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Five Go to Mystery Moor

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Bleak and eerie, Mystery Moor is well-known for its spooky atmosphere, but is there something really scary out there? The Famous Five are intrigued, but the unfriendly travellers camped on the moor aren't letting on. The gang risk treacherous conditions to follow them over the moor -- but what danger will they find at the end of their trail? Cover illustration: Richard Jone Bleak and eerie, Mystery Moor is well-known for its spooky atmosphere, but is there something really scary out there? The Famous Five are intrigued, but the unfriendly travellers camped on the moor aren't letting on. The gang risk treacherous conditions to follow them over the moor -- but what danger will they find at the end of their trail? Cover illustration: Richard Jones


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Bleak and eerie, Mystery Moor is well-known for its spooky atmosphere, but is there something really scary out there? The Famous Five are intrigued, but the unfriendly travellers camped on the moor aren't letting on. The gang risk treacherous conditions to follow them over the moor -- but what danger will they find at the end of their trail? Cover illustration: Richard Jone Bleak and eerie, Mystery Moor is well-known for its spooky atmosphere, but is there something really scary out there? The Famous Five are intrigued, but the unfriendly travellers camped on the moor aren't letting on. The gang risk treacherous conditions to follow them over the moor -- but what danger will they find at the end of their trail? Cover illustration: Richard Jones

30 review for Five Go to Mystery Moor

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Revill

    I'm showing my age when I say read this book years ago and it was an earlier edition. I remember distinctly my teacher, cane behind his back to ensure a quiet classroom, opening his desk drawer and taking out the first book in this series. Not sure why he thought he needed a cane because when he started reading to the class you could have heard a pin drop. Thus began my love of reading and I went straight to the library to borrow the book. It was way to long to wait another week for the next inst I'm showing my age when I say read this book years ago and it was an earlier edition. I remember distinctly my teacher, cane behind his back to ensure a quiet classroom, opening his desk drawer and taking out the first book in this series. Not sure why he thought he needed a cane because when he started reading to the class you could have heard a pin drop. Thus began my love of reading and I went straight to the library to borrow the book. It was way to long to wait another week for the next installment of the famous five. I even still have my Enid Blyton club badge that is one of my favourite keepsakes. There was no one in my opinion could write a children's story quite like Enid Blyton and my children and grandchildren have loved theses stories too. One of the best classic children's series at the time and still loved today.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mark Lawrence

