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Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross' fully-painted re-telling of key moments in the Marvel Universe (as seen through the eyes of an innocent bystander) is presented in this collected edition. Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross' fully-painted re-telling of key moments in the Marvel Universe (as seen through the eyes of an innocent bystander) is presented in this collected edition.


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Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross' fully-painted re-telling of key moments in the Marvel Universe (as seen through the eyes of an innocent bystander) is presented in this collected edition. Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross' fully-painted re-telling of key moments in the Marvel Universe (as seen through the eyes of an innocent bystander) is presented in this collected edition.

30 review for Marvels

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    Marvelous reading!!! This TPB edition collects “Marvels” #0-4, plus commentary section by the involved people even an introduction by Stan Lee, also an artwork section. Creative Team: Writer: Kurt Busiek Illustrator: Alex Ross A TIME(LY) WHEN MARVEL YET TO PROPERLY BORN Maybe you have seen material mentioning the 75 years of Marvel, and technically that’s true, but it’s a fact that the company was called “Timely Comics”, and while it’s the same company, it’s obvious that in the 40’s, they were Marvelous reading!!! This TPB edition collects “Marvels” #0-4, plus commentary section by the involved people even an introduction by Stan Lee, also an artwork section. Creative Team: Writer: Kurt Busiek Illustrator: Alex Ross A TIME(LY) WHEN MARVEL YET TO PROPERLY BORN Maybe you have seen material mentioning the 75 years of Marvel, and technically that’s true, but it’s a fact that the company was called “Timely Comics”, and while it’s the same company, it’s obvious that in the 40’s, they were still decades away of its “boom” when Stan Lee (a young assistant in Timely era) started to create his popular characters. To be fair, and totally unbiased (since I read comics from all houses: DC, Marvel and the Indy ones (I don’t believe in limit myself)), DC Comics also has its blurry era to say that they have 75 years of existence, since when it was created Superman and Batman, it was still two separate companies: National Comics and All-American Comics, in fact, Batman was a result to compete in sales against Superman, and once united under the seal of DC Comics, it has continuously buying other comic book companies, like Fawcett, Charlton, Wildstorm, etc… adding their characters to the DC roster. So, Timely Comics was a brave beginning where they triumphed with the “Big Three” of that era: Captain America, Namor the Sub-Mariner and The Human Torch (the original one), and this very book, Marvels is firstly, a tribute to the origins of comics, where it presented in a marvelous way that said “big three”, but also other Timely characters like Millie the Model and Ka-Zar the Great, but even you can glimpse cameos of Superman, Clark Kent and Lois Lane, if you know where to look (not to mention The Watchmen in the following development of the story). Marvels is told from the point of view of Phil Sheldon, a character invented for this tale and where he is a photojournalist and through his camera you’ll watch in a new light the great events that made Marvel what is, and where the human being met a new kind of species with powers and abilities far beyond of those mortal men, questioning what this new rising kind means to the former inhabitants of the planet. MARVELOUS NEW ERA After the first chapter of the story dedicated to the “Timely years”, the other three chapters are focused in what known properly as the “Marvel years” where Stan Lee began his excelsior era basically creating the foundations of what is Marvel, with The Fantastic Four, The Avengers, The X-Men, Spider-Man (with all the support characters on each title), but also the creations of other talented people that contributed to the success of Marvel like Luke Cage between other ones. Phil Sheldon is our leading tour guide, where you’ll have a front seat (but still in the observer area) in the major events of the rising of Marvel Comics, starting (in the first chapter) with the battle of Namor vs. The Human Torch, and proceeding to The Wedding of Reed Richards and Susan Storm, The Trial of Galactus, the Mutant Revolution, the Kree-Skrull War, and of course… …the Day when Gwen Stacy died… …properly ending the “Silver Age” of Marvel, introducing it to a yet even more mature era of storytelling.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kemper

