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Edgar Rice Burroughs' Tarzan: The Sunday Comics, Volume 1: 1931-1933

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One of comics' greatest artistic achievements gets its due in this deluxe 15" x 20" hardcover collecting the first two years of Tarzan Sunday strips by Hal Foster! Beautifully restored and printed at giant size, this first volume in Dark Horse's comprehensive collection of Foster's Tarzan Sundays reprints over one-hundred strips on high-quality paper and in eye-popping col One of comics' greatest artistic achievements gets its due in this deluxe 15" x 20" hardcover collecting the first two years of Tarzan Sunday strips by Hal Foster! Beautifully restored and printed at giant size, this first volume in Dark Horse's comprehensive collection of Foster's Tarzan Sundays reprints over one-hundred strips on high-quality paper and in eye-popping color, replicating when they first appeared! Includes a historical essay on Tarzan and Foster by comics scholar, Mark Evanier.


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One of comics' greatest artistic achievements gets its due in this deluxe 15" x 20" hardcover collecting the first two years of Tarzan Sunday strips by Hal Foster! Beautifully restored and printed at giant size, this first volume in Dark Horse's comprehensive collection of Foster's Tarzan Sundays reprints over one-hundred strips on high-quality paper and in eye-popping col One of comics' greatest artistic achievements gets its due in this deluxe 15" x 20" hardcover collecting the first two years of Tarzan Sunday strips by Hal Foster! Beautifully restored and printed at giant size, this first volume in Dark Horse's comprehensive collection of Foster's Tarzan Sundays reprints over one-hundred strips on high-quality paper and in eye-popping color, replicating when they first appeared! Includes a historical essay on Tarzan and Foster by comics scholar, Mark Evanier.

34 review for Edgar Rice Burroughs' Tarzan: The Sunday Comics, Volume 1: 1931-1933

  1. 5 out of 5

    ΕιζΝιnΕ, a.k.a. Víðarr Andlát Fenris

    This reprint is a conundrum for both publisher and buyer... As someone who greatly admires the artistry of Hal Foster, I was excited to see that Dark Horse had followed the example of Sunday Press and their acclaimed reprints of classic comics like Winsor McCay's Little Nemo in Slumberland and Frank King's Gasoline Alley, both published in their original, glorious format of 16"W x 21"H. The prospect of seeing Foster's earliest work on the seminal adventure strip Tarzan was justification for the p This reprint is a conundrum for both publisher and buyer... As someone who greatly admires the artistry of Hal Foster, I was excited to see that Dark Horse had followed the example of Sunday Press and their acclaimed reprints of classic comics like Winsor McCay's Little Nemo in Slumberland and Frank King's Gasoline Alley, both published in their original, glorious format of 16"W x 21"H. The prospect of seeing Foster's earliest work on the seminal adventure strip Tarzan was justification for the price (I find Dark Horse's MSRP's to be far more reasonable than DC's or Marvel's, usually), as well as the novelty of adding another uber-sized volume to the top shelf... alongside the Sunday Press books and Kramers Ergot 7. They're not the magnificent and rare things they used to be, but still... Unfortunately, Fosters' draftsmanship at this stage of his career is crude compared with his Prince Valiant Sunday pages, and there-in lies the conundrum. Prince Valiant, perhaps more than any other comicstrip in the medium's short history, deserves the 16" x 21" treatment. The level of detail in Fosters' peak period is something beautiful to behold, rendering medieval castles, armor and weaponry with such a dedication to historical accuracy that, for many youths following Val's exploits, it brought them closer to that vanished past than any movie ever could. Prince Valiant, however, is currently being reprinted by Fantagraphics Books in a smaller format; at 10.25" x 14.25", it is certainly larger than most, and the first 8 volumes released so far have been excellent examples of what a reprint should be. Another important factor is cost; despite their generous over-sized format, Fantagraphics' Prince Valiant hardcovers are very affordable, thus making it easier to purchase each new volume in the series without going bankrupt. Fantagraphics also has a new 'Prince Valiant: Studio Edition' project on the horizon that makes the Dark Horse collections of his Tarzan work superfluous to all but the most dedicated Foster completists: a full-size tabloid facsimile hardcover reprinting a selection of the very best 'Prince Valiant' Sunday pages. Following in the foosteps of IDW's popular 'Artist's Editions', this might be the ultimate fanboy wetdream, reprinting 200 exact facsimile's of Hal Foster's hand-colored original pages... It's scheduled for release just a few short months from now, in February of next year, and I think this is the most important classic comic reprint since that groundbreaking Centennial Edition of Little Nemo in Slumberland from Sunday Press a decade ago. There's much I like these Hal Foster Tarzan reprints -- I enjoy following the charmingly dated stories and examining the artistic growth of Foster's skills; the materials are of the highest archival quality... I prefer the thick, glossy, Arctic-white stock Dark Horse elected to use, as opposed to the kind used by Sunday Press and in Taschen's recent Little Nemo omnibus collection; but I can also appreciate the decision to use an acid-free paper that gives the look of ink on newsprint, but with none of the bleeding or flimsiness or pulpy feel. For those who are collecting the multigenerational, multi-format Tarzan archives, broken down according to the legendary artists who defined the character in the dailies and Sundays -- Burne Hogarth, Russ Manning, Jesse Marsh, Joe Kubert and Hal Foster -- you must have a crazy fucking collection, because they're adding up fast; these Hal Foster volumes are pretty much essential, the starting point; they're not the best of the Tarzan newspaper comics, but they're the most important. For those of us who are fans of Hal Foster, without completist aspirations, 'Price Valiant: The Studio Edition' is worth the wait, less than 4 months away. Save your pennies, though, since the price is 200$ for pre-orders. But buy it fast, too; it's likely to be an immediate sell-out, and the markup will increase exponentially once it does... 500$, 1000$. {A}Foster on the Tarzan Sunday Pages: {B}Foster on the Prince Valiant Sunday Pages: Obviously, a lot of progress was made between point 'A' and point 'B'. Which gigantic Foster reprint book would you choose? For me, that's no fuckin' conundrum.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ralph Carlson