    I'm not saying that the Five's parents are the world's worst parents ... they barely qualify as parents at all. The kids are shunted almost directly from boarding school to unsupervised vacation. I'm not sure Anne spends more than a week in the company of her parents between the ages of 10 and 21. Julian, Dick, and Anne, join George and Timmy at a "farm with horse riding". George has been there a while and is bored. Enid has provided yet more girl-who-dresses-like-boy competition for her, and the I'm not saying that the Five's parents are the world's worst parents ... they barely qualify as parents at all. The kids are shunted almost directly from boarding school to unsupervised vacation. I'm not sure Anne spends more than a week in the company of her parents between the ages of 10 and 21. Julian, Dick, and Anne, join George and Timmy at a "farm with horse riding". George has been there a while and is bored. Enid has provided yet more girl-who-dresses-like-boy competition for her, and the two have fallen out. Mystery (or Misty) Moor is by the sea and as is often the case there is a handy old man to relate the history of the place. The unlikely tale is of a family of seven rather nasty brothers who find a sand deposit so lucrative that it warrants the building of a rail line out to where they mine it on the moor. And of how these seven fell out with the local gypsies and all vanished (i.e were brutally murdered, though this is left unsaid). The Five discover gypsies still frequent the moor and befriend a gypsy lad who teaches them gypsy lore and who they gift with a handkerchief! The mystery is why the gypsies head out to camp in the middle of this desolate spot. Anyway, the Five, by virtue of being rich don't need a reason and so they go off to camp in the middle of the moor too, and wouldn't you know it, they're within shouting distance of the gypsies at the end of the old rail track. The gypsies have a big light that they refuse to explain and it turns out to be to guide a plane in that drops counterfeit American money! Given how many whole people are smuggled into the country every day it seems odd that so many of Blyton's books revolve around ingenious ways of circumventing the primitive 1950s UK border security. A plane dropping packages in order to get dollars into the country? Really? The story proceeds along the usual rails. Some of the children are kidnapped again, there is a cave system again, laughably within the sandy soil around the sand mine ... exactly the sort of ground that is so dangerous to dig holes in because they collapse... They escape and hide the money in the smoke stack of the abandoned locomotive that was used to ship all that rare and valuable ... sand. And the baddies are caught. Timmy comes in handy as deterrent and as radar dog in the mist, though he does get clouted round the head with a rock! It all comes together in the end, the gypsy boy (Sniffer) gains a new bike and loses a father, and George and the other boy-dressing girl get so friendly that they even start to use the boy versions of each other's names. Hoorah! Ticks the boxes for caves, cross dressing, smuggling, kidnap, spare child, & urchin redeemed. We might need a box for disused rail lines too if they crop up again. Join my 3-emails-a-year newsletter #prizes ...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    This may well be my favourite book in the series so far, as the spookiness factor was dialled up considerably. Any story featuring a group of kids riding horses through a creepy, misty moor gets my horror-loving genes buzzing. The best scene features the kids gathered around a blacksmith's smelting pit while they listen to the blacksmith recount a local legend about how a local family once drove a group of gypsies into the sea and how the myth is that the travelers who occasionally turn up on the This may well be my favourite book in the series so far, as the spookiness factor was dialled up considerably. Any story featuring a group of kids riding horses through a creepy, misty moor gets my horror-loving genes buzzing. The best scene features the kids gathered around a blacksmith's smelting pit while they listen to the blacksmith recount a local legend about how a local family once drove a group of gypsies into the sea and how the myth is that the travelers who occasionally turn up on the misty moors to this day are their ghosts... This book is also notable for being the first book in the series where it is acknowledged within the story itself that books are being written about the Five's adventures, although the specifics of their publishing deal aren't gone into. Enid does give the occasional wink to camera, though, which always makes me smile. Buddy read with Sunshine Seaspray

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sophie Crane

    I dont know how Enid Blyton managed to know just what children wanted to read about, even in this day and age the books hold a wonderful fascination to children. They read of the Famous Five who could go off and have fantastic exciting adventures and not have any interference from adults. These books are and always have been a real feel good read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Irma *Irma The Book Whisperer*

    ... reading with my 10 year old daughter... Daughter and I have this rule about reading a chapter per day. It's sometimes so hard to follow them because the stories are so adventurous. We loved Five Go to Mystery Moor. ... reading with my 10 year old daughter... Daughter and I have this rule about reading a chapter per day. It's sometimes so hard to follow them because the stories are so adventurous. We loved Five Go to Mystery Moor.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Aulia Koesmeidisari

    My favorite childhood read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nayana Harilal

    Mystery Moor is near where Anne and george are at the riding school. It is kind of like a desert. Travellers always go and camp there, why no one knows. When Julian And Dick comes to the scenes, an adventure begins at their camping place which is a quarry in the moor. Things get out of hands as Aeroplanes drop things at night . The children finds out that the parcels have 100 dollar american notes in them. They find out that the travellers take these parcels to their boss. The most exciting part Mystery Moor is near where Anne and george are at the riding school. It is kind of like a desert. Travellers always go and camp there, why no one knows. When Julian And Dick comes to the scenes, an adventure begins at their camping place which is a quarry in the moor. Things get out of hands as Aeroplanes drop things at night . The children finds out that the parcels have 100 dollar american notes in them. They find out that the travellers take these parcels to their boss. The most exciting part is when a mist so thick hungs on the very night the children finds the parcels and decides to hide them and go home. Travellers capture Anne, George and Timmy in the quarry, when they don't find Julian And Dick coming back who went to hide the parcels. George .Anne and Timmy escape with the help of a girl at the Riding school, Henrietta, who would only answer if called Henry and a boy at the stables; William, who is very sensible. Julian and Dick who were lost in the mist, at last find the way and come back. Things then get more settledwhen Mrs. Johnson, the captain's wife, calls the police and arrest the travellers except sniffer, a poor boy, who had helped Anne and George to get out.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Russell Taylor

