counter Road Rage (Graphic Novel) - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Road Rage (Graphic Novel)

Availability: Ready to download

Acclaimed novelist/Eisner-winning graphic novelist Joe Hill collaborated with his father, Stephen King, in Throttle, for the first time on a tale that paid tribute to Richard Matheson's classic tale, Duel. Now, IDW is proud to present comic-book tellings of both stories in Road Rage, adapted by Chris Ryall with art by Nelson Daniel and Rafa Garres. Acclaimed novelist/Eisner-winning graphic novelist Joe Hill collaborated with his father, Stephen King, in Throttle, for the first time on a tale that paid tribute to Richard Matheson's classic tale, Duel. Now, IDW is proud to present comic-book tellings of both stories in Road Rage, adapted by Chris Ryall with art by Nelson Daniel and Rafa Garres.


Compare

Acclaimed novelist/Eisner-winning graphic novelist Joe Hill collaborated with his father, Stephen King, in Throttle, for the first time on a tale that paid tribute to Richard Matheson's classic tale, Duel. Now, IDW is proud to present comic-book tellings of both stories in Road Rage, adapted by Chris Ryall with art by Nelson Daniel and Rafa Garres. Acclaimed novelist/Eisner-winning graphic novelist Joe Hill collaborated with his father, Stephen King, in Throttle, for the first time on a tale that paid tribute to Richard Matheson's classic tale, Duel. Now, IDW is proud to present comic-book tellings of both stories in Road Rage, adapted by Chris Ryall with art by Nelson Daniel and Rafa Garres.

30 review for Road Rage (Graphic Novel)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Shelby *trains flying monkeys*

    This is the third book I've read this week that featured a motorcycle gang and drugs. I might need to read a smexy book soon. The first story in this book kinda lost me a bit. A motorcycle gang is running from a lone truck. Smashing and bashing happen. Not bad. I like smashing and bashing. (Yes, I do know how weird I am) Then the second one..is bad-ass. It's based on the movie "Duel" that Joe Hill watched with his dad back in the day. They collaborated on these stories later on. (One of the b This is the third book I've read this week that featured a motorcycle gang and drugs. I might need to read a smexy book soon. The first story in this book kinda lost me a bit. A motorcycle gang is running from a lone truck. Smashing and bashing happen. Not bad. I like smashing and bashing. (Yes, I do know how weird I am) Then the second one..is bad-ass. It's based on the movie "Duel" that Joe Hill watched with his dad back in the day. They collaborated on these stories later on. (One of the best parts of this book is letters added that were written by them) Watch out for those truckers in your rear view windows kiddies.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Daviau

