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Missing scientists! Plucky girl reporters! Betty and Cliff on the rocks! The mysterious Church of Cosmicism! And who is the sinister Otto Rune? Pulp thrills the way you like them as the Rocketeer comes up against a brand-new adversary in... "The Hollywood Horror!" Missing scientists! Plucky girl reporters! Betty and Cliff on the rocks! The mysterious Church of Cosmicism! And who is the sinister Otto Rune? Pulp thrills the way you like them as the Rocketeer comes up against a brand-new adversary in... "The Hollywood Horror!"


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Missing scientists! Plucky girl reporters! Betty and Cliff on the rocks! The mysterious Church of Cosmicism! And who is the sinister Otto Rune? Pulp thrills the way you like them as the Rocketeer comes up against a brand-new adversary in... "The Hollywood Horror!" Missing scientists! Plucky girl reporters! Betty and Cliff on the rocks! The mysterious Church of Cosmicism! And who is the sinister Otto Rune? Pulp thrills the way you like them as the Rocketeer comes up against a brand-new adversary in... "The Hollywood Horror!"

30 review for Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Art was good, although a little cartoonish if held up against the original Dave Stevens work. Nice continuation in writing of the cameos by pulp and noir characters.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gianfranco Mancini

    3,5 stars Action! Thrill! Pulp! (view spoiler)[Fake pseudo-lovecraftian-elder-gods! (hide spoiler)] Lots of laughs and the Darwyn Cooke/Tim Sale cartoonish style art was just great. Very funny read.["br"]>["br"]>["br"]>["br"]> 3,5 stars Action! Thrill! Pulp! (view spoiler)[Fake pseudo-lovecraftian-elder-gods! (hide spoiler)] Lots of laughs and the Darwyn Cooke/Tim Sale cartoonish style art was just great. Very funny read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    The Rocketeer is a character I’ve never been fully convinced is a particularly great hero - he’s just a guy with a jetpack and a weird robot helmet, isn’t he? He’s not a particularly skilled fighter or even a genius like Tony Stark - after all, someone else made the rocket pack for him, he’s just the pilot! That said, Roger Langridge and J Bone have made a pretty entertaining comic book in Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror. Its 1930s Hollywood and a no-good hypnotist called Otto Rune is out to rob tin The Rocketeer is a character I’ve never been fully convinced is a particularly great hero - he’s just a guy with a jetpack and a weird robot helmet, isn’t he? He’s not a particularly skilled fighter or even a genius like Tony Stark - after all, someone else made the rocket pack for him, he’s just the pilot! That said, Roger Langridge and J Bone have made a pretty entertaining comic book in Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror. Its 1930s Hollywood and a no-good hypnotist called Otto Rune is out to rob tinseltown’s wealthiest with his nefarious plans. Meanwhile Cliff Secord aka the Rocketeer is being pursued by goons working for a shady employer who wants the jetpack for himself. But when Cliff’s girl, the pinup model Betty, gets caught up in Rune’s plan, he’ll have to make do with a sub-par rocket pack to take on - the Hollywood Horror! I’ve read some reviews that say this is the Rocketeer crossed with HP Lovecraft and let me say, it’s not. There is some cult-like stuff here, dark arts, etc. and a tentacled “horror” does emerge in the final issue, but it’s not at all a Lovecraftian comic. It’s more light-hearted, even comedic in places, and kind of charming in its way. It’s going for the kind of 30s Hollywood movie tone and it accomplishes this - except I’m just not a fan of those kinds of movies. If you like old-style movies, you’ll get more out of this but I felt the story was at times a bit too light as to be forgettable. It’s also a bit anachronistic in that while its aiming for the 1930s tone, Langridge gives Betty a 21st century progressive personality. J Bone’s art is fantastic, kind of like late 90s Darwyn Cooke, and beautifully coloured, so the book looks really, really good. The one reservation I had was the exploitative ways Betty was depicted, constantly in her underwear or in very revealing dresses, and in one scene wearing the kind of outfit Carrie Fisher would immortalise in Return of the Jedi - it just made me feel a bit pervy reading this. If not for that I’d have recommended this book to kids. Also the Walt Simonson covers are super-awesome! I’ve never read a Rocketeer book before but I was quite entertained with this one, enough to want to read another one sometime in the future. And for a character whom I had written off as too one-dimensional, Langridge does a decent job of making Cliff and his alter ego seem relevant and interesting in this book. The ending is a little Scooby-Doo-ish but overall this is a pretty fun comic that doesn’t take itself too seriously and is enjoyable enough to read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    There's something not quite right - probably related to not involving the creator (and understandably so) - but its still a fun read. There's something not quite right - probably related to not involving the creator (and understandably so) - but its still a fun read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Wayne McCoy

