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A Field Guide to Lucid Dreaming: Mastering the Art of Oneironautics

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Wake up and dream.   Imagine experiencing all the things that happen in dreams, but with one extraordinary difference: You are “lucid”––consciously, joyously in control. Not just an adventure (yes, you can fly), a lucid dream is a time ripe for creative thinking, healing, inspiration, and self-knowledge.   This lively dream guide shows step-by-step how to become lucid, and Wake up and dream.   Imagine experiencing all the things that happen in dreams, but with one extraordinary difference: You are “lucid”––consciously, joyously in control. Not just an adventure (yes, you can fly), a lucid dream is a time ripe for creative thinking, healing, inspiration, and self-knowledge.   This lively dream guide shows step-by-step how to become lucid, and then what to do once awake in the dream world. Here’s how to reconnect with dreams, and the importance of keeping a journal and timing REM cycles. How to use simple reality checks to differentiate between waking and sleeping states. How to incubate a dream to solve a problem.   With every dream we are washing up on the shores of our own inner landscape. Now, learn to explore this strange and thrilling world.  


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Wake up and dream.   Imagine experiencing all the things that happen in dreams, but with one extraordinary difference: You are “lucid”––consciously, joyously in control. Not just an adventure (yes, you can fly), a lucid dream is a time ripe for creative thinking, healing, inspiration, and self-knowledge.   This lively dream guide shows step-by-step how to become lucid, and Wake up and dream.   Imagine experiencing all the things that happen in dreams, but with one extraordinary difference: You are “lucid”––consciously, joyously in control. Not just an adventure (yes, you can fly), a lucid dream is a time ripe for creative thinking, healing, inspiration, and self-knowledge.   This lively dream guide shows step-by-step how to become lucid, and then what to do once awake in the dream world. Here’s how to reconnect with dreams, and the importance of keeping a journal and timing REM cycles. How to use simple reality checks to differentiate between waking and sleeping states. How to incubate a dream to solve a problem.   With every dream we are washing up on the shores of our own inner landscape. Now, learn to explore this strange and thrilling world.  

30 review for A Field Guide to Lucid Dreaming: Mastering the Art of Oneironautics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Heidi The Reader

    An excellent guide to experiencing or deepening lucid dreams, A Field Guide to Lucid Dreaming is filled with tips, tricks and advice to explore your dream world. My husband and daughter experience lucid dreams all the time and I don't or, at least, haven't yet. It's embarrassing. It's as if they have access to worlds that I can only dream about, literally. I picked this book up because I wanted to develop this skill too. So far, with the advice contained within this Field Guide, I've realized that An excellent guide to experiencing or deepening lucid dreams, A Field Guide to Lucid Dreaming is filled with tips, tricks and advice to explore your dream world. My husband and daughter experience lucid dreams all the time and I don't or, at least, haven't yet. It's embarrassing. It's as if they have access to worlds that I can only dream about, literally. I picked this book up because I wanted to develop this skill too. So far, with the advice contained within this Field Guide, I've realized that I was dreaming once, became lucid and immediately woke up. But, that's progress. I'm encouraged actually. If I can go lucid once, I can do it again. "Lucid dreaming is the ability to know you're dreaming while you're dreaming. A lucid dreamer is able to go to sleep at night and wake up within his or her dream. With this unique awareness, you can generally behave like someone who is awake, exercising the free will, imagination, and memory of waking life." introduction. How fun would that be? Ever wanted to fly? Face your nightmares? Talk to a deceased loved one? The authors of this book claim that it is all possible. They addressed some of my problems directly: "Quite often, the amateur lucid dreamer's early exploits in lucidity last only a few moments. If you've become lucid already but lost your awareness very quickly, don't worry. This is common. In the next chapter we'll look at ways in which you can stabilize the dream and stay lucid for long stretches of time." pg 106. Practice makes perfect, it seems. The shamanistic beliefs about the dream world are intriguing: "...shamans of indigenous cultures understood that in order for something to be created in the physical world (such as that kitchen you've been meaning to remodel, or this book), it must first be constructed in the "imaginal realm." In other words, lucid dreaming might be a tool in creating our physical reality." pg 151. Life is like a dream and we are the dreamers, whether asleep or awake: "This world can be a nightmare or a nice dream. It's full of friends or enemies, success or failure, meaning or nihilism. We're headed toward destruction or we're headed toward rebirth. There are many viewpoints on Earth as there are people. And just like the dream, we shape our experience with our thoughts, emotions, and expectations. pg 246. Recommended for anyone who, like me, wants to master lucid dreaming. I think that this book will help you find your way. Sweet dreams :)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    The best thing I can say about this is that it is exactly what it purports to be. It provides step-by-step instruction to develop a lucid dreaming practice. I found the text to be engaging and not overwritten. It's just the right tips and tricks to figure things out. It also contains a lot of little anecdotes which are interesting and inspiring. I read the book slowly - for about a month - so that I would have time to practice dreaming after each chapter. Finally… It worked. I was in a hotel bath The best thing I can say about this is that it is exactly what it purports to be. It provides step-by-step instruction to develop a lucid dreaming practice. I found the text to be engaging and not overwritten. It's just the right tips and tricks to figure things out. It also contains a lot of little anecdotes which are interesting and inspiring. I read the book slowly - for about a month - so that I would have time to practice dreaming after each chapter. Finally… It worked. I was in a hotel bathroom looking at the mirror something wasn't right. I realized I was dreaming. It all started to fade away so I said "stabilize" and started to spin around. When other people walked into the bathroom I walked out and started floating through the hotel lobby. The fun is just beginning.