    Obviously, and correctly, the sexism and racism in this book would not be acceptable in a book released today, however, it is a dangerous road to judge books from the past by today's standards. It is hilarious to think that Julian and Dick are allowed to sleep in the barn when the house becomes overcrowded, but it would be out of the question for Anne or George to do this. On the other side of the coin, had this book been written today, surely the natural ending would have been a steamy lesbian e Obviously, and correctly, the sexism and racism in this book would not be acceptable in a book released today, however, it is a dangerous road to judge books from the past by today's standards. It is hilarious to think that Julian and Dick are allowed to sleep in the barn when the house becomes overcrowded, but it would be out of the question for Anne or George to do this. On the other side of the coin, had this book been written today, surely the natural ending would have been a steamy lesbian encounter between George and Henry. All through the book there is a brooding tension between the two which is resolved at the end. Of course, this being a children's book written in the 50's they just become good friends. Hoorah! The story itself is very much what you would expect if you have read the previous books, with just enough menace, mystery, and sandwiches to keep children gripped.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This was always a favourite of mine as a child, but as an adult it got a bit boring. Somehow George's temper tantrums don't give the same thrill when you read from a "grown up" perspective, and neither does the whole 'dressing as a boy' thing. That aside, myserty lovers will like this one - myserious moors, myserious planes, mysterious packages, all jammed in alongside the obligatory nefarious gypsy gang, the aptly named gypsy boy "Sniffer" (who just wants a bike, please!), horses, ANOTHER girl- This was always a favourite of mine as a child, but as an adult it got a bit boring. Somehow George's temper tantrums don't give the same thrill when you read from a "grown up" perspective, and neither does the whole 'dressing as a boy' thing. That aside, myserty lovers will like this one - myserious moors, myserious planes, mysterious packages, all jammed in alongside the obligatory nefarious gypsy gang, the aptly named gypsy boy "Sniffer" (who just wants a bike, please!), horses, ANOTHER girl-who-wants-to-be-a-boy, Henry, friendly farmer's wives, blacksmiths...all the key elements are here for a romping great FF adventure!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicola

    Gypsies, mysterious mists, and camping on the moor! I absolutely adored Famous Five as a child. I trawled through secondhand stores and slowly acquired all of them. For some reason in my childhood, there were lots of British books and comics widely available and back then they were sold for the mighty sum of 10 cents. Seems funny now when some of the secondhand shops charge $7-10 per book! I still have all of them safely saved in storage for when Little Miss grows up.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Vandana

    read this in 8th standard and the vast world of fiction, kiddish and adventure... opened up to me :) i absolutely loved the famous five series!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    This one's a cracker. We have a standard affair of lots of food, an extra child in need of improvement, patronising Julian, George's jealousy of another girl who wants to be a boy, secret tunnels and caves, people in caravans and lack of parental supervision. (At this point Fanny and Quentin are up for a parenting award in comparison to Julain. Dick and Anne's parents. Are we sure they actually exist - maybe the didn't behave correctly once and Julain locked them in the attic to improve them?) A This one's a cracker. We have a standard affair of lots of food, an extra child in need of improvement, patronising Julian, George's jealousy of another girl who wants to be a boy, secret tunnels and caves, people in caravans and lack of parental supervision. (At this point Fanny and Quentin are up for a parenting award in comparison to Julain. Dick and Anne's parents. Are we sure they actually exist - maybe the didn't behave correctly once and Julain locked them in the attic to improve them?) Anyway, the plot is brilliant. Not one to question or ponder over any plot holes, that would ruin the sheer insanity of it. This insanity is what makes Blyton's books so appealing