    The Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror is a pure treat. Roger Langridge has created a nice homage to the era of the 1930s (including a great introduction). The book feels more in tune with The Rocketeer movie than the comics, but it's still a nice nod to the creation of Dave Stevens. There is still plenty of Rocketeer action and all the usual characters, but it all plays out against a wonderful background of Hollywood characters that are familiar and fun to try to guess. There is also an interesting sub The Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror is a pure treat. Roger Langridge has created a nice homage to the era of the 1930s (including a great introduction). The book feels more in tune with The Rocketeer movie than the comics, but it's still a nice nod to the creation of Dave Stevens. There is still plenty of Rocketeer action and all the usual characters, but it all plays out against a wonderful background of Hollywood characters that are familiar and fun to try to guess. There is also an interesting subplot with a couple of goons trying to take away the rocket pack. The narrator shows up in the beginning, then disappears for a couple issues, but the reveal is a wonderful touch. J Bone's art fits nicely. It's a cartoony style with caricatures of Hollywood stars of the era, and it works so very well. Betty looks a little like Betty Page, the Rocketeer is gangly, and the villain looks like a mad scientist from old horror films. The covers by Walter Simonson are worthy of framing. Included are alternate covers. A nice tribute to serials and pulp fiction.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    I liked this one pretty well. It's very Hollywood-centric, so expect lots of movie star cameos. SLIGHT SPOILER ALERT I think I'm the wrong kind of nerd even for comic books, because I was excited to recognize Nick and Nora Charles (from the Thin Man movies) even without Asta. END SPOILER A very bad man has kidnapped a scientist, and is forcing the scientist to do his evil bidding, because that always ends well. Betty does some private detecting herself, and there's also a Howard Hughes cameo. Cliff I liked this one pretty well. It's very Hollywood-centric, so expect lots of movie star cameos. SLIGHT SPOILER ALERT I think I'm the wrong kind of nerd even for comic books, because I was excited to recognize Nick and Nora Charles (from the Thin Man movies) even without Asta. END SPOILER A very bad man has kidnapped a scientist, and is forcing the scientist to do his evil bidding, because that always ends well. Betty does some private detecting herself, and there's also a Howard Hughes cameo. Cliff tries to save Betty from herself, and ends up in the mud with a group of pigs. I didn't think I liked the style of the book when I first opened it. I thought it looked too cartoony (I know. I know. I know. I know.). However, after reading for a while, it really grew on me and I decided I liked the style a lot. It's very cute. It's still cartoony, but I can hardly sit here and criticize that, because I think one of my favorite drawings ever of Cliff Secord is in this series. The artists for this story were also artists for one of the stories in either Rocketeer Adventures 1 or 2. I can't remember, and can't look it up because I'm at work. But I thought the drawings seemed familiar, and when I looked in the collected volume, there they were. I hope this trend of using artists from the collected volumes continues, and have some opinions on who should draw the next ones. The narration is fantastic (I almost had to be hit over the head with who the narrator was, because he never explicitly says), and I laughed right out loud in several places. Favorite line from this book: "This lunch is not going to drink itself." I have not ruled out that I have a serious problem. Has anyone figured out how to time travel to a book yet? If you like the rest of the Rocketeer series, you'll like these.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eoghann Irving

