. One of my favorite sections is the very first one, which Graves calls In the Beginning. As the name implies, this section deals with the creation of the universe and the big, or main, gods and goddesses. I found it interesting to think about and compare the few different creation myths. Graves includes the Pelasgian, Homeric and Orphic, and Olympian creation myths. My personal favorite is Homeric and Orphic myth in large part because of the character of Night. The character is so beautifully written that I wanted a whole story about her! I also want to note that I will always love the story of the birth of Aphrodite. It's pretty hard not to picture Botticelli's The Birth of Venus (most consider Venus the Roman equivalent to Aphrodite). Be warned, there is a whole lot of incest going on (view spoiler)[and rape (hide spoiler)] . It's weird and it will never not be weird. One of the biggest surprises I found while reading was the story Deucalion's Flood. In short, it's Noah's Ark before there was Noah's Ark. Makes you wonder how original that bible story is. One last comment, I found it interesting to think about whether or not these myths influenced morality - or at least tried to influence it. Certain stories seemed to be pushing a certain point of view (as many stories do) on the reader. Just some food for thought. I will say that some of the myths, in my opinion, are rather dull. However it helps that the myths are short. I think the longest one was about 5 pages long, so it makes for a quick read nonetheless. Do I recommend? Yes. I think most people can find some part of this book that they'd enjoy.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jak

    There are several pros and cons to this book. Pros: It’s very comprehensive in that it covers just about all the Greek mythology. Cons: It’s very focused towards the academic. Each myth is told a break neck speed with a bare bones of story followed by a list or sources and then a list of how the myth came to be with interpretations of historical events/persons basically and entomology. This would be an invaluable tool to an academic but as some one who only wanted to read and enjoy the stories I There are several pros and cons to this book. Pros: It’s very comprehensive in that it covers just about all the Greek mythology. Cons: It’s very focused towards the academic. Each myth is told a break neck speed with a bare bones of story followed by a list or sources and then a list of how the myth came to be with interpretations of historical events/persons basically and entomology. This would be an invaluable tool to an academic but as some one who only wanted to read and enjoy the stories I skipped all that and consequently probably only read half the near 750 pages. Also, in order to be academic each character is given their lineage which in a cast of thousands becomes tiresome. Also each possible source is given a brief mention which becomes again, tiresome. For example Graves might write a couple of paragraphs describing how a character murdered a king with a spear, married his wife and begat several children. He then has a paragraph where he adds “others say”, or “it’s said elsewhere” that it was in fact the named character that killed the king or if he did it was with a bow and arrow, or that it was the kings wife who killed him and then killed the named character and was then turned into an olive tree as punishment by the Gods. Graves should be confident enough in his research/translations to just present the story as he believes it unfolded. All in all I wish the stories could have been more entertainingly told with some effort towards dialogue etc but that would mean the book would probably be 3000+ pages! As I said previously with this being aimed at the academic I guess it’s not quite the book for those who just want to enjoy the highly entertaining stories that mythology represents.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Helena of Eretz ✰