    THIS. WAS. BRILLIANT. I felt absolutely giddy with glee to finally have this as a part of my King/Hill collection and I swear I was dancing a little in my seat as I was reading because I was just enjoying it so damn much! I recently read Full Throttle and loved it so it was so awesome to see it brought to life in graphic novel form. Same goes for the Matheson story which I read ages ago and loved as well. The illustrations alone are worth 5 stars just on their own, they are just stunning and sui THIS. WAS. BRILLIANT. I felt absolutely giddy with glee to finally have this as a part of my King/Hill collection and I swear I was dancing a little in my seat as I was reading because I was just enjoying it so damn much! I recently read Full Throttle and loved it so it was so awesome to see it brought to life in graphic novel form. Same goes for the Matheson story which I read ages ago and loved as well. The illustrations alone are worth 5 stars just on their own, they are just stunning and suit the stories so damn well! If you’re a King fan or a horror fan of any sort, do yourself a favour a pick up this little gem of a graphic novel.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Stephen King and Joe Hill wrote Throttle, a short story homage to Duel by Richard Matheson, for He Is Legend, a collection celebrating Matheson’s career. Chris Ryall adapts both Throttle and Duel into comics for this book, Road Rage. Throttle is about some bikers who’re pissed over a drug deal gone wrong. People are dead, money’s missing and they’re headed off to cause more mayhem. But on the road they’re met with a faceless trucker who decides to run them all down. Who will win – bikers or murde Stephen King and Joe Hill wrote Throttle, a short story homage to Duel by Richard Matheson, for He Is Legend, a collection celebrating Matheson’s career. Chris Ryall adapts both Throttle and Duel into comics for this book, Road Rage. Throttle is about some bikers who’re pissed over a drug deal gone wrong. People are dead, money’s missing and they’re headed off to cause more mayhem. But on the road they’re met with a faceless trucker who decides to run them all down. Who will win – bikers or murderous trucker? It’s Duel: the Sons of Anarchy version! King should be barred from venturing into comics. The first volume of American Vampire showed his corny stories are totally out of place in today’s environment and his totally uninteresting imitation of Duel is even more boring to read. The bikers are stereotypical bikers: meth-making lunatics on hogs – there’s nothing else to them! And the trucker is the same trucker from Duel without any changes. Originality? He don’t need no stinkin’ originality, he’s Stephen King! Joe Hill, King’s son, is also enormously overrated as a comics writer and the stale story, flat dialogue and simplistic characterisations of Throttle underlines that. The second and final story, Duel, is slightly better if only because Richard Matheson was a far better writer whose original story was brilliant. But the comics adaptation waters down the impact of the story by taking away a lot of Matheson’s tense writing and letting the murky art try, and fail, to fill in for it. My takeaway from the comics adaptation of Duel is that it made me want to re-read the Matheson prose story – the adaptation is no substitute and really isn’t worth bothering with. In a perfect world I’d have a truck to run over my copy of this tedious pap but instead I’ll just recommend everyone read Richard Matheson’s superb short stories instead!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    I was ten when my super cool dad gave me permission to stay up late and watch an ABC-TV movie called Duel. As I recall, it was a somewhat monumental experience. I have never forgotten the images of a lone motorist being chased by that stranger driving a tanker truck, his menacing left forearm propped on the open window. It was sure a lot more exciting than that moonwalk thing they showed a few years earlier! The second story in this graphic novel is an adaptation of Duel, a short story written by I was ten when my super cool dad gave me permission to stay up late and watch an ABC-TV movie called Duel. As I recall, it was a somewhat monumental experience. I have never forgotten the images of a lone motorist being chased by that stranger driving a tanker truck, his menacing left forearm propped on the open window. It was sure a lot more exciting than that moonwalk thing they showed a few years earlier! The second story in this graphic novel is an adaptation of Duel, a short story written by Richard Matheson, and originally published in Playboy magazine. Rafa Garres' scratchy, gritty artwork is perfect for this frenetic tale, and adds to the chaos and suspense. This story is a plain old thrill ride, no matter how it's presented. The first story in the book, Throttle, written by Stephen King and Joe Hill, doesn't fare quite as well. It's a tribute to Duel, only this time a biker gang is threatened by a mysterious trucker Visually, it's a bloody mess, as the truck crunches over men and motorcycles. Unlike Duel, where it was easy to feel for the innocent salesman, these bikers are so vile...well, I was rooting for the truck. I did really enjoy the introductions to both stories, King for Throttle and Hill for Duel. Both men talk about how the Matheson story, and the film made from it, have influenced their writing, and also hint at some great father/son bonding. Good times, good times.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    Road Rage collects two stories. The first is "Throttle" by Stephen King. The second story is the one that inspired SK to write "Throttle", that story is Richard Matheson's (of "I Am Legend" fame) "Duel". Both stories share a common antagonist- truck drivers. The first is the story of a outlaw band of bikers who are dealing with the fallout of a meth deal gone awry. But they may have bigger problems on their heads as they run into an semi-truck driver who has no intention of letting them live. The Road Rage collects two stories. The first is "Throttle" by Stephen King. The second story is the one that inspired SK to write "Throttle", that story is Richard Matheson's (of "I Am Legend" fame) "Duel". Both stories share a common antagonist- truck drivers. The first is the story of a outlaw band of bikers who are dealing with the fallout of a meth deal gone awry. But they may have bigger problems on their heads as they run into an semi-truck driver who has no intention of letting them live. They "why?" is answered in the end and is a rather interesting twist. I enjoyed it. The second one, the original, is not as good. But it is still a decent story. The art is certainly not as good as the first story, but it is the story that doesn't resonate like King's tale. The motivations of the trucker and even the car driver are slightly obscure and something about the car driver's personality rubbed me the wrong way (almost ended up siding with the trucker). So the first story is a 4 star, the 2nd is a 2 star and thus this book ends up a three star. A good volume for horror fans.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Johann (jobis89)