    I went into this one biased towards liking it. First off it's Roger Langridge and he has written some phenomenal comics over the last few years and shown a particular knack for hitting the right tone on other people's properties as well. On top of that it's the Rocketeer. Before the movie (which I rather like) there was a comic book written and drawn by Dave Stevens. He created the Rocketeer as a homage to the black and white cliffhanger serials of the 30s and 40s. The Rocketeer character itself I went into this one biased towards liking it. First off it's Roger Langridge and he has written some phenomenal comics over the last few years and shown a particular knack for hitting the right tone on other people's properties as well. On top of that it's the Rocketeer. Before the movie (which I rather like) there was a comic book written and drawn by Dave Stevens. He created the Rocketeer as a homage to the black and white cliffhanger serials of the 30s and 40s. The Rocketeer character itself is clearly influenced by serials like _King of the Rocketmen_ which Cliff Secord's girlfriend seems to look remarkably like one Betty Page. Now I happen to love movies from the 30s and 40s and happily watch cliffhanger serials including King of the Rocketmen so obviously I love this character. Recently IDW has started to publish Rocketeer material again, with other writers and artists as Dave Stevens sadly died a few years ago. _Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror_ is the latest of those and it is wonderful. The tone of the book is light and incredibly fast paced. There are loads of Hollywood references from the time period and the thing has the feel of one of those movie serials. Which is exactly what you want. This isn't modernized, its exactly what you should get from that period. Betty is independent minded but invariably ends up getting herself in trouble. Sometimes she gets herself out again, sometimes she needs Cliff's help. And she has habit of ending up in skimpy attire in the process. Art wise J Bone wisely makes no effort to mimic Dave Stevens style but instead goes for a minimalist cartoony approach instead which while very different does seem to mess nicely into the 40's era material. It's very energetic and matches the script well in that regard. All round this is just a lovely package and well worth reading.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Issa

    Fun old fashioned adventure the kind they don't make anymore. The artist reminds me of Darwyn Cooke's art style with a dash of Tim Sale thrown in. The writer has the lingo of 1930s down pat. If you are looking for dashing (yet somewhat naive) heroes, tough as nails yet very gorgeous women and a lot of crazy old fashioned mustache twirling villains you can't go wrong with the Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror Fun old fashioned adventure the kind they don't make anymore. The artist reminds me of Darwyn Cooke's art style with a dash of Tim Sale thrown in. The writer has the lingo of 1930s down pat. If you are looking for dashing (yet somewhat naive) heroes, tough as nails yet very gorgeous women and a lot of crazy old fashioned mustache twirling villains you can't go wrong with the Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror

  9. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 3.0 of 5 With a comic like The Rocketeer it is important to not take the work too seriously. Given that, this book works nicely but could still be much stronger. It is the 1930's, America (Hollywood, of course) and Cliff Secord is a man looking to be a hero and dons a helmet and jet-pack to take on whoever needs taking on. There are goons a-plenty looking to take Secord's jet secrets and that puts his dame, Betty, in harm's way. Thi This review originally published in Looking For a Good Book. Rated 3.0 of 5 With a comic like The Rocketeer it is important to not take the work too seriously. Given that, this book works nicely but could still be much stronger. It is the 1930's, America (Hollywood, of course) and Cliff Secord is a man looking to be a hero and dons a helmet and jet-pack to take on whoever needs taking on. There are goons a-plenty looking to take Secord's jet secrets and that puts his dame, Betty, in harm's way. This is an over-the-top, cartoon-y graphic novel. The story-line is generally pretty sound, but it features some real stereotyped characters. The villain is using mass hypnotism to cloud people's minds, which strikes me as a very 30's-era sort of move (and of course the idea of clouding minds harkens to The Shadow [also a 1930's era creation]). I wasn't a fan of the art style. I couldn't tell if it was trying to be retro or just 'simple' so as to appeal to the youngest of the comic-book-reading crowd. In fact, that was my biggest problem with the entire book - who is this for? Who is the target audience? It's a just a little corny for the serious comic/graphic novel reader and a little to mature for the kids who may be drawn to the art style. It strikes me as the sort of book one might give as a gift. I would read this, enjoy it, but then probably donate it to my local library or used book store. I like the concept - I'm still a huge fan of the classic pulp heroes of fiction, but this isn't an homage to the pulps as much as it is an homage to Disney's Donald Duck comic books. Looking for a good book? Rocketeer: Hollywood Horror is a graphic novel featuring pulp hero-like character, complete with jet-pack on his back and gorgeous dame at his side, but it's a little too corny. I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher, through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    What a fun romp! Sadly, this is not a sequel by the late and much-missed Rocketeer creator, Dave Stevens, but it is by other great talents, Roger Langridge (script) and J. Bone (artist), along with Jordie Bellaire on colors and Walt Simonson drawing covers. In all honesty, I know both Roger and Jason, so I'm predisposed to like their work, but when it comes to the Rocketeer, I'm a pretty tough critic, having been a fan since the character's first appearance in the early '80's. It's a fast-paced, What a fun romp! Sadly, this is not a sequel by the late and much-missed Rocketeer creator, Dave Stevens, but it is by other great talents, Roger Langridge (script) and J. Bone (artist), along with Jordie Bellaire on colors and Walt Simonson drawing covers. In all honesty, I know both Roger and Jason, so I'm predisposed to like their work, but when it comes to the Rocketeer, I'm a pretty tough critic, having been a fan since the character's first appearance in the early '80's. It's a fast-paced, straight-forward adventure, showcasing both Cliff's (The Rocketeer) and his girlfriend, Betty's (inspired by Bettie Page), personalities and their relationship, while throwing in lots of old Hollywood cameos and a plot straight out of the best pulps and serials, giving space for lots of Rocketeer action. Jason's art style is fun to begin with, but he goes all out on this, keeping the action moving, while Jordie does a great job with the colors. Such fun that I wish I'd gotten to draw it! And I don't know Jordie, but I'd love to work with them someday. Highly recommended.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    One of the occasional Rocketeer stories published since the death of creator Dave Stevens. It's a very nice hardcover book, if on the slim side. The story itself is fairly lightweight -- Cliff Secord is pulled into a scheme by the greedy Otto Rune as a result of his girlfriend Betty investigating the disappearance of her roommate, while also having to deal with the operatives of the man who created the rocket pack (this character being an expie of Doc Savage, never named.) Also getting into the One of the occasional Rocketeer stories published since the death of creator Dave Stevens. It's a very nice hardcover book, if on the slim side. The story itself is fairly lightweight -- Cliff Secord is pulled into a scheme by the greedy Otto Rune as a result of his girlfriend Betty investigating the disappearance of her roommate, while also having to deal with the operatives of the man who created the rocket pack (this character being an expie of Doc Savage, never named.) Also getting into the act are a couple of familiar detectives with a dog named Asta. Langridge and Bone do a lot of winking at the audience here, especially with the narrator. The artwork itself is more cartoonish than might be expected of an adventure story like this, which results in the cheesecake moments (Betty being based on Bettie Page, after all) being rather strange. Still, if you've ever wondered how an animated version of The Rocketeer would look...here you go.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Subham