    This is quite honestly the BEST Greek myths compendium ever written. It's always been my favourite, and it always shall be. :) This is quite honestly the BEST Greek myths compendium ever written. It's always been my favourite, and it always shall be. :)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    This is a reference book more than a short story collection. If you want entertainment, look elsewhere. If you want research and philosophy on the myths this book might be up your ally. Graves writing is good, but very dry. NOTE: This is not a comic book nor is this for kids. Yes the guy who wrote Percy Jackson did the introduction, but this is way above that reading level. This book would be perfect for a college class since he doesn't cut out the adult situations and he compares this with other This is a reference book more than a short story collection. If you want entertainment, look elsewhere. If you want research and philosophy on the myths this book might be up your ally. Graves writing is good, but very dry. NOTE: This is not a comic book nor is this for kids. Yes the guy who wrote Percy Jackson did the introduction, but this is way above that reading level. This book would be perfect for a college class since he doesn't cut out the adult situations and he compares this with other myths and gives some historical background and sites everything.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    Robert Graves “The Greek Myths” is a wonderful resource for learning about the myths of ancient Greece. Originally published in 1955, it was updated for the last time in 1960. There are two volumes, but they are often available in a single book, which makes it easier for the reader to handle. Graves does a wonderful job of making the myths easy to read and understand, and discusses the variations which often occurred in the myths. His interpretation of the myths is a bit subjective, so the reade Robert Graves “The Greek Myths” is a wonderful resource for learning about the myths of ancient Greece. Originally published in 1955, it was updated for the last time in 1960. There are two volumes, but they are often available in a single book, which makes it easier for the reader to handle. Graves does a wonderful job of making the myths easy to read and understand, and discusses the variations which often occurred in the myths. His interpretation of the myths is a bit subjective, so the reader needs to treat that aspect as such. The volumes can be used in different ways. One of the more useful ways is as a reference for learning about references to Greek Mythology. The table of contents provides 171 different myth titles to choose from, but if that doesn’t help you find a particular reference, the index at the end of the second volume will help you locate the relevant myths that touch upon a particular name or subject. A second way to use the book is to simply browse until you find a myth that interests you and spend some time reading about it and its variations. Each myth is explained in clear English and divided into paragraphs relating to each of the ancient Greek works which mention the myths. These ancient references are then listed which easily provides the reader the information they need to do further investigation. Lastly, additional notes are included which help to better understand the myths and put them into an historical perspective, though again this is not necessarily factual as much as it is supposition on the part of Graves. Another way to use this book is to simply read it to gain an overall understanding of Greek myths. I would say this book doesn’t work as well in this way as it does in the prior ways. The myths are intentionally split apart to better focus on the individual parts and so it doesn’t flow. In addition, many of the myths have multiple versions and Graves discusses many of these variations which also interfere with treating this book like a story book. In addition the links to references and the material added to better understand the myths which are so useful for treating this as a reference, definitely get in the way of telling the story. All that being said, you can still use the book in this way, it is just not the optimum format and there may be better books out there for this purpose. I have found this book to be very useful over the years. It is very helpful when doing research, but also good for a diversion when one wants to look at one particular myth. Some may not care for Graves personal input on the myths, but I think it is a useful perspective even if one doesn’t agree with his conclusions. Though not perfect, this book still rates five stars in my opinion.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Barrow Wilfong

    Robert Graves is quite thorough in writing about the myths and at the end of each story, he provides foot notes that can be as long as the story itself. Some of the footnotes are speculative. "This god replaced an earlier pagan god etc.". It is difficult to know these things or the origins of any of these stories. But Graves gives his educated guesses and they are worth pondering. In Graves' version the myths are not child friendly and a lot more graphic than I remember Edith Hamilton's version. I Robert Graves is quite thorough in writing about the myths and at the end of each story, he provides foot notes that can be as long as the story itself. Some of the footnotes are speculative. "This god replaced an earlier pagan god etc.". It is difficult to know these things or the origins of any of these stories. But Graves gives his educated guesses and they are worth pondering. In Graves' version the myths are not child friendly and a lot more graphic than I remember Edith Hamilton's version. I have not read Hamilton's version in many years, so I suppose I could be wrong. She also includes stories that Graves leaves out. Graves seems to lean heavily on saga, which I appreciated since I recently read the Iliad and the Odyssey. He also fills in the gaps those two poems leave, letting us know how the Trojan War began and what happened to some of the key players such as Achilles, who is alive in the Iliad, but already dead in the Odyssey. I do not know if Robert Graves has a certain predilection towards the salacious (his books, I, Claudius and Claudius the God were pretty lewd) or if he is simply preserving a faithful translation of the stories. He has been criticized for relying too heavily on Suetonius' histories, who is also known for creating scandals that are not as historically reliable as they should be. Simply put, The Greek Myths Volume One and Two , are filled with violence and perversion. Every single story contains murder and rape. No Greek hero is exempt from practicing treachery, adultery, and, in one instance, necrophilia. Leaving children out for exposure was common. Many of the heroes were spared from an early death by compassionate shepherds, or even female animals who nursed them. Women are treated savagely by men, and especially Zeus who ravaged the countryside without mercy. These women were not only the victims of this heinous crime but they also got to be punished for it by the ever jealous Hera. The female goddesses were not much better than the gods. Both male and female gods' sense of justice was based largely on caprice and selfish ambition. There seemed to be very little reason other than a cruel nature behind any of their actions. Ancient Greece is known for being the intellectual epicenter of the B.C. epoch, but I have to conclude that these myths, as Robert Graves tells them, were formed during a much earlier time when the Greeks were no more than tribal barbarians steeped in pagan practice that by today's standards of morality seem demonic.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.)