    This book is spilt into two parts: the story "Throttle" written by the duo of Stephen King and Joe Hill; and "Duel" written by Richard Matheson. Throttle itself is a kind of spin-off of the Richard Matheson story. I gotta say, the story Throttle was just okay. It focuses on a group of bikers who are angry after a drug-deal goes wrong, so they head out on the road quickly encountering a truck intent on killing them all. It kinda felt a bit all over the place, I didn't care for it much. The illustr This book is spilt into two parts: the story "Throttle" written by the duo of Stephen King and Joe Hill; and "Duel" written by Richard Matheson. Throttle itself is a kind of spin-off of the Richard Matheson story. I gotta say, the story Throttle was just okay. It focuses on a group of bikers who are angry after a drug-deal goes wrong, so they head out on the road quickly encountering a truck intent on killing them all. It kinda felt a bit all over the place, I didn't care for it much. The illustrations were pretty awesome though. However, I much preferred the Richard Matheson story Duel. It was about a lone man who finds himself being chased down by a relentless truck intent on murder. This was more exciting and easier to follow than Throttle, I felt. To be honest, the best part of this entire graphic novel was the introductions by Stephen King and Joe Hill. And they were too short-lived!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    Basically, Stephen King and his son present their 21st century updating / interpretation (or is it a homage?) of Richard Matheson's classic short story Duel with Throttle, featuring an outlaw biker gang murderously pursued by a vengeful trucker on the less-traveled roads of the American southwest. It was okay, although there was a nice "oh @$%&" realization moment near the climax. Likely because I am a fan of Matheson's original work (and that TV-movie version by some forgotten guy named Spielber Basically, Stephen King and his son present their 21st century updating / interpretation (or is it a homage?) of Richard Matheson's classic short story Duel with Throttle, featuring an outlaw biker gang murderously pursued by a vengeful trucker on the less-traveled roads of the American southwest. It was okay, although there was a nice "oh @$%&" realization moment near the climax. Likely because I am a fan of Matheson's original work (and that TV-movie version by some forgotten guy named Spielberg) that I instead enjoyed the graphic novel version of Duel. Maybe it was just because of its familiarity, but it seemed more frugally effective than Throttle.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    An interesting contrats in the two stories. The updated verion adding motive and character , while the original is more about an unknown entity and sheer force of hatred.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stephen the Librarian

    Road Rage is a collected graphic-novel adaptation of two similarly themed stories—“Throttle”, written by Stephen King and his son Joe Hill; and Richard Matheson's “Duel”. Long, desolate strips of desert road are the featured landscapes of both stories, and in both situations isolation mixes with the unlikely actions of complete strangers and spins out of control, resulting in intense, fast-paced dilemmas—with fatal consequences (naturally). “Throttle” is an uncompromising roadside drama of a bike Road Rage is a collected graphic-novel adaptation of two similarly themed stories—“Throttle”, written by Stephen King and his son Joe Hill; and Richard Matheson's “Duel”. Long, desolate strips of desert road are the featured landscapes of both stories, and in both situations isolation mixes with the unlikely actions of complete strangers and spins out of control, resulting in intense, fast-paced dilemmas—with fatal consequences (naturally). “Throttle” is an uncompromising roadside drama of a biker tribe, led by a veteran father Vince and his impulsive son Race. When Race manipulates the tribe into following up on a botched meth deal, causing the deaths of the dealers and his young girlfriend. As chance and plotting would have it, the murdered girl’s father, a trucker, discovers her killers and follows the tribe in his 18-wheeler. It’s not long before the faceless trucker begins killing the bikers one by one, pancaking them into asphalt with his big truck. Familial ties between father and son are put to the test in this grimy, pulse-pounding race for survival. The biker culture is well-depicted well, and King/Hill utilize the threat of the killer trucker to illuminate the strained relationships between the anti-hero characters. Nelson Daniel's classical, comic-style artwork lends itself to the fulsome mayhem. “Duel” is essentially a primal tale of cat-and-mouse in which a traveling salesman gets caught up in an increasingly reckless game of aggressive driving with a menacing trucker. The artwork is by far the most startling aspect of this story. Artist Rafa Garres creates a stark and oppressive atmosphere, twisting roadways and faces, bleakly distorting the human form, which works incredibly well in this perilous tale. I could genuinely feel the desperation and paranoia of the driver, Mann, amidst the tightly-packed panels. On the downside, though, the ending felt a bit rushed, the deadly chase ending too abruptly for my tastes. In fact, if I remember the prose story correctly, a significant chuck of Matheson’s story is omitted from this graphic adaptation. What's more, the staging of the climax was somewhat mismanaged and presented in a very unclear manner that I couldn’t really discern what was happening on the page. I’m altogether pleased with this venture and would recommend it to Joyride fans or connoisseurs of King, Hill, or Matheson. Both stories present a terrifying premise of a looming death machine that's brimming with terrific visuals. Murder-by-truck—how can you go wrong?