    This book was quite fun. Focusing on Cliff and Betty vs Otto Rune, a psychologist who is hypnotizing people to donate to his church and more mysteries regarding what happened to the missing Scientist August Lowcroft and the mysteries regarding some people after Cliff's Rocket. It was such a fun read this time focusing on the hollywood setting and the 1940s insanity of it. And the art felt so golden age but so fun! This book was quite fun. Focusing on Cliff and Betty vs Otto Rune, a psychologist who is hypnotizing people to donate to his church and more mysteries regarding what happened to the missing Scientist August Lowcroft and the mysteries regarding some people after Cliff's Rocket. It was such a fun read this time focusing on the hollywood setting and the 1940s insanity of it. And the art felt so golden age but so fun!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Good solid storytelling by Roger Langridge with wonderful cartoony art by J. Bone. Nice Hollywood cameos.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Albert

    The writer is so talented. You can publish you work on NovelStar App and earn big time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    In this new adventure of Dave Stevens’ classic superhero of the late 1930s, Cliff Secord, Betty, and Peevy get caught up in a scheme involving mysticism and magic... or do they? Is a mysterious cult leader really in communion with beings from beyond the stars? Or is he planning something much more nefarious? This second full-length story reviving the Rocketeer (following two anthologies of short comic stories and Cargo of Doom by Mark Waid and Chris Samnee) feels very much of a piece with the pre In this new adventure of Dave Stevens’ classic superhero of the late 1930s, Cliff Secord, Betty, and Peevy get caught up in a scheme involving mysticism and magic... or do they? Is a mysterious cult leader really in communion with beings from beyond the stars? Or is he planning something much more nefarious? This second full-length story reviving the Rocketeer (following two anthologies of short comic stories and Cargo of Doom by Mark Waid and Chris Samnee) feels very much of a piece with the previous stories, containing all the elements that made the original Stevens stories so memorable. It’s a light, fun, fast-paced adventure full of likable characters and nods and homages to its period setting. And the art is fantastic. Like Stevens and Waid, writer Roger Langridge includes a metric ton of nods to popular culture of 1939. And, like those writers before him, he doesn’t hit the reader over the head with them. You’ll either pick up who the cameo appearances from film, comics, and pulp literature are, or you won’t, but either way, it doesn’t damage your enjoyment of the story at all. And what a story it is! It’s very much a fast-paced adventure, in the style of Raiders of the Lost Ark (although entirely Hollywood-bound) or a pulp adventure, or the two original Rocketeer stories by Dave Stevens. It’s colorful and clever, featuring a larger-than-life villain. What makes it special, as usual, is the presence of the three main leads. As usual, Cliff Secord is a regular, down-to-earth guy, whose only special qualities are his rocket pack and his desire to do the right thing. He still has trouble making ends meet, and he still has trouble with his relationship with Betty. For her part, Betty loves Cliff so completely, but refuses to be pushed to the sidelines when it comes to his heroic adventures. And cantankerous mechanic Peevy is still the voice of sanity, bringing Cliff down to earth when he starts getting too crazy. The art, by J. Bone, is about a million miles away from the detailed, realistic drawings of Dave Stevens, at first glance. However, as with the work of previous artist Chris Samnee, the art has its roots in the great work of artists of the past. While Bone’s figures are drawn in a more exaggerated, impressionistic style, the overall qualities of the work echo those of the great Alex Toth, who worked so hard to convey so much with as few lines as possible. Everything we need to see is in the art, without extraneous detail cluttering anything up. It’s distinctive and beautiful and clear. While it may not look like the work of the late Dave Stevens, I believe that by having artists work on the Rocketeer in their own distinctive, unique styles, publisher IDW is honoring the spirit of the original more than if they’d hired artists to ape Stevens’ style. The original work endures due to Stevens’ own artistic voice, not because it looks like anything else. Dave Stevens is no longer with us, and if he can’t work to place his own stamp on new Rocketeer stories, I think it does a disservice to his work and his memory to have other artists try to do what he would have done. Overall, this is another great addition to the Rocketeer canon. As a fan of the character, I found myself having to make a choice when IDW brought him back. I either had to ignore these stories, or accept that if I wanted new Rocketeer stories, they would have a different feel than the originals. I’m glad I made the decision to accept them on their own terms, because they’ve been a lot of fun in their own right, while honoring the spirit of the originals.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Online Eccentric Librarian