    Second reading of this fantastic book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Tarzan exploded into the newspaper funny pages on January 7, 1929 with the extraordinary art of the then unknown Hal Foster. An adaptation of Burroughs' first Tarzan novel, Foster's worked graced the black & white strip for its first ten weeks. Though extremely popular, the artist had accepted more lucrative advertising work and was replaced by the inferior Rex Maxon, who, over the protestations of Burroughs, stayed on the strip until 1947. A color Sunday comic, also drawn by Maxon, premiered on Tarzan exploded into the newspaper funny pages on January 7, 1929 with the extraordinary art of the then unknown Hal Foster. An adaptation of Burroughs' first Tarzan novel, Foster's worked graced the black & white strip for its first ten weeks. Though extremely popular, the artist had accepted more lucrative advertising work and was replaced by the inferior Rex Maxon, who, over the protestations of Burroughs, stayed on the strip until 1947. A color Sunday comic, also drawn by Maxon, premiered on March 15, 1931. While Burroughs failed to get him removed from the everyday strips, Foster returned and began illustrating the Sundays on September 27, 1931. For the next six years, Foster produced some of the most impressive adventure strips ever and his vision help to define Tarzan. He left the character for his seminal creation Prince Valiant. The Tarzan strip survived with original dailies until July 29, 1972 and Sunday originals through 2000. Complete with an insightful introduction by comics historian Mark Evanier, Dark Horse's Edgar Rice Burroughs' Tarzan: The Sunday Comics Volume 1, 1931-1933 collects the first two years of Foster's gorgeous strips. The handsome over-sized book chronicles the evolution of the extraordinary artist, whose worked noticeably improved each week.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Ummm...George Carlin?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tore KS

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jay

  7. 4 out of 5

    Larry Mitchell

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jovany Agathe

  9. 5 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  10. 5 out of 5

    Keith

  11. 5 out of 5

    Peter Sanderson

  12. 4 out of 5

    P.S. Winn

  13. 4 out of 5

    ISMOTU

  14. 4 out of 5

    Fergus Reig Gracia

  15. 4 out of 5

    Subhajit Das

  16. 5 out of 5

    Peter Cooper

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brian Reagan

  18. 5 out of 5

    Fadi Sh

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dave

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Smith

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mac

  22. 5 out of 5

    Doug Henderson

  23. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brook Gale

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  26. 5 out of 5

    Judah

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brent

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alex Groce

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mikebo

  31. 5 out of 5

    All Graphic

  32. 4 out of 5

    Maja

  33. 4 out of 5

    John Kaster

  34. 4 out of 5

    Nika Kapanadze

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