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The Renaissance Computer: Knowledge Technology in the First Age of Print

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In the fifteenth century the printing press was the 'new technology'. The first ever information revolution began with the advent of the printed book, enabling Renaissance scholars to formulate new ways of organising and disseminating knowledge. As early as 1500 there were already 20 million books in circulation in Europe. How did this rapid explosion of ideas impact upon In the fifteenth century the printing press was the 'new technology'. The first ever information revolution began with the advent of the printed book, enabling Renaissance scholars to formulate new ways of organising and disseminating knowledge. As early as 1500 there were already 20 million books in circulation in Europe. How did this rapid explosion of ideas impact upon the evolution of new disciplines? The Renaissance Computer looks at the fascinating development of new methods of information storage and retrieval which took place at the very beginning of print culture. And it asks some crucial questions about the intellectual conditions of our own digital age. A dazzling array of leading experts in Renaissance culture explore topics of urgent significance today, including: * the contribution of knowledge technologies to state formulation and national identity *the effect of multimedia, orality and memory on education *the importance of the visual display of information and how search engines reflect and direct ways of thinking.


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In the fifteenth century the printing press was the 'new technology'. The first ever information revolution began with the advent of the printed book, enabling Renaissance scholars to formulate new ways of organising and disseminating knowledge. As early as 1500 there were already 20 million books in circulation in Europe. How did this rapid explosion of ideas impact upon In the fifteenth century the printing press was the 'new technology'. The first ever information revolution began with the advent of the printed book, enabling Renaissance scholars to formulate new ways of organising and disseminating knowledge. As early as 1500 there were already 20 million books in circulation in Europe. How did this rapid explosion of ideas impact upon the evolution of new disciplines? The Renaissance Computer looks at the fascinating development of new methods of information storage and retrieval which took place at the very beginning of print culture. And it asks some crucial questions about the intellectual conditions of our own digital age. A dazzling array of leading experts in Renaissance culture explore topics of urgent significance today, including: * the contribution of knowledge technologies to state formulation and national identity *the effect of multimedia, orality and memory on education *the importance of the visual display of information and how search engines reflect and direct ways of thinking.

33 review for The Renaissance Computer: Knowledge Technology in the First Age of Print

  1. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Although this collection was compiled in 2000, and therefore shows its age a bit in terms of identifying "current" computer trends (remember the good old days when we used 3 1/2" disks and internet access was an **option** on computers?) it demonstrates a heightened perception about the ongoing human need to catalog, access, archive, and otherwise organize and retrieve data. A very good read. Although this collection was compiled in 2000, and therefore shows its age a bit in terms of identifying "current" computer trends (remember the good old days when we used 3 1/2" disks and internet access was an **option** on computers?) it demonstrates a heightened perception about the ongoing human need to catalog, access, archive, and otherwise organize and retrieve data. A very good read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Antonio Gallo

    Read and re-read still reading ...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eben

    Not all the title claims. It is a collection of individual essays based around the metaphor of the book as an information system. Although several are of interest, the collection lacks cohesion.

  4. 5 out of 5

    John

  5. 4 out of 5

    MD Mahasweta

  6. 5 out of 5

    murkuo

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kasia

  8. 4 out of 5

    Fireblazebw

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aimee

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sobookonline Jahjah

  13. 4 out of 5

    Terry Kuny

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Menon

  15. 5 out of 5

    John Kaye

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jarrod Dunham

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paige

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brightonsunny

  19. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Steve

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rodrigo Barbosa

  21. 5 out of 5

    Marbie Almarez

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mohammad Shahid

  23. 4 out of 5

    Drspk

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Rainey

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cercamon

  26. 5 out of 5

    Loverlay Pyae

  27. 5 out of 5

    sheilabeta

  28. 5 out of 5

    Abel

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  30. 4 out of 5

    RocĂ­o Db

  31. 5 out of 5

    Matteo Romanello

  32. 4 out of 5

    Ang

  33. 4 out of 5

    Mike Schafaer

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