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"We Lindberghs still know ourselves best as a tribe: close-knit, self-enclosed, and self-defining, always prepared to be besieged by invisible forces upwelling from the past...." The world knew Charles Lindbergh as a daring aviator, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and controversial isolationist in World War II.  His wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, was a bestselling author.  To "We Lindberghs still know ourselves best as a tribe: close-knit, self-enclosed, and self-defining, always prepared to be besieged by invisible forces upwelling from the past...." The world knew Charles Lindbergh as a daring aviator, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and controversial isolationist in World War II.  His wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, was a bestselling author.  To their five children they were Father, never Daddy, and Mother.  Charles, a stern yet loving father, was surprisingly affectionate and playful; Anne provided a great, gentling love.  With remarkable candor, their youngest daughter provides a rare, intimate look at her legendary family...the pervasive impact of her brother's kidnapping and death...the complexity of her parents' long, loving marriage...the night her life and her mother's converged, as Reeve's own infant son died suddenly.  With grace and insight, Reeve Lindbergh appraises her remarkable parents, her unusual childhood, and the troubling questions that remain.  At once an eloquent reminiscence and a slice of American history, Under a Wing is, at its core, a heartfelt tribute to an extraordinary family.


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"We Lindberghs still know ourselves best as a tribe: close-knit, self-enclosed, and self-defining, always prepared to be besieged by invisible forces upwelling from the past...." The world knew Charles Lindbergh as a daring aviator, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and controversial isolationist in World War II.  His wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, was a bestselling author.  To "We Lindberghs still know ourselves best as a tribe: close-knit, self-enclosed, and self-defining, always prepared to be besieged by invisible forces upwelling from the past...." The world knew Charles Lindbergh as a daring aviator, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and controversial isolationist in World War II.  His wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, was a bestselling author.  To their five children they were Father, never Daddy, and Mother.  Charles, a stern yet loving father, was surprisingly affectionate and playful; Anne provided a great, gentling love.  With remarkable candor, their youngest daughter provides a rare, intimate look at her legendary family...the pervasive impact of her brother's kidnapping and death...the complexity of her parents' long, loving marriage...the night her life and her mother's converged, as Reeve's own infant son died suddenly.  With grace and insight, Reeve Lindbergh appraises her remarkable parents, her unusual childhood, and the troubling questions that remain.  At once an eloquent reminiscence and a slice of American history, Under a Wing is, at its core, a heartfelt tribute to an extraordinary family.

30 review for Under a Wing: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

    I loved this book! It is rich in anecdotes and reflections, as Reeve Lindbergh, the youngest child of Anne and Charles, shares memories of family life with her famous parents. I reveled in the fond descriptions of various cornerstones in her growing up years – the sprawling homestead in Darien, Connecticut, the summer retreat on an island in Maine, and Sunday dinners at their grandmother Morrow’s. Reeve’s bonds within her immediate family are poignantly described, as are the household rhythms an I loved this book! It is rich in anecdotes and reflections, as Reeve Lindbergh, the youngest child of Anne and Charles, shares memories of family life with her famous parents. I reveled in the fond descriptions of various cornerstones in her growing up years – the sprawling homestead in Darien, Connecticut, the summer retreat on an island in Maine, and Sunday dinners at their grandmother Morrow’s. Reeve’s bonds within her immediate family are poignantly described, as are the household rhythms and routines, often humorous and sometimes very touching. Despite the disparity in our families’ social status, common threads were to be found from a personal perspective. As I, too, was one of five children with an eccentric, strong minded, though often absent father and an introspective, intellectual mother, there was much to savor. Reeve sheds a great deal of light on her famous father. With regard to the family dynamic, Reeve quotes Charles, ’This is not a democracy. This is a nonbenevolent dictatorship’. She also explains that he was the more affectionate parent. ‘There were back-rubs and bear hugs, long rides on his shoulders during the daytime and bedtime games.’ Of her mother the author writes, ‘Our mother’s love for her children was no less deep, but her expressions of love were gentle, often verbal, and just as often unspoken, and yet completely understood by every one of her children.’ And later, ‘But she has an innate, immediately perceivable bodily reserve. One kisses her lightly, hugs her softly, with the understanding that it is imperative to leave the intimacy of her physical space, and her body, inviolate.’ The contrasts and the subtleties are so skillfully set forth. I found this to be a fascinating follow-up to the recent novel The Aviator’s Wife, which was based on the Lindbergh family.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Holt