    Treasure of the Rubbermaids 17: Marvel At Marvel’s Marvelous ‘Marvels’! The on-going discoveries of priceless books and comics found in a stack of Rubbermaid containers previously stored and forgotten at my parent’s house and untouched for almost 20 years. Thanks to my father dumping them back on me, I now spend my spare time unearthing lost treasures from their plastic depths. I would hate to be a New Yorker in the Marvel universe because it seems like the city is constantly being threatened by s Treasure of the Rubbermaids 17: Marvel At Marvel’s Marvelous ‘Marvels’! The on-going discoveries of priceless books and comics found in a stack of Rubbermaid containers previously stored and forgotten at my parent’s house and untouched for almost 20 years. Thanks to my father dumping them back on me, I now spend my spare time unearthing lost treasures from their plastic depths. I would hate to be a New Yorker in the Marvel universe because it seems like the city is constantly being threatened by super villains, invaded by aliens, flooded by pissed off Atlanteans, or beset by some other form of comic book mayhem. I’ll bet it’s impossible to get property insurance at all. Comic book readers get a ring side seat and full explanations for everything that’s happening, but what would your average man on the street think about all this insanity? That’s what Marvels explores beautifully. Phil Sheldon is a young newspaper photographer during the Great Depression who witnesses the public unveiling of the original Human Torch followed shortly after by the appearance of Namor the Sub-Mariner. Like most people, Sheldon is initially shocked and disturbed by these new super beings he thinks of as Marvels who routinely turn New York into a battleground. With the coming of WWII and the introduction of Captain America, Phil embraces the costumed heroes who fight the Nazis. Years later in the early ‘60s, an explosion of superheroes creates an odd mix of emotions in Phil and the general public. The Fantastic Four and The Avengers are celebrities who get put on magazine covers while some don’t know whether Spider-Man is a good guy or a criminal, and the mutant X-Men are feared and persecuted. Phil’s work as a photojournalist puts him in the middle of almost every big event Marvel did during the Silver Age, and he frequently finds himself conflicted about how he feels about them. This does a great job of exploring that idea of how the public responds to larger than life characters and events that make them feel scared and insignificant, and one of the things I’ve always liked about Marvel’s comics is how they've always portrayed the public's attitudes towards the superheroes as being full of contradictions. People cheer the heroes like Iron Man and Captain America, but some blame them for the fights that cause so much destruction. The mutants are the target of hatred and bigotry while stores sell clothing lines based on the many costumes of Wasp. New Yorkers will cheer on the Fantastic Four as they battle Galactus to save the entire world, but just days later their landlord will try to evict them from the Baxter Building for the danger they attract. Phil’s a great character to use in the midst of this because he’s a decent, ordinary guy who is still fully capable of giving into his worst instincts at times. He makes a career out of documenting the craziness that comes with the superheroes and thinks deeply about what the heroes mean to all of them. At times he almost worships them but can easily swing to resentment and jealously. Phil’s attitude towards them mirror how the superheroes have always been portrayed with a mixture of admiration and fear in the Marvel comics. The stunning artwork has a retro realism to it that really makes you feel like you’re looking at people wearing tights in the 1960s, yet still conveys all the wonder of seeing someone otherworldly like the Silver Surfer. By showing us how one regular person reacted to some of Marvel’s greatest hits, this moving tribute to the past gives a fresh perspective on how fans relate to the characters in these wild and amazing stories.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Marvels, Kurt Busiek, Alex Ross (Illustrator) Marvels is a four-issue limited series comic book written by Kurt Busiek, painted by Alex Ross and edited by Marcus McLaurin. It was published by Marvel Comics in 1994. In 1939, Jim Hammond, the original Human Torch is created by scientist Phineas T. Horton, and the project is considered a success until the android catches on fire when air is projected into its glass chamber, only to go out when the air is gone. Horton shows his creation to the public, Marvels, Kurt Busiek, Alex Ross (Illustrator) Marvels is a four-issue limited series comic book written by Kurt Busiek, painted by Alex Ross and edited by Marcus McLaurin. It was published by Marvel Comics in 1994. In 1939, Jim Hammond, the original Human Torch is created by scientist Phineas T. Horton, and the project is considered a success until the android catches on fire when air is projected into its glass chamber, only to go out when the air is gone. Horton shows his creation to the public, which is met with demands from the terrified civilians to destroy it. A dejected Horton begins to bury the android, but the chamber cracks, allowing in air and enabling the Human Torch to escape. The android describes his appearance as the beginning of a "golden age". Meanwhile, young Phil Sheldon, an aspiring photographer, and young J. Jonah Jameson are shocked by these "Marvels". Sheldon is more confused than Jameson by the spectacle and, worried, seeks the support of his fiancée, Doris Jacquet. More unusual beings begin to appear, notably Namor the Sub-Mariner, and fights erupt between him and the Human Torch. Sheldon, feeling it would be irresponsible for him to raise children in a world where these Marvels run rampant, breaks off his engagement with Doris. It is only when Steve Rogers/Captain America is unveiled to the world that Sheldon becomes less apprehensive about the Marvels. When World War II begins, Sheldon, Doris, and many others see the Marvels in newsreels joining forces with the Allies, providing public reassurance. But after rekindling his romance with Doris, Sheldon hears that the Human Torch and Namor are fighting again, and the battle this time damages New York City landmarks. During the fight, they come near but do not directly encounter Sheldon; he is knocked out by a small chunk of masonry and permanently blinded in his left eye. Still, he has lost all fears of the Marvels and goes on to marry Doris. Sheldon becomes a war correspondent in Europe, reporting on the Allied Forces and the Marvels as they combat the Nazis. ... تاریخ نخستین خوانش روز نوزدهم ماه سپتامبر سال 2019میلادی عنوان: شگفت زده (مارولز)؛ نویسنده کرت بوسیک؛ ناشر مارول؛ آرتیست آلکس راس؛ خیلی‌ها شاید خیال کنند، که کتاب‌های کمیک، دستاورد سال‌های اخیر هستند، اما جالب است بدانید، که نخستین کمیک بوک تاریخ، در سال 1933میلادی منتشر شد؛ این کتاب که با نام «سرگرمی مشهور»، روی قفسه ‌های فروشگاه‌ها عرضه شد، مجموعه ‌ای از کمیک‌هایی بود، که در روزنامه‌ ها منتشر شده بودند؛ همین مسئله نشان می‌دهد، که کتاب‌های کمیک، قدمتی تقریبا نود ساله دارند؛ از سوی دیگر، با ظهور «سوپرهیروها (ابرقهرمانها)» در کتاب‌های مصور، کمیک‌ها از مقبولیت بیشتری، برخوردار شدند، و تا همین امروز، نه ‌تنها از محبوبیت این نوع سرگرمی، کاسته نشده، بلکه به ‌لطف «مارول» و «دی‌سی»، و فیلم‌ها و سریال‌هایی که این دو شرکت بزرگ، براساس شخصیت‌هاشان تولید کرده ‌اند، بر محبوبیت آن‌ها، افزوده شده است؛ اکنون دیگر کمتر کسی را، می‌توانید پیدا کنید، که نام این دو شرکت را، نشنیده باشند؛ باز هم به ‌لطف فیلم‌ها و سریال‌ها، افراد بیشتری، با «سوپرهیروها» آشنا شده اند؛ ابرقهرمانهایی همانند «دردویل»، «جسیکا جونز»، «آکوامن»، و بسیاری دیگر، که تا پیش از اینکه، از آن‌ها فیلم و سریال، ساخته شود، فقط روی پنل‌های کمیک بوک‌ها، و شاید در برخی از بازی‌های نچندان محبوب، حضور داشتند مارولز (شگفت زده)؛ یک سری کمیک، با چهار شماره است، که توسط «کورت بوسیک» نگارش، توسط «الکس راس» نقاشی، و توسط «مارکوس مک لورین» ویرایش شده اند؛ کتابها را، نشر «مارول کمیکز» در سال 1994میلادی منتشر کرده است برخلاف کمیک‌هایی که با برند «ورتیگوی»، «دی‌سی» و انتشاراتیهایی مانند «دارک هورس» و «ایمیج» منتشر می‌کنند، خیلی کم پیش می‌آید، که «مارول» از کمیک‌های ابرقهرمانی خویش، فاصله بگیرد؛ که البته هیچ کسی با این مسئله، مشکلی ندارد؛ با این‌حال در سال 1994میلادی و زمانی‌که «کمیک مارولز» منتشر شد، انتشارات «مارول» در بالاترین قله ی خلاقیت خود، قرار داشت؛ «کمیک مارولز»، روایت‌گر مهم‌ترین و بهترین صحنه ‌های تاریخ «مارول»، از دید شخضیتی با نام «فیل شلدون»، یک عکاس خبری، است؛ دیدن سوپرهیروهای «مارول»، از زاویه دید فردی عادی، بسیار هیجان‌انگیز است؛ با اینکه این ایده، به خودی خود، ایده ی جذابی است، و نویسندگی «کرت بوسیک» برای این کمیک نیز، کاملا خوب است، اما هیچ‌کدام از آن‌ها، به اندازه ی تصویرسازی بیمانندی که «الکس راس»، برای این کمیک انجام داد، اهمیت ندارد؛ مبارزه ی «اسپایدرمن» با «گرین گابلین»، جنگ چهار شگفت ‌انگیز با «گالاکتوس»، و رونمایی افراد ایکس، از هویت واقعی خودشان، برای عموم مردم، از دید یک عکاس، که یک انسان عادی است، «مارولز» را، به اثری چشم‌نواز، و جذاب بدل کرده است تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 28/11/1399هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Photographer Phil Sheldon experiences what it's like to live in a world of super heroes, from the rise of the Human Torch in the late thirties all the way to the dawn of the mutants, the first appearance of Galactus, and the death of Gwen Stacy. When Marvels first hit scene, I was a wee lad of 17. The internet was in its infancy and comic shops were dying by the dozen. As it became easier to come by comics, or "graphic novels" if you're too cool to read comics, I always had a mind to read this bu Photographer Phil Sheldon experiences what it's like to live in a world of super heroes, from the rise of the Human Torch in the late thirties all the way to the dawn of the mutants, the first appearance of Galactus, and the death of Gwen Stacy. When Marvels first hit scene, I was a wee lad of 17. The internet was in its infancy and comic shops were dying by the dozen. As it became easier to come by comics, or "graphic novels" if you're too cool to read comics, I always had a mind to read this but didn't pick it up until recently. Maybe it was just nearly twenty years of expectations but I wasn't wowed by this. Sure, the premise is cool and Alex Ross is still Alex Ross but not a hell of a lot happens. Busiek's writing has never done much for me and this is no exception. I think Busiek should send Alex Ross a fruit basket or something every week considering this is the book that moved Busiek on to bigger and better things. Don't get me wrong, I like Phil Sheldon's odyssey through the Marvel universe from an everyman's point of view. It's cool seeing what he thinks about things and how his life unfolds alongside superheroes fighting in the streets and sky of New York for decades. A brief sidebar, if I may. One thing that always bugged me about the Marvel Universe is how the mutants are continuously feared and/or shat upon but the regular superheroes are idolized for the most part. Really? Is it more likely that the X-Men are going to destroy your house during a battle than the Avengers? Is a mutant more dangerous than someone like the Spider-Man? Anyway, back to the show. Maybe my less than stellar reaction to this book is due to almost 20 years of speculation on my part. I kept thinking, when is stuff going to happen? I feel like Alex Ross's artwork was wasted and should have been used on a story with more action, more like Kingdom Come, which I rated higher than this but probably won't hold up well under a re-read. So yeah. Marvels. Fantastic art, kind of a meh story for me. It may have been a case of wrong book, wrong time. Your mileage may vary.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    I just read Ed Brubaker's Marvels Project and liked that a bit better, but it may just be a matter of taste. I like Brubaker's and Steve Epting's earthier noir approach versus the glossier, more dramatic work of Busier and Ross. But I gave both 4 stars. They both take a kind of unique wide angle, meta and historical approach to the history and purpose of comics; both are approaches to the inception of the Golden Age of superheroes in the late thirties, as WWII loomed (for the US). We see the lov I just read Ed Brubaker's Marvels Project and liked that a bit better, but it may just be a matter of taste. I like Brubaker's and Steve Epting's earthier noir approach versus the glossier, more dramatic work of Busier and Ross. But I gave both 4 stars. They both take a kind of unique wide angle, meta and historical approach to the history and purpose of comics; both are approaches to the inception of the Golden Age of superheroes in the late thirties, as WWII loomed (for the US). We see the love of comics at least in the US in both volumes as in part driven by our interest in fighting Evil, and with a sense of optimism about doing so in the waning of the Depression. Everything seems possible. We can unite with them under FDR's leadership with the Allies to defeat a common enemy. Both humanize the comics, putting it in the context of regular folks, helping us see things from the angle of the Everyman that encountered them suddenly everywhere. Marvels looks at heroes and villains with a more contemporary feel, with moral ambiguity about what they positively and negatively might do with their powers. It's dangerous having all these superheroes flying around! Busiek takes the approach specifically of telling the story through photographer Phil Sheldon. He's even hurt by one of them in the process, but keeps on snapping. We get to meet many of them, too, one by one. The point is ALL of them, just rolling out many of them versus a focus on one superhero and his story. And Sheldon does the meta-fictional thing of publishing a book of photographs of superheroes called Marvels. There are Ross pages with dramatic swooping inspiring superhero feats alternating with the corresponding intimacy of the awe and worries of the Common Man. Over all, I would say with Brubaker's volume they are indispensable comics works, and I am glad I have finally read them.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    2.5 stars I think I get what Marvel was aiming for with Marvels, and I've been a fan of their legendary roster of 'super'-characters for nearly 40 years, but this book was . . . dull. Said characters aren't even the stars of this storyline - they're strictly limited to 'featured' status, noticeably detached in a sense. The plot focuses on a fictional New York City photojournalist (the second time I've used that job title in a review today - how odd) from 'The Greatest Generation' who specializes i 2.5 stars I think I get what Marvel was aiming for with Marvels, and I've been a fan of their legendary roster of 'super'-characters for nearly 40 years, but this book was . . . dull. Said characters aren't even the stars of this storyline - they're strictly limited to 'featured' status, noticeably detached in a sense. The plot focuses on a fictional New York City photojournalist (the second time I've used that job title in a review today - how odd) from 'The Greatest Generation' who specializes in covering the notable superheroes who debut during the WWII era (Captain America, Sub-Mariner, etc.) and then later in the 60's (Fantastic Four, the Avengers, the X-Men, Spider-Man, and many more). The illustrations were often first-rate and the humor was sly on occasion (e.g. look for the Beatles, among other celebs, attending the nuptials of Mr. Fantastic and Invisible Girl), but the story just seemed creaky.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Terrington