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Good graphic novel versions of two outstanding stories.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Wally Flangers

    “Road Rage” is a comic book adaptation of Joe Hill and Stephen King’s collaborated short story titled, “Throttle” and Richard Matheson’s short story titled, “Duel”…. IDW Publishing combined all four comics into one, hardcover edition and released it in 2012. It includes an introduction by Hill and King that mainly pay tribute to Matheson and provide background on how they came up with the idea for “Throttle”. Like all the rest of IDW hardcover publishing’s, the construction of this book is solid “Road Rage” is a comic book adaptation of Joe Hill and Stephen King’s collaborated short story titled, “Throttle” and Richard Matheson’s short story titled, “Duel”…. IDW Publishing combined all four comics into one, hardcover edition and released it in 2012. It includes an introduction by Hill and King that mainly pay tribute to Matheson and provide background on how they came up with the idea for “Throttle”. Like all the rest of IDW hardcover publishing’s, the construction of this book is solid and the pages are nice and thick with a smooth texture finish. It’s really impressive looking and will not disappoint. The first story in the book, “Throttle”, was published in a 2009 limited edition anthology honoring Richard Matheson, titled “He Is Legend”. It is a collaboration by Joe Hill and Stephen King. Matheson has been credited as being a big influence on a lot of King’s ideas and his short story “Duel” was the inspiration for “Throttle”…. It's about a pissed off, dishonorable discharged road warrior, aboard his motorcycle on the path of destruction with his dad and their biker tribe…. The Mad Max wannabe’s commit a crime that shall not go unpunished. A tattooed truck driver parked at a gas station makes sure of that. This was a pretty good, action-packed story that I would recommend to motorcycle lovers. It’s fairly predictable who the antagonist is but that doesn’t take away from the suspense. The second story in the book, “Duel”, was published in “Playboy” magazine in 1971 and was also adapted to film (directed by Steven Spielberg). It is about a traveling salesman on a business trip venture who encounters a truck driving maniac on the road who decides to toy with him by driving his ass off the road, not letting him pass, and following him wherever he goes…. I really enjoyed this story, but I was not fond of the ending. Although I liked the mystery behind the truck driver’s motive, it ended too abruptly for me. It felt as if Richard Matheson didn’t know where to go with it. Although similar, both stories have their differences and writing styles…. A big-ass eighteen wheeler with a faceless, pissed off driver is the only common thing they share. The motive and storyline is vastly different between them. I will say that I enjoyed “Throttle” a little more than “Duel” because it had a better ending. But, you should have fun reading both of them. The artwork that Nelson Daniel and Rafa Garres illustrated was amazing. I loved the use of colors and action sequences. It really captured brought both stories to life. FINAL VERDICT: I give this book 3 out of 5 stars. I would recommend this book to anyone who is a fan of Joe Hill’s graphic novels and action-packed, short stories…. Although the stories are not as good as the “Lock and Key” series or “The Cape”, “Road Rage” is still a fun read. It isn’t as gruesome and full of gore like most of Joe Hill’s comic’s, but it is still not a comic book for kids.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2017/11/1... Lately I have been on a Stephen King and Joe Hill kick, and Goodreads noticed. Recently I read "The Cape" and and on the 'readers also enjoyed' sidebar "Road Rage" was recommended. I was able to track down a copy and was pleased to see that the book included two short stories- the first written by the father and son duo of King and Hill, but also included an adaptation of the classic story "Duel" by Richard Matheso This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2017/11/1... Lately I have been on a Stephen King and Joe Hill kick, and Goodreads noticed. Recently I read "The Cape" and and on the 'readers also enjoyed' sidebar "Road Rage" was recommended. I was able to track down a copy and was pleased to see that the book included two short stories- the first written by the father and son duo of King and Hill, but also included an adaptation of the classic story "Duel" by Richard Matheson. Throttle: Written by Stephen King and Joe Hill, Adapted by Chris Ryall, Art by Nelson Daniel With an introduction by Stephen King, the reader is given a homage to Richard Matheson, for this first story was originally included in "He is Legend", a book collection of Matheson-inspired stories. King gives Matheson partial credit for shaping him into the writer he is today. We are introduced to a group of ten bikers, that have a Sons of Anarchy vibe, although they are called The Tribe. The three main characters are leader Vinny, Lemmy, and Vinny’s son Race, with the other bikers getting less face time. At a truck stop they are discussing a drug deal gone wrong, that resulted in a death, and their plans to try to recoup their losses. The leaders speculate that one of the truckers might have overheard their conversation , but figures “No one with any sense would want to get involved in their shitpull”. They were wrong. Out on the road the trucker comes after them, and blood and mayhem endue. You will just have to read the story to find out the trucker’s motives, and the resulting causality count. The story is illustrated by Nelson Daniel who did the art in "The Cape", also written by Hill. I enjoy his work, and liked his computer generated dot matrix that he uses for shading. He was able to make each biker unique looking, and had some great layout designs in his panels. Duel: Written by Richard Matheson, Adapted by Chris Ryall, Art by Rafa Garres This story included a second introduction, this time by Joe Hill, and he recounts some fond childhood memories of road trips with his father. As a child he had been fascinated with the movie "Duel", directed by Steven Spielberg, and he and his father had fun in the car imagining what they would do under the same circumstances. The premise is simple, a traveling salesperson is on a deadline, and wants to pass a trucker on a desert stretch of highway. He does so, but the trucker is incensed and starts to play cat and mouse games with the hapless driver. The driver pulls over at a truckstop, knowing he will now be late for the meeting, but as he fears for his safety, he wants to let the menacing trucker go by. Unfortunately for him the trucker also stops as to continue their driving duel. To find out who wins the duel you must read this book and/or watch the movie! In fact, the movie is my Friday night plans, as I was too scared by it in my younger years to watch it to completion. The art is reminiscent of the famous painting The Scream by artist Edvard Munch, with the swirling lines and emotion of fear coming through the work. Colored with a muddy palette the browns, yellows and oranges aptly depict the barren landscape. At first I was not a fan of the illustrations, and was turned off by the impreciseness of how the driver looked. But his seemingly melted face conveyed his terror as his day went to hell in a blink of an eye. I would definitely give this book a recommendation, but it will come as no surprise to King and Hill fans, the book is for mature audiences as it has quite a bit of violence with some graphic illustrations.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

