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Why we do business impacts how we do it and what ultimately gets done. As is belief, so is behavior, so is business. This is Business Sutra, a very Indian way of doing business. It is very different from Management Science, taught in business schools around the world, which does not factor in belief, because belief is subjective truth, hence cannot be measured. Despite the v Why we do business impacts how we do it and what ultimately gets done. As is belief, so is behavior, so is business. This is Business Sutra, a very Indian way of doing business. It is very different from Management Science, taught in business schools around the world, which does not factor in belief, because belief is subjective truth, hence cannot be measured. Despite the veneer of objectivity, Management Science is rooted in Western belief. Just as ancient Greeks celebrated Elysium, much-cherished heaven of heroes, and the Bible speaks of the Promised Land, ultimate destination of faithful, Management Science is goal-oriented, obsessed with vision, mission, objectives, milestones, and targets. By contrast, Business Sutra is gaze-oriented. Great value is placed on the practice of darshan: how we see the world and our relationship with Lakshmi, goddess of wealth, whose image adorns Hindu homes, Jain temples and Buddhist stupas. If we believe that wealth is something that needs to be pursued, we end up turning the workplace into a rana-bhoomi, a battleground of investors, regulators, employers, employees, vendors, competitors and customers. If we believe that wealth is something that needs to be attracted, we end up turning the workplace into a ranga-bhoomi, a playground where everyone is happy. Communicated symbolically through the stories, symbols and rituals of India, which have been transmitted across the subcontinent for centuries, Business Sutra reveals a radically different approach to management, business, goverance, leadership, even economics and politics, that India seems to have forgotten, and the world has overlooked. Who better to unravel it than India’s foremost mythologist, renowned speaker, columnist, author, leadership coach and Chief Belief Officer of Future Group, Devdutt Pattanaik. He reveals how Management Science is based on the assumption that the world is finite, certain, controllable and linear. But in a global village, where everything is volatile and vibrant, there is need for a theory that is more comfortable with infinity, diversity, uncertainty and non-linear modes of thinking. Hence, Business Sutra.


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Why we do business impacts how we do it and what ultimately gets done. As is belief, so is behavior, so is business. This is Business Sutra, a very Indian way of doing business. It is very different from Management Science, taught in business schools around the world, which does not factor in belief, because belief is subjective truth, hence cannot be measured. Despite the v Why we do business impacts how we do it and what ultimately gets done. As is belief, so is behavior, so is business. This is Business Sutra, a very Indian way of doing business. It is very different from Management Science, taught in business schools around the world, which does not factor in belief, because belief is subjective truth, hence cannot be measured. Despite the veneer of objectivity, Management Science is rooted in Western belief. Just as ancient Greeks celebrated Elysium, much-cherished heaven of heroes, and the Bible speaks of the Promised Land, ultimate destination of faithful, Management Science is goal-oriented, obsessed with vision, mission, objectives, milestones, and targets. By contrast, Business Sutra is gaze-oriented. Great value is placed on the practice of darshan: how we see the world and our relationship with Lakshmi, goddess of wealth, whose image adorns Hindu homes, Jain temples and Buddhist stupas. If we believe that wealth is something that needs to be pursued, we end up turning the workplace into a rana-bhoomi, a battleground of investors, regulators, employers, employees, vendors, competitors and customers. If we believe that wealth is something that needs to be attracted, we end up turning the workplace into a ranga-bhoomi, a playground where everyone is happy. Communicated symbolically through the stories, symbols and rituals of India, which have been transmitted across the subcontinent for centuries, Business Sutra reveals a radically different approach to management, business, goverance, leadership, even economics and politics, that India seems to have forgotten, and the world has overlooked. Who better to unravel it than India’s foremost mythologist, renowned speaker, columnist, author, leadership coach and Chief Belief Officer of Future Group, Devdutt Pattanaik. He reveals how Management Science is based on the assumption that the world is finite, certain, controllable and linear. But in a global village, where everything is volatile and vibrant, there is need for a theory that is more comfortable with infinity, diversity, uncertainty and non-linear modes of thinking. Hence, Business Sutra.