  13. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Pinkett

    Not one of the better ones of the series. Certainly very dated

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jenny Palliveettil

    Honesty, Bravery, Good wits, and intelligence-to be favorable for an adventure. I got that. The book awakens all the senses, for me. The author really knows how to express his fantasy. I’ve just noticed that it’s always about money! Very unique thought for the author. The famous five always teaches us honesty and good principles and values one should uphold in life. Always split up to help each other incidentally. And rejoined. Presented With a scary personality in the book too. Two or three wil Honesty, Bravery, Good wits, and intelligence-to be favorable for an adventure. I got that. The book awakens all the senses, for me. The author really knows how to express his fantasy. I’ve just noticed that it’s always about money! Very unique thought for the author. The famous five always teaches us honesty and good principles and values one should uphold in life. Always split up to help each other incidentally. And rejoined. Presented With a scary personality in the book too. Two or three will be in trouble and the others go to get help. The usual of most famous fives. But I like the unique idea each book presents. Dungeons and gold, dollar notes, island, typically British- clean, calm and well organized. This book really cultivates love for all living things, through Timmy’s character, in readers mind. And the fun of good friendship too. I really savored the last part. It was really adventurous to read this book!!They’d make fine men and women when they’ll be adults. The writing style is so energetic! I really enjoyed the book with its unique writing style. The dialogues are too old. The happenings are so dramatic. Perfect book for children!! They’ll adore it!!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shabana Mukhtar

    Famous Five, #13 Non-review rant Some of the famous five books I owned (now donated to the library); others were borrowed from the library. Kid fiction is fun to read. Review The plot The plot is always that the five of the characters get into some trouble while seeking adventure. They solve mysteries, save others from trouble, eat a lot of delicious food. The plot gets repetitive after a few reads. Does it sound like HP? Yes, it is and above mentioned elements are common. Their adventures are not as Famous Five, #13 Non-review rant Some of the famous five books I owned (now donated to the library); others were borrowed from the library. Kid fiction is fun to read. Review The plot The plot is always that the five of the characters get into some trouble while seeking adventure. They solve mysteries, save others from trouble, eat a lot of delicious food. The plot gets repetitive after a few reads. Does it sound like HP? Yes, it is and above mentioned elements are common. Their adventures are not as severe and serious. And HP has a great world built inside the books. The characters I like how the characters are built. I can remember them for their character traits. George: A slightly arrogant, but likable daughter, raised more like a son. Her father is a scientist. Anne: Geroge's cousin. Almost opposite of George, behaves most sensibly. Julian & Dick: Anne's brothers. Timmy: George's dog. He loves food, and he is a savior in most of the story. Verdict

  16. 5 out of 5

    Saptarshi

    The book is about the famous five children i.e. Anne, Dick, Julian, Georgina and her dog Timmy. Honestly I really like the thrilling journey. The adventurous plot makes the reader continue flipping the pages till the end. The mystery of the Moor gives a chill through the spine. Continuous twisting and turning of the plot makes these five miserable during the journey as well as the reader. The Mystery of the Moor was unknown to everybody except the ill minded travellers who used to visit the place i The book is about the famous five children i.e. Anne, Dick, Julian, Georgina and her dog Timmy. Honestly I really like the thrilling journey. The adventurous plot makes the reader continue flipping the pages till the end. The mystery of the Moor gives a chill through the spine. Continuous twisting and turning of the plot makes these five miserable during the journey as well as the reader. The Mystery of the Moor was unknown to everybody except the ill minded travellers who used to visit the place in every three months. Everyone in the district was scared of them due to their fierce appearance and outraged behaviour. The travellers had mysterious personalities as if they were trying to hide something from the world, which germinated the seed of curiosity in those five children. The book was a bit boring at first but gradually it increased my interest when the five was getting leads from various sources to solve the mystery. I enjoyed the book a lot. This is a good children book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David Evans

    Comfort zone reading by this stage of the series. As I remember, a pony trekking holiday at a stables with (another) boy/girl, Henry/Henrietta, for George to dislike. What would have made these stories really controversial would have been the introduction of a boy character who wanted to be a girl. They get lost in the fog on the moor and there's talk of catacombs but that's about all I remember but I expect there were some gipsies about so I could learn about piebald ponies. Oh, and bilberies. Comfort zone reading by this stage of the series. As I remember, a pony trekking holiday at a stables with (another) boy/girl, Henry/Henrietta, for George to dislike. What would have made these stories really controversial would have been the introduction of a boy character who wanted to be a girl. They get lost in the fog on the moor and there's talk of catacombs but that's about all I remember but I expect there were some gipsies about so I could learn about piebald ponies. Oh, and bilberies. I forever associate these innocent berries with getting lost in the fog after reading this book. So some helpful health and safety advice accrued.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Summer