  3. 5 out of 5

    K.M. Weiland

    Can’t say it’s worked for me yet, but the book was full of interesting food for thought—and I look forward to seeing if I can cultivate the skill in the future.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Susie

    Pretty straight forward guide to lucid dreaming. I loved the quotes at the beginning of each chapter. We shall not cease from exploration. And the end of all our exploring Will be to arrive where we started And know the place for the first time. - T.S. Eliot, poet, playright, aka 'Old Possum' Fear has its use but cowardice has none. - Mahatma Gandhi, nonviolent activist, lawyer, walking enthusiast If we have learned one thing from the history of invention and discovery, it is that, the long run--and ofte Pretty straight forward guide to lucid dreaming. I loved the quotes at the beginning of each chapter. We shall not cease from exploration. And the end of all our exploring Will be to arrive where we started And know the place for the first time. - T.S. Eliot, poet, playright, aka 'Old Possum' Fear has its use but cowardice has none. - Mahatma Gandhi, nonviolent activist, lawyer, walking enthusiast If we have learned one thing from the history of invention and discovery, it is that, the long run--and often in the short one--the most daring prophecies seem laughably conservative. - Arthur C. Clarke, writer, knight, sscuba diver The guide looks at lucid dreaming as a practice. After three weeks of meditation techniques and dream journalling I was able to have pretty detailed dream recall. I liked the ritual of waking up and writing down my dreams before they were lost. It was a nice transition from waking up to going to work. Much better than getting up and checking Facebook. After a month, I had a lucid dream. I was running at my old university at night. I got to in front of my old apartment and realised I had lost my shoes. I ran back to find my shoes and saw a pile of shoes in front of a corner shop. I rumbled through the shoes and kept finding single shoes I owned from various pairs. At which point, I questioned reality and realised it was dream. So what does one do when they realise they're dreaming? I tried to ride a hover board. I concentrated on conjuring a hoverboard. I couldn't do it. But I found a serving platter among the pile of shoes. I got on the serving platter and "skated" down a hill. The platter grinding against the pavement and hurt my toes as I still hadn't bothered to find shoes and was barefoot. I focused again and was able to make the platter hover. Then I woke up.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Max

    This is a pretty frustrating book. The idea of an intro to lucid dreaming is pretty cool, since I've wanted to explore the subject for a while. And this is a rather pretty book - there are a ton of nice black and white illustrations, and the map at the front of the book is rather neat. However, that's also one of the big problems - there's way too much whitespace and pictures and not enough actual content. The pictures are pretty, but often only kind of relate to the text. There are a bunch of s This is a pretty frustrating book. The idea of an intro to lucid dreaming is pretty cool, since I've wanted to explore the subject for a while. And this is a rather pretty book - there are a ton of nice black and white illustrations, and the map at the front of the book is rather neat. However, that's also one of the big problems - there's way too much whitespace and pictures and not enough actual content. The pictures are pretty, but often only kind of relate to the text. There are a bunch of stories of dreams scattered throughout, and many of them are annoyingly written by the authors rather than others. Thus they just serve to reinforce the pretentious tone of the book that I found so annoying. The content here is pretty scant, and what is present is written in a New Agey, kinda up its own ass tone. There's a whole bunch of stuff about mindfulness and how lucid dreaming might magically change the world stuck on at the end, which is really not what I was looking for. I wanted a straightforward and information guide to the basics of lucid dreaming, not rambling half-formed pap with freshman philosophy crap stuffed in. Honestly, this was so bad I'm a little turned off of lucid dreaming now, although I think I will be able to have good experiences with it once I find a book that isn't a trio of guys talking themselves up. (That was one thing that really pissed me off about the book and especially the dream stories - the perspective is 99% male.) I'm really glad I borrowed this from the library rather than buying it or contributing to the Kickstarter it apparently originated from.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Giorgi Bazerashvili