30 review for Business Sutra: A Very Indian Approach to Management

  1. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    A few months ago, I ran into a slight problem. I had a bit of a misunderstanding with Mrs. Asha Singh (not her real name), a neighbourhood friend of mine, someone I've known since I arrived in India about two decades ago. We'd gone for a bit of shopping. Mrs. Asha Singh, I'd come to understand, had been collecting discount coupons for a very large chain store. Her husband would go there, buy the monthly provisions and pay for them and he would hand Mrs. Asha Singh these discount coupons every ti A few months ago, I ran into a slight problem. I had a bit of a misunderstanding with Mrs. Asha Singh (not her real name), a neighbourhood friend of mine, someone I've known since I arrived in India about two decades ago. We'd gone for a bit of shopping. Mrs. Asha Singh, I'd come to understand, had been collecting discount coupons for a very large chain store. Her husband would go there, buy the monthly provisions and pay for them and he would hand Mrs. Asha Singh these discount coupons every time he returned with the shopping. She would save up these coupons with the hope of buying something nice for herself. However, the discount coupons scheme was about to come to an end in favour of a card/point system. So Mrs. Asha Singh was anxious to encash these coupons in order to get their full value. That, however, proved to be easier said than done. For starters, she wouldn't go to the local branch of that chain but insisted on going to the city centre branch of it, which was, to say the least, very inconvenient. The Indian traffic on a hot day is nothing less than a nightmare. I wondered why she was doing this. I soon found out. The city centre branch had a jeweller's shop on it's premises. Mrs. Asha Singh entered the shop, produced her coupons on the counter and insisted on redeeming their value in gold jewellery items. Not surprisingly, she was immediately dismissed. This shop was not a part of the chain store, it simply rented a premises there and was therefore not a part of its schemes. Mrs. Asha Singh had thousands of rupees worth of these coupons. Moreover, as I tried to explain to her, the coupons were not money. They were simply pieces of paper which, under certain circumstances, could be exchanged in order to benefit the user with discounts on certain items. None of these items would be anything like gold jewellery, they would be consumer goods like clothing or electrical items. I tried to explain to her that no item could be purchased completely by coupons, actual money had to pay a role in each and every purchase. As we shopped around a bit, Asha soon got the hang of using the coupons and even purchased some bowls and dishes. But obviously, it was nothing like the shopping she'd originally envisaged. I purchased some items too, an electric kettle and some clothing items and was pleasantly surprised when Asha insisted that I use the coupons to avail of discounts. I made a saving of six hundred rupees that day, which was great. Of course, I made sure to thank Asha for her kindness and also made a point of paying her fare home in the rickshaw and the buses we travelled in. I also paid for what she ate and drank when we stopped somewhere for tea and snacks. So it came as a bit of a surprise to me when my daughter handed me a handwritten bill from Mrs. Asha Singh a few months later. As neither my Hindi nor Mrs. Asha Singh's English is very good, the lady had resorted to communicating her message through my daughter. It turned out that, knowing I'd made a saving of Rs.600/- with her coupons, Mrs. Asha Singh was insisting on my paying half my discount back to her in the form of cash. And very indignant she was too, about my being slow to repay 'her' money.Naturally, I was shocked. I had paid her back, I thought. Hadn't I picked up the responsibility for our fares and refreshments that day? Moreover, coupons are pieces of paper which, under certain conditions, can be redeemed for discounts. They're not actual cash. Besides, the coupons had been about to expire. I've shared coupons of my own with friends many times and was only too glad to help them out. I certainly didn't see myself as having given away cash. None of this reasoning cut any ice with Mrs. Asha Singh. Nope! She wanted her money back. All Rs.300 of it, exactly half of the discount I'd received. When I pointed out to her that I'd incurred about Rs.100 expense on her fares and refreshments, she cut the 'bill' by Rs.100, but dug her heels in, threatening to 'complain' to my mother-in-law and husband if I didn't repay 'her' money. That did it. I dug Rs.200/- out of my purse, sent it via my daughter's hand and my friendship with Mrs. Asha Singh is now reduced to nothing more than a cold nod by the garden gate. BTW, my husband and mother-in-law, both Indians, had a hearty laugh about this later on. I told them about it. Don't mind that foolish woman, the mother-in-law told me, she and her people are just greedy for money. My husband pointed out that Mrs. Asha Singh, although the same age as myself (fiftyish!), had been married at a mere sixteen years and while she was now a mother, a mother-in-law and a grandmother, she had very little actual experience of the world of commerce. Well that made sense. My doctor sahib (my husband) is quite a rock of wisdom. Yet I couldn't understand, for the life of me, how Asha could make the mistake of turning the gesture of helping a friend into a business transaction. I only wish I'd read BUSINESS SUTRA by Devdutt Pattanaik sooner. It might have made things so much clearer for me. I was fortunate enough to get a copy of this most enlightening book recently and it has done a lot to explain to me why the 'Western' (i.e. USA and western European) approach towards business transactions is so very different from the subcontinental (or Indian) approach. Wasn't it Kipling, the wise old man, gave us that awful adage that east is east and west is west and 'ne'er the twain shall meet'? He was a bit of a pessimist, if you ask me. If only he'd dug a little deeper, he might have understood that the very different approach Indians have to business, among other things, is because of their very mindset, which is part of the cultural baggage they have inherited. For people of Western origin, it's the same. We're all only human and the twain have been meeting forever (doing business together, getting married, producing children and doing any number of things) but in order for the encounter to go smoothly, understanding, awareness and insight are required - these things are so essential. Devdutt Pattanaik, is a terrific teacher and storyteller. Using clear language, simple illustrations and apt examples, he shows us how the Indian approach to business can be interpreted from an attitude which is rooted deeply in the psyche and can be interpreted using clues from the rich treasure house of Indian mythology. He rightly points out that western approach is rooted in Biblical (to some extent) thinking or rather a form of it, on one hand and by classical Greek thinking on the other. The Biblical approach glorifying, but eclipsed by Greek thought which glorifying man. He shows us how the Western approach is always concerned with 'what'. The Indian approach, rooted as it is in it's mythology, is more concened with 'why', while the Chinese approach, rooted in its own peculiar mosaic of philosophies, is supremely concerned wth 'how'? Basically, Devdutt had decoded mysteries that it could have taken many a scholar a lifetime to unravel. I'd been offended at the thought that Mrs. Asha Singh was treating me as a mobile cash dispenser. But I now realize that that wan't the case. Heck she was putting me at the level of a goddess. Devdutt Pattanaik explains clearly in the book how ubcontinental people approach an investment or business transaction as they would a religious ceremony. The investor (yajaman!) gives an offering (svaha) which they hope the 'devata' (god) will accept and return in the form of a gift (taathastu). In this case, Mrs. Asha Singh was the devotee, I was the goddess, her 'svaha' was the discount coupons and no wonder she was displeased when her taathastu was not only delayed, but reduced as well! I'd originally thought we were two friends supporting each other but that the whole exchange had turned sour because of Mrs. Asha Singh's greed. I had no idea that the whole situation was imbued with spiritual significance. Oh, I'll smile more warmly at Mrs. Asha Singh next time I see her. But no way am I taking it for granted that her approach to variou interactions should be to mine in future. The differences, of course, being rooted in our cultural backgrounds. BUSINESS SUTRA is an ideal read for any Indian person who has studied management science, of which a western model is prevalently taught They will discoer how belief influences behaviour and therefore, business. This will help to give them the Indian approach to management and business and give them a more balanced east/west view. It would also be a terrific addition to the library of any business person of western origin who has regular business with Indians or businesses based in India. Even for readers who just enjoy studying the significance of mythology and who are particularly interested in studying the effect mythology has on the lives of people - this book has something for them too. If it comes out in Hindi (I'm not sure if it has yet) I might consider purchasing a copy of this book and giving it as a gift to Mrs. Asha Singh? But will she 'get' what I'm trying to convey? Well, to answer it in a typical Indian style, 'that depends". I can live with that.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sukanya