    These books (Famous five) are hands down one of my favorite books from my childhood. All those adventures and mystery …and those sandwiches they always packed! aww, just the best! I would love to read one of these again. To bring back those memories..memories of first experiences with reading books.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Trace

    Luke's Review: The Famous Five went camping on Mystery Moor (Misty Moor) and walked into a mystery! A plane dropped packets of money from the sky and the Famous Five had to figure out why - and then the excitement began from getting tied up to getting lost in a thick mist but in the end they solved the mystery! I LOVE Famous Five books!! I'm going to read The Mountain of Adventure next! Luke's Review: The Famous Five went camping on Mystery Moor (Misty Moor) and walked into a mystery! A plane dropped packets of money from the sky and the Famous Five had to figure out why - and then the excitement began from getting tied up to getting lost in a thick mist but in the end they solved the mystery! I LOVE Famous Five books!! I'm going to read The Mountain of Adventure next!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vinay Leo

    First time I’m rereading The Famous Five series. Some series are as beautiful to read as adults as they were in childhood. This series does fall into that category. I like the story. But don't love it. The "twin" to George was a nice touch perhaps, but my favourite part was the patrins of the gypsies. Might just search about patrins and try making some. First time I’m rereading The Famous Five series. Some series are as beautiful to read as adults as they were in childhood. This series does fall into that category. I like the story. But don't love it. The "twin" to George was a nice touch perhaps, but my favourite part was the patrins of the gypsies. Might just search about patrins and try making some.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Ponies. Travellers. Mists. Tiny trains. Moors. Fabulous Famous Five, as per usual. Feeling a serious drive to chase down some literary examinations of Blyton. Or write some.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Another good story with lots of adventure. But quite a few loose ends not tied up, which was rather unsatisfactory.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Farseer