    If you plan to read Homer's The Iliad or The Odyssey, or any of the great plays of the Greek classicists, I have a suggestion for a book that will prove to be indispensable to you on your journey through these great works of literature. Robert Graves (1895-1985), the British poet, translator and novelist, produced some 140 works. He is probably best known for his novel, I Claudius, and his historical study of poetic inspiration, The White Goddess. In the late-1950s, he also completed a two-volum If you plan to read Homer's The Iliad or The Odyssey, or any of the great plays of the Greek classicists, I have a suggestion for a book that will prove to be indispensable to you on your journey through these great works of literature. Robert Graves (1895-1985), the British poet, translator and novelist, produced some 140 works. He is probably best known for his novel, I Claudius, and his historical study of poetic inspiration, The White Goddess. In the late-1950s, he also completed a two-volume compilation and analysis of Greek mythology. In this posting, I am reviewing the 1992 Penguin soft-cover edition entitled, The Greek Myths--Complete Edition. It is encyclopedic in content, organization and structure, as well as size as it is nearly 800 pages in length. It is my humble opinion that this really may be the very best desk reference on Greek mythology that is available. I did quite a lot of research, on-line and in the bookstores, before I made the decision to buy a copy of Graves' book, and I really couldn't be more satisfied. Graves starts off, rightly so, with the early Pelasgian creation myths that tell the stories of the creation of the Universe, the Titans, Titanesses, and the first man, Pelasgus. Graves compares the early Pelasgian creation myths with the later Homeric, Orphic, and Olympian creation myths, and from there the reader is 'off to the races.' Graves takes each myth--from the Creation through Odysseus' homecoming at the end of The Odyssey--and provides a synopsis of all of the variations, includes a comprehensive set of bibliographic citations associated with the source(s) for each myth and its variations, and then follows that up with detailed set of explanatory notes and comments. Frankly, it is just this organizational structure that makes this book priceless, in my opinion. Now, does the book lend itself to sitting down and reading it straight through, cover-to-cover? No, not particularly. I did, but then I wanted to read each myth--all 171 of them--as some of them I wasn't familiar with at all. Having done that though, I can honestly say that I am completely convinced that Graves' organizational scheme in this reference book is nothing short of brilliant. I am also completely comfortable navigating my way around the book, starting from either the table of contents or index, reading the actual myth(s), the source citations, and then exploring Graves' notes and comments. In summation, I'd say that Graves has taken a scholarly approach in his presentation of the myths, documenting sources, and with his explanatory notes and commentary. Having said that though, I also maintain that this is still an enjoyable and eminently readable book, and one that you could pick up and open to any page and start reading and just lose yourself for an hour or two. There's another fascinating aspect of this work that I want to highlight. While Graves, in this volume, has collected and compiled the myths and stories of the ancient Greeks, he is obviously very interested in the genesis and spread of these myths through time and across cultural boundaries. Consequently, Graves spends a lot of time and commentary on an etymological analysis of words (no matter how arcane or archaic) in establishing relationships between, for example, some of the creation myths emanating from Sumer (e.g., the Epic of Gilgamesh), or the variations of similar myths found in Celtic regions of western Europe. This makes sense to me too; as peoples, with their customs, beliefs and ideas, were surely moving about and interacting with one another. Now, whether one buys into all of the notions put forth by Graves in his commentaries, I'll leave that up to each reader to make up his or her mind, but I think he's on to something here--like I said, it just seems to make sense. I think that the myths of ancient Greece are important, and will continue to be. They are some of the foundational building blocks of much of the great literature, art, and music that we all love and appreciate today; and, as such, they are an important part of our cultural and spiritual heritage as human beings. They continue to provide artistic and philosophical inspiration to us in our lives, from the likes of John Keats' great poems Endymion and Lamia, or the Daphnis et Chloe ballet musical score by Maurice Ravel, to graphical renditions of Agamemnon's murder at the hands of his wife Clytemnestra, such as that by the Pre-Raphaelite painter John Collier. Graves' The Greek Myths--Complete Edition will help you make sense of these daily encounters with Greek mythology, and I hope will leave you looking for more. I highly recommend having a copy of Graves' book on your bookshelf, right next to your dictionary, thesaurus, style guides, and poetry anthologies. Its a keeper! As the inveterate bibliophile that I am, I am now on the lookout for a hardbound copy of this wonderful book in two volumes, as it was originally published.

