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Phred, the Cute Little Bunny Rabbit. A Tale of Fear and Horror

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Phred, a rabbit who is the class pet, persuades Jason to take him home for the weekend. Jason starts to worry when he realizes he's taken the rabbit illegally. Jason's even more concerned when he finds that the rabbit is more inclined to give orders than to take them, and that the rabbit has adequate means to get his way. Jason really starts to sweat when he realizes that Phred, a rabbit who is the class pet, persuades Jason to take him home for the weekend. Jason starts to worry when he realizes he's taken the rabbit illegally. Jason's even more concerned when he finds that the rabbit is more inclined to give orders than to take them, and that the rabbit has adequate means to get his way. Jason really starts to sweat when he realizes that resistance is futile. Think of Alice in Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll, above ground, out in the suburbs, a fantastic world that lurks just below the surface of everyday life. Phred, a smart-ass, well educated rabbit, will appeal to the childlike of all ages, some of whom might actually be adults. And as he hops to do Phred's bidding, Jason discovers that adults are a bit more like large children, and he also finds that he has more life skills and confidence than he ever imagined. Phred's view of the human race provides a bit of perspective on what humans are good for, and raises the question as to why they should be so lucky as to have opposable thumbs. Phred puts humans in their place: living in harmony with the rest of the planet. N. B. No animals were harmed in the writing of this book.


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Phred, a rabbit who is the class pet, persuades Jason to take him home for the weekend. Jason starts to worry when he realizes he's taken the rabbit illegally. Jason's even more concerned when he finds that the rabbit is more inclined to give orders than to take them, and that the rabbit has adequate means to get his way. Jason really starts to sweat when he realizes that Phred, a rabbit who is the class pet, persuades Jason to take him home for the weekend. Jason starts to worry when he realizes he's taken the rabbit illegally. Jason's even more concerned when he finds that the rabbit is more inclined to give orders than to take them, and that the rabbit has adequate means to get his way. Jason really starts to sweat when he realizes that resistance is futile. Think of Alice in Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll, above ground, out in the suburbs, a fantastic world that lurks just below the surface of everyday life. Phred, a smart-ass, well educated rabbit, will appeal to the childlike of all ages, some of whom might actually be adults. And as he hops to do Phred's bidding, Jason discovers that adults are a bit more like large children, and he also finds that he has more life skills and confidence than he ever imagined. Phred's view of the human race provides a bit of perspective on what humans are good for, and raises the question as to why they should be so lucky as to have opposable thumbs. Phred puts humans in their place: living in harmony with the rest of the planet. N. B. No animals were harmed in the writing of this book.

37 review for Phred, the Cute Little Bunny Rabbit. A Tale of Fear and Horror

  1. 5 out of 5

    Geoff (G. Robbins) (merda constat variat altitudo)

    More a tale of tedium and preaching. I was attracted to this book, by an advertisement in Goodreads that made it sound quirky and interesting. Unfortunately, this is not the case. This book, if book is the right word when it’s only 45 pages long, has so many flaws that I cannot begin to list them all. Here are some of my observations. The writing style is flat and uninteresting. More like a sermon than an adventure. The grammar is poor, commas there and not there, almost by whim. Thankfully, there More a tale of tedium and preaching. I was attracted to this book, by an advertisement in Goodreads that made it sound quirky and interesting. Unfortunately, this is not the case. This book, if book is the right word when it’s only 45 pages long, has so many flaws that I cannot begin to list them all. Here are some of my observations. The writing style is flat and uninteresting. More like a sermon than an adventure. The grammar is poor, commas there and not there, almost by whim. Thankfully, there were few typos. The story is nothing to do with horror, or comedy. In fact, I’m not really sure who this short story is aimed at, it is too young for adults, but too old for children and too boring for young adults. The preaching about the food chain and global warming at the end is the final turn-off. The authors note at the end is the final nail in the coffin, as he tries to perform a Wellsian trick to involve himself. As a UK citizen, his explanation of the Welsh is nothing less than insulting and shows a complete lack of understanding or research. His similes are teeth grindingly bad. For example: “Imagine, dear reader, the sound of a train stopping in the New York City subway system. If you’ve never been in the New York subways, just imagine a fairly loud metallic shriek, as metal grinds upon metal.” If a simile needs to be explained, it’s worthless. I was shocked when I saw that this short story was being sold for 3.50 UKP. With fairness, I pointed this out to the author, who promised to bring the price down to 2.00 UKP. This, in my opinion is nowhere near low enough for a debut work, especially one this short. The author supplied a copy for my review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Reva Nowell

    Based on the title of this book I expected fear and horror, but got neither. I thought it was a cute story.