    It took me quite some time to read this book. I originally picked it up as research material to learn more about Anne Morrow Lindbergh and share that knowledge with the library book club meeting I agreed to host on the book Gift From The Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh. Having already hosted the meeting, I still hadn't finished reading it. This week I decided to pick it up and finish it off as my book of the week. It was well worth the wait. The emotional vulnerability Reeve was able to share reall It took me quite some time to read this book. I originally picked it up as research material to learn more about Anne Morrow Lindbergh and share that knowledge with the library book club meeting I agreed to host on the book Gift From The Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh. Having already hosted the meeting, I still hadn't finished reading it. This week I decided to pick it up and finish it off as my book of the week. It was well worth the wait. The emotional vulnerability Reeve was able to share really touched me in many ways. She writes about her parents in a very honest way, not leaving out the black marks on their records so to speak. Her insight into family life provoked joy, grief, and a sense of longing in me for the tight knit bond she shared with her whole family, immediate and extended. More than once she touches on the impact of loss and coping with grief in a way that I connected with on a deep personal level. Despite the trials and hardships of personal loss in addition to being in the media spotlight, this family found a way to endure it all and sustain a strong bond of loyalty.

  3. 4 out of 5

    N.

    3.5/5 I have owned a copy of Under a Wing for too long to recall where I acquired it but reading The Aviator's Wife renewed my interest in the family. I reread Gift from the Sea and then move on to Under a Wing. Because The Aviator's Wife focuses on Anne Morrow Lindbergh's emotions but skims over some events, I was hoping Reeve would fill in the blanks a bit. For the most part, she describes what it was like to live as the child of famous parents who fiercely protected their privacy at home. Lac 3.5/5 I have owned a copy of Under a Wing for too long to recall where I acquired it but reading The Aviator's Wife renewed my interest in the family. I reread Gift from the Sea and then move on to Under a Wing. Because The Aviator's Wife focuses on Anne Morrow Lindbergh's emotions but skims over some events, I was hoping Reeve would fill in the blanks a bit. For the most part, she describes what it was like to live as the child of famous parents who fiercely protected their privacy at home. Lack of privacy led to the death of their first son, after all. What I loved about Under a Wing: The fuller description of Reeve's famous father was very satisfying. I thought The Aviator's Wife focused too much on his absences and what a control freak he was, painting him as a very cold man. Reeve describes Charles Lindbergh as the more physically affectionate and playful parent. While both were "distant" in some way, she comments that an awful lot of people describe their parents as distant. When her father was home, there was a tension caused by his perfectionism and insistence that the children do everything on their lists, behave in a certain manner, etc. And, yet, those were the times they had the most fun, as well. When he left, they were a little lost, for a time, and then they'd return to their more casual lifestyle. I particularly loved her description of a time when Reeve was flying with her father and the plane's engine died. He skillfully landed the plane and it was an eye-opening experience for her -- why her father was the man he was. There's also a description of Reeve's loss of a son at about the same age as that of her famously kidnapped/killed brother and how her son's death helped her mother, who insisted on sitting with the body as she could not do with her own son, who was cremated immediately after identification. What I disliked about Under a Wing: Parts of the book are just flat boring. She describes her daily life as a child in quite a bit of detail. Sometimes that detail was interesting; sometimes it was simply commonplace. Her childhood was so far removed from the real world that she didn't seem to even understand what was typical and what was unusual. Her descriptions of visits to the grandmothers' houses (particularly the Morrows' -- that grandmother had three homes and a raft of servants) provided a nice peek into the life of a very wealthy woman who somehow managed to maintain a lifestyle that had faded elsewhere. But, for a short book, there were a lot of times I felt myself trying to pick up the reading pace to just get through some of the dull bits. In general, Under a Wing did help to fill in the blanks and restored Charles Lindbergh's image, in my mind. Yes, he was a perfectionist and a control freak who was very old-fashioned. But, he was also a loving father. Nice to know. She also didn't shrink from describing what little she knew of her older brother's death and described her father's death in a way that made a whole lot more sense than the novel does. I got what I hoped for from Under a Wing and I'm content.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Linda Lipko