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Five Go to Mystery Moor Brief Summary by Poppy Hutchinson (from http://www.enidblytonsociety.co.uk): George meets her match in this thirteenth Famous Five adventure: with Henrietta (or Henry, as she prefers to be called), who is intent on acting like a boy, and the first few chapters of this fantastic book are based purely on their disliking of each other. It seems as if George's cousins: Julian, Dick and Anne are in for an awkward time, when George refuses to let Henry join their company – but w Five Go to Mystery Moor Brief Summary by Poppy Hutchinson (from http://www.enidblytonsociety.co.uk): George meets her match in this thirteenth Famous Five adventure: with Henrietta (or Henry, as she prefers to be called), who is intent on acting like a boy, and the first few chapters of this fantastic book are based purely on their disliking of each other. It seems as if George's cousins: Julian, Dick and Anne are in for an awkward time, when George refuses to let Henry join their company – but will the fiery tomboy prove to be more decent than George expected, when a mystery evolving around the atmospheric: Mystery Moor, emerges, and the children find themselves: yet again, caught up in another adventure! Random thoughts: Was the United Kingdom in the 50s teeming with girls who wanted to be boys, dressed like boys and were happy when people took them for boys? Because there's yet another one in the series, Henrietta (Henry). I have to say I loved the pre-adventure part of this book. I like it when we get some character conflict. We got that in Go Adventuring Again, and it made me enjoy that book a lot even though the adventure was lightweight. Here I really enjoyed George's feud with Henry. Let's face it, George is the most interesting character in the series, which doesn't necessarily mean the more likable (even though I really like her, flaws and all). Anyway, she's the one you can count on not to react in conventional ways. And Enid Blyton gets all the personality details so right... the way she gets into her moods, how she excludes herself from an activity to show she is mad, and how she reacts when she is ignored, half angry and half ashamed of herself. Even though she is difficult to deal with, I love how she makes an effort to act better and make up for her occasional petulant childishness. Blyton also gets Henry right, making her different to George in some ways, even though she is so similar in many others. I could read a whole book about everyday life at the riding school, with it's family atmosphere and with Anne trying to keep George and Henry from bickering. I also love how canny EB is, realizing that characters who are too similar can be jealous of each other because they unconsciously fear that the other will usurp their role in the group. It happens with George and other tomboys, like it does with Kiki in the Adventure series with other pets the children pay attention to. Henry is even more boyish than George, and our poor George gets really mad when they have to dress up for dinner and people notice that, of the two, George looks more like a girl with her curly hair. I know parents in this series need to get out of the way, but really, what a letter Aunt Fanny sent, curtly stating that the girls could not come back because Quentin was ill, without specifying the illness and how serious it was. And don't think the girls waste too much time worrying about Uncle Quentin. They immediately start thinking about what that means for their holidays. Anyway, the boys are coming too, presumably because they also don't have anywhere else to go due to Uncle Quentin's illness. So the Famous Five will be together again at the riding school. Of course, their arrival is spoiled for George because Henry is the one who meets them due to a change in traveling plans at the last moment, and she gives a good first impression and is taken for a boy. I liked how Julian and Dick dealt with George's excessive rivalry with Henry. Sometimes they are a bit insensitive when it comes to dealing with George's moods, but I really felt they dealt with it appropriately here. It would have been unfair to exclude Henry when there were no other kids their age around. Although William (we'll meet him later) looks like he could be in their group too. In the meantime, Sniffer gets introduced. He is a little gyps... I mean, traveler boy who is always sniffing, hence his nickname. I haven't spoken much about the readers of the audiobooks. Jan Francis does a very adequate job, in my opinion, differentiating the voices from each character and telling the story well. Here, though, she really shines when she does Sniffer: she uses such a childish, helpless voice for him, and he does his sniffs so well... She also does an incredible job with Henry's snores, by the way. There's some drama with Sniffer's father, who is rather abusive with him, and with their horse, who gets injured and is treated by Captain Johnson. Sniffer's father wants to take the horse, but the captain forces him to leave the animal at the farm until it gets better. It's the right thing to do, of course, but it seems to me that he has no legal right to retain the animal against the owner's wishes. The captain even threatens to tell the police. I mean, what legal right does he have? Well, maybe the police will be on his side, because he is a respectable farmer and the other guy is a gyps... I mean, a traveler. Speaking of Sniffer, don't miss the stuff about him and the handkerchief George gives him. It's quite funny! So, why is Sniffer's jerk of a father and the other gyps... travelers in such a hurry to go to Mystery Moor? And why is Mystery Moor called that way? After some investigations and hearing a curious story from an old smith, the adventure proper begins when the Five (without Henry, who gets kidnapped by two unpleasant great-aunts) go camping on their own to help the captain and his wife, since the riding school is overbooked for a few days. And it's a good adventure, not feeling like a rehash of previous books even though this is already 13th in the series. The setting once more is very atmospheric. Are there really so many moors in the UK, though? Anyway, that scary, impossibly thick fog... really well done. At one point, when the children are running away in the fog following the abandoned train tracks, carrying the parcels the plane dropped, they start making a series of really bad decisions. Even though they only had to follow the tracks to get away, they decide to hide the parcels (which admittedly were rather heavy). To do that, they separate in two groups, with the girls and Timmy waiting on the track while the boys go look for the old train engine to hide the parcels there. It's a bad idea to part ways in the middle of the fog, it's a bad idea to leave the tracks and it's a bad idea to leave Timmy, the only member of the group who can find his way in the fog, behind. So, even though they have a compass, the boys manage to get lost. The girls, even though they could have easily used Timmy to find the boys, decide instead to follow the tracks and ask for help. However, they make a mistake and follow the tracks the way they had come. Really, girls, I know it's foggy, but you can do better than that. Anyway, when they realize what's happening, instead of turning back again and following the tracks to safety, they decide to leave the tracks and look for the quarry in the middle of the fog to spend the night there (?). That quarry, let's not forget, is the last known location of all the bad guys. The girls manage to find the quarry, but they are soon taken prisoners. These are children, and I understand them making mistakes, but this really wasn't their most inspired moment. Well, while Julian and Dick are missing in action, the girls manage to fool their captors and get a message to Henry via Timmy asking for help. Henry, boyish as she is, is still not as brave as she boasts, and she hesitates. The Captain is out, and apparently Mrs. Johnson is a sorry excuse for an adult and would be too distressed to hear that her charges are in trouble. So Henry enlists the help of an incredibly competent younger boy called William, who takes charge. Henry and William rescue the girls, Timmy is injured, the boys manage to remember they have a compass and find their way out of the moor and everything is very thrilling. I was happy to see George and Henry finally become friends. I would have liked to see Sniffer getting his wishes (a bike and living in a house where he can ride his bike to school). George promised that to him and it's implied that he gets it, but I would have liked to see it. And what happened to his horse? Maybe Captain Johnson and his fragile wife could have fostered him. He would have been happy in the riding school, I think. Hopefully he'll get the happy home he deserves. Anyway, I had a blast with the adventure, the setting and the character work. Another fine entry in the series.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nikhil