    In my view Marvels is one of, if not the greatest, comics released by Marvel Comics. I first encountered it as a twelve year old and have read it several times since. And each time I encounter again what it is that makes Marvels a stand out work in the Marvel universe of comics. The artwork in Marvels is clearly a stand-out feature. Though Alex Ross is better known for his work in the also grand Kingdom Come I personally prefer his artwork here where he first worked his unique stylistic magic. In In my view Marvels is one of, if not the greatest, comics released by Marvel Comics. I first encountered it as a twelve year old and have read it several times since. And each time I encounter again what it is that makes Marvels a stand out work in the Marvel universe of comics. The artwork in Marvels is clearly a stand-out feature. Though Alex Ross is better known for his work in the also grand Kingdom Come I personally prefer his artwork here where he first worked his unique stylistic magic. In my eyes Marvels has some of the greatest illustrations in the genre. While Watchmen and Batman: The Dark Knight Returns may be the greatest acclaimed graphic novels, I believe that alongside Batman: Noel this novel has the greatest artwork style. The story is essentially a trip through Marvel comic history, beginning with the WW2 based heroes and moving forward to the space-age/cosmic heroes. This trip is seen from the Odyssean perspective of one man by the name of Phil Sheldon. Phil is a photographer who through the course of the novel takes advantage of the rise of superheroes to gain work experiences. Through his eyes the reader sees how the world is changing with the rise of the superhero and the prejudice as regards the mutant X-Men. As an aspect of this comic history the reader can see the interconnected nature of the comics. I believe this shows better than any Marvel comic how connected the story arcs are. And in this way it makes the perfect entry novel into the Marvel universe. It also makes for the perfect novel to see a progression of human reactions to the heroes across the different entire continuing arcs. Part of the joy and brilliance of this graphic novel is how it also shows how individuals respond to the heroic and to the extraordinary. There is the sense that there are those vigilante style heroes - the Spiderman characters - who are disliked, because, despite being the heroes with power and responsibility, they are the heroes who make the right calls. There are the heroes like The Avengers, the public heroes which are loved and adored by many until they make an error or leave an unforgiving public to their fate. Then there are the X-Men, those unloved figures seeking desperately to be accepted and working behind the scenes as heroes. And then of course for every hero you have a villain, the individual who chooses to use their abilities for other purposes. The book essentially could be seen as filled with metaphors for the changes in history after WW2. For instance the rise of the nuclear powered heroes, or heroes who gained powers from nuclear power, are representative of the advent of the Cold War, where the racism directed against the X-Men reminds one of the periods of racism throughout recent history. In such a way though Marvels is a beautiful romp through a world imbued with super-heroics it is also a tribute to our own history and a reminder through the eyes of the everyman of how we as people adapt to the changing times. In short this is a poignant book full of superheroes and also with a deeper look into how the ordinary individual must survive in a world where men and women can tear down buildings with ease. Or to put it in other words, how men and women survive in an era of gods and mortals, an era of politics and advanced technology. It is the story of the 'marvels' but it is also the story of the ordinary people caught in the crossfire of the miraculous and therefore the deadly. And I personally know of few other comics (perhaps Watchmen or The Dark Knight Returns in some sense do this) that take a look into how people are affected by the extraordinary. As such I rate this as an important, must read, graphic novel.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    A very bland book story-wise that is only saved by Alex Ross and his beautiful painted artwork. It's basically a condensed history of the Marvel universe shown from the perspective of the regular people. As a result, we don't really see any of the superheroes doing anything heroic, and the regular folks' perspective doesn't bring anything interesting to the table by itself. If anything, it makes it even more obvious how arbitrarily and illogically hate is distributed among the superheroes in the A very bland book story-wise that is only saved by Alex Ross and his beautiful painted artwork. It's basically a condensed history of the Marvel universe shown from the perspective of the regular people. As a result, we don't really see any of the superheroes doing anything heroic, and the regular folks' perspective doesn't bring anything interesting to the table by itself. If anything, it makes it even more obvious how arbitrarily and illogically hate is distributed among the superheroes in the Marvel universe. People hate the X-Men because... why, exactly? Why don't they hate Captain America the same way? Why do people despise Spider-Man but not the Fantastic Four, love The Wasp and can't stand Iron Man (apparently)? The book clumsily raises those questions but doesn't have a clear answer. I'm not sure what kind of message Busiek was aiming for here, but I missed it. That Alex Ross art, though... Every time he gets to do a splash page or a double spread, it's phenomenal. This is the book's main strength, and if it was just that — a retelling of Marvel universe history illustrated exclusively by large format Alex Ross paintings, it would have been infinitely better. This could have been the definitive go-to comic for new Marvel readers, showing everything they need to know about the universe. As it is, though, the tacked-on story of Phil Sheldon the photographer is soulless, pointless and entirely forgettable, and that's a real shame.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jesse A