    This is an amazing book about an amazing phenomenon. What I like about the idea of becoming lucid in your dreams is its huge potential in exploring your subconscious mind and potentially healing yourself. This book is written in a very easy-to-read way. It starts by explaining the history of using dreams for all sorts of reasons. It turns out that ancient people knew about the positive effects that becoming lucid in their dreams could have on their lives. Then, we learn about DILD (Dream Induced Lu This is an amazing book about an amazing phenomenon. What I like about the idea of becoming lucid in your dreams is its huge potential in exploring your subconscious mind and potentially healing yourself. This book is written in a very easy-to-read way. It starts by explaining the history of using dreams for all sorts of reasons. It turns out that ancient people knew about the positive effects that becoming lucid in their dreams could have on their lives. Then, we learn about DILD (Dream Induced Lucid Dreaming), which is the most common way of becoming lucid in your dreams. There is a detailed step by step instruction on how to do it. Towards the end, we also learn about a more effective technique called WILD (Wake Induced Lucid Dreaming), which is a bit more advanced but a very promising one. If you master this one technique, you would be able to enter dreams directly from waking state. This is supposed to be a very interesting experience on its own. I have had a couple of lucid dreams before and I constantly write dreams in my dream journal upon waking up. This has helped me to better remember my dreams, lucid or not. Authors talk about this in the book too, along with the importance of reality checks that you should be performing a couple of times a day. The things that I think and intuit that are possible via lucid dreaming excite me very much. Becoming conscious of your unconscious mind is the key to solving many of your life's problems. Dreams seem to be a great medium to look straight into the eyes of the hidden aspects of your psyche. Shadow work is essential if you want to return to your state of wholeness, and exploring dreams lucidly seems to be an exciting and a very fun way to do it. Also, authors make correlations between lucid dreaming and what mystics have been saying for thousands of years, that we are all connected, and that life is a big dream that we can awaken from, just like a lucid dream. As you become more aware inside your dreams, you clearly see the interconnectedness of everything in it and you easily recognize that all of that is just your mind and you are the creator of everything in it and the only thing left is to just explore the infinite potential of it. What if the waking world is just like that, and a solidity of it is just an illusion. Well, that's what all those mystics and cutting edge quantum physicists have been telling us. It seems that lucid dreaming can help us realize all that and more. So, read this book if you want to get excited about mastering lucid dreaming, like me. Sweet dreams.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bakunin

    Ever since I was a little kid I've been interested in dreams and how strange they can be in comparison to my waking life. Although I've only had lucid dreams a few times but from reading this book I understand that the possibilities are endless once you learn to controll your dreams. You can time travel, shape shift, fly, have sex with anyone you want and create whatever you want to create (even a universe). The authors intention is not only to show the reader how to master a dream but also that Ever since I was a little kid I've been interested in dreams and how strange they can be in comparison to my waking life. Although I've only had lucid dreams a few times but from reading this book I understand that the possibilities are endless once you learn to controll your dreams. You can time travel, shape shift, fly, have sex with anyone you want and create whatever you want to create (even a universe). The authors intention is not only to show the reader how to master a dream but also that society at large has a somewhat fallacious view of the subject. Dreams tell us something about ourselves and if we have a recurring nightmare it says something about you as a person. Your unconscious (or subconscious if you want to use their terminology) is a large part of who you are and why not try to explore it in hopes of learning more about yourself? Why should we settle for anything less than the most exilarating experience of our lives? All it takes is a little patience and discipline. I am currently working as an account manager at an IT-firm and often times I feel pressured. In order to develop resilience I therefore try to do everything I can to find the calmness within me - meditation, self-help books (and now lucid dreaming as well). I strongly believe that we can become stronger people by seeing dreamworld as an unexplored gateway to yourself.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jamie J

    With so many books out there on lucid dreaming this book fails to offer anything new. Born from a kickstarter campaign that raised $27000, you would be inclined to imagine this book would be something special, unfortunately it isn't and it would appear most of that money has been spent on promotion and layout, not research or content. The book has an enthusiastic tone but is let down by the inexperience of its young authors, whose research seems to have amounted to little more than a few websear With so many books out there on lucid dreaming this book fails to offer anything new. Born from a kickstarter campaign that raised $27000, you would be inclined to imagine this book would be something special, unfortunately it isn't and it would appear most of that money has been spent on promotion and layout, not research or content. The book has an enthusiastic tone but is let down by the inexperience of its young authors, whose research seems to have amounted to little more than a few websearches and borrowing the content from the books of more established works. I found its overly simplistic tone annoying and at times I felt as if I were reading a picture book. It's alluring cover and mass of pictures will likely appeal to the masses who have been bought up on 1 minute youtube videos, for everyone else looking for a substantial and educating read, it falls rather flat. In short, I found this book to be an oversimplification of a subject that deserves much better. With so many better books available, this is one I cannot recommend.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    Quite good, I'd give it 5 stars were it not for the ocassional filler. It tells you how to induce lucid dreams, and it tells you what you can do once you recognize you are in a lucid dream. I'd say that if you only want to read 1 book on lucid dreaming, this is it. It goes just a bit beyond the basics. Quite good, I'd give it 5 stars were it not for the ocassional filler. It tells you how to induce lucid dreams, and it tells you what you can do once you recognize you are in a lucid dream. I'd say that if you only want to read 1 book on lucid dreaming, this is it. It goes just a bit beyond the basics.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    I ended up reading most of the book only by the summary points. I found the writing a bit pedantic and needed more citations to believe a lot of the claims in it. Trying other books on lucid dreaming, maybe they’ll be worse but right now I can’t recommend this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    I really enjoyed this book. I did have a lucid dream while I was reading it and intend on practicing the skills I learned here.