  3. 4 out of 5

    C. J. Scurria

    This is the tale of Phred a talking bunny. The story is short and is at times sort of innocent (though the "multiplying" part is referred to so much to the point it makes me wonder if this book has a specific age group to be offered to) but there is little going on. Though I giggled maybe once or twice I don't really get the "horror" reference within the title. Not much conflict either. I guess it is true that the book is admitted to be entertainment mostly it's not really put together to amass This is the tale of Phred a talking bunny. The story is short and is at times sort of innocent (though the "multiplying" part is referred to so much to the point it makes me wonder if this book has a specific age group to be offered to) but there is little going on. Though I giggled maybe once or twice I don't really get the "horror" reference within the title. Not much conflict either. I guess it is true that the book is admitted to be entertainment mostly it's not really put together to amass sales or whatever the book was written for and was great at spelling and other stuff for being an independent e-book. So there's that at least. It seems to be written for young kids though I wouldn't really call it that. At best it's an okay, cute book though.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leah Lake

    Phred,the Cute Little Bunny Rabbit. Ah, come on… I just read the previous review about this story. And my review is here inspired by the earlier comment on this brief first fiction work by Doug Friedenberg. Reading the above review, I’m inspired to defend Phred as a good first effort and a story well told. Clearly, the author is bright, articulate and experienced in non-fiction writing. And it’s not easy to switch genres. So kudos for Phred. Before continuing this note, and to avoid reviewing the Phred,the Cute Little Bunny Rabbit. Ah, come on… I just read the previous review about this story. And my review is here inspired by the earlier comment on this brief first fiction work by Doug Friedenberg. Reading the above review, I’m inspired to defend Phred as a good first effort and a story well told. Clearly, the author is bright, articulate and experienced in non-fiction writing. And it’s not easy to switch genres. So kudos for Phred. Before continuing this note, and to avoid reviewing the previous review, I will reread the story. Okay, I did. Two thoughts emerge when I read the story again. The first is a distinction (not necessarily a difference) when someone writes a play . You can write a play (or story) as a literary product, correct sentences, etc. Or you can write it as people actually speak…broken sentences, lots of ‘buts’ and ‘ands’, etc. I think with Phred, too often the literary presentation won out. The second is the realization that the conversation with Phred is a thinly veiled way of telling a spiritually true story with a fictional varnish disguised as a children’s story. The reality of the deeper story may sometimes be too obscure to speak to the reader as intended. I also concur that the ‘reader’ is insufficiently defined/clarified in the story. I think it’s a good story that may need a heavier hand with editing and continuity. The bones are good, the story is important in this day and age, and Doug Friedenberg definitely has a way with words. And as his first fictional effort I think it’s a good start.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    I owned a white rabbit named Fred for 12 years so the title and cover art of this book, and the first few chapters, made me laugh. But the author never takes full advantage of his own setup. A story about a talking rabbit who knows an awful lot about human behavior has the potential to be really funny. Friedenberg achieves a few humorous moments but most of the book plods along and is completely ruined by the ending (a pedantic lesson on man vs. nature) and the Author's Note in which Friedenberg I owned a white rabbit named Fred for 12 years so the title and cover art of this book, and the first few chapters, made me laugh. But the author never takes full advantage of his own setup. A story about a talking rabbit who knows an awful lot about human behavior has the potential to be really funny. Friedenberg achieves a few humorous moments but most of the book plods along and is completely ruined by the ending (a pedantic lesson on man vs. nature) and the Author's Note in which Friedenberg unsuccessfully and unnecessarily inserts himself in the story. Sadly, the cover is the best part of this aimless book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emily Lai

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cardozzo, Maykon

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jessi

  10. 5 out of 5

    OTIS

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cheri

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brian Hudson

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shannanvalentin

  14. 4 out of 5

    Traci Craig

  15. 5 out of 5

    E.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Andy Frazier

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ellie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Terry

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gwen

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sls

  21. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

  22. 5 out of 5

    Stu George

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lara Michelle

  24. 4 out of 5

    Donn

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rose

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mashkai

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kyrian Friedenberg

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jenniferapark

  29. 5 out of 5

    Niccuinn

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katie O Toole

  31. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Lapen

  32. 4 out of 5

    Karmen

  33. 5 out of 5

    Henk

  34. 5 out of 5

    Frances Johnson

  35. 4 out of 5

    Carol Sanchez

  36. 4 out of 5

    Veronica McKay

  37. 4 out of 5

    Cat

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