    It took me a bit to warm up to this one but by the end I had come around. Obviously great art and a very good story. I know they shared the artist but I felt like this had a Marvel's version of Kingdom Come feel (though I know this came first so maybe Kingdom Come was DC's version of this). It took me a bit to warm up to this one but by the end I had come around. Obviously great art and a very good story. I know they shared the artist but I felt like this had a Marvel's version of Kingdom Come feel (though I know this came first so maybe Kingdom Come was DC's version of this).

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nicolo

    Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross’ Marvels is their love letter to the superheroes of the Golden Age and Silver Age of Marvel Comics. Theirs is a tale that examines the Marvel universe through the eye of an everyman character, Phil Sheldon. Like his fellow unpowered denizens, he and his family have to live through every invasion, super-villain attack and the coming of Galactus fearing that each crisis would bring about the end of their world. The story brought it acclaim and the theme explored in several Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross’ Marvels is their love letter to the superheroes of the Golden Age and Silver Age of Marvel Comics. Theirs is a tale that examines the Marvel universe through the eye of an everyman character, Phil Sheldon. Like his fellow unpowered denizens, he and his family have to live through every invasion, super-villain attack and the coming of Galactus fearing that each crisis would bring about the end of their world. The story brought it acclaim and the theme explored in several other books featuring painted art. But it is Alex Ross’ art that would be the true reason this work stands out. Each cover and page is lovingly painted in the photorealistic style that becomes Ross’ trademark. It is not traced, or done by light box, but every line is rendered by freehand. Every detail is in there, rendered by a key eye who certainly knows his comics. Some of its panels are even recreated from key moments in Marvel comics. It is a joy to read, or even just to scan the beautiful art. Every comics fan should a copy of this masterpiece. Even if you don’t appreciate comics, this is a book that will improve your opinion of comics, as this a product of high production values and a keen eye for detail.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    I've read Marvels more times than I can possibly count. Thousands of other people have written glowing reviews so much better than I ever could. Let me just say that I love this book, I always have. The experience of reading it is always magical for me, completely enthralling. And the art, that makes it all feel so real while I'm reading it... This goes very high on my list of all-time favorite comics. I've read Marvels more times than I can possibly count. Thousands of other people have written glowing reviews so much better than I ever could. Let me just say that I love this book, I always have. The experience of reading it is always magical for me, completely enthralling. And the art, that makes it all feel so real while I'm reading it... This goes very high on my list of all-time favorite comics.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amanja