  12. 5 out of 5

    D

    An exploration life in the dreamworld. The book offers 3 teachings: 1) How to reconnect with your dreams, 2) How to have a lucid dream, and 3) What to do once you're lucid. Lucid dreaming is the ability to know you're dreaming while you're dreaming. A lucid dreamer goes to sleep and wakes up inside the dream. You can learn, discover, heal and awaken to different realities. We shall not cease from exploration And the end of all our exploring Will be to arrive where we started And know the place for th An exploration life in the dreamworld. The book offers 3 teachings: 1) How to reconnect with your dreams, 2) How to have a lucid dream, and 3) What to do once you're lucid. Lucid dreaming is the ability to know you're dreaming while you're dreaming. A lucid dreamer goes to sleep and wakes up inside the dream. You can learn, discover, heal and awaken to different realities. We shall not cease from exploration And the end of all our exploring Will be to arrive where we started And know the place for the first time. - TS Eliot aka Old Possum To start, take a moment now, and ask yourself this seemingly bizarre question: "Am I dreaming?" Oneironaut is derived from the Greek words oneira meaning 'dreams' and nautis meaning sailor. An oneironaut is one who has learned to travel consciously in the dream world with a high degree of clarity and awareness. If we have learned one thing from the history of invention and discovery, it is that, in the long run -- and often in the short one -- the most daring prophecies seem laughably conservative. - Arthur C Clarke, writer, knight and scuba diver Tibetans The philosophical practice of dream yoga among Tibetan Buddhists dates back at least 1000 yrs. While ancient Egyptians and Greeks knew the power of dreams, the yogis were pioneers of lucid dreaming. They describe specific techniques for lucidity and training consciousness. Once aware in the dream state, yogis complete a number of tasks, progressing to higher levels of practice. The challenges include exploration of various worlds, speaking with enlightened dream beings, and shape-shifting into other animals, to name just a few. The ultimate goal for a dream yogi was to become conscious of the fact that 'all life is but a dream.' Apprehending the dream was attaining complete conscious awareness. REM and Stages of Sleep Stage 1 - Begin to doze off Stage 2 - Asleep, lower heart rate and core temperature. Things begin to slowwww doooowwwn. Stage 3 - Deep sleep. Repair mode. Your body is rebuilding muscle and bone, repairing organs and tissue, strengthening your immune system. As we climb back toward waking, we go through Stage 2, then, 1 and finally REM Stage - Your brain is buzzing with activity, and it seems like you're about to wake up, but you enter the sweet spot -- the dream zone. Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakes - Carl Jung Intention 1) Wording is key - be specific 2) Feel it, see it 3) Expect it 4) Make it your dominant thought. Gratitude Feeling thankful before something happens is a very powerful, creative force. If you're thankful in advance, it has already happened in your mind. Let us learn to dream, and then we may perhaps find the truth. - FA Keule, German chemist I've dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas; they've gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind. - Emily Brontë aka Ellis Bell Keep a Dream Journal - Put it next to your bed - Record date and time of your bedtime - Write keywords - Use the present tense - Title your dreams - Note whether you were lucid or not, what triggered lucidity, how long it lasted, what you did, and any tips that will help with later lucid adventures. "A dream is an answer to a question we haven't learned to ask." - Special Agent Dana Scully, skeptical FBI agent in the X-Files Reality is frquently inaccurate. - Douglas Adams I soon realized that no journey carries one far unless, as it extends into the world around us, it goes an equal distance into the world within. - Lillian Smith, author, social critic, notorious fighter for equal rights The natives... are generally tall, straight, well built and of singular proportion; they tread strong and clever, and mostly walk with a lofty chin. Their language is lofty yet narrow... and I must say that I know not a language spoken in Europe, that hath words of more sweetness or greatness, in accent and emphasis, than theirs. - William Penn, founder of Pennsylvania, friend of the Lenape No matter what kind of nightmare it is, the only way to get ride of it completely is to face it head-on. Chat away with your demons and discover their hidden message: Why are you chasing me? What do you want? Who are you? Why am I in this situation? How can I help you? What do you represent? What do you have to teach me? The Greeks believed that some dreams foretold the future. After a bad dream, they would purify themselves by bathing in cold water, telling their dream to the sun, and even performing sacrifices to protective deities. Healing the Mind According to psychologist Abraham Maslow, the main goal of all therapy is integration. Many mental problems seem to happen when we're repressing parts of ourselves. If a traumatic event occurs, we may lock that experience away in order to cope. Psychologists call this dissociation. Shamans call it soul loss. A healthy person is a united, integrated person whose memory, emotions, social function, body, are all connected as a united system. We become unhealthy when one or more of these aspects become disconnected from the system, and we become detached, numb, anxious or depressed. It is wisdom to know others; it is enlightenment to know one's self. - Lao-tzu, writer, philosopher The day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. - Anaïs Nin, French-Cuban author, one of the finest writers of erotica The most astounding fact is the knowledge that the atoms that comprise life on Earth the atoms that make up the human body are traceable to the crucibles that cooked light elements into heavy elements in their core under extreme temperatures and pressures. These stars, the high mass ones among them went unstable in their later years they collapsed and then exploded scattering their enriched guts across the galaxy guts made of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and all the fundamental ingredients of life itself. These ingredients become part of gas cloud that condense, collapse, form the next generation of solar systems stars with orbiting planets, and those planets now have the ingredients for life itself. So that when I look up at the night sky and I know that yes, we are part of this universe, we are in this universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the Universe is in us. When I reflect on that fact, I look up – many people feel small because they’re small and the Universe is big – but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars. There’s a level of connectivity. That’s really what you want in life, you want to feel connected, you want to feel relevant you want to feel like you’re a participant in the goings on of activities and events around you That’s precisely what we are, just by being alive… - Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist, director of Hayden Planetarium Let's wake up! Let's wake up in our relationship, let's wake up where we work, let's wake up in where we live. - Fariba Bogzaran, artist, dream researcher, writer, pioneer of dream studies http://noetic.org/directory/person/fa... They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream at night. - Edgar Allan Poe, fan of ravens - Take life more symbolically and dreams more literally - See everyday patterns you fall into - Go about creating the world you want to live in. The term 'spirit guides' refers to entities who protect, teach and heal you on your physical journey into spiritual awareness. An individual may have more than one spirit guide, and a guide may change over the course of someone's lifetime. These beings are here to help us when we are in turmoil or seeking assistance. The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams. Eleanor Roosevelt, civil rights activist In the history of the collective as in the history of the individual, everything depends on the development of consciousness. - Carl Jung, protégé of Freud Share your dreams on a daily basis, and help each other discover the hidden meanings. Use the Internet to spread and share dreams like your waking life experiences on Facebook. Publish your dreams to social media circle, like you talk about the weather... We must teach our children to dream with their eyes open. - Harry Edwards, sociologist, activist