    It took awhile to read this book because I wanted to savor each wonderful phrase. The writing is outstanding. Told from the perspective of the youngest child of Anne Morrow Lindbergh and Charles Lindbergh, the reader learns of an idyllic childhood. After the loss of their first-born son, the Lindbergh's sought time out of sight from the public eye. Wanting to protect their children and themselves from the invasive media and overwhelming curiosity of the public, they rented or purchased homes far It took awhile to read this book because I wanted to savor each wonderful phrase. The writing is outstanding. Told from the perspective of the youngest child of Anne Morrow Lindbergh and Charles Lindbergh, the reader learns of an idyllic childhood. After the loss of their first-born son, the Lindbergh's sought time out of sight from the public eye. Wanting to protect their children and themselves from the invasive media and overwhelming curiosity of the public, they rented or purchased homes far away from cities. The children lived in large houses in the country where they could romp and play. With little contact from others than family members, Reeve writes in detail of her love of family and stories of uncles, aunts, grandparents and her parents. While she absolutely adored her father, she is quite honest regarding his difficult personality and his near constant berating of Anne and the children. Everything had to be exact, including a journal regarding how much was spent for an item. A .05 package of rubber bands had to be noted and explained. Stating that the house and the family breathed easily when her father left, the reader obtains a picture of a dynamic, charasmatic man who loved his family, was, for the most part a doting father, but simply could not help himself in perfectionism and obsessive, critical demands. At the time the book was written, Reeve did not know that her father had three other families in Europe. She knew he was missing for long periods of time. She knew her mother had more strength than any other person. Highly recommended. Five Stars!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sallie

    A very enjoyable portrait of both Anne Morrow Lindbergh and Charles Lindbergh by their youngest daughter. I have read all six volume's of Anne's letter-memoirs, plus I love the short stories for children by Elizabeth Morrow (Anne's mother)--so I read this for new information and perspective from Reeve. Writing is wonderful; insights helpful.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    This is a gem of a book. After reading the Aviator's Wife I was hungry for more info on the Lindberghs and my library search turned up this. Written by the youngest Lindbergh child, Reeve, it is not a linear account, but a true memoir of impressions and memories of growing up with such famous parents and under the shadow of a tragedy. I knew of her as a children's author, but was excited to find this book for adults. She writes beautifully and poetically about the "give-and-take between public i This is a gem of a book. After reading the Aviator's Wife I was hungry for more info on the Lindberghs and my library search turned up this. Written by the youngest Lindbergh child, Reeve, it is not a linear account, but a true memoir of impressions and memories of growing up with such famous parents and under the shadow of a tragedy. I knew of her as a children's author, but was excited to find this book for adults. She writes beautifully and poetically about the "give-and-take between public impression and private memory, each informing, educating, correcting and ultimately humanizing the other, over time. . . I have learned that by pursing my own history consistently, pursuing it with compassion and without fear, I will discover over and over again that the people I love best can never be lost to me." (195) This book was written in 1998, 20+ years after her father's death, and during her mother's slow decline to old age (she died in 2001). Reeve looks at her childhood from the impressionable view of a child, complete with smells, feelings and spatial memory of favorite places and memories of favorite people. She also looks at family dynamics and the sheer force of her father's will ("in his presence we became much more completely and perilously alive") and her mother's intelligence and sensitivity. ("she taught us that any experience worth living through was worth writing about") She also shares her close relationship with her siblings, especially Anne, who died at age 59 from cancer. The importance of place and family identity is explored beautifully and she does not shy away from difficult topics (Charles Lindbergh's perceived antisemitism in WWII, for example) but she also accurately catches the distance a child feels from the life and actions of an adult parent, especially things that happened before her birth. The same goes for the kidnapping. The family resisted letting that define them, to the betterment of all the subsequent children. The title is so apt, as is the cover picture that it predisposed me to a pleasant read and I wasn't disappointed.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    I love Reeve Lindbergh. She is one of those writers I would love to meet for dinner. Considering her very unusual growing-up years, that she grew up to be so open-hearted, so generous, and so full of humor amazes me. In this very honest memoir, she tells us what it was like to be the youngest child of two brilliant (but somewhat remote) parents; both universally known as writers and aviators. Born long after the Lindbergh hysteria and the infamous murder of the Lindbergh baby, she nonetheless is I love Reeve Lindbergh. She is one of those writers I would love to meet for dinner. Considering her very unusual growing-up years, that she grew up to be so open-hearted, so generous, and so full of humor amazes me. In this very honest memoir, she tells us what it was like to be the youngest child of two brilliant (but somewhat remote) parents; both universally known as writers and aviators. Born long after the Lindbergh hysteria and the infamous murder of the Lindbergh baby, she nonetheless is raised in its shadow. Not permitted to discuss him with her parents, she never really knows her own brother. She craves the demonstrative love of her father who loves her deeply but cannot show it (to her or her brothers and sister). He is demanding of both Reeve and her mother, over-critical, and pathologically self-protective. As we found out several years ago, he was also an adulterer of historic proportions, having maintained two separate families in Germany while remaining married to Ann Lindbergh. Her mother, Ann Morrow Lindbergh, is a sad figure who is far more loving, but also consumed with her writing. Their closeness is evident, especially when they share the experience of losing a child, but it feels more like friendship than parent/child. But it is her father that Reeve writes about here. He is difficult to know and difficult to like. He is petty, rigid, disappears often and for long periods, and can be coldly remote as a father and husband. Yet,he can at times, be playful and affectionate but only on his terms. His complexity as a man, a father, and a husband forced Reeve to dance on eggshells through most of her adolescence, and at times it can uncomfortable to read. Her love for her father is evident,but so her is her pain. My fascination with Charles Lindbergh as a unique 20th century historical figure was not lessened by Reeve's memoir. Reeve made him more human, less heroic, and far more complex.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    Our community read this year is The Aviator’s Wife by Melanie Benjamin. I’m on a Mission to read as much about the writings of the Morrow/Lindbergh family. It was a slog for me to get through some chapters in the first half of the book. I was fascinated that Reeve had to go to the Lindbergh Museum in Minnesota, a place she had not visited prior to his death, to feel a connection with all the phases of his life. The placement of the heavy black cast iron skillet on the kitchen stove finally allowe Our community read this year is The Aviator’s Wife by Melanie Benjamin. I’m on a Mission to read as much about the writings of the Morrow/Lindbergh family. It was a slog for me to get through some chapters in the first half of the book. I was fascinated that Reeve had to go to the Lindbergh Museum in Minnesota, a place she had not visited prior to his death, to feel a connection with all the phases of his life. The placement of the heavy black cast iron skillet on the kitchen stove finally allowed her to grieve. She subsequently visited often. On one visit, she heard the tape of her father’s Isolation Speech of 1941. Of course this was one of three topics that were never discussed in their home when she the youngest child was growing up. (With the kidnapping, the big flight) She had read the speech while in college and had to endure the rancor of fellow students. But it was hearing her father’s speech she became horrified and ashamed. She is ultimately able to parse the speech with her father’s well known, to the family problem solving techniques. Even though Ann Morrow tried to tell him the effect, he still persisted in keeping it as written. This incident should be a cautionary tale for users of the media today when every word ever written and spoken is “out there” and can be retrieved by anyone at any time. I’m thinking about the children and grandchildren of the mean spirited politicians during the past few years. How will they feel about their ancestors using such phrases as legitimate rape and other derogatory, demeaning phrases?