    Reviewing is as much a subjective experience as reading. This isn't so much a review as much as it is an attempt to record my experience of reading this book - the things that stayed back with me, the things that registered in my mind and the things which will perhaps make me revisit the book again some day. The book,as many have rightly pointed out, is not the kind one can finish quickly. It isn't an easy book to read. Not because it is difficult to comprehend. Or sprawling. Or moribund. But bec Reviewing is as much a subjective experience as reading. This isn't so much a review as much as it is an attempt to record my experience of reading this book - the things that stayed back with me, the things that registered in my mind and the things which will perhaps make me revisit the book again some day. The book,as many have rightly pointed out, is not the kind one can finish quickly. It isn't an easy book to read. Not because it is difficult to comprehend. Or sprawling. Or moribund. But because there is so MUCH that this book has to offer, that one must, once in a while, set this book aside and give oneself time to process one's thoughts. The book starts with a comparison between Western philosophy, Oriental philosophy and Indian philosophy. So far, the very little of philosophy that I have read happens to be mostly Indian philosophy. And so I have consciously decided to revisit this section of the book, when I'll hopefully have read some more on Western and Oriental philosophies. The structure of the book is absolutely simple. Pattnaik takes various mythological stories in Hindusism and links them to contemporary business situations/ cases. The success of Pattnaik's work lies in that, it attunes the reader to look at business/a corporate body as an organism, composed of individual stakeholders, instead of an objective system driven by rules, profit margins and turnovers. Further more, Pattnaik forces one to stop slotting decisions as either right or wrong or profit-making or loss-making. Instead he nudges us towards a Hindu subjective view which espouses that action can be neither right nor wrong. Action can only have consequences which in turn will claim accountability. In business, this will roughly translate to a decision taken in the best of interest, under a set of circumstances which may accrue short term benefits but have long term adverse implications. Or, vice versa. All in all, action is important and in most cases inevitable. Along the way, Pattnaik also uncovers long forgotten histories of cultural mythologies so inherent to our social fabric that it would perhaps never occur to us to ask how did they ever come into being! To give an example, the fact that cow-slaughter came to be considered a terrible crime in this country is not so much for religious reasons but because in the not so distant past, the cow played an extremely important economical role. In agrarian India, a cow could actually sustain an entire family, which is why one of the greatest acts of charity was considered to be 'gow-daan'. Killing a cow meant taking away the very means of existence of an entire family - a very tangible misfortune- and hence an act which carried enormous implications. I stumbled upon so many such wondrous details in this book that it was almost like living one revelation after another! More so it made me extremely appreciative of hinduism as a life philosophy. The most important thing that I would take away from this book is the beautiful way in which Pattanaik brings together spirituality and work. Our Gods are as much bound to karma as we humans. Shiva's karma is to create detachment, Vishnu's to create attachments and sustain them. Praying to our Gods is not simply an attempt to secure good fortunes for ourselves but to expand our human potential, a conscious effort to become closer versions of our ideals, our Gods. I don't think there can be anything more beautiful, more powerful than this thought.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ashish Taneja