  13. 4 out of 5

    KNCHNGL

    I read about the concept of lucid dreaming for the first time a couple years ago, and have kept a dream journal on and off since, but never really delved into the topic deliberately until this book. Still undecided as to whether the concept is pseudoscience or not, but it is way cool. Given the trendy focus on spirituality and mindfulness, this is but another aspect of holistic awareness - I can see how this was funded as a kickstarter project. Results wise - based on the fragments of dreams that I read about the concept of lucid dreaming for the first time a couple years ago, and have kept a dream journal on and off since, but never really delved into the topic deliberately until this book. Still undecided as to whether the concept is pseudoscience or not, but it is way cool. Given the trendy focus on spirituality and mindfulness, this is but another aspect of holistic awareness - I can see how this was funded as a kickstarter project. Results wise - based on the fragments of dreams that I have been able to document in my dream journal in the 7 days after I started this book... 1) I had a semi-lucid dream of with awareness of very briefly flying from the first night, with very sparse details. 2) Dream recollection has skyrocketed, 1-2 dreams recorded for every night in the 7 days since reading this book, mostly during the 4-5th REM cycles. I've noticed... 1) Usually an observer, very rarely a participant in my dreams. 2) Dialogue is minimal. If it occurs, it is between other people. 3) Eyes tend not to be as fully rested upon waking, likely from (more aware) REM movement? 4) Dont need an alarm clock to wake, as brain is more active from (more aware) REM movement? Definitely a cool thing to try! But still undecided as to the statement of "dreams are real experiences" - can this be falsified?

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anna Richey

    Most of the book is very practical, with attainable steps to achieve a lucid dreaming state. The illustrations are delightfully strange - I'd even recommend the book for those alone. The last 25% or so of the book gets a little hippie dippy, which might not be everyone's cup of tea, but you can skip or skim those without losing out on the rest. Most of the book is very practical, with attainable steps to achieve a lucid dreaming state. The illustrations are delightfully strange - I'd even recommend the book for those alone. The last 25% or so of the book gets a little hippie dippy, which might not be everyone's cup of tea, but you can skip or skim those without losing out on the rest.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Emmaline Soken-Huberty

    3.5 stars Most of it was really cool, some of it was a little goofy

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kristina

    A quote from the book that sums it up nicely. " No matter what your journey is, what your religion is, where or how you grew up, dream exploration can be a way to understand who you truly are." I am so impressed with this book. It takes a subject that has been shrouded in mystery and expresses it in an easily understood manner. Most authors present lucid dreaming as complicated and extremely difficult to learn and master. Instead, the authors present the topic in a simple and straight forward way A quote from the book that sums it up nicely. " No matter what your journey is, what your religion is, where or how you grew up, dream exploration can be a way to understand who you truly are." I am so impressed with this book. It takes a subject that has been shrouded in mystery and expresses it in an easily understood manner. Most authors present lucid dreaming as complicated and extremely difficult to learn and master. Instead, the authors present the topic in a simple and straight forward way. So simple in fact, I'm sure there will be some that are turned off by it. If anything this book makes lucid dreaming accessible to the masses, unlike a lot of the classics that came before. Many other lucid dreaming books can be overwhelming to the novice, but this one is completely accessible to those with even zero knowledge of the subject. And while this is great for the complete novice; it's also a refreshing read for those who do have some knowledge or experience under their belt. I enjoyed the authors' voice and found it very readable. I feel like even those who have no interest in lucid dreaming might become interested if they read this book. The case studies are particularly motivating. The wide variety of experiences from other dreamers definitely builds confidence. And I particularly enjoyed the quotes beginning each chapter. Their attributes to the authors were delightful One thing I appreciate above all is that the material is not presented dogmatically whatsoever. Instead, it poses lots of ideas and theories and asks the reader questions. It then leaves it up to the reader to explore and come to their own conclusions. This is a better approach for true learning, in my opinion. I highly recommend this book especially to the beginner, or those who want a refresher. If your ego is particularly tied up in your knowledge of lucid dreaming, this might not be the book for you.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chen