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amy Edwards

    Fun read. Naturally it is great fun to read a daughter's perspective of her famous, quirky father (he often complained about badly-made products made by "punk designers" who afflicted the world with their shoddy work) and her writer-mother (she took it bitterly when John Ciardi ripped her book in a review). I was most interested in the chapter reflecting about the lingering impact on the family of the loss of the "Lindbergh baby." It was moving to read about Anne Morrow Lindbergh's wisdom and adv Fun read. Naturally it is great fun to read a daughter's perspective of her famous, quirky father (he often complained about badly-made products made by "punk designers" who afflicted the world with their shoddy work) and her writer-mother (she took it bitterly when John Ciardi ripped her book in a review). I was most interested in the chapter reflecting about the lingering impact on the family of the loss of the "Lindbergh baby." It was moving to read about Anne Morrow Lindbergh's wisdom and advice for Reeve when Reeve's baby son died in his crib. Many years ago I read A. Scott Berg's biography of Charles Lindbergh, and found the Lindberghs to be a fascinating family. Although Reeve's memoir focuses on the latter part of her parents' lives (of course--she is their youngest child and it is her memoir of growing up a Lindbergh), she still brings us a special perspective on her famous family. Famous or not, Reeve's experiences caring for aging parents reminded me again that whatever our rank socially or financially, death and dying puts us all on the same level. I gave the book just three-stars because, while it was fun, I found myself skimming through much of it. And while Reeve wrote a memoir of her parents and family, and gave us her impressions and feelings about both, we don't learn much about a Reeve herself. I suppose that stands to reason, but it still disappointed me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    A fascinating insight into the marriage of a wildly famous and yet fiercely private couple. Reeve looks at her celebrated parents honestly and without sentimentality, and they emerge as whole, flawed, gifted, and completely human. Some of it is heart rending, especially her journey to understand and be close to her mother and the loss of her beloved sister to cancer. Tragedy and its resulting grief suffuse much of the story, but there's also a lot of happiness and humor. Nice book!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    A touching memoir of the Lindbergh family, written by the youngest daughter, Reeve. It was so interesting to learn about Reeve's parents, what they were like, their interests, their characters. The chapter on their first son's kidnapping and murder was heartbreaking and, as a mother, so hard to read. But they went on with their lives and raised a wonderful family. Great memoir!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    I love memoirs and I have read many Lindberg books. This is one of the best and I fell in love with Reeve Lindbergh and could hardly wait for her book Forward From Here to come out.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    It was a very good book. Loved to see the family through Reeve's eyes. Very interesting view of Charles Lindbergh.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tom Schulte