    A very impactful book challenging the core beliefs of our workplaces - the ones which make us crib about our professional lives! Belief ---> Behavior ---> Business Organizations work hard to model our behavior so that business can be done but no one talks about the belief-system of a person which leads to a certain kind of behavior. The focus is on goals rather than the person which dehumanizes the organization. The thread which links Belief to Behavior to Business is the Business Sutra. Author say A very impactful book challenging the core beliefs of our workplaces - the ones which make us crib about our professional lives! Belief ---> Behavior ---> Business Organizations work hard to model our behavior so that business can be done but no one talks about the belief-system of a person which leads to a certain kind of behavior. The focus is on goals rather than the person which dehumanizes the organization. The thread which links Belief to Behavior to Business is the Business Sutra. Author says that this goal-oriented approach is a Western manifestation of an efficient workplace. People there believe in just one life and every goal has to be completed in this life itself by hook or by crook. But us, their Indian counterparts have faith in the concept of multiple lives and Karma. We don't understand this obsession with enforced deadlines but we are obliged to follow them. So the better approach in Indian context must be gaze-oriented where everyone is able to do Darshan of each other's personality and work in unison for the organization! The mythological stories mentioned in every chapter breathe life into the book. Even though most of them are well-known but the way they are linked with our lives feels refreshing. A really great book to read for anyone working in the corporate India! Highlight of the book: Difference between Varna-System and Jati-System: It is indeed very disappointing to see the very logical Varna system being converted to the grossly illogical Jati system currently prevalent in our society. People were assigned Varnas based on their capabilities and personalities and the system used to be very flexible. There used to be a mutual respect between two groups. A person could become a Brahman from Shudra and vice versa based on the changes in his abilities! Brahman = Unconditional Leader Kshatriya = Conditional Leader Vaishya = Conditional Follower Shudra = Unconditional Follower Whereas now, all the flexibility is lost as we have associated these Varnas with the birth, which in turn have now become the Jatis! This has created a huge divide in the society coupled with oppression and exclusion.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paromita Bardoloi

    It is not a very usual experience that you read a book on management and you are gripped within its stories and intricacies. Devdutt Pattanaik is definitely does that with no apologies. Business Sutra looks at management through the Indian perspective. The writer uses symbols, codes, stories from Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism to put forth his perspective. He also uses the Mahabharata and Ramayana as the background as if he was born to tell the stories and break the myths to bring in a new point It is not a very usual experience that you read a book on management and you are gripped within its stories and intricacies. Devdutt Pattanaik is definitely does that with no apologies. Business Sutra looks at management through the Indian perspective. The writer uses symbols, codes, stories from Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism to put forth his perspective. He also uses the Mahabharata and Ramayana as the background as if he was born to tell the stories and break the myths to bring in a new point of perspective. It’s a must read. For more:http://paromitabardoloi.blogspot.in/#...