    Listen rating doesn't have to be about the quality and style. It can also be about how you benefit from a book. I've been having lucid dreams for years. So while I'm not a spiritual person at all, this is something I know is real and also, is totally scientific. It's a neurological thing. And that's what I love about this book and the concept of lucid dreaming, it's the science that is also philosophical. Many moments in the book reminded me in that way of Sapiens. Like the idea that we're the onl Listen rating doesn't have to be about the quality and style. It can also be about how you benefit from a book. I've been having lucid dreams for years. So while I'm not a spiritual person at all, this is something I know is real and also, is totally scientific. It's a neurological thing. And that's what I love about this book and the concept of lucid dreaming, it's the science that is also philosophical. Many moments in the book reminded me in that way of Sapiens. Like the idea that we're the only specie that can create a future that doesn't exist, conjure it, thanks to our imagination. Philosophical sentiment? Yes. But that doesn't make it untrue. We *do* create realities. And so the first quarter of the book is almost like a dream related prologue. II could do with a shorter one, but it doe put things in order. The last portion of the book is a bit of what some would call zen mambo jambo but not even that is enough to get you all sarcastic because you understand where it's coming from. I'm not a person who mediates, and even so, after following some of the techniques in the book that are border line meditative, I've been remembering my dreams more often, and I've been sleeping a bit better and a bit longer. I feel like while I haven't had a lucid dream since I started reading the book (but again, I had many "spontaneous" lucid dreams over my life, way above the average) I, in a way, started healing my sleep, and kinda to back control over the entire process. Think about it, as much as this is a psychological thing, some would say spiritual, it's still about being in control, even in your dreams, which is a super practical approach. There are unlimited possibilities to what you can do when you have lucid dreams, not to mention - constant muse and ideas, and that, for an artist, is really important.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cody

    Let's become oneironauts! When one has a lucid dream, their sense of reality tends to change radically. When I had my first one (where I was aware enough to bring control into my dream), I was told upon waking that this wasn't possible. Only later would I learn from the person that'd told me it wasn't possible, that he himself had lucid dreams where he was flying; I'm assuming at this point he'd simply lost touch with that part of his mind. And I the same... until I picked up this book. This is da Let's become oneironauts! When one has a lucid dream, their sense of reality tends to change radically. When I had my first one (where I was aware enough to bring control into my dream), I was told upon waking that this wasn't possible. Only later would I learn from the person that'd told me it wasn't possible, that he himself had lucid dreams where he was flying; I'm assuming at this point he'd simply lost touch with that part of his mind. And I the same... until I picked up this book. This is day two of my dream journal; I'm surprised that both nights I've been able to successfully record a dream. I feel as though when I sleep I'm venturing into the unknown, and all for the better. I'm not afraid or anxious anymore, understanding that all things take time, and the subconscious is one that must be delicately cared for. If I didn't read this book, I wouldn't feel like lucid dreaming was so easy. More than anything, this book revealed to me, higher probabilities of becoming aware that I'm dreaming. I'd read a lot of the information that I learned about lucid dreaming on the Internet, where people's opinions are somewhat concealed by a veil of anonymity. By reading this book, I've taken the information that I feel is applicable to me, and am learning to exploit it. As for the lucid dreaming, there's nothing like it; it is its own reality. We should all try to get a little better sleep, wake up, and remember our dreams.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    As an experienced lucid dreamer who started in 2008 I've read many books about dreaming. Because of this I read a lot in this book which was not new to me. Things like the history of dreaming, well known writers, scientific research and dream techniques. These are the basics you will find in any good book about dreaming. But I won't rate this book based on that because it wouldn't be fair to give them a lower rating simply because I read that stuff in another dream book first. What makes this boo As an experienced lucid dreamer who started in 2008 I've read many books about dreaming. Because of this I read a lot in this book which was not new to me. Things like the history of dreaming, well known writers, scientific research and dream techniques. These are the basics you will find in any good book about dreaming. But I won't rate this book based on that because it wouldn't be fair to give them a lower rating simply because I read that stuff in another dream book first. What makes this book unique is the fact it's written as a field guide. Like a compass guiding you, this is a great book for people who are new to lucid dreaming because they give you a step by step. Easy to read and amusing from time to time. I mean what's not to like about a whole chapter discussing superpowers? They also discuss themes like dream characters (interesting take on the 3 kinds of dream characters), ethics, self healing, awareness, lucid living. There is so much to learn about dreaming but they did a great job discussing many of the great possiblities oneironauts can have/do/be. A must read!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kasandra

    Lucid dreaming seems to run in my family (doing it spontaneously), but it's been a while since I had a run of lucid dreams, and I have been eager to figure out how to make it happen more frequently. I believe this book was a big help, even though CPA exam stress has had my mind so anxious that most of my dreams as of late have been anxiety-induced. I'll keep trying the tips inside and see what happens. I've read books on lucid dreaming before, but this one was more interesting and more thorough Lucid dreaming seems to run in my family (doing it spontaneously), but it's been a while since I had a run of lucid dreams, and I have been eager to figure out how to make it happen more frequently. I believe this book was a big help, even though CPA exam stress has had my mind so anxious that most of my dreams as of late have been anxiety-induced. I'll keep trying the tips inside and see what happens. I've read books on lucid dreaming before, but this one was more interesting and more thorough than most, especially in addressing how to keep a lucid dream from turning back into a "normal" dream, and how to handle getting so excited by your lucidity that you pop yourself out of the dream, which I have done many times. Highly recommended.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bálint

    I really liked the book, because it presented a lot of information in a concise form that is suitable for beginners. Although it's very far from detailed for those who like to know the "whys". It's a great introduction to Lucid Dreaming and also the book looks beautiful. The typo and everything is just spot on. Too bad that after finishing it it falls apart (literally). I really liked the book, because it presented a lot of information in a concise form that is suitable for beginners. Although it's very far from detailed for those who like to know the "whys". It's a great introduction to Lucid Dreaming and also the book looks beautiful. The typo and everything is just spot on. Too bad that after finishing it it falls apart (literally).