  14. 4 out of 5

    James

    If you are looking for Greek myths where a random person takes a journey to distant lands, finds monsters, travels through mystical lands, saves the girl, is elevated to hero status, has a final fight, and then lives happily ever after – this set is not for you. This two volume set does cover Greek mythology but instead of a story like Homer’s Iliad these are the stories of where the Greek gods and deities came from. Basically, an extremely detailed family tree of the deities and characters from If you are looking for Greek myths where a random person takes a journey to distant lands, finds monsters, travels through mystical lands, saves the girl, is elevated to hero status, has a final fight, and then lives happily ever after – this set is not for you. This two volume set does cover Greek mythology but instead of a story like Homer’s Iliad these are the stories of where the Greek gods and deities came from. Basically, an extremely detailed family tree of the deities and characters from the mythologies, histories and background of the cities and locations, who the Heroes, Gods, and Mortals were, and some details and back story from some of the better known stories. The Folio Society edition is quarter bound in (real?) leather with a Greek inspired graphic on the rest of the covers, inside are maps of the Greek islands and Mediterranean region – a little crowded but still good for helping you to narrow down the places of interest. The first book covers the basics, starting with well written introductions from the Editor and Author as well as a Forward, moving on into the beginnings of Greek mythology – essentially creation mythology, how and where Gods and deities were born, who their parents and children were. Moving on into the various stories of the Gods, who they were and what they did (Nature and Deeds), how they rule the various levels of the world such as the Sky, the Sea, and the Underworld. The second book gets deeper into the actual mythological stories such as Jason and the Argonauts, Heracles, the Trojan War, and Odysseus. It is a very interesting read for those interested in Greek mythology, but again it is closer to a “Who's Who” of mythology and Classical Literature and not the full stories. If you are looking for stories with heroes fighting monsters I would suggest you look elsewhere, however if you are looking a deeper understanding of where the characters you know (and either love or hate) come from and interacted with the world, this is for you. I give it either a high 3 or low 4, a bit closer to an educational book instead of a casual reader, still enjoyable for those with an interest in the subject – however if you only have a casual passing interest in Greek Mythology I would suggest reading Homer instead.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Quiver

    Starting with the Pelgasian creation myth and ending with Odysseus’s homecoming, this compendium covers all the traditional ancient Greek myths and legends over the course of 171 chapters. Each chapter consists of three parts: the first part contains a retelling of a myth (sometimes multiple version thereof) divided into paragraphs that are labelled alphabetically; the second part contains references that appeared as numbered footnotes in the first part; the third part contains Graves’s commenta Starting with the Pelgasian creation myth and ending with Odysseus’s homecoming, this compendium covers all the traditional ancient Greek myths and legends over the course of 171 chapters. Each chapter consists of three parts: the first part contains a retelling of a myth (sometimes multiple version thereof) divided into paragraphs that are labelled alphabetically; the second part contains references that appeared as numbered footnotes in the first part; the third part contains Graves’s commentary, also divided into paragraphs, though labelled numerically. The myths are comprehensive and comprehensible, if at times dense with names. I cannot imagine recommending this to anyone as a first book on the subject; in fact, unless you have an intense interest a priori, I would not recommend taking it up. This is no story book; you may have trouble staying awake. That said, enthusiasts will find it an excellent overview and a window into the less “famous" stories (“Cleobis and Biton" anyone?) and a starting reference point that will lead to other sources (Apollodrus, Herodotus, Pausanias etc.) I set aside the criticism of Graves's commentary, as I am not qualified to assess it. Truth, fiction, or poetic imagination, be that as it may, I did enjoy the various pattern observations: triplets of goddesses, the persistent “king and tanist" motif, symbols of flora and fauna, and so on. I’m no less enamoured by the world of myths after having read this heavy tome. If anything, I’m asking: what’s next?

  16. 4 out of 5

    Flapper72

    This was, by far, the most awful book I have ever tried to read. I am very much, 'I've started so I'll finish' when it comes to reading books. Sometimes books that I've struggled with initially are actually those that I enjoy the most but this was just horrible. I'd hoped that it would be a book that enabled me to access Greek Mythology but it was just far too esoteric I didn't feel I could access anything the book was saying at all. I don't think I'm stupid or ill educated, I enjoy reading and This was, by far, the most awful book I have ever tried to read. I am very much, 'I've started so I'll finish' when it comes to reading books. Sometimes books that I've struggled with initially are actually those that I enjoy the most but this was just horrible. I'd hoped that it would be a book that enabled me to access Greek Mythology but it was just far too esoteric I didn't feel I could access anything the book was saying at all. I don't think I'm stupid or ill educated, I enjoy reading and reading everything, giving anything a try but this was just inaccessible. The writing style was very formal yet not written in the style of a factual text book - rather disparaging of any other scholars' opinions and, 'This is how it is, everything else that is said is silly, I know best'. I decided that life is too short to even bother continuing reading. I have paint to watch dry. If there were less than one star as a rating then this book would most definitely have it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Constanza Gomez