  5. 4 out of 5

    SHALEEN Dr

    Mostly this is about mixing mythology with present times. Most of issues are repetitive and common sensical. Book changes stances about symbols and symptoms and rightfully twists it as per needs. Probably the religion is always made to be so. One can't expect reading this book to start a new business or run the already running one. Less of business strategy more of mythology mixed with common sense morality. Mostly this is about mixing mythology with present times. Most of issues are repetitive and common sensical. Book changes stances about symbols and symptoms and rightfully twists it as per needs. Probably the religion is always made to be so. One can't expect reading this book to start a new business or run the already running one. Less of business strategy more of mythology mixed with common sense morality.

  6. 4 out of 5

    M

    Though I am an ardent fan of Devdutt this book didn't live up to its expectations and media publicity. Though I am an ardent fan of Devdutt this book didn't live up to its expectations and media publicity.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anu Ranganath

    I was very excited to read the book but the book does not grasp the attention fo the reader. The flow threw me off. The content is good but could have helped with some good editing.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Azeem Azimuddin

    What a disappointment! No unique insights here, only topical and pop, superficial.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ashutosh

    Not very much satisfying, and i wont recommend it to others as well.. you surely can skip it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dhruv Khosla

    This is not a practical guide on how to conduct business. It is a more generic philosophy on how to broadly think about business, linked to Indian mythology and certain imagined anecdotes. A little more real world correlation with solid cases to back up the claims would have made it more relevant. Best used as a philosophical compass on how one may conduct himself in corporate / business set-ups, and even then some of the advise seems a little too oblique for the real world scenarios we face eve This is not a practical guide on how to conduct business. It is a more generic philosophy on how to broadly think about business, linked to Indian mythology and certain imagined anecdotes. A little more real world correlation with solid cases to back up the claims would have made it more relevant. Best used as a philosophical compass on how one may conduct himself in corporate / business set-ups, and even then some of the advise seems a little too oblique for the real world scenarios we face every day.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Umang Rohani

    nothing worthwhile here

  12. 5 out of 5

    Abhishek

    There are certain books, that affects you deep to the core & soul, and you come out on the other side as a completely changed person. This certainly qualifies as a book which has changed me forever in some way. "In the world of management, nobody takes you seriously, unless you have a model to prove your theory, therefore I came with the 3B model. As is your belief, so is your behavior & so is your business." These are the words of the "Chief belief Officer" for future group, the one of a kind po There are certain books, that affects you deep to the core & soul, and you come out on the other side as a completely changed person. This certainly qualifies as a book which has changed me forever in some way. "In the world of management, nobody takes you seriously, unless you have a model to prove your theory, therefore I came with the 3B model. As is your belief, so is your behavior & so is your business." These are the words of the "Chief belief Officer" for future group, the one of a kind post created by Mr. Kishore Biyani, which has validated the role of Indian Mythology in the business environment. This book is filled with anecdotes, which lets you see the familiar mythological stories in a completely different light, and lets you wonder if what you knew was really the truth? Which brings me to the biggest strength of this book, it does not impose any opinion about any subject in any form, instead it lets you think. It lets you decide, and makes you in-charge of what opinion you are forming about things. The way the concepts are graphically explained is the second biggest strength. The vivid description along with figures, would make any manager salivate. Personally, I believe is that this book should not be restricted to only management crowd, it should rather be read by as many individuals as possible.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nelton D'Souza