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nyamsuren

    Thank you for helping me build a healthy relationship with lucid dreaming. I am grateful to you for correcting my misconceptions, lightening my fears, and reassuring my beliefs. I can step out into the dream world, or more accurately, my dream world with confidence, love, and acceptance now. Sweet dreams.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Trey Kiernan

    This is the first book I read on lucid dreaming. I found it very helpful. My dreams have already become clearer although I cannot say I have had a lucid dream as of yet. I will keep this book and a dream journal on my night stand....

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tomas Serrien

    Lucid writing gives lucid dreaming. Difficult to learn but i had my first lucid flying dream during reading this. Very special experience.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Frobisher

    A good overview for a beginner looking to find out about the subject, but lacks depth and substance. I've found better lucid dreaming knowledge and techniques just browsing the internet. A good overview for a beginner looking to find out about the subject, but lacks depth and substance. I've found better lucid dreaming knowledge and techniques just browsing the internet.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Maya Man

    I can’t remember why we initially became interested in this, but Isaac and I were really wanting to get into lucid dreaming earlier this year. So, when I happened to be at McNally Jackson I asked them if they had any books on the subject and luckily they had exactly two copies of this one! First let me just say that the writing in this book is WEIRD. Reading it often feels like that moment where someone makes a joke nobody understands and then there’s this period of awkwardness where everyone fee I can’t remember why we initially became interested in this, but Isaac and I were really wanting to get into lucid dreaming earlier this year. So, when I happened to be at McNally Jackson I asked them if they had any books on the subject and luckily they had exactly two copies of this one! First let me just say that the writing in this book is WEIRD. Reading it often feels like that moment where someone makes a joke nobody understands and then there’s this period of awkwardness where everyone feels bad. For example, this is a chapter’s opening quote: What we think, we become. -Buddha, spiritual teacher, available in both skinny and tubby varieties. I always had to pause for a second and be like what. The book also could have easily been a nice compact ~50 page read, but instead it really stretched out over 250 pluc pages. In some ways, this actually became useful because it kept the idea of lucid dreaming rattling around in my mind for many months as I read a couple pages before bed each night. All of that said, this book definitely does provide the necessary tools to get started on a lucid dreaming journey. For a while, I was doing reality checks: looking at my hands, trying to breathe while holding my nose periodically, and continually reminding myself to ask am I dreaming? I also started keeping a dream journal, which I still update almost every day now. This practice helps me remember my dreams super clearly and retain them more throughout the day. I only really lucid dreamt twice during the time I read this book. Once, the night after I started it where I dreamt Sofie was in my apartment in Park Slope and then quickly realized that this must be a dream. And another time much later when I was standing across from Chella in an abandoned parking lot high up, realized I was dreaming, and proceeded to fly. Both were very exciting moments, but did not last long and I haven’t really been able to conjure the power again SINCE. So, I’ve never had the chance to explore the super wild stuff in the book like talking to my dream characters or teleporting. But! This was a very comprehensive read on the potential of lucid dreaming and although I think it would be bad for me to get reallllllyyyy into it, I am enjoying my current lightweight involvement. Also, super curious about the ways that the book talks about dreams and consciousness…. The idea that dream world is a land that connects all of us?! Insane. I might return to the first few chapters if I ever want to try and really dive into attempting to lucid dream again, but for now I am very glad to have finally finished the dang thing. I feel like I really could have learned all that I needed to know on reddit in like 20 minutes. Oh wait also last thing: the ILLUSTRATIONS. So confusing?! Could def have done without.