    Richard Matheson is one of those writers who has been present in our lives for many years even without our being aware of it. He is the mind behind many stories that have been adapted into the film world including "I Am Legend," "Stir of Echoes," and "What Dreams May Come." And, to add to the list, his short story "Duel," which was Steven Spielberg's breakthrough into the film world. Spielberg adapted the short story and so came into being his first feature film. With such history and the cultura Richard Matheson is one of those writers who has been present in our lives for many years even without our being aware of it. He is the mind behind many stories that have been adapted into the film world including "I Am Legend," "Stir of Echoes," and "What Dreams May Come." And, to add to the list, his short story "Duel," which was Steven Spielberg's breakthrough into the film world. Spielberg adapted the short story and so came into being his first feature film. With such history and the cultural role it played, I have had this short story on my shelf with every intention of reading it. And now, I have done so. Counter to my normal, I did see the film just before reading the story. It was interesting to see what Spielberg did with it in his adaptation. In the short story, the villain is not meant to be a person with scruples and an anger problem, but rather an embodiment of evil. He is rage and anger, no back story or characterization needed. In the film, though there is still the presence of these characteristics, there is a driver present who is the one pursuing the main character, David. We watch David try to race him out, wait him out, challenge, and even despair under his pursuit. The visual aspect of it adds an additional sense of mystery to the situation. Matheson did an excellent job with the short story. However it was on screen that it felt to really come to life. (view spoiler)[For example, in the film, we see the truck driver stop to help a broken-down school bus full of kids to get going again. This begs the question, why David? This question is present too in the short story. We watch the truck driver let car after car go by as he waits for David. However, in this school bus scenario he isn't just waiting, the truck driver is providing an act of kindness. By giving him a redeemable quality, it adds complexity and a new depth to this villain that the short story chalks up to "Evil." Yes, evil without reason can be frightening. But evil with possible reason is much more intriguing. It suddenly becomes about so much more than the chase. It becomes about the characters. (hide spoiler)] I was really glad to get to experience this story. In both formats. I turned it on with a friend who does not enjoy older movies. For a film that was made in 1971 we were both drawn in. It's a credit to the author who first sparked the idea of the story itself, and to Spielberg for what he did with the piece. It is easy to see his skill even all the way back at Film 1. It also makes sense that Richard Matheson's stories have inspired the likes of Stephen King. The second story "Throttle," by King and his son was inspired directly by "Duel." It was nice to have them together in one book where they could be read and experienced together. I have read not many, but a few of King's books. I'm not sure how to describe this one except to say it was full of grit. It was about a biker gang that is unraveling. On the road they too experience an evil trucker that tries to run them down. Hill and King are great with characterization. They put in the work to develop the individual characters, their relationships, the situation they're in, and how they're responding to it. This story was not as much for me, but I can appreciate the work and dedication that went into it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    #ReadAllTheBooks