    I just finished reading breathless recollection of the pioneering cross-Atlantic flight of "Lucky Lindy" in The Start 1904-30 and so it felt right to read about the family privacy so jealously guarded after the aviation breakthrough and the murder of Charles Lindbergh III. Reeve recalls a self-described "non-benevolent dictator" running the children and household like a martinet. Reeve recalls the long train of false Charles Lindbergh III's at the door and writing and her understandably appalled I just finished reading breathless recollection of the pioneering cross-Atlantic flight of "Lucky Lindy" in The Start 1904-30 and so it felt right to read about the family privacy so jealously guarded after the aviation breakthrough and the murder of Charles Lindbergh III. Reeve recalls a self-described "non-benevolent dictator" running the children and household like a martinet. Reeve recalls the long train of false Charles Lindbergh III's at the door and writing and her understandably appalled feelings about humorous references to this horrific crime. There is also much about her literate, sensitive, and creative mother Anne Morrow Lindbergh, including dealing with her senility and sharing the painful night of the sudden death of Reeve's son. The Morrow branch back in Detroit also makes for interesting reading. I was very surprised not to see any extensive recollection of the motivation to step away from privacy to contribute to the invention of the perfusion pump, but I guess that makes sense as the high point of activity on that was 10 years before Reeve's birth. ...I guess there is much tragic here, much realized in the presence of the kidnapping in overwhelming intensity instead of the more recent perfusion triumph....

  15. 4 out of 5

    Janice

    How fitting the book cover photograph for Reeve Lindbergh's memoir, Under a Wing. The youngest child of historic and legendary parents, Charles and Anne Morrow Lindberg, the author offers a view of family life the public never saw. Granted it may not be the most candid, after all, she was preached the mantra of privacy from early childhood and lived under the benevolent dictatorship of her father. Still, I believe she did a remarkable job sharing what growing up Lindbergh meant for her. In her re How fitting the book cover photograph for Reeve Lindbergh's memoir, Under a Wing. The youngest child of historic and legendary parents, Charles and Anne Morrow Lindberg, the author offers a view of family life the public never saw. Granted it may not be the most candid, after all, she was preached the mantra of privacy from early childhood and lived under the benevolent dictatorship of her father. Still, I believe she did a remarkable job sharing what growing up Lindbergh meant for her. In her research, I guessing Ms. Lindbergh discovered and uncovered a behemoth of material about her legendary parents she knew nothing about. Not only was the public kept at bay, but personal history and activities of her parents were never discussed at home with their children. Sharing her personal tragedy of her 18 month old son's death and later the trials caring for her aged mother lost to dementia was touching and relatable. I look forward to reading the two additional memoirs Reeve Lindbergh wrote later in her live.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    I'm consistently surprised by the quality of writing the Morrows/Lindberghs produce. Reeve Lindbergh's memoir of her family is wise, gracious, and artful. And exceedingly perceptive. Recommended.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Penny McGill

    Finished it last night. I read it because it was on the list that Melanie Benjamin had in the back of The Aviator's Wife and it was just wonderful. It was a great choice to read after the fictional Aviator's Wife because it gave greater depth to the issues she covered in her storytelling about Anne Lindberg and also because Reeve Lindberg does such a wonderful job of painting the pictures of her family in each chapter. She doesn't shy away from the difficult parts of her parents' life together a Finished it last night. I read it because it was on the list that Melanie Benjamin had in the back of The Aviator's Wife and it was just wonderful. It was a great choice to read after the fictional Aviator's Wife because it gave greater depth to the issues she covered in her storytelling about Anne Lindberg and also because Reeve Lindberg does such a wonderful job of painting the pictures of her family in each chapter. She doesn't shy away from the difficult parts of her parents' life together and covers the ultimate tragedy of their loss of Charles Jr although it would have been perfectly reasonable for her to leave them out. She talks about how difficult it was to have her father be absent for so much of their growing up years while admitting that it was somehow easier when he was gone. The chapters where she talks about assisting her sister and mother through their illnesses is so very raw in the details that you can't help but ache for her. There is something about her writing that left me feeling very nostalgic for my own growing up years even though they couldn't be more different. Maybe it's the way that she was able to take the reader back into the visits to grandparents, car sickness on long drives, looking forward to special treat foods, that reminded me of my own childhood? We certainly didn't have monogrammed towels and napkins or servants to care for the house, garden and kitchen but there was something about those chapters that made me feel like we were somehow alike as kids. I loved it and have two friends that I will suggest it to. I'm filing it under 'bookclub books' because there is enough in there about childhood and adulthood that would lead to great conversation.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kymberly