    I long to be an entrepreneur and hence when BlogAdda presented with this opportunity I took it with both hands. After constant rescheduling the delivery I finally got my hands on it. I must say, its least than what I expected. In the world of Kamasutra and Aam Sutra, Business Sutra leaves no stone unturned in simply following suit. A voluminous 460 odd pages filled with illustrations on every second page you have to be ready to take on this one. But if you're there for the taking then this book I long to be an entrepreneur and hence when BlogAdda presented with this opportunity I took it with both hands. After constant rescheduling the delivery I finally got my hands on it. I must say, its least than what I expected. In the world of Kamasutra and Aam Sutra, Business Sutra leaves no stone unturned in simply following suit. A voluminous 460 odd pages filled with illustrations on every second page you have to be ready to take on this one. But if you're there for the taking then this book won't disappoint. If you're bored there are illustrations, if you're into business and ideologies theres lots of it and if you're hard for time there are little grey boxes which cut the details and give you the gist. The book is divided into 3 sections - Introduction, which is more kind of a launchpad to understanding the book and the author's life and the need for something like this. 'Goal To Gaze', where Western, Chinese and Indian beliefs are mixed and matched and tried to make sense of and lastly Business Sutra, the mantra for success where the author challenges the reader to achieve the impossible. The downside of this book is that it - See more at: http://justamin.blogspot.in/2013/05/b...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Avisek Barla

    Devdutt Pattanaik is a brilliant speaker & writer. period. Business Sutra is more than an Indian approach to management. As an atheist but brought up in hindu tradition, I had a fair bit of knowledge about the gods, the devatas, rakshas, yaksha and asuras. Yet this book shows them in a very different light. They are a representation of human character, of you and me. The incidents explained from the epic of Ramayana and Mahabharata are similar to our lives and the decisions we need to take. Ram Devdutt Pattanaik is a brilliant speaker & writer. period. Business Sutra is more than an Indian approach to management. As an atheist but brought up in hindu tradition, I had a fair bit of knowledge about the gods, the devatas, rakshas, yaksha and asuras. Yet this book shows them in a very different light. They are a representation of human character, of you and me. The incidents explained from the epic of Ramayana and Mahabharata are similar to our lives and the decisions we need to take. Ram and Krishna , two heroes of opposite poles. One is law abiding and the other a beloved breaker. Ravan and Kansa, two villains with different qualities. What makes them a villain? Turns out the world is not binary and so are these characters. There is no wrong and right, there are just actions and consequences. So much about life and still it teaches you about business. From ideas, greed, character to handling team, setting vision and beyond. As a wanna be entrepreneur I found this extremely useful. Do give it a read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ranjeet Bhosale

    I jave finished reading this book today after so many days of reading and taking a break, business sutra by devdutt pattanaik is a book which helps understand the mentality of indian people that has been shaped through generations after generations in this society. The behaviour of our people is starkly different from other countries per say, we have a rich heritage of the our gods and mythological stories related to the divine beings which shape up our conciousness which ultimately reflects in I jave finished reading this book today after so many days of reading and taking a break, business sutra by devdutt pattanaik is a book which helps understand the mentality of indian people that has been shaped through generations after generations in this society. The behaviour of our people is starkly different from other countries per say, we have a rich heritage of the our gods and mythological stories related to the divine beings which shape up our conciousness which ultimately reflects in our behaviour. The more we expand our views and look towards the two very contradictory realities that exists in out society. The more we include those truths and try to look at things the other peoples way the more inclusive we become and the more we grow. Now growth is also a subjective term depending on weather it is monitory growth,physical growth, intellectual growth or any other form of it which we expect we deserve. We are performing this yagya of our business where we have to give our respective swahas to the devatas in order to obtain the desired tathasthu.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Siddharth Maheshwari

    A gem by Devdutt Pattanaik. More than business management it is a book of philosophy and psychology. It helped me understand the basic philosophy of West,India and China. It also gave a good understanding of human psychology and behavior. On the management part, it is more of philosophy than concrete management. It presents a framework which can be applied to any field or system other than business management. It made use of great examples from the Indian Scriptures to bring home a point and mad A gem by Devdutt Pattanaik. More than business management it is a book of philosophy and psychology. It helped me understand the basic philosophy of West,India and China. It also gave a good understanding of human psychology and behavior. On the management part, it is more of philosophy than concrete management. It presents a framework which can be applied to any field or system other than business management. It made use of great examples from the Indian Scriptures to bring home a point and made me look at the Indian scriptures and their characters from a very different perspective. A praiseworthy thing about Devdutt is his use of Samskrit terms as it is instead of piggy backing on their incorrect English translations.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Reshmi Pillai