    This is a summer adventure when the five meet and explore the Mystery moor. Why is it called mystery moor? This fast paced adventure, written in the 50s England has kids camping in the moors, trying to understand the mystery in the moor. It features 10 year olds acting very matured and adult like perhaps from their previous adventures. They are your smart teens but in the form of kids who haven’t reached their teens yet. So they still stick to the basic, food fun and contentment associated with This is a summer adventure when the five meet and explore the Mystery moor. Why is it called mystery moor? This fast paced adventure, written in the 50s England has kids camping in the moors, trying to understand the mystery in the moor. It features 10 year olds acting very matured and adult like perhaps from their previous adventures. They are your smart teens but in the form of kids who haven’t reached their teens yet. So they still stick to the basic, food fun and contentment associated with kids with the added zing of mystery. Reading this now feels very strange. When life was simpler, safety was not as much an issue or as much of a cause for concern. Kids in this novel are allowed to roam freely and explore, often manage two days in their own with packed food and tents. They have the resource to think outside the box and to know what is right in a tricky situation even for adults. Perhaps the villains also stay simple in response to kids being the protagonists. You won’t expect character depth, you are searching fir simplistic stories such as this one. Another thing peculiar with this one was the urge of girls 9 years old trying to be like boys - act smart like boys, enjoy outdoors like boys do etc. I never realized this competition in little girls to be like boys. When these novels were being written, that must have been true - but I think it’s less true now though I am not entirely sure. The other beautiful thing about this novel (as is true for other 5 series) is their interaction with dogs. For one of the 5 to be a dog makes a point. The presence of a canine is as important for the author as it is for the story. Enid captures interactions with canine beautifully. I love this about her! About the story: this one is interesting not because of the innumerable twists you would expect in a fiction, but because of the locale of the final mystery - the moor. It’s described beautifully and you would like to be there and take your kids to moor. Or have then read famous 5 and let them imagine the moor to be a place of fun and mystery.