    This is the spoiler free review of Marvels, if you would like to read the spoiler full review and see all of the amazing art please visit https://amanjareads.com/2019/12/05/ma... Marvels is the beginning of the Marvel universe from the perspective of a New York reporter named Phil. It begins in 1940 as a scientist reveals his newest invention, the Human Torch. From there the world quickly experiences a surplus of superpowered superbeings. Some, like Captain America, are instantly beloved. And some This is the spoiler free review of Marvels, if you would like to read the spoiler full review and see all of the amazing art please visit https://amanjareads.com/2019/12/05/ma... Marvels is the beginning of the Marvel universe from the perspective of a New York reporter named Phil. It begins in 1940 as a scientist reveals his newest invention, the Human Torch. From there the world quickly experiences a surplus of superpowered superbeings. Some, like Captain America, are instantly beloved. And some, like the poor X-Men, are immediately villainized. Phil documents it all with his camera and experiences a whirlwind of experiences with beings far above his level of comprehension. The book makes strong commentary about what it means to be human who feels helpless in a world full of dangers both relatable and completely far fetched. It was wise to follow this story from the perspective of an unknown player. Phil is relatable and doesn't require previous Marvel knowledge. His humanity toward the conflicts in the book is powerful. The author manages to make huge intergalactic conflicts parallel issues that we've seen throughout history as well as today. The art is absolutely stunning in its realism. It's a style that is far more common for covers than whole books and makes this one feel extra special. It also places the book back in time but the context of the book could easily have been written today with how fresh and relatable it feels. I strongly recommend this one for Marvel fans or casual readers. It is one of those comic books that transcends fandom to stand fully on its own.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shalini

    What a brilliant storytelling and fantastic art! This was my first read of the origins of the Human Torch and I'm totally digging it. "The golden age of miracles would begin, and in the years to come, the world would know the presence of the unnatural and extraordinary as part of reality"" "Marvels" is a book completely from the perspective of New Yorkers who had been mute spectators ever since Avengers and X-Men, whom they collectively call Marvels, were building and breaking stuffs. It documents What a brilliant storytelling and fantastic art! This was my first read of the origins of the Human Torch and I'm totally digging it. "The golden age of miracles would begin, and in the years to come, the world would know the presence of the unnatural and extraordinary as part of reality"" "Marvels" is a book completely from the perspective of New Yorkers who had been mute spectators ever since Avengers and X-Men, whom they collectively call Marvels, were building and breaking stuffs. It documents the exploration into the motives of the fickle-minded public and reasons behind maligning the superheroes every now and then. "They save us and they save us and we insult and belittle them. We're just blind to the truth about them." Almost every series that runs sufficiently long has this one phase which is not always very well developed, for instance, the vol 5 of Ms Marvel - Super Famous. This series does an excellent job at building substantial background to a great many such events, New Yorkers' encounters with the Marvels and their always changing opinions of them... "The Eel, he was just a man in a suit, dangerous, sure. But the torch would stop him, would protect us. Who would protect us from the mutants?" ... through the main protagonist, Phil, who is a freelance photographer who documents the reactions of the spectators during the strifes with the enemies of their universe. The only downside of this book is that there are way too many events which don't provide sufficient room for background development of each event. It has covered almost everything from Torch vs Submariner fights to Stacy siblings's deaths. There is a lot of content which a non-regular reader can't keep up with. Still, it was a great entertaining read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    I had no real preconceptions going into this, so this knocked me out of my chair and into the milky pools of Alex Ross's paint. Man that was good. One of the most unique and, what's the word, atypical superhero comics probably ever written, by one Kurt Busiek. It strikes me as Watchmenesque in its examination of heroes and villains and their moral ambiguity, particularly in relation to civilians. There's a lot of action considering it only happens if Phil Sheldon is there snapping photographs, l I had no real preconceptions going into this, so this knocked me out of my chair and into the milky pools of Alex Ross's paint. Man that was good. One of the most unique and, what's the word, atypical superhero comics probably ever written, by one Kurt Busiek. It strikes me as Watchmenesque in its examination of heroes and villains and their moral ambiguity, particularly in relation to civilians. There's a lot of action considering it only happens if Phil Sheldon is there snapping photographs, like a story of negatives, what isn't there. There's even meta fiction here, as Phil Sheldon writes a book called Marvels that is essentially this book. My only criticism is the back and forth soap opera of the Marvels, as each character is at some point either fighting the Nazis for America or trying to destroy America, with little or no justification. But then again, that could be satire for the space opera nature of comic book events, how without provocation characters morally flip flop to suit that particular week's plotting. At any rate, downright amazing, or should I say Marvelous?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    Why doesn't Marvel write more stories like this and less let's-make-a-TV/movie stuff? Honestly, this was one of the best written Marvel Comic I've read in a lot time. The superheroes where in this, but they weren't the main characters. This is told by a everyman who has a normal life, but lives in a world of Marvel. Alex Ross's art helps a lot with this too. My only issue with this is they freak out over mutants and aliens, but they never go into the fact Thor is fighting with the Avengers. Reali Why doesn't Marvel write more stories like this and less let's-make-a-TV/movie stuff? Honestly, this was one of the best written Marvel Comic I've read in a lot time. The superheroes where in this, but they weren't the main characters. This is told by a everyman who has a normal life, but lives in a world of Marvel. Alex Ross's art helps a lot with this too. My only issue with this is they freak out over mutants and aliens, but they never go into the fact Thor is fighting with the Avengers. Realistically, I think their would have been a religious debate over the existence of God and the gods.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    I'm torn on this one...I really wanted to love it. I do admire all the research that went into this one, the referencing of classic Marvel stories and moments, the art, but... At the end of the book, I was left with a pretty 'oh that's all?' feeling. The art of Alex Ross is always something to behold, but here, I think it took away from things. I wasn't able to connect to a lot, and the main character is actually kind of un-likable. He ditches his fiancée because of the arrival of Sub-Mariner and I'm torn on this one...I really wanted to love it. I do admire all the research that went into this one, the referencing of classic Marvel stories and moments, the art, but... At the end of the book, I was left with a pretty 'oh that's all?' feeling. The art of Alex Ross is always something to behold, but here, I think it took away from things. I wasn't able to connect to a lot, and the main character is actually kind of un-likable. He ditches his fiancée because of the arrival of Sub-Mariner and Torch, only to ask her back after Captain America makes the 'Marvels' seem good. Then he hates Mutants, until his daughters shelter one in their basement, then he decides that maybe they're not so bad. He avoids his family, and even resents them for making him miss a story when they're out at the zoo together and something happens. I mean, do you really want to connect with a guy who's willing to walk away from his family (3 women no less) in the middle of a crisis because 'there's a story and photos to get'?? No, not so much. Here's the problem: He's enough of a boring character who flip-flops on his beliefs and then just gives up, so that you don't really enjoy the rest of the story. I can enjoy the crafting, the research and so forth, but the protagonist really takes away from what could have been a much better story. I mean no doubt, Stan Lee and John Romita liked it, but still. It's a curio, something you show people to look at something shiny, but there's not much substance; there's hardly even an interaction with any heroes, nor is there much insight into their lives. If Marvels was supposed to make us marvel, it does; at how utterly boring all the humans are, so no wonder they buy books and pictures about the Marvel-ous heroes and observe them as a respite from boredom and tedium. Disappointing. probably 2.5 stars really, because at some points it just seems like an excuse to let Alex Ross draw/paint every hero they can think of.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    A good read! So we have witnessed the birth of The Marvel Cinematic universe, from iron man 1 to Ant-man and still more to come, but what if these weren't movies, what if they were real, what if we really had super heroes protecting us? That what this book is, the birth of the marvel universe from the perspective of ordinary citizens! The concept was pretty interesting, as it realistically looks at how the world would react to heroes, in the 40s and 50s, they would be seen as icons, but soon aft A good read! So we have witnessed the birth of The Marvel Cinematic universe, from iron man 1 to Ant-man and still more to come, but what if these weren't movies, what if they were real, what if we really had super heroes protecting us? That what this book is, the birth of the marvel universe from the perspective of ordinary citizens! The concept was pretty interesting, as it realistically looks at how the world would react to heroes, in the 40s and 50s, they would be seen as icons, but soon after they would seen as villains, and then heroes again! The book also has ordinary people witness famous Marvel stories as they happen, such as The Avengers, Galactus, The Death of Gwen Stacy, all in all its a good story! Alex Ross's artwork is also very good, although its not his best. But overall this a great read!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Koen