  27. 5 out of 5

    May Ling

    Summary: I liked this book a lot. It's a bit more advanced if you're new to the ideas of sleep and lucid dreaming. It was very interesting and there are parts i liked and others I wasn't so sure I loved. Worth throwing in the list. There was a lot of useful information in this book. P.10 "The normal state of sleep is known as atonia. Fortunately there are two parts of he body that remain unaffected by the paralysis: the diaphragm, so we can keep breathing, and the eyes." p. 19, current hypothesis o Summary: I liked this book a lot. It's a bit more advanced if you're new to the ideas of sleep and lucid dreaming. It was very interesting and there are parts i liked and others I wasn't so sure I loved. Worth throwing in the list. There was a lot of useful information in this book. P.10 "The normal state of sleep is known as atonia. Fortunately there are two parts of he body that remain unaffected by the paralysis: the diaphragm, so we can keep breathing, and the eyes." p. 19, current hypothesis on what dreaming is for: 1) it's defragging, i.e. organizing information to help store memories. 2) Future rehearsal, safe environment to make connections among thoughts, emotions, future events, etc. 3) Randomness, it's just firing and that's creating all sorts of randomness. p. 36/37 - it talks about the power of intention in dreaming and in waking. In pro skiers, the mind fires the same if they think it and if they actually physically do the action. Similarly, there is an experience where people that mentall thought about a workout still grew muscle at 13.5% vs. those that went to the gym at 30%. "Larger goals, such as starting a business, need more passion and specificity, but the process still begins with an intention, a burning desire to get what you want. For us lucid dreamers, not only do clear, passionate, and specific thoughts prove essential as we explore our dreams, but they are often necessary to becoming lucid in the first place." As relates to a young mind, the book talks about how lucid dreaming promotes a failure to see limitations. They aren't thinking about what is concrete. p. 52 talks about reality checks in dreaming, such as putting your finger through your hand P. 73 Levels of Lucidity: 1) No awareness. Can't remember it. Totally unconscious 2) Slight awareness, able to make decisions. Dream recall is easier. 3) You know you're dreaming. You see things out there as separate from you. hard time influencing the dream environment. 4) You know that you're dreaming and that everything "out there" is really in here. There is no separation, mastery over dream elements and creation. 5) The very end or is it. It goes beyond normal interactions with the dream world. The projections of the dream world dissolve and your each a level of pure conscious awareness. p. 76, I don't agree with this whole section on dreaming and training to fly. I think when I fly, I just do it. I might be on the ground, I might be not on the ground. But knowing I am in a dream there is no need to do these other things he mentions. Not sure what to make of this part. P. 141 talks about lucid living. This is intriguing. this idea that when you're so in your mind you've lost track of what you're doing in the living world. never thought about it that way. P. 145 He talks about how some of the best meditators reach a brain wave state superior to sleeping.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Philip Kuo

    Lilly loaned me this book when she was introducing the concept of lucid dreaming to me a while back when we visited Liufoo Village. I read through the first half and skimmed through the second, but was still able to get the core ideas which is that dreams are highly correlated to my real-life experiences since dreams are formed only with the things I already know. The book provided me with some pretty good insights into lucid dreaming, and it seems like most things the author talks about are bas Lilly loaned me this book when she was introducing the concept of lucid dreaming to me a while back when we visited Liufoo Village. I read through the first half and skimmed through the second, but was still able to get the core ideas which is that dreams are highly correlated to my real-life experiences since dreams are formed only with the things I already know. The book provided me with some pretty good insights into lucid dreaming, and it seems like most things the author talks about are based on real science and personal experiences, although there are still parts that I skipped entirely because it's too much fictional storytelling. To get a better chance at entering the lucid dream state, I should constantly ask myself the nature of my reality so that I form a habit doing so, and when I am in a dream and does that same, then that'd be the first step in entering a lucid dream! The book also talked about how to maintain in the ludic dream state, how to wake up right before the REM cycle for more vivid experience and all. I have been following the book's directions but haven't successfully entered a lucid dream, but I sure hope I am close to succeeding!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Contains sound, practical advise about how to retain dream memory, become aware that you are dreaming, and then navigate toward a more lucid state. The ideas and history of dream interaction is backed up with some research, notable quotes and data from other sources. My dream journal work while listening to this audio book became fascinating; the simple act of pondering Tuccillo's writing spurned more interaction with my unconscious and Higher Self. One star deducted for several reasons: the auth Contains sound, practical advise about how to retain dream memory, become aware that you are dreaming, and then navigate toward a more lucid state. The ideas and history of dream interaction is backed up with some research, notable quotes and data from other sources. My dream journal work while listening to this audio book became fascinating; the simple act of pondering Tuccillo's writing spurned more interaction with my unconscious and Higher Self. One star deducted for several reasons: the author rather flippantly suggests, at several times, that dream work can heal physical ailments. Secondly, the description of dream beings and how to relate to them was tiresome and a bit silly. Narrators voice is also slightly nasal; coupled with some corny examples, listening proved a bit hard to digest at times. Regardless, if inclined to learn more about Lucid Dreaming and the awareness it can spurn, I do recommend this book without hesitation. Thoroughly enjoyed it and I am continuing with the work's potential.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lisa O

    I chose this book about lucid dreaming because it seemed more accessible than the rest, which skipped around from culture to culture or were overly scientific and pedantic. This one was written in a conversational style, but it was not written WELL in a conversational style. While the author seems to be addressing this to the reader with no experience in lucid dreaming (me), it comes across as though we have the mental capacity to read and understand things like stop signs and no more. The autho I chose this book about lucid dreaming because it seemed more accessible than the rest, which skipped around from culture to culture or were overly scientific and pedantic. This one was written in a conversational style, but it was not written WELL in a conversational style. While the author seems to be addressing this to the reader with no experience in lucid dreaming (me), it comes across as though we have the mental capacity to read and understand things like stop signs and no more. The author focuses on MCU-like aspects of lucid dreaming, e.g. shapeshifting, having brothels in the sky, and being able to fly. This man loves his flying. It’s a very bro look at lucid dreaming. The tips and tricks are the most basic of basic and did not aid me in my quest. I was still unable to have a lucid dream after reading and practicing this book.

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