    I loved this book. I fell in love with the writings and style of Reeve Lindbergh - her openness, her candor - reading this book. Reeve manages to do what so few can. She humanized people so famous as to have become icons - without embarrassing or sensationalizing them along the way. This is not an "expose" - thank goodness. This is the sweet, honest memoir of "growing up Lindbergh" under the shadow of fame, infamy, tragedy, courage, and almost unmeasurable talent in both parents. Quite a wingspan I loved this book. I fell in love with the writings and style of Reeve Lindbergh - her openness, her candor - reading this book. Reeve manages to do what so few can. She humanized people so famous as to have become icons - without embarrassing or sensationalizing them along the way. This is not an "expose" - thank goodness. This is the sweet, honest memoir of "growing up Lindbergh" under the shadow of fame, infamy, tragedy, courage, and almost unmeasurable talent in both parents. Quite a wingspan indeed. I have long felt "protective" of Anne Morrow Lindbergh, realizing even as a teen first learning of the "Lindbergh Tragedy" that coverage seems to focus on the crime - and not the real people irreparably harmed by it. Reeve Lindbergh humanizes these people, this time, this tragedy - sometimes painfully so. It's easier to think of the "Crime of the (Last) Century" - harder to think of a young mother losing her baby so senselessly, and in such spectacle. To so many people "The Lindbergh Baby" seems somehow unreal. Reeve reminds us that he was first, foremost, and always - somebody's baby. Somebody's brother. Her brother. The writing is skillful and engaging. I came away feeling not like I read an "all about me" memoir but, rather, had a nice correspondence with a dear friend who had trusted me with family stories. I'm grateful she did. When so many others enjoy declaring themselves "experts" on the Lindberghs, I prefer to listen to a source that can be trusted - their daughter.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    After reading The Aviator's Wife and Gift from the Sea, I looked forward to reading a daughter’s view of the Lindbergh family history. Reeve Lindbergh did not disappoint. This was a touching memoir and managed to achieve intimacy without seeming to trample upon the privacy of her family members. It isn’t a tell-all kind of book, but reveals much about the family, and the author shares a wisdom that speaks to all women. Reeve came from a family of writers: her grandmother, her mother and father, After reading The Aviator's Wife and Gift from the Sea, I looked forward to reading a daughter’s view of the Lindbergh family history. Reeve Lindbergh did not disappoint. This was a touching memoir and managed to achieve intimacy without seeming to trample upon the privacy of her family members. It isn’t a tell-all kind of book, but reveals much about the family, and the author shares a wisdom that speaks to all women. Reeve came from a family of writers: her grandmother, her mother and father, as well as her sister, Anne. She reports having been instructed by her mother to write down every important thought and event, and her practice is evident in a beautiful style that reflects her mother’s, but is clearly her own. I feel like Reeve Lindbergh is a person I would like to meet and chat with over a cup of tea, and I intend to read more of her works. First up will be Forward From Here: Leaving Middle Age--and Other Unexpected Adventures, a book she wrote upon reaching her 60th birthday.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Susanne

    A really wonderful family memoir, written by Reeve Lindbergh, the youngest daughter of Charles Lindbergh and Ann Morrow Lindbergh. Very evocative and affectionate descriptions of her stern (but surprisingly playful) father and her sensitive and creative mother, and well as a colorful cast of grandmothers, aunts, uncles and cousins. Her descriptions of their large house and sprawling acreage (purposely isolated, to protect them from public scrutiny), really brought to life the slower days of the A really wonderful family memoir, written by Reeve Lindbergh, the youngest daughter of Charles Lindbergh and Ann Morrow Lindbergh. Very evocative and affectionate descriptions of her stern (but surprisingly playful) father and her sensitive and creative mother, and well as a colorful cast of grandmothers, aunts, uncles and cousins. Her descriptions of their large house and sprawling acreage (purposely isolated, to protect them from public scrutiny), really brought to life the slower days of the late 50's and early 60's. One of my favorite chapters dealt with her famous father insisting that all his children learn to fly: "I think my father wanted to share his love for the air and airplanes with his family, the way sports-minded fathers take their children to ball games. Instead, my father took his children to the airport and taught them to fly...". Reeve spend these excursions ..."sitting in the rear cockpit of a very small plane, feeling sick to my stomach ... hoping my father wouldn't notice the cotton balls stuffed n my ears". Another very thought-provoking chapter dealt with the life-long effects of the "Lindbergh Baby Kidnapping", even though this event occurred before any of the other children were born. This book is a quick but very enjoyable read. I highly recommend it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kricket