    Wauw, probably the best take on the Marvel heroes I've read so far ... from a completely different perspective, that's what makes it special .. and then the characterbuilding, that's what makes it amazing .. And then to top it off with such an amazing artwork .. Well, I must say: this was a stunning piece of artwork ! Wauw, probably the best take on the Marvel heroes I've read so far ... from a completely different perspective, that's what makes it special .. and then the characterbuilding, that's what makes it amazing .. And then to top it off with such an amazing artwork .. Well, I must say: this was a stunning piece of artwork !

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2021/01/0... Happy New Year! 2020 proved to be a trash year, so I am hoping that this new year will be as marvelous as this graphic novel is! After enjoying two podcasts about Wolverine last year, I heard Marvel had put one out about The Fantastic Four without realizing it was based partly on this graphic novel. I enjoyed the Marvels podcast and picked up this source material to accompany it. I was in a bit of a reading slump at This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2021/01/0... Happy New Year! 2020 proved to be a trash year, so I am hoping that this new year will be as marvelous as this graphic novel is! After enjoying two podcasts about Wolverine last year, I heard Marvel had put one out about The Fantastic Four without realizing it was based partly on this graphic novel. I enjoyed the Marvels podcast and picked up this source material to accompany it. I was in a bit of a reading slump at the time, so after skimming it and seeing it was worth a deeper read, I put it aside to read after the holidays. This amazing story gives the perspective of everyday people living in a world populated with superheroes, villains and mutants. We see the world through their eyes as they try to make sense of the incredible things happening around them. Begining in 1939, we first meet Phil Sheldon a young photojournalist and his friend Jonah Jameson who are amazed when superheroes begin to appear in New York City. The populace is at first scared and then in awe of these costumed avengers and soon admire them as they help fight for American freedom in World War II. But as the decades go by, in a 35-year span, perception of them waxes and wanes. The Fantastic Four are beloved for awhile but later pilloried. Later, the poor mutants get the brunt of the public’s hate. Divided into four chapters, the narrative moves forward chronologically with Sheldon marrying and having two daughters as he follows and photographs the heroes, that he calls the Marvels, both for his career and for a book he is planning about them. He is an everyman, who at times succumbs to mob mentality but as the years go by he thinks critically about what having heroes in his world means, despite losing an eye when he gets too close to a fight between Namor and the Torch. There is a poignant scene set in the 60s where Sheldon recounts seeing a mob react during a Sentinals attack, and a riot breaks out. Sheldon comments: “The real story was the people who’d been scared too long…who’d been wound too tight and cut loose”. This has uncomfortable parallels to today, 25+ years after this graphic novel came out, as a certain populace seems to be glorying in a changed America and violence is a daily worry during this contested election. Alex Ross’s work is a marvel! He did for the Marvel universe what he would do again later in DC’s Kingdom Come– he made all the heroes fleshed out and real. His trademark painted photo-realism style is exquisite, as each panel is a work of art. The research he did was evident, showing the heroes in their original costumes from the Golden and Silver eras of comics. He also is great at recreating period pieces, as the narrative takes place from 1939-1974 and he gets the clothing styles and the inevitable aging of the characters spot-on. To further strengthen this unique story, author Kurt Busiek shares his thoughts about creating this tale. He plumbs the Marvel comic universe for a timeline on how the heroes developed, and they are worked into the story. Thus, the book becomes an encyclopedia of sorts as heroes and villains move in and out of the narrative in cameos as Sheldon, his family and regular people are the true main characters in this story. In addition, Marvel great Stan Lee adds an introduction and other artists share their insight during chapter breaks. The story is then bookended with comic sources for all the hero references and Ross shares his artistic process. While the podcast based on this graphic novel was interesting, it centered on the second and third chapters only, and this entire book fleshes out the story more thoroughly. Although only one day into 2021, I’m guessing this book will be a contender for my Best Reads at the end of the year!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alice