    More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ The Rocketeer: Hollywood Horrors follows the adventure of 1930s deco streamlined hero with a jetpack Cliff Secord. The story follows dastardly Otto Rune, who has a nefarious plan that hurts Cliff's dame's friend. The dame, Betty, goes undercover to find out more and faces danger as a result. Meanwhile, some goons want Cliff's backpack and will stop at nothing to take it from him. Will Cliff be able to save Betty, uncov More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ The Rocketeer: Hollywood Horrors follows the adventure of 1930s deco streamlined hero with a jetpack Cliff Secord. The story follows dastardly Otto Rune, who has a nefarious plan that hurts Cliff's dame's friend. The dame, Betty, goes undercover to find out more and faces danger as a result. Meanwhile, some goons want Cliff's backpack and will stop at nothing to take it from him. Will Cliff be able to save Betty, uncover Otto Rune, keep the backpack from being airlifted, and still keep his hair coiffed? Well, you get the idea that this is told in pulpy silliness and fun. The book is full color and collects the full story arc of four comics. The illustration work is Disney cartoony - more over the top Flash Gordon than Dark Knight Commissioner Gordon. So the story is a light tongue-in-cheek fair with very bright neon colors and lots of sass and inside jokes. One problem I had with the book was the tone. At times, it is an homage to the original 1930s era with words like 'cockamime', girls who are simple and in need of constant saving, and a simple homespun hero. But then there are the anachronistic modernisms - girls saying, "as if!" and then complaining about women's lib - while also having a career as scantily clad pin up girls. As well, Cliff's girlfriend Betty looks like Betty Page, has Betty Page's career, but is supposed to be from the 1930s, not the 1950s. As well, the whole feel of 1930s Hollywood was lost somewhere. I think the author was going for "My Girl Friday" but just ended up with Betty Page after a lobotomy. Another problem was that Cliff spends most of the book not really doing anything except flying around and then complaining. He wasn't really a likeable character - I missed the Earnest and daring Cliff Secord of earlier comics. I thought it was interesting to tell the tale from a narrator. But that also might have further distanced me from the characters and really liking them. So, definitely not a bad book but the inconsistencies in tone were a bit frustrating for me. Provided as an ARC from the publisher.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    The Rocka-who? For those who've seen the movie or read the previous adventures, Cliff Secord is back for more action. This time he's up against an evil mastermind that is using mental powers and a mechanical monster to make money off the Hollywood elite. What more can you want from a comic book hero? You have the ruggedly handsome Cliff, the incredible jetpack, Cliff's beautiful girlfriend Betty and his friend Peevy, the villain Otto Rune, the science genius August Lowcroft, intrepid girl report The Rocka-who? For those who've seen the movie or read the previous adventures, Cliff Secord is back for more action. This time he's up against an evil mastermind that is using mental powers and a mechanical monster to make money off the Hollywood elite. What more can you want from a comic book hero? You have the ruggedly handsome Cliff, the incredible jetpack, Cliff's beautiful girlfriend Betty and his friend Peevy, the villain Otto Rune, the science genius August Lowcroft, intrepid girl reporter Dahlia Danvers ... all the staples of a 1930's comic strip. The period flavor is solid throughout the book with clothing and songs of the era, famous names like Howard Hughes, and even detective work by Nick and Nora Charles and their dog Asta. If you enjoy comic book heroes, or are already a Rocketeer fan, you will enjoy this trip to the past.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    I'm a fan of Roger Langridge after reading his wonderful Muppet comics for Boom Studios. His Rocketeer story isn't quite as funny as those, but it does a very good job of capturing the feel of the 30's era serials, and the glamour of 30's era Hollywood. It's not often your narrator is a cameo (well played), and there are lots of other famous faces that show up (A Nick and Nora Charles analog are prevalent), as the Rocketeer and his girl find themselves embroiled in a shady Scientology-like cult I'm a fan of Roger Langridge after reading his wonderful Muppet comics for Boom Studios. His Rocketeer story isn't quite as funny as those, but it does a very good job of capturing the feel of the 30's era serials, and the glamour of 30's era Hollywood. It's not often your narrator is a cameo (well played), and there are lots of other famous faces that show up (A Nick and Nora Charles analog are prevalent), as the Rocketeer and his girl find themselves embroiled in a shady Scientology-like cult leader's attempts on the Hollywood elite. The story does manage to swing pretty far on both sides of the female empowerment/female exploitation theme, which is an odd thing to see, but other than that it feels note perfect.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Scott wachter