    If you read this is some kind of "fiction book" could be fine. But as a manual to mythology is just awful, there are many inaccuracies (like distorting myths of seduction into sexual rapes). If you want to learn about Greek Mythology this is not the book. I remember reading this some years ago, and after I kept on reading other books and studies I realized how badly taught I was by Graves book. Read it with caution. If you read this is some kind of "fiction book" could be fine. But as a manual to mythology is just awful, there are many inaccuracies (like distorting myths of seduction into sexual rapes). If you want to learn about Greek Mythology this is not the book. I remember reading this some years ago, and after I kept on reading other books and studies I realized how badly taught I was by Graves book. Read it with caution.

  18. 5 out of 5

    ♥Mary♦Sweet♣Dreams♠Are♥Made♦of♣This♠

    Alright I actually like this book a lot because unlike Bulfinch's Mythology, this book delivers what you're looking for. It actually has the Greek Myths in a style that is understandable and for entertainment purposes. You'll get the whole stories here and they are easy to read! Alright I actually like this book a lot because unlike Bulfinch's Mythology, this book delivers what you're looking for. It actually has the Greek Myths in a style that is understandable and for entertainment purposes. You'll get the whole stories here and they are easy to read!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    I'm really surprised this book has such high ratings, because it is completely bonkers. This book is a weird combination of extremely thorough mythology encyclopedia and bizarre conspiracy theories concocted by the author. The myths themselves are great, although they are more like encyclopedia entries than stories. But given the vastness of the Greek mythological corpus, I think that's the only way to do it if you want to squeeze all of the myths into one book. Each chapter is about 50% myth and I'm really surprised this book has such high ratings, because it is completely bonkers. This book is a weird combination of extremely thorough mythology encyclopedia and bizarre conspiracy theories concocted by the author. The myths themselves are great, although they are more like encyclopedia entries than stories. But given the vastness of the Greek mythological corpus, I think that's the only way to do it if you want to squeeze all of the myths into one book. Each chapter is about 50% myth and 50% Robert Graves' analysis of the myth. Robert Graves believes in some really weird things, like that pre-Hellenic Greece was a matriarchal society that believed in a "Mother Goddess" or "Triple Goddess" that was common to all Eastern Mediterranean worship. Most of the rapes of early Greek myth can be explained by the invading Hellenes conquering goddess shrines, according to Graves. Graves also claims that in pre-Hellenic Greece, kings' rules were limited to solar cycles (such as one year, or 'great years' of 4 or 19 years, when the moon and sun are in greater alignment), and rule was divided between a sacred king and a 'tanist' (an earthly king), who were often in competition. And at the end of their reign, the sacred king had to be sacrificed (there was apparently a lot of human sacrifice in pre-Hellenic Greece); eventually, substitutes were found for the king (such as his children). These beliefs actually would account for a lot of the repeating oddities of Greek mythology. For example, why are there so many examples of women laying with a god and with their husband at around the same time and then bearing twins, one divine and one mortal? For example, Heracles and Iphicles, Castor and Polydeuces, and Eteocles and Polyneices are just three of many examples. Graves explains this as being the sacred king and his tanist. Why are there so many examples of people dying by drowning in water? (King Aegeus, father of Theseus, jumping into the Aegean Sea and Icarus falling into the Icarian Sea are two of MANY examples). Of kings being killed by their son with a discus (Perseus is one of several). Of kings being bitten by serpents on the heel (Achilles is one of many)? Why are so many children sacrificed or killed? (Heracles murdering his 6 children by Megara; Agamemnon sacrificing Iphigenia; Cepheus and Cassiopeia sacrificing Andromeda; and about a million other examples). Why are so many kings killed by their sons? (Odysseus by Telegonus, Agamemnon by Orestes, and Laius by Oedipus are just the tip of the iceburg). Graves explains these via his theory that ancient kings were sacrificed at the end of their term (which is why so many sons kill their fathers in Greek myth), or that ancient kings could sacrifice substitutes to extend their terms (which is why so many kings sacrifice their children). Apparently the ancient Greeks loved to sacrifice people by throwing them off of cliffs. He also explains many myths via misreadings of ancient icons (for example, the discus that kills kings is actually a sun-disk representing the length of their term, according to Graves). Why do certain numbers appear so frequently in Greek myth? For example, triads of women - the 3 Fates, the 3 Erinnyes, the 3 Graeae, the triad of Hera, Aphrodite, and Athena coming to Paris; the triad of Core, Demeter, and Persephone; and many, many more surprisingly subtle triads that pop up throughout Greek myth. According to Graves, these are all manifestations of the ancient "Triple Goddess" who appears as Virgin, Nymph, and Crone. Why are there so many sets of 50 siblings? (The Danaids, the Nereids, and the Menae are three examples). Because there were colleges of 50 priestesses, who represented something like the 50 months of a "great year" of a king's term in office... yep. Why are there often sets of 350? (Helios's herd of 350 cattle; Heracles losing 350 men of Cleonae in battle). Because 350 represents the number of days in the Egyptian calendar besides the 5 devoted to the gods (and a year was the length of a king's term in office). Graves has a lot of other intriguing but also totally nuts but kind of plausible theories. Hades, Poseidon, and Zeus represent to him "three successive Hellenic invasions, commonly known as Ionian, Aeolian, and Achaean." "Hera’s forced marriage to Zeus commemorates conquests of Crete and Mycenaean—that is to say Cretanized—Greece, and the overthrow of her supremacy in both countries. He probably came to her disguised as a bedraggled cuckoo, in the sense that certain Hellenes who came to Crete as fugitives accepted employment in the royal guard, made a palace conspiracy and seized the kingdom." "It is plain that the Ionian Pelasgians of Athens were defeated by the Aeolians, and that Athene regained her sovereignty only by alliance with Zeus’s Achaeans, who later made her disown Poseidon’s paternity and admit herself reborn from Zeus’s head." And it goes on and on. I think the book is better than 2 stars, since the myths alone are great. But the weird theories, while interesting, are a waste of time (given that they probably take up like 300 pages of the book at least), and I wish I had known that I would be wasting my time reading so many conspiracy theories before starting this book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Whisper19