  25. 4 out of 5

    OG

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Every possible trope we’ve come to expect of the famous five is in this book. The children are once again abandoned by their parents, who no doubt will expect them to support them in their dotage, and sent of to a horse riding - live in - payed for - but the children will work as free labour- establishment. While they are there they meet sniffer, a gypsy boy with an adenoids issue, and a girl called Henry (EB is obsessed with this trope. We have Jo, Henry, George and we meet another in the next Every possible trope we’ve come to expect of the famous five is in this book. The children are once again abandoned by their parents, who no doubt will expect them to support them in their dotage, and sent of to a horse riding - live in - payed for - but the children will work as free labour- establishment. While they are there they meet sniffer, a gypsy boy with an adenoids issue, and a girl called Henry (EB is obsessed with this trope. We have Jo, Henry, George and we meet another in the next book. George hates Henry but the boys like her (you know George is going to marry Henry in the future. (I’m Shipping this pair) ). I probably prefer Jo overall as a character but this has a few hidden and interesting points to make, about bravery, friendship and bashfulness. So mystery moor was mysty moor once long ago until some brothers who owned a stupidly lucrative sand mine (so lucrative the build a train line to transport their sand...?) disappeared. By disappeared I mean brutally murdered by gypsies who wanted the moor for their own dastardly reasons. So we have casual race jokes about gypsys, a boy who just wants to escape his life that’s so awful just like jo did. (All young gypsy children get this fate eventually in any of EB’s books. However not withstanding I give this a high rating as it has the spark back. It’s been missing that for a while.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    Keeping up with the rereads given how much I've struggled to get reading done this month. Again, this isn't the cover I have, but it's not on the editions list. Besides, most of the others are in the illustrated reprints so it's fine. I like this paperback cover. :) Anyway, this one was ok and nice to have it set in a riding school partly. I've never learned to ride properly (something I've always wanted to change at some point) but I love horses regardless. Now I'm older, I can tell how much He Keeping up with the rereads given how much I've struggled to get reading done this month. Again, this isn't the cover I have, but it's not on the editions list. Besides, most of the others are in the illustrated reprints so it's fine. I like this paperback cover. :) Anyway, this one was ok and nice to have it set in a riding school partly. I've never learned to ride properly (something I've always wanted to change at some point) but I love horses regardless. Now I'm older, I can tell how much Henry annoys me in this, with her and George always at each other's throats apart from the end, and then she isn't in any others. I'd have preferred to hear more about the younger kids having their holidays than those two arguing (as much as I like George)! As a mystery/adventure, it's ok but number 13 isn't one of my favourites in the series.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ayush Agarwal

    George and Anne are at a horse-riding school when they receive a letter from Dick and Julian saying that they were coming the next day. George and Anne were with a girl named Henrietta (Henry) who George hated because Henrietta wanted to be a boy just like George. (Which was the most surprising thing in the book) When Julian and Dick arrived, the five heard a traveller boy saying that him and the other travellers had to go to a place called "Mystery Moor" for their traveller business but their h George and Anne are at a horse-riding school when they receive a letter from Dick and Julian saying that they were coming the next day. George and Anne were with a girl named Henrietta (Henry) who George hated because Henrietta wanted to be a boy just like George. (Which was the most surprising thing in the book) When Julian and Dick arrived, the five heard a traveller boy saying that him and the other travellers had to go to a place called "Mystery Moor" for their traveller business but their horse, Clip had a wound on it's leg so they left Clip to their captain, Captain Johnson. Now you have to figure out what happened to the five in Mystery Moor!!

  28. 4 out of 5

    M

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The famous five are going to mystery moor. They go to an old shoemaker and get info about the past of the moor and they learn about the Bartles, the travelers the name change of the place and other stuff. They set out to mystery moor along the old railway track and they find its engine. They go to a small quarry and spend there camping nights there and one night they saw a flight circling low around the travelers camp and it came again on the next night too! The next night when it came it droppe The famous five are going to mystery moor. They go to an old shoemaker and get info about the past of the moor and they learn about the Bartles, the travelers the name change of the place and other stuff. They set out to mystery moor along the old railway track and they find its engine. They go to a small quarry and spend there camping nights there and one night they saw a flight circling low around the travelers camp and it came again on the next night too! The next night when it came it dropped packages containing American dollars. The five hide in the funnel of the engine and cover it with sand later on the travelers were caught by the police.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lee Johnson

    I realise that this book is a product of its time, however I cannot turn a blind eye to the blatant racism and sexism I found between its covers. I read these and other series by Blyton as a child, and hoped to find some of the old magic there upon revisiting them, but all I found were one dimensional characters following a very predictable plot that contained little to no mystery. Would have given a 1 star rating, but I awarded an extra star in recognition of the joy these gave me over 20 years a I realise that this book is a product of its time, however I cannot turn a blind eye to the blatant racism and sexism I found between its covers. I read these and other series by Blyton as a child, and hoped to find some of the old magic there upon revisiting them, but all I found were one dimensional characters following a very predictable plot that contained little to no mystery. Would have given a 1 star rating, but I awarded an extra star in recognition of the joy these gave me over 20 years ago.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ryder Capson

    Five go to mystery moor is my favorite book. I like the book because it is not scary. It is really exciting because they always trick the bad guys, then they escape, then they tell the police and then the they go back to school. Then when they have a break they have another adventure and that is Famous five.

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