    Phil Sheldon is a freelance newspaper photographer whose close-ups of New York's favorite superheroes often cover the Daily Bugle's front page. Through the lenses of his career the reader can experience what it's like to live as an ordinary man in a world of superhumans. Starting off with the rise of the Human Torch, the Avengers assembling, the wedding of Reed Richards and Sue Storm, the break-out of the mutants all the way to the death of Gwen Stacy. Phil isn't always the biggest fan of the Mar Phil Sheldon is a freelance newspaper photographer whose close-ups of New York's favorite superheroes often cover the Daily Bugle's front page. Through the lenses of his career the reader can experience what it's like to live as an ordinary man in a world of superhumans. Starting off with the rise of the Human Torch, the Avengers assembling, the wedding of Reed Richards and Sue Storm, the break-out of the mutants all the way to the death of Gwen Stacy. Phil isn't always the biggest fan of the Marvels, as he likes to call them. His emotions range from fearful, distrustful and angry to admiring and grateful. As the Silver Age unravels, his involvement with the press gets him closer to the action, pushing his feelings, which formerly reflected that of the public opinion, in a different direction... The contradiction's in the public's attitude towards the superheroes reach a depth that had never been equally explored before. It had never been possible to focus fully on the mass without distancing the narration from the hero, which can only happen in Marvels because of the shift in the point of view. Phil's dissent contrasts the hypocrisy of the ordinary men, who blame the heroes by whom he's saved and despising mutants while buying The Wasp merchandise.I knew very little of this before picking it up and therefore had no expectations. Nonetheless as the story took form I felt like it wasn't going in the direction I thought it should. Not that I had a better plan but I sometimes felt like Phil's eye wasn't catching all there was to see. However, right from page one I was conquered by Alex Ross's incredible artwork. The retro style matches the vibe of this voyage into the history of Marvel's superheroes. Phil's shots are the perfect excuse for panels so rich in colour and detail that modern comics are put to shame. I definitely Ross's painting as potential poster material.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    RATING: 3 just okay stars. 5 stars for the art though. I am a huge fan of Alex Ross' art hence why I decided to grab Marvels. It was an okay story. I know that is a well-loved book so I was expecting a lot more, but it felt a bit flat for me. Story-wise, it didn't leave me with any lingering thoughts about what I read. It felt like there was a lot of back and forth between narratives, one moment were talking about this and now this, then even when we haven't completely resolved this, we jump RATING: 3 just okay stars. 5 stars for the art though. I am a huge fan of Alex Ross' art hence why I decided to grab Marvels. It was an okay story. I know that is a well-loved book so I was expecting a lot more, but it felt a bit flat for me. Story-wise, it didn't leave me with any lingering thoughts about what I read. It felt like there was a lot of back and forth between narratives, one moment were talking about this and now this, then even when we haven't completely resolved this, we jump into another one. I kind of get why the narrative is sort of choppy as this person narrating is a person outside looking in, but at least give us some closure on some of the things talked about. There were a lot of times, I looked at how many more pages of this should I read because, honestly, I was getting impatient and bored. And the ending... it wasn't satisfying. After everything, that's what he did. It didn't make sense to me. Before I can completely forget, I love the foreword from Stan Lee. It made me teary-eyed a bit.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    Ever since Alan Moore’s 1982 dark, post-modern deconstructionist series of Miracleman – formerly known as Marvelman – he introduced the concept of how superheroes could exist and behave in “the real world”. However, being Alan Moore, his approach to superheroes has mostly been dark and cynical, though brilliant nonetheless. In the case of the four-issue comic Marvels from Astro City writer Kurt Busiek and legendary painter Alex Ross, this is an optimistic view of how our world interacts with our Ever since Alan Moore’s 1982 dark, post-modern deconstructionist series of Miracleman – formerly known as Marvelman – he introduced the concept of how superheroes could exist and behave in “the real world”. However, being Alan Moore, his approach to superheroes has mostly been dark and cynical, though brilliant nonetheless. In the case of the four-issue comic Marvels from Astro City writer Kurt Busiek and legendary painter Alex Ross, this is an optimistic view of how our world interacts with our favourite Marvel characters. Set from 1939 to 1974, the series examines the life and career of news photographer Phil Sheldon living and witnessing ordinary life in a world full of costumed supermen. Using the first thirty-five years of Marvel Comics’ history as well as retelling some of the most famous events from that period, the story is told through the perspective of an Everyman character that provides a unique voice to the way humanity can look at the “Marvels”. Busiek’s writing does a smart job at contrasting the existence of the Marvels with real-life politics, as best established in the second issue that introduces the X-Men and the mutant race in the mid-sixties, which leads to riots and manhunts based on racism and paranoia. As great an artist Alex Ross has always been, you can only hire him for certain projects and in the case of books like Marvels and later Kingdom Come, he shows how brilliant he is with his realistic, human depictions of classic comic book characters. If you are a hardcore Marvel fanatic, you will get a good kick out of Ross’ stunning recreations of classic Marvel moments. At the core of Marvels, is a truly moving human story with Phil Sheldon witnessing the extraordinary and yet it is the intimacy he experiences with his own kind where he learns the true beauty of the Marvels, whether it is his beloved family protecting a hunted mutant girl or the few conversations he has with Gwen Stacy before her terrible demise. If you want a story that is both heroic and human, go and read Marvels, you won’t be disappointed.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amal El-Mohtar

    I'm trying to be less stingy with my 5 stars, in order to go by "it was amazing" regardless of how less or more amazing it was than another thing to which I gave a positive review. There just aren't enough star-fractions for the latter system. So this was amazing. The fully painted art style took some getting used to, but quickly began seeping into my reception of the story after the initial "wait this doesn't look like a comic" reaction. The premise is brilliant: if you've ever watched a superhe I'm trying to be less stingy with my 5 stars, in order to go by "it was amazing" regardless of how less or more amazing it was than another thing to which I gave a positive review. There just aren't enough star-fractions for the latter system. So this was amazing. The fully painted art style took some getting used to, but quickly began seeping into my reception of the story after the initial "wait this doesn't look like a comic" reaction. The premise is brilliant: if you've ever watched a superhero film or animated show and winced at all the property damage (AS I HAVE DONE) then this is a book for you. Some things were difficult to reconcile, and for all that Busiek makes a great effort, the X-Men stuff still feels wildly dissonant existing in the same universe as the Fantastic Four and the Avengers. The prejudice angle within the context of the hero-worship world only makes sense when you have the story of a mutant who isn't a conventionally attractive white person. The arc was still very effective, but I still felt it didn't fit quite rightly within the broader context. The ending also saddened me, and didn't feel quite as strong as the preceding two chapters, but this was still a really masterful take on the classic material from an unusual and necessary angle.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I love, love, love the combination of Busiek and Ross. I had never bothered with this book before because I'm not usually a Marvel girl, and because I thought that it sounded like it covered the same territory as the excellent Astro City Vol. 1: Life in the Big City, just with known characters. Wrong. It looks at the Marvel characters and the Marvel universe through the lens of one photographer/observer, whose opinions change very realistically over time. The other clever conceit is that it look I love, love, love the combination of Busiek and Ross. I had never bothered with this book before because I'm not usually a Marvel girl, and because I thought that it sounded like it covered the same territory as the excellent Astro City Vol. 1: Life in the Big City, just with known characters. Wrong. It looks at the Marvel characters and the Marvel universe through the lens of one photographer/observer, whose opinions change very realistically over time. The other clever conceit is that it looks back at a slightly revised history while referencing adventures - and sometimes exact frames, I think - from the classic titles. There's a list of all of the stories it borrows from at the end, along with a little photo essay by Ross that would probably in itself be worth the price of the comic. Forget that shyster Thomas Kinkade; Alex Ross is the real painter of light. The combination of Ross's art with Busiek's intelligent takes on superheroes is always a potent combination.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    A very different view of the world of supers. Marvel takes the common man's view of what the world looks like and how it changes with the arrival of superheroes. Great storyline and exceptional art. Very recommended A very different view of the world of supers. Marvel takes the common man's view of what the world looks like and how it changes with the arrival of superheroes. Great storyline and exceptional art. Very recommended