    Partly memoir, partly business fundamentals the book makes for a compelling, easy read if the subject interests you. It is one of those books that I call A. R. Rehman music type, the book grows on you as you sail through chapter to chapter. The language as with his earlier works is easy, the narration interesting and by the time we reach the back cover we mildly understand why our beliefs, behavior and businesses ought to be different. I have always wondered even during my PG in Management why I Partly memoir, partly business fundamentals the book makes for a compelling, easy read if the subject interests you. It is one of those books that I call A. R. Rehman music type, the book grows on you as you sail through chapter to chapter. The language as with his earlier works is easy, the narration interesting and by the time we reach the back cover we mildly understand why our beliefs, behavior and businesses ought to be different. I have always wondered even during my PG in Management why India never had pioneers, trend changers and innovators in the field of management. It is because we cannot make biryani the burger way! Full review: http://wp.me/p2DEiS-Mg

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nehal Joshi

    Great wisdom The book is trying to develop vision of reader towards the problems we face as an employee or employer in our day to day life through mythological stories with an interesting comparison with the western and even Chinese business wisdom. There are no readymade solutions given means the fish is not given directly but author has done excellent job to divert readers attention not only how to catch fish but also with which fish to capture and purpose of catching fish! Interesting and enli Great wisdom The book is trying to develop vision of reader towards the problems we face as an employee or employer in our day to day life through mythological stories with an interesting comparison with the western and even Chinese business wisdom. There are no readymade solutions given means the fish is not given directly but author has done excellent job to divert readers attention not only how to catch fish but also with which fish to capture and purpose of catching fish! Interesting and enlightening ! Must read

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ramya

    Reading this book is a wonderful experience and I would highly recommend doing so. In simple terms, the book takes us through the many thoughts that we might have had during the course of our work day or in other situations, and shows us how those thoughts could be processed. What I like best is the book is never preachy nor narrow in it's approach. A good place to start is at the end of the book (after the index) at the page titled 'How to reject this book'. Reading this book is a wonderful experience and I would highly recommend doing so. In simple terms, the book takes us through the many thoughts that we might have had during the course of our work day or in other situations, and shows us how those thoughts could be processed. What I like best is the book is never preachy nor narrow in it's approach. A good place to start is at the end of the book (after the index) at the page titled 'How to reject this book'.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Avishkar Surana

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book expresses subjective thoughts of the writer, as he mentions in the book, the book can be confusing for people who do not have interest in mythology. The book starts very slow and continue to be at the same pace, you will hardy get any excitement reading it. So those who like to read books slowly and steadily and also have interest in mythology shall go ahead.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sangyasharma

    Mr Davedut Pattnaik didn't disappoint me with this one too...so... waiting for the next book..:) Mr Davedut Pattnaik didn't disappoint me with this one too...so... waiting for the next book..:)

  22. 4 out of 5

    Aniruddh Sudharshan

    Author explains complex things in a single paragraph and simple sketches. Goodread.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rajesh CNB

    There are times when your thirst for knowledge is fully quenched by a book and you decide that it is that eternally regenerative well that you will drink from time and again. Stephen Covey's Seven Habits of Highly Effective people, Daniel Goleman's Emotional Intelligence and Rama Bijapurkar's We Are Like That Only did that to me at different stages of my life. I dip my bowl into the eternal wisdom they have, whenever I thirst for knowledge and guidance and they have so far been reliable companio There are times when your thirst for knowledge is fully quenched by a book and you decide that it is that eternally regenerative well that you will drink from time and again. Stephen Covey's Seven Habits of Highly Effective people, Daniel Goleman's Emotional Intelligence and Rama Bijapurkar's We Are Like That Only did that to me at different stages of my life. I dip my bowl into the eternal wisdom they have, whenever I thirst for knowledge and guidance and they have so far been reliable companions. The experience with Business Sutras is somewhat similar. When I picked the book and started gazing at the content, I was a bit sceptical if I would learn anything new. Well, haven't instead the 18 Upanishads and part of the Vedas? Haven't i read the puranas and the Bhagavadgeeta? Haven't I read the Bhashyas on the Brahmasutras? What more new stuff would this book teach me? was the attitude. How arrogant was I? I wouldn't know until much later. Devdatt, deep dives into the intricate symbolism of Hinduism and expertly draws out the metaphorical equivalents of business from the abstract ritualistic practices from the Vedas, Upanishads and the Puranas. In doing so, he renders two parallel services. He proves to the world and to the reader that the ancient Hindu knowledge embedded in the Vedas, Upanishads and Puranas are indeed abstractions that have been derived out of inductive logic and embodied knowledge of wise men. He also unequivocally proves that through power of deductive logic such abstract bodies of knowledge can indeed lead to practical, ready to use in daily life, insights in even so materialistic pursuits such as business. And through these he gives a scientific flavor to the spiritual knowledge base that is uniquely Indian. This book is a recommended read for all those people, businessmen, teachers and students, who want to evolve a unique style of leadership and would like to know if the study of scriptures would enable such evolution. In fact, after reading this, i felt compelled for quite a while that this should be a recommended text for all business management students. Well written, lucid, page turning book from the master story teller.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    One of the concepts is that because India has (many!) different belief systems and operates differently, it must be wrong and therefore change. I hadn’t ever realized how dominant the thought is that the west favors science and logic, and therefore must always be right – and therefore everything else must be wrong. If you’re looking for insights into the roots of western, Chinese, and Indian beliefs and how those impact day-to-day thought at a high level, the first section of the book is wonderf One of the concepts is that because India has (many!) different belief systems and operates differently, it must be wrong and therefore change. I hadn’t ever realized how dominant the thought is that the west favors science and logic, and therefore must always be right – and therefore everything else must be wrong. If you’re looking for insights into the roots of western, Chinese, and Indian beliefs and how those impact day-to-day thought at a high level, the first section of the book is wonderful. If you’d like to take a detailed look at how Indian beliefs impact day-to-day behavior, the latter part of this book would be interesting. It ties into mythology, translates that into behaviors, and often includes practical, business-related examples.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Himanshu Varshney