    Ok, this took a while. And it was not an easy read, not in the least! If you decide to pick this one up arm yourself with patience, focus and lots of coffee. It is meticuloucly researched, but given in a very dry way... Very much like Frazer's Golden Bough (wich I'm still stuck at around 50% with). But if you just want to check one myth, very good source material. Ok, this took a while. And it was not an easy read, not in the least! If you decide to pick this one up arm yourself with patience, focus and lots of coffee. It is meticuloucly researched, but given in a very dry way... Very much like Frazer's Golden Bough (wich I'm still stuck at around 50% with). But if you just want to check one myth, very good source material.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Denson

    Robert Graves does an excellent job of retelling both the main Greek myths and the more obscure ones. He summarizes variants when applicable as well. Overall, the text of the myths is something that everyone will enjoy. It begins with the creation myths and the ascension of the Olumpians to the labors of Heracles and the Trojan War. Graves' commentary on the myths though has rightly been denounced by scholars. In the words of the editor for this edition, "His comments on the stories, printed at Robert Graves does an excellent job of retelling both the main Greek myths and the more obscure ones. He summarizes variants when applicable as well. Overall, the text of the myths is something that everyone will enjoy. It begins with the creation myths and the ascension of the Olumpians to the labors of Heracles and the Trojan War. Graves' commentary on the myths though has rightly been denounced by scholars. In the words of the editor for this edition, "His comments on the stories, printed at the end of each section, are a magpie's nest of anecdotes, other people's half-digested ideas, bucking-bronco rides on every Gravesian hobby-horse from magic mushrooms to goddess-fixation, and the purest fantasy" (p.19). That said, it's best if you just skip his comments at the end of each myth. At best, the commentary is outdated and, at worst, it is wildly outlandish. The Folio Society edition itself is very nice. It comes in two volumes at about 700 pages in total and hopefully still has the slipcase with it. The illustrations on the cover and throughout the text are a wonderful touch. My only complaint is that they should have left in Graves' original line references to the primary sources. The editor remarks that this was done to clean up the text, which is understandable for casual readers. However, the references are immensely important for scholars. If only that was included, I could say that this is a perfect reference text for being able to find multiple sources of a myth.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Toby