    I read this, actually, hoping to learn more about Anne Lindbergh, Reeve's sister, who died in 1993 and wrote several of my favorite books for children. But, it focused much more on Reeve and Anne's famous parents, Charles A. and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, who had quite the hefty influence on Reeve and her life. Much of the book is Reeve working through the enigmatic character of her father. At times, it reminded me of Frank and Ernestine Gilbreth's stories of their own father in the book Cheaper by I read this, actually, hoping to learn more about Anne Lindbergh, Reeve's sister, who died in 1993 and wrote several of my favorite books for children. But, it focused much more on Reeve and Anne's famous parents, Charles A. and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, who had quite the hefty influence on Reeve and her life. Much of the book is Reeve working through the enigmatic character of her father. At times, it reminded me of Frank and Ernestine Gilbreth's stories of their own father in the book Cheaper by the Dozen (not to be confused with the recent Steve Martin film.) Charles Lindbergh was eccentric and had interesting ideas about politics and parenting. Reeve also felt the need to spend time defending the assertions that have come up about her family over the years: that her older brother, the famous "Lindbergh baby" wasn't really kidnapped and killed, that Charles Lindbergh fathered dozens of other children with different women, and that Charles was an anti-semite, a fascist, etc. She has a tendancy to ramble off and lost me now and again, describing houses or her mother's love of birds. But for the most part I enjoyed her writing, and the stories she shared about her intriguing family.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Under a Wing is a short, sweet memoir written by Reeve Lindberg, daughter of Anne Morrow Lindberg and Charles A. Lindberg. Even though it was written when Reeve Lindberg was a much older adult with a family of her own, many of the stories seem like they are written through the eyes of a child. Ms. Lindberg presents details and anecdotes from her childhood through the years to her father’s death and her mother’s battle with dementia. All of her siblings are included in the stories. They were also Under a Wing is a short, sweet memoir written by Reeve Lindberg, daughter of Anne Morrow Lindberg and Charles A. Lindberg. Even though it was written when Reeve Lindberg was a much older adult with a family of her own, many of the stories seem like they are written through the eyes of a child. Ms. Lindberg presents details and anecdotes from her childhood through the years to her father’s death and her mother’s battle with dementia. All of her siblings are included in the stories. They were also included in the black and white photos in the center of the book. She writes with honesty and with her own perspective, having been a member of the family. While some of the material is sad, it is not a sad book. There are an equal number of happy memories of daily interactions within the Lindberg family. The one thing that I had to remember was that this was a memoir written through the eyes of the youngest child in the family. I totally enjoyed this very quick read. It gave a very different perspective on the Lindbergs, particularly Charles A. Lindberg. It was definitely a good read and contributed to my overall knowledge of the Lindberg family.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    I wish there was more about Anne Morrow Lindbergh than about Charles. However, I did read this daughter's memoir "No More Words" about her mother, which I loved - being a fan of "Gift from the Sea." This poem by the author's sister Anne made me think of Lake George. Jenny, get your Mom to read this: "This much is sure- that I am here again at the morning window in another year as are the wings, the birdsong and the line of firs against the sky, the line of tides against the beach and streaks of calm smo I wish there was more about Anne Morrow Lindbergh than about Charles. However, I did read this daughter's memoir "No More Words" about her mother, which I loved - being a fan of "Gift from the Sea." This poem by the author's sister Anne made me think of Lake George. Jenny, get your Mom to read this: "This much is sure- that I am here again at the morning window in another year as are the wings, the birdsong and the line of firs against the sky, the line of tides against the beach and streaks of calm smoothing the ruffled bay. "North Haven - June 20" The things that change the least Are those that are never the same But are always there. Endure, return, endure - And do not compare." [164] The following is asked as a universal question: "Is it true that all parents are too busy to pay full attention to their children? Or is the truth instead that no child can ever be satisfied, because no child can have every ounce of a parent's attention?"