    fun stuff here guys. The volume serves as a follow-up more to the film version than the original comics, but is has the same pulp adventure spirit. The art pairs well with action and overall tone of the setting and characters. My main issues with the book have to do with the side elements of the story. The protagonist spend the first half of the book being harassed by Hughes' goons over ownership of the rocket pack, only to be given it back at the end by the same people to serve as its 'test pilo fun stuff here guys. The volume serves as a follow-up more to the film version than the original comics, but is has the same pulp adventure spirit. The art pairs well with action and overall tone of the setting and characters. My main issues with the book have to do with the side elements of the story. The protagonist spend the first half of the book being harassed by Hughes' goons over ownership of the rocket pack, only to be given it back at the end by the same people to serve as its 'test pilot' in a slice of deus ex machina. There are also a pair of detectives that continue to show at exactly the right moment to shove the plot forward via their expositional contrivances.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Very comic-book-y / cartoonish-y, but then again, it is fun to read an actual comic-book now and again; I guess they don't all have to be fancy-schmancy "Graphic Novels". A fun simple read, with fun simple art. Lots of 30s stars and pulp heroes walking around, and they're not all that easy to identify... I got taken by surprise when I realized who the narrator was supposed to be, and it kind of ruined the "voice" I'd given him in my head... oh and he didn't look anything like him, but hey, all"s Very comic-book-y / cartoonish-y, but then again, it is fun to read an actual comic-book now and again; I guess they don't all have to be fancy-schmancy "Graphic Novels". A fun simple read, with fun simple art. Lots of 30s stars and pulp heroes walking around, and they're not all that easy to identify... I got taken by surprise when I realized who the narrator was supposed to be, and it kind of ruined the "voice" I'd given him in my head... oh and he didn't look anything like him, but hey, all"s fair in love and comics. Not the greatest Rocketeer story or art out there, but then again, nobody'll ever match the original Dave Stevens stories and art.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Diz

    I'm a big fan of the Rocketeer, so I was happy to see that the main characters Cliff and Betty are written well. Their characters match the tone of the characters in Dave Stevens original series. Surprisingly, I'm also a fan of the cartoony art style that they went with--clean lines and large solid fields of color. The one thing I didn't like is there is a bit too much narration, but it drops away towards the end of the book. I'm a big fan of the Rocketeer, so I was happy to see that the main characters Cliff and Betty are written well. Their characters match the tone of the characters in Dave Stevens original series. Surprisingly, I'm also a fan of the cartoony art style that they went with--clean lines and large solid fields of color. The one thing I didn't like is there is a bit too much narration, but it drops away towards the end of the book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    I don't want to say the Rocketeer is better when his original creator isn't handling him, but.....while the original art may be slightly better, this is much more fun and the story is leaps and bounds better than what preceded it. I don't want to say the Rocketeer is better when his original creator isn't handling him, but.....while the original art may be slightly better, this is much more fun and the story is leaps and bounds better than what preceded it.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Aric

    Review pending....maybe....

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    Incoherent, but fun enough to finish.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kristofer

    The Rocketeer meets The Thin Man, Doc Savage and H. P. Lovecraft. Sold.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eric Manix

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Reid

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matt

  30. 5 out of 5

    Adam

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