    First a quibble. If the chimaera is a goat with the head of a lion and the body of a snake, what exactly is the goaty bit - the legs? The tail? In which case why not say that it is a snake with the head of a lion and the legs of a goat? The myths themselves are chimeric and confused. Multiple sources create regular confusion as to persons, places and fates. Graves retelling of the myths effectively consists of two books merged together. The first is a readable narration of the myths in the style First a quibble. If the chimaera is a goat with the head of a lion and the body of a snake, what exactly is the goaty bit - the legs? The tail? In which case why not say that it is a snake with the head of a lion and the legs of a goat? The myths themselves are chimeric and confused. Multiple sources create regular confusion as to persons, places and fates. Graves retelling of the myths effectively consists of two books merged together. The first is a readable narration of the myths in the style of a later Greek or Roman historian. As such it is a helpful and at times entertaining compendium of the myths. The second is a dull and po-faced commentary on the myths which essentially boils down to a master myth of a sacred king being killed in various different ways. As such it is an uninteresting mix of The Golden Bough and Casaubon's Key to All Mythologies. Read the myths. Ignore the interpretation.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Regina Lindsey

    Graves has pulled together an exhaustive compilation of Greek myths, arranged by themes, and provides short commentary on their history as well as documentation on where and when they appear. I have been a fan of Robert Graves since reading I, Claudius in college. I also read a range of hisotrical fiction set in ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Often myths of the time period are important elements of the story line. I had a cursory knowledge base of the basic myths. What Graves did for me was c Graves has pulled together an exhaustive compilation of Greek myths, arranged by themes, and provides short commentary on their history as well as documentation on where and when they appear. I have been a fan of Robert Graves since reading I, Claudius in college. I also read a range of hisotrical fiction set in ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome. Often myths of the time period are important elements of the story line. I had a cursory knowledge base of the basic myths. What Graves did for me was connect the dots on when they emerged and why. I'm glad I read this, as I think it will provide an extra layer of understanding in reading future historical fiction work. Graves is just simply a master.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Darwin8u

    See reviews to Part I and Part II. I'll probably get around to combining a full review of the whole Graves/Greek thingy, but I've got other books to hump and other stories to ride. See reviews to Part I and Part II. I'll probably get around to combining a full review of the whole Graves/Greek thingy, but I've got other books to hump and other stories to ride.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    4.5 stars

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ed Smiley

    This book was exhaustive and exhausting in that it goes into tertiary incidents with enormous detail. I admit I did have to skim a bit. It is a great reference, however. I would suggest you not read it cover to cover as I did, but grab an interesting that grabs your attention. It is supplied with copious illustrations of Greek representations of the various mythic persons. Greek myths seem to have total disregard for any ethical guidelines in the behavior of any of the characters, a problem remark This book was exhaustive and exhausting in that it goes into tertiary incidents with enormous detail. I admit I did have to skim a bit. It is a great reference, however. I would suggest you not read it cover to cover as I did, but grab an interesting that grabs your attention. It is supplied with copious illustrations of Greek representations of the various mythic persons. Greek myths seem to have total disregard for any ethical guidelines in the behavior of any of the characters, a problem remarked on frequently by the ancient Greeks themselves. They do have a certain richness of detail and fantasy, and I think most of the emphasis is on how characters solve their problems. So problem solving and ingenuity in unfamiliar situations features frequently. The situations themselves have a gripping psychological reality even when most fanciful, hence Freud and others have mined Greek mythology for psychological metaphors until the sacred bulls come home. A composite Greek myth, would go something like this: it would start by involving Zeus transforming himself into somebody or something or other and impregnating some royal daughter with the complicity of Ares/Athena/etc. The baby would grow up to have an altogether too interesting life, which involves accidental killings, treachery, monsters, trickery, wars, sea voyages, theft, perhaps a patricide or matricide or two, magical transformations of people into animals or folks getting killed in awful ways and turned into gods when the gods feel sorry for what happend, and the creation of multiple cities, mountains, seas and kingdoms, because Hera is really pissed off, and won't rest and let their life proceed normally. At the end, the hero or heroine will either perish miserably, found a race or get transformed into a god and show up in the sky, mostly depending on the mood of the gods and on how well Zeus and Hera are getting along right then, or whether Zeus can trick Hera or vice versa, or which gods side with which, and in many cases involve all three.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Serena