    Disclaimer: I have only read the first issue of this comic, so my review will be limited in its scope of the series as a whole. Stephen King is no stranger to the graphic novel world, with his books Dark Tower, The Stand being adapted into comic format. Add onto this the American Vampire series and you know that you've got an experienced writer coming into this series. For the most part King shows that he knows what he's doing, but I can't help but feel that I'm missing out on something. I've nev Disclaimer: I have only read the first issue of this comic, so my review will be limited in its scope of the series as a whole. Stephen King is no stranger to the graphic novel world, with his books Dark Tower, The Stand being adapted into comic format. Add onto this the American Vampire series and you know that you've got an experienced writer coming into this series. For the most part King shows that he knows what he's doing, but I can't help but feel that I'm missing out on something. I've never read/listened to the short stories that comprised the audiobook version of Road Rage, which brought together Matheson's Duel with Stephen King and Joe Hill's Throttle. Both stories deal with a person or persons dealing with a psychotic trucker, and maybe if I'd heard those stories first I'd have a better idea of the various characters. The first issue of Road Rage focuses on King and Hill's story, and while it's fairly clear as to what the basic storyline is, we're given such a brief introduction to everything and everyone that I just didn't feel as connected to the characters as I wanted to be. We have characters getting killed off in the first issue that have to be re-introduced as they die- that's how little we're told about them, that the artists/writers felt that they needed to have their names flashed twice so we don't forget who they were. The artwork does fit the feel of the story, though. We have this wonderful "pulp comic" feel to the panels, something that will either completely thrill the readers or drive them batty. I kind of wavered between which side I was on, ultimately deciding that I loved how the book was illustrated. It just plain works and is one of the strong points of the volume. In my first issue I also got to see some beautiful cover artwork as well as some illustrations that were thrown in for good measure, which is what pushed me into the "love it" category. I really can't fault this first issue for anything other than the slow pacing, as going into the secondary Tribe members would probably have been unnecessary and only bogged the story down. I do wish that I could shake the feeling that I'd understand more if I'd have listened to the audiobook, but I would imagine that the story will be more fully developed as the book goes on. Stephen King fans will no doubt snap this graphic novel up in a heartbeat, but for those who are a little hesitant I recommend picking up the audiobook before this is released or looking for this in your local library. It's something that does look to be worth reading and I'll look for the full version when it hits the shelves of my local stores. 3 out of 5 stars (ARC provided by Netgalley)

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Bridgeman

    Hmmm... I ahve read most graphioc adaptations of Kings' stuff but found this hard to 'get', don't know if it is the artwork or the story but this did not stand out as one of the better ones. The book itself is a handsome thing but the artwork,( different artists do each story ), left me cold. The first half of the book introduced by King is his take on a Duel scenario co written with his son Joe Hill. Originally published in a short story anthology celebrating Richard Matheson this is tale not f Hmmm... I ahve read most graphioc adaptations of Kings' stuff but found this hard to 'get', don't know if it is the artwork or the story but this did not stand out as one of the better ones. The book itself is a handsome thing but the artwork,( different artists do each story ), left me cold. The first half of the book introduced by King is his take on a Duel scenario co written with his son Joe Hill. Originally published in a short story anthology celebrating Richard Matheson this is tale not for the faint of heart, is gruesome and involves a pack of bikers being hounded by a moster of a truck whose driver you never see. This is followed up by anadaptation of the Steven Speilberg film Duel, a film I have never seen but this was more successfully menacing and I guess if you have seen the film you know what to expect. Thsi is introduced by Joe Hill. It was good but not up to the standard I had been expecting.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hakim

    I choose not to drive. I don't have a driving license and I never took driving lessons. It's way too stressful, frustrating and (dare I say it?) often times hair-raising. I came upon a large number of reckless truck drivers when I used to travel across the Sahara desert by car. Believe me, these crazy mofos are truly disturbing. You really don't want to mess with a crazy truck driver. Richard Matheson captures that emotion perfectly in "Duel" - a tense, blood-curdling and fun piece that left me b I choose not to drive. I don't have a driving license and I never took driving lessons. It's way too stressful, frustrating and (dare I say it?) often times hair-raising. I came upon a large number of reckless truck drivers when I used to travel across the Sahara desert by car. Believe me, these crazy mofos are truly disturbing. You really don't want to mess with a crazy truck driver. Richard Matheson captures that emotion perfectly in "Duel" - a tense, blood-curdling and fun piece that left me breathless. 4 stars. Team King, however, failed to impress me with "Throttle" (or Road Rage ? I'm not sure), which was way too predictable and dull. 2 stars. All in all, worth the read if you really are into monster trucks and horror.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Janice

    Two words: not impressed. "Road Rage" contains two stories adapted by Chris Ryall. The first is a work by Joe Hill and Stephen King about a biker gang that is falling apart. This is the better of the two stories for 2 reasons: the art was better by far, and the story had a reasonable amount of logic to the events. The second story "Duel" could have been better. The art was difficult to make out at times; I couldn't always tell what I was looking at. The other major issue was all the time I thought Two words: not impressed. "Road Rage" contains two stories adapted by Chris Ryall. The first is a work by Joe Hill and Stephen King about a biker gang that is falling apart. This is the better of the two stories for 2 reasons: the art was better by far, and the story had a reasonable amount of logic to the events. The second story "Duel" could have been better. The art was difficult to make out at times; I couldn't always tell what I was looking at. The other major issue was all the time I thought, "Why didn't he just...?" while reading. There was also no real reason for the conflicts of the story, so I was left feeling like the whole story was pointless.