  24. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Reeve Lindbergh, daughter of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, talks about being their daughter. She admires and loves both parents, giving them more credence and humanity than author Melanie Benjamin in her novel "The Aviator's Wife." Reading what Reeve wrote restored my faith in these two consummately experienced professionals. Reeve relates a deeply personal and touching event following the death of her toddler son. Her mother Anne insisted that they sit at the dead child's bedside, just bein Reeve Lindbergh, daughter of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, talks about being their daughter. She admires and loves both parents, giving them more credence and humanity than author Melanie Benjamin in her novel "The Aviator's Wife." Reading what Reeve wrote restored my faith in these two consummately experienced professionals. Reeve relates a deeply personal and touching event following the death of her toddler son. Her mother Anne insisted that they sit at the dead child's bedside, just being with him. And Anne relates that she never had that opportunity when her first-born Charlie died (kidnapped, found dead, cremated by her husband, ashes scattered at sea). The two grieving women shared this experience, mourning two lost sons. Next, I'm reading "Forward from Here," in which she describes the life experience of learning that her famous father had other children with other women - secret European families.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mimi

    After reading the "Aviator's Wife," I wanted to learn more about the Lindbergh family. This book is a memoir written by the youngest of the Lindbergh children. She writes more about her father than about her mother. I believe her intent in writing this book is to put a more human face on her father. She wanted people to relate to him as someone's father rather than just as a hero figure. She also mentions that the oldest Lindbergh child was kidnapped and killed, and for many years none of the ot After reading the "Aviator's Wife," I wanted to learn more about the Lindbergh family. This book is a memoir written by the youngest of the Lindbergh children. She writes more about her father than about her mother. I believe her intent in writing this book is to put a more human face on her father. She wanted people to relate to him as someone's father rather than just as a hero figure. She also mentions that the oldest Lindbergh child was kidnapped and killed, and for many years none of the other children knew this until a teacher brought it up in one of the children's class. The children found it difficult when this information was in their schoolbooks or popped up on television.Reeve stated that they were always a very close family and I am sure the tragedy in the family made the parents more protective and why they held their children close. I found this book interesting since I wanted to read more about the Lindberghs.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Barbara M

    I just finished reading "The Aviator's Wife" (historical fiction about Anne Morrow Lindbergh and her family)and wanted to learn more about the family. I was very interested in reading a book written by a member of the Lindbergh family. The author, Reeve Lindbergh, is the youngest daughter of Charles & Anne Morrow Lindbergh. Her memoir is beautifully written. Reeve definitely inherited her mother's gift for writing. I recommend this book to anyone who would like to learn more about the Lindbergh f I just finished reading "The Aviator's Wife" (historical fiction about Anne Morrow Lindbergh and her family)and wanted to learn more about the family. I was very interested in reading a book written by a member of the Lindbergh family. The author, Reeve Lindbergh, is the youngest daughter of Charles & Anne Morrow Lindbergh. Her memoir is beautifully written. Reeve definitely inherited her mother's gift for writing. I recommend this book to anyone who would like to learn more about the Lindbergh family. They are fiercy private people and this memoir is written by someone inside the family. Reeve protrays her parents as much more loving than they were protrayed in "The Aviator's Wife." She describes some of their eccentricities but also remembers the love she felt from them and for them.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    Sorely disappointing. I read this book with one of my book groups as a response to "Aviator's Wife." Reeve Lindbergh describes her family as a self protecting tribe on the back cover. Not only did she ignore some of the major issues described in the historical fiction but this was boring. The only bit of satisfaction was the chapter on Mr. Lindberg's anti-semitism. Even so, it was very incomplete. Why publish a memoir if you are too private to share memories?This one was published in 1998. I pla Sorely disappointing. I read this book with one of my book groups as a response to "Aviator's Wife." Reeve Lindbergh describes her family as a self protecting tribe on the back cover. Not only did she ignore some of the major issues described in the historical fiction but this was boring. The only bit of satisfaction was the chapter on Mr. Lindberg's anti-semitism. Even so, it was very incomplete. Why publish a memoir if you are too private to share memories?This one was published in 1998. I plan to read her most recent book "Polygamy and Other Family Matters." The title sounds more promising. I want to know how her family reacted to finding that their nearly super hero father had TWO other families on another continent.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Joanna Teodosio

    Great book! It is beautifully written by Reeve Lindbergh and really gave me a glimpse of her famous parents. All I ever really knew about them was limited knowledge. Reeve really gives a fuller picture of her parents, her upbringing, and how her parents' lives shaped her own understanding of being a parent as well as a child of a famous parent. I highly recommend this book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    This was a lovely little book that told stories of the young Lindbergh family and Reeve's reactions to her parents, siblings, grandparents, the price of fame, and her growing-up years. It is told with compassion and insight, using lovely language. I really enjoyed it and it gave me another perspective on her parents after reading a scholarly biography about her father.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jsarno49

    I enjoyed this earlier book by Reeve Lindbergh, but found her style less personalized and much more controlled especially when she writes about her father. The sections on her mother and the family were more personal, and frankly, better written. It's been fun reading one author for a while.

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