    A great piece of wisdom. The whole book with so many different stories and illustrations try to make you understand the value of outgrowing fear, personal and mental growth. Becoming from dependent to dependable. Becoming Shiva and Vishnu. Learn to seek Narayn over Narayani. For people without any knowledge of india mythology, this book may become a strange reading as you may not be ble to recognise the characters and connects the dots. However people with basic knowledge of mythology of Mahabhar A great piece of wisdom. The whole book with so many different stories and illustrations try to make you understand the value of outgrowing fear, personal and mental growth. Becoming from dependent to dependable. Becoming Shiva and Vishnu. Learn to seek Narayn over Narayani. For people without any knowledge of india mythology, this book may become a strange reading as you may not be ble to recognise the characters and connects the dots. However people with basic knowledge of mythology of Mahabharata and Ramayan can get most out of this book.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sumit Pawar

    "Inclusive Business wisdom of the East". Some Indian Business and Startups use to have such Dharmic Business Traits, some still have these Dharmic Traits. I just wonder if more and more Indian Businesses will adopt such Indic business policies can change the world we live in. The only book which i will recommend from Devdutt Pattnayak's stable of books is Business Sutra. As the full name indicates it details the Indic/Dharmic approach of Money making. A must read to understand the delicate balanc "Inclusive Business wisdom of the East". Some Indian Business and Startups use to have such Dharmic Business Traits, some still have these Dharmic Traits. I just wonder if more and more Indian Businesses will adopt such Indic business policies can change the world we live in. The only book which i will recommend from Devdutt Pattnayak's stable of books is Business Sutra. As the full name indicates it details the Indic/Dharmic approach of Money making. A must read to understand the delicate balance between Sustainable Business and Unsustainable Oppressive Business policies of the west.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ajay

    Conceptually very different A very exhaustive book.. Too much of mythology will drain you out.. The modern day illustration do stand out..would have been good if the author had structured the contents so as to convey a series of objective learning...but this comes across as a learning with no clear beginning and ending...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mehul

    It takes a lot of time to grasp this book. This book is for those who have a keen interest in mythology and see mythology from a different perspective by widening the gaze. Otherwise you will feel bored in between. The essence of this book comes out to be that Expand your mind to expand your business. A good read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Twinkle

    Beliefs explained with logic This book gives insights into Indian thoughts, Which in general seems illogical but this book helps to find out the logic behind. One can understand the process and stories behind the act and decision of an Indian businessman. This book can help those people who want to expand their mind and become inclusive. And this is why I gave 5*

  30. 4 out of 5

    Saravana Sastha Kumar

    Beautiful book. Superbly explained on the interpretation on Indian mythology, philosophy and thoughts in the business world. Some parts of the book are literal copy, paste of Devdutt's other books but nevertheless a must read for Indian professionals. Beautiful book. Superbly explained on the interpretation on Indian mythology, philosophy and thoughts in the business world. Some parts of the book are literal copy, paste of Devdutt's other books but nevertheless a must read for Indian professionals.

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