  18. 5 out of 5

    sixthreezy

    Really disappointing. Good storytelling, but mediocre art and overly simplistic stories that I feel have been told already in some shape or form... (Fast and Furious, Joy Ride, Death Proof, etc.) Maybe in book form it's much better...? Really disappointing. Good storytelling, but mediocre art and overly simplistic stories that I feel have been told already in some shape or form... (Fast and Furious, Joy Ride, Death Proof, etc.) Maybe in book form it's much better...?

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Morrell

    Graphic adaptation of two novellas. The first is "Road Rage," written by Joe Hill and Stephen King as a tribute to Richard Matheson's "Duel." The second is an adaptation of "Duel." Don't piss off the big trucks, guys. Graphic adaptation of two novellas. The first is "Road Rage," written by Joe Hill and Stephen King as a tribute to Richard Matheson's "Duel." The second is an adaptation of "Duel." Don't piss off the big trucks, guys.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    I liked the Stephen King/Joe Hill story well enough, but I very much disliked the art on the adaptation of Richard Matheson's "The Duel." I liked the Stephen King/Joe Hill story well enough, but I very much disliked the art on the adaptation of Richard Matheson's "The Duel."

  21. 5 out of 5

    James

    Father and son writing duo Stephen King and Joe Hill team up to introduce this book as well as contribute the first of two stories. Overall I liked the theme of the Killer on the Road.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Beth Wisniewski

    As a HUGE fan of both Stephen King and his son Joe Hill, I was so excited to read this graphic novel! I was not disappointed!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Fahad Ahmed

    Now, I consider myself to be a relatively calm driver on the Emirati roads. By most other countries' standards, that would make an insane speed junkie, but the UAE is full of even crazier motorists than me. I've gotten into a few passing matches with road hogs over the years, but the prospect of having to do something like that with a truck is scary even to me Road Rage is a little graphic novel containing adaptations of two stories. I'll review them and rate them separately Throttle This story was Now, I consider myself to be a relatively calm driver on the Emirati roads. By most other countries' standards, that would make an insane speed junkie, but the UAE is full of even crazier motorists than me. I've gotten into a few passing matches with road hogs over the years, but the prospect of having to do something like that with a truck is scary even to me Road Rage is a little graphic novel containing adaptations of two stories. I'll review them and rate them separately Throttle This story was written by Joe Hill and Stephen King in collaboration for He Is Legend, a short story collection celebrating the work of Richard Matheson. A short story, I think, should be about one of three things: it should either be about story, or about horror or both. Throttle, judging from this adaptation, seems to have been solely about the horror and I can't imagine anything these writers could write would leave me so unfeeling, so I'll assume that a lot was lost bringing it from prose to a more visual medium Throttle is about a biker gang pissed off about a drug deal gone wrong. While they're having a spat as they drive through the highway, a truck from hell shows up to kill half of the gang and relentlessly chase the other half. And that's it, really. The art, while good, fails to compensate for the lack of suspense or scares that was lost with the prose. It's not a terrible read, and you won't mind having this along with the superior second story in this collection, but I feel that either Throttle isn't presented in its best form here, or its just not that good Gonna give this one a 3/5 Duel Now this story is scary. It's an adaptation of one of Richard Matheson's best known works (and subject of a Steven Spielberg movie) about a man named Mann having a passing match with a truck that can somehow match speed with a little sedan There's some context to what's happening here, but it's not important. Duel, I feel, is better at bringing the horror than Throttle was by building up the scariness of this mysterious, unstoppable force that could easily turn Mann into paste. Unlike with Throttle, we never find out why the truck driver was so bent on staying ahead of Mann, and that's what makes threats on the road scary. Though I've never played this game with a truck, it's a little scary to think that you could piss someone off by accident to the point where they'll brake check you into rear-ending them. You can never know what's going on in the heads of your fellow drivers, and that's the fear that Duel capitalizes on Conversely from Throttle, I was not a fan of the art in Duel. The style was very muddy and it was often hard to tell what was happening in the panels. Some people like this kind of art, but it's definitely a no-no for me, though I will say that in the end, I was able to grasp the events of the story well enough. But art shouldn't just be good enough to present the plot, it should enhance the plot and be good in its own right In all, great story, not so great art. This one is a 3.5/5 for me Overall This one is for the real fans out there who insist on having everything Stephen King or Joe Hill (or both!) have ever written. It's an enjoyable and quick read that won't shake your world like the best of either of these authors The book gets an overall 3.25/5