  26. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    When I was a kid, I was a complete Marvel Zombie (i.e., a person who only bought Marvel Comic books and nothing else). I even remember picking up The Killing Joke off of a spinner rack, flipping through it, and putting it back because I just couldn't bring myself to buy a DC book, even though it looked good. Over the years my tastes have shifted quite a bit. I actually collect very few Marvel comics nowadays. Still, because of my youthful obsession, I am have more nostalgia for Marvel Comics than When I was a kid, I was a complete Marvel Zombie (i.e., a person who only bought Marvel Comic books and nothing else). I even remember picking up The Killing Joke off of a spinner rack, flipping through it, and putting it back because I just couldn't bring myself to buy a DC book, even though it looked good. Over the years my tastes have shifted quite a bit. I actually collect very few Marvel comics nowadays. Still, because of my youthful obsession, I am have more nostalgia for Marvel Comics than most. In other words, Marvels was tailor made for me. Written by Kurt Busiek and illustrated by Alex Ross, Marvels looks back at the events of the Marvel Universe through the eyes of an average man, specifically photographer Phil Sheldon. Retelling old Marvel stories from the perspective of a man on the street gives these old stories a completely new and different feel. It helps that Kurt Busiek has an amazing knack for telling deeply personal stories against a four-color superhero backdrop, a talent he would later perfect in his Astro City series. Alex Ross' hyper-realistic art style is also perfect for this story. When Giant-Man steps over the anxious crowd during a battle, it looks every bit as awe-inspiring as you would imagine a 30' tall man would be in real life. The Human Torch really looks as terrifying as you would expect a man on fire to look. Yet, despite the sense of grandeur he imparts on his heroes, he shows you their little imperfections as well. If you look close enough, you can see the seams on Spider-Man's costume and the slight bulge on his wrists where his web-shooters are located. Honestly, I think Marvels and the similar Kingdom Come are some of Alex Ross' best work.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jedi JC Daquis

    Marvels is by far the best Marvel work I have ever read. It tells the birth of an amazing universe through the eyes of a normal person, a cameraman journalist named Phil Sheldon. You'd be surprised on how realistic and grounded the story is under a world where superhumans and mutants exist. Kurt Busiek has done a mesmerizing job on carefully placing human emotions - awe, fear, ignorance and hatred effectively across the progression of the story. This is a graphic novel where great feats and epic Marvels is by far the best Marvel work I have ever read. It tells the birth of an amazing universe through the eyes of a normal person, a cameraman journalist named Phil Sheldon. You'd be surprised on how realistic and grounded the story is under a world where superhumans and mutants exist. Kurt Busiek has done a mesmerizing job on carefully placing human emotions - awe, fear, ignorance and hatred effectively across the progression of the story. This is a graphic novel where great feats and epic battles only give auxiliary aesthetics to the main thesis: what would we do when "they" come to this world? Though rich with Marvel gallery of heroes and villains, it doesn't feel convoluted. Bits and pieces of them are carefully scattered throughout the book, both on and off panels. Some can be seen longer than the others, like the Fantastic 4 but all of them do get an enough amount of screen time to be appreciated by readers. Marvels is a one of a kind story that has beautiful art (thanks Alex Ross!) and a heart of every normal person.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nana Spark

    (Source) DNF @ ~50 pages Vintage Marvel? Hell yeah! Reading it through the eyes of a boring nobody? Hell. No. They really chose the worst possible POV character to follow along with. The art is GORGEOUS, but I quickly found myself skimming the text bubbles. Where to get a copy: 📚 Amazon* - Book Depository* (Free Shipping) - Barnes & Noble ℹ Disclosure: *This review contains affiliate links. If you use these links to buy something I may earn a commission. (Help a college girl out, will ya?) Thanks. (Source) DNF @ ~50 pages Vintage Marvel? Hell yeah! Reading it through the eyes of a boring nobody? Hell. No. They really chose the worst possible POV character to follow along with. The art is GORGEOUS, but I quickly found myself skimming the text bubbles. Where to get a copy: 📚 Amazon* - Book Depository* (Free Shipping) - Barnes & Noble ℹ Disclosure: *This review contains affiliate links. If you use these links to buy something I may earn a commission. (Help a college girl out, will ya?) Thanks.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Casandra

    3.5 stars This was different from what I expected, but I found it interesting enough. The art was outstanding and the premise was cool. It was fascinating to read from the POV of just an ordinary citizen and have their take on living in a world of superheroes. However, I just found that not a whole lot happens. Even though it was still enjoyable and kept me engaged enough to read until the end, I expected..... more. But yeah. Fanatisc art, okay writing, and that's all I really have to say. 3.5 stars This was different from what I expected, but I found it interesting enough. The art was outstanding and the premise was cool. It was fascinating to read from the POV of just an ordinary citizen and have their take on living in a world of superheroes. However, I just found that not a whole lot happens. Even though it was still enjoyable and kept me engaged enough to read until the end, I expected..... more. But yeah. Fanatisc art, okay writing, and that's all I really have to say.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ανδρέας Μιχαηλίδης

    This is undoubtedly in the Top 5 best Marvel comics of all time, on occasion ranked as the Top 1 of all time. Many people have written about it better than I care to, but there are a few things I would like to add. You might have noticed I also placed ti in the "philosophy" shelf. This mini-series is more than the foundational history of Marvel Comics through the evolution of its heroes. It is more than an often overlooked view of what happens to mere mortals when the heroes and the villains duke This is undoubtedly in the Top 5 best Marvel comics of all time, on occasion ranked as the Top 1 of all time. Many people have written about it better than I care to, but there are a few things I would like to add. You might have noticed I also placed ti in the "philosophy" shelf. This mini-series is more than the foundational history of Marvel Comics through the evolution of its heroes. It is more than an often overlooked view of what happens to mere mortals when the heroes and the villains duke it out (not on a personal level, such as with Gwen Stacy or similar cases, but on a population level). It is more than a reflection of how people reacted to comics and superheroes themselves over the years, using the metaphor of "what if superheroes were real?". This comic book series, eerily, uncomfortably, timelessly, tells of how we treat our heroes in real life or as products of popular culture. Put simply, we are small and ungrateful (not all of us, but oh, so MANY of us), whether we are talking about real-life heroes like scientists and doctors (especially when it comes to what has been happening in the world, not just for the past year, but at least the past decade), or characters and stories that are suddenly offensive, do not meet a good many artificial standards and need to be watered down and subverted to pander to a vocal minority. As the disgusting Jonah Jameson puts it, painfully honest and right for once in his miserable life (in issue #4): "How could the rest of us measure up? How could we meet that standard?" It is a thought-provoking work and if you perceive it as a meta-narrative of the medium itself, it is the only explanation one needs for the death throes of the comic book industry. I first read this comic when I was 12 and was mainly awed by Alex Ross's realistic depictions. Now nearing 40, I am awed by the sum, multi-layered, nuanced total of it.

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