    A very good reference book to all those little details that one can love and hate. Robert Graves writes the myths in a few paragraphs which do more to "telling" then to "showing" the myths. Yet there are things I do not agree with (the mix-and-mash of myths which were once religions unrelated to the Greeks) also I do not quite like his assumptions upon myths and the ancient Greek people themselves. It isn't so clear to me as it seems cut to him; it makes me wonder where he got a lot of those ass A very good reference book to all those little details that one can love and hate. Robert Graves writes the myths in a few paragraphs which do more to "telling" then to "showing" the myths. Yet there are things I do not agree with (the mix-and-mash of myths which were once religions unrelated to the Greeks) also I do not quite like his assumptions upon myths and the ancient Greek people themselves. It isn't so clear to me as it seems cut to him; it makes me wonder where he got a lot of those assumptions from -what facts? He only tells what these are, his theory, he does not show you from what source. (The sources of the myths, yes, not of his "history" behind them). In that way I feel a lot of unanswered questions. A lot of this is book is putting facts behind the myths, where one might confuse what is real with what wasn't. I think this book was once read a lot by authors (Mary Renault/Marion Zimmer Bradley?) and I would be interested to know if they had read this work and based their own setting to Greek "ancient history" upon it. If so, it would go a long way to answering some unasked questions I have. There is also that it is claimed Robert Graves was attached to the early forming of "wicca" (his novel "The White Goddess") so may have shaped his "Greek history" and the "facts behind myths" to those budding beliefs. Yet for a resource book, it's very good, if one ignores what Robert Graves attempts as history to explain myth and ancinet religions.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ensiform

    NB: This is not the original, heavily annotated two-volume work but an illustrated edition, condensed by one John Buchanan-Brown. It is an informative dash through the major Greek myths. The condensation from two thick volumes into one sparse, illustrated book dashes any hope of narrative flow, of course, but the crucial facts are here for the reader. The epic of Heracles and the saga of the house of Atreus (Agamemnon, Orestes) are explored in detail. The myths are also refreshingly not bowdleri NB: This is not the original, heavily annotated two-volume work but an illustrated edition, condensed by one John Buchanan-Brown. It is an informative dash through the major Greek myths. The condensation from two thick volumes into one sparse, illustrated book dashes any hope of narrative flow, of course, but the crucial facts are here for the reader. The epic of Heracles and the saga of the house of Atreus (Agamemnon, Orestes) are explored in detail. The myths are also refreshingly not bowdlerized. However, possibly due to the prose cuts, the reader is given no historical or psychological explanations for the myths (of what significance is Athene’s birth from Zeus’ head? What might be the germ of meaning in the tale of the Golden Fleece?). Certainly due to the cuts, names and events are sometimes dropped with no prior or future explanation given. Also, too often there is no human element, no personality put to what is sometimes a bizarre litany of violent events, such as the Danaids’ mass murder of their husbands. On a more quibbling note, while the contemporary art serves nicely as illustrations to the myths, I wished the age of the art had been given. Still, despite all these flaws, no one had a deeper understanding of the Greek myths than Graves, and at least his erudition shines through.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Urban

    This book is dryer than Agamemnon's sandals. Though thorough, it's a pretty joyless read. Having said that, I find I just don't get along with the Greek Myths as well as I want to. If it was all gods, there'd be that internal (lack of) god logic. Throwing a mountain into the sea and making Sicily etc. etc. It would be daft, but interesting. If it was all mortals and no gods, it'd read like some great sprawling ancient soap opera. A lot of family sagas. And people like family sagas. The mix of gods This book is dryer than Agamemnon's sandals. Though thorough, it's a pretty joyless read. Having said that, I find I just don't get along with the Greek Myths as well as I want to. If it was all gods, there'd be that internal (lack of) god logic. Throwing a mountain into the sea and making Sicily etc. etc. It would be daft, but interesting. If it was all mortals and no gods, it'd read like some great sprawling ancient soap opera. A lot of family sagas. And people like family sagas. The mix of gods and men seems to result in just too much randomness, too many abrupt ends and unsatisfactory narratives. It was all going well for (insert brave mortals here), then Zeus killed em all. Or. It was all going well for (insert lone mortal here), then Zeus turned him into a tree/swan/flower. The abandoned baby (again, take your pick, there are so many) grows up in secret and then kills his dad. Or Zeus does. Or he's turned into a tree. Or another swan. And if you have sex, you make a baby. Every time. Each tale starts so intriguingly, so promisingly and yet ultimately they end, in most cases, as if the Greek god of Editing demanded a quick conclusion.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    an excellent place to go for exploration of the Greek myths. This book has been especially helpful to me since Graves very accurately lists the ancient sources he used for each myth...then there's that little star followed by his own interpretation and comments. If you need to write a paper on the subject it's the book to have. I haven't read it cover to cover, but I think I've gotten to just about every myth via the index an excellent place to go for exploration of the Greek myths. This book has been especially helpful to me since Graves very accurately lists the ancient sources he used for each myth...then there's that little star followed by his own interpretation and comments. If you need to write a paper on the subject it's the book to have. I haven't read it cover to cover, but I think I've gotten to just about every myth via the index

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