  24. 5 out of 5

    Michael Fredette

    Road Rage features graphic adaptations of Richard Matheson’s suspense clsssic Duel, and Throttle by Joe Hill and Stephen King. Throttle originally appeared in an anthology entitled He is Legend, a collection inspired by Matheson. Throttle is about an outlaw biker gang, The Tribe, who are being picked off one by one by a crazed trucker. I generally love Joe Hill and Stephen King’s stories, but this one just wasn’t very well developed. Maybe it didn’t translate as a work of graphic fiction. Thrott Road Rage features graphic adaptations of Richard Matheson’s suspense clsssic Duel, and Throttle by Joe Hill and Stephen King. Throttle originally appeared in an anthology entitled He is Legend, a collection inspired by Matheson. Throttle is about an outlaw biker gang, The Tribe, who are being picked off one by one by a crazed trucker. I generally love Joe Hill and Stephen King’s stories, but this one just wasn’t very well developed. Maybe it didn’t translate as a work of graphic fiction. Throttle provides the title for Joe Hill’s upcoming collection, Full Throttle, scheduled for release in the fall. Duel, is a classic. A tense story of a road rage encounter between a traveling salesman & a trucker, which was the basis of an early Spielberg film.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jimmie

    I enjoyed the collaborated effort between Stephen King, Joe Hill and Richard Matheson. This graphic novel contains two stories, Throttle and Duel. I grew up reading Stephen King books and I have a vivid memory of watching Richard Matheson's novel Duel on adapted for TV. Both stories also honed in on a modern day Sons of Anarchy motorcycle group. Both stories deal with an evil driver that enacts his horror on the open road. I found it fitting the evil driver in both stories drove trucks. This wor I enjoyed the collaborated effort between Stephen King, Joe Hill and Richard Matheson. This graphic novel contains two stories, Throttle and Duel. I grew up reading Stephen King books and I have a vivid memory of watching Richard Matheson's novel Duel on adapted for TV. Both stories also honed in on a modern day Sons of Anarchy motorcycle group. Both stories deal with an evil driver that enacts his horror on the open road. I found it fitting the evil driver in both stories drove trucks. This world is a better place for have great writers like the three found in Road Rage. I highly recommend this book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    3 stars The first story and artwork was decent on both accounts. Art was pleasant enough to look at and the story meshed and ended well. A little twist is always nice. The second stories artwork was very off-putting. Not pleasing to look at. The story itself was basic. Nothing to write home about. The graphic novel was a bit meh all in all, but still enjoyable. Too bad about the artwork in the second story. Really let the book down as a whole.

  27. 4 out of 5

    KD Grainger

    Across the numerous horror-centric graphic novels I’ve now read by Joe Hill, I think I enjoy the personal stories from hill as much as the excellent story-line and illustrations. I was intrigued by King’s Intro about Richard Mathewson (who’s now on my TBR), and amused by Hill’s description of what it was like growing up with King as a father. All the nostalgia and emotional impact was there for me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Faith Hurst-Bilinski

    I got this graphic novel version of this as a gift. I don't usually like this form but I familiarity with the stories made it easier for me to read. I usually prefer to make my own pictures. Here I did find myself comparing the illustrations in Throttle with the pictures I formed when I was reading. Love the story every time I read it. I only knew Duel from the movie way back when. In this case it was comparing the old take with the new take. I got this graphic novel version of this as a gift. I don't usually like this form but I familiarity with the stories made it easier for me to read. I usually prefer to make my own pictures. Here I did find myself comparing the illustrations in Throttle with the pictures I formed when I was reading. Love the story every time I read it. I only knew Duel from the movie way back when. In this case it was comparing the old take with the new take.

  29. 4 out of 5

    John

    Serviceable adaptation of a Richard Matheson story and the Stephen King / Joe Hill story it inspired. Since each adaptation lasts only two issues, there's not much to sink your teeth into here. The Matheson story works better than the King/Hill story, but the artwork is bizarre to say the least. For some reason, the main character looks like a leper whose skin is melting off his face. Neither adaptation has much reason to exist, but they're fine for what they are. Serviceable adaptation of a Richard Matheson story and the Stephen King / Joe Hill story it inspired. Since each adaptation lasts only two issues, there's not much to sink your teeth into here. The Matheson story works better than the King/Hill story, but the artwork is bizarre to say the least. For some reason, the main character looks like a leper whose skin is melting off his face. Neither adaptation has much reason to exist, but they're fine for what they are.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Albert Yates

    if you've ever spent any time driving long distances you are aware of how many transport trucks you see on the road. these massive vehicles take their loads to the far reaches of the continent. if you're like me you daydream about their lives and the mood they might be in after driving for so many hours that day. this book summarizes every fear I have when I'm on the road. if you've ever spent any time driving long distances you are aware of how many transport trucks you see on the road. these massive vehicles take their loads to the far reaches of the continent. if you're like me you daydream about their lives and the mood they might be in after driving for so many hours that day. this book summarizes every fear I have when I'm on the road.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.