counter Thank You for Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson Can Teach Us About the Art of Persuasion - Free Download Books
Hot Best Seller

Thank You for Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson Can Teach Us About the Art of Persuasion

Availability: Ready to download

Thank You for Arguing is your master class in the art of persuasion, taught by professors ranging from Bart Simpson to Winston Churchill. The time-tested secrets this book discloses include Cicero’s three-step strategy for moving an audience to action—as well as Honest Abe’s Shameless Trick of lowering an audience’s expectations by pretending to be unpolished. But it’s al Thank You for Arguing is your master class in the art of persuasion, taught by professors ranging from Bart Simpson to Winston Churchill. The time-tested secrets this book discloses include Cicero’s three-step strategy for moving an audience to action—as well as Honest Abe’s Shameless Trick of lowering an audience’s expectations by pretending to be unpolished. But it’s also replete with contemporary techniques such as politicians’ use of “code” language to appeal to specific groups and an eye-opening assortment of popular-culture dodges—including The Yoda Technique, The Belushi Paradigm, and The Eddie Haskell Ploy. Whether you’re an inveterate lover of language books or just want to win a lot more anger-free arguments on the page, at the podium, or over a beer, Thank You for Arguing is for you. Written by one of today’s most popular language mavens, it’s warm, witty, erudite, and truly enlightening. It not only teaches you how to recognize a paralipsis and a chiasmus when you hear them, but also how to wield such handy and persuasive weapons the next time you really, really want to get your own way.


Compare

Thank You for Arguing is your master class in the art of persuasion, taught by professors ranging from Bart Simpson to Winston Churchill. The time-tested secrets this book discloses include Cicero’s three-step strategy for moving an audience to action—as well as Honest Abe’s Shameless Trick of lowering an audience’s expectations by pretending to be unpolished. But it’s al Thank You for Arguing is your master class in the art of persuasion, taught by professors ranging from Bart Simpson to Winston Churchill. The time-tested secrets this book discloses include Cicero’s three-step strategy for moving an audience to action—as well as Honest Abe’s Shameless Trick of lowering an audience’s expectations by pretending to be unpolished. But it’s also replete with contemporary techniques such as politicians’ use of “code” language to appeal to specific groups and an eye-opening assortment of popular-culture dodges—including The Yoda Technique, The Belushi Paradigm, and The Eddie Haskell Ploy. Whether you’re an inveterate lover of language books or just want to win a lot more anger-free arguments on the page, at the podium, or over a beer, Thank You for Arguing is for you. Written by one of today’s most popular language mavens, it’s warm, witty, erudite, and truly enlightening. It not only teaches you how to recognize a paralipsis and a chiasmus when you hear them, but also how to wield such handy and persuasive weapons the next time you really, really want to get your own way.

30 review for Thank You for Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson Can Teach Us About the Art of Persuasion

  1. 5 out of 5

    Always Pouting

    I hate the writers voice and writing style and I am so tired of these accessible books being about ten pages of content inflated with real life anecdotes as if they prove anything. How can you do that in a book about rhetoric and logic fallacy especially. Also it wasn't structured very well and was a little sporadic and made use of all these things in a manipulative way and even praised being manipulative. There are way better books on rhetoric honestly so choose something else instead that isn' I hate the writers voice and writing style and I am so tired of these accessible books being about ten pages of content inflated with real life anecdotes as if they prove anything. How can you do that in a book about rhetoric and logic fallacy especially. Also it wasn't structured very well and was a little sporadic and made use of all these things in a manipulative way and even praised being manipulative. There are way better books on rhetoric honestly so choose something else instead that isn't a vehicle for the author to try and show off how much he knows but rather something with substance.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kristi

    For an accessible, engaging, and non-textbook book about rhetoric, I found it very successful. The examples are relevant and Heinrichs creates more memorable names for the Latin rhetorical terms. He gives rhetoric more applicability and relevance to our lives by exposing how it used in popular culture. I learned quite a bit from the book, even if it jumped around a lot. However, I got quite annoyed with Heinrichs' narrative voice by about halfway through the book. At first, I really enjoyed the h For an accessible, engaging, and non-textbook book about rhetoric, I found it very successful. The examples are relevant and Heinrichs creates more memorable names for the Latin rhetorical terms. He gives rhetoric more applicability and relevance to our lives by exposing how it used in popular culture. I learned quite a bit from the book, even if it jumped around a lot. However, I got quite annoyed with Heinrichs' narrative voice by about halfway through the book. At first, I really enjoyed the humor and sarcasm, but then it just went overboard. The sarcasm got old very quickly and I felt like Heinrichs was quite arrogant in his own presentation of the material (which involved praising his book). I thought he was rather pretentious; while I don't particularly mind pretension, his embodiment of the techniques he discussed bothered me. I had trouble connecting with his experiences and felt that in a few places he was condescending by over-simplifying the techniques. I also didn't like how he almost praised the manipulation involved in rhetoric; while I do understand its there, he seemed to throw it in your face. For these reasons, I had difficulty continuing with the book. At first it read fast, but then I got so sick of the narrative voice and presentation, that it took a lot of motivation to finish it (If I didn't need to read for class, I might've stopped). However, I did learn a lot from reading this book and do believe it is a much more accessible resource than other rhetoric resources.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    This is a highly competent introduction to the ancient Greek and Roman art of rhetoric -- or, as the author is fond of saying -- verbal ju-jitsu. It's that kind of irritating cheerful trendiness that prevented me from giving the book 5 stars. The author is determined to make the book funny and cute. He tells many stories on himself where his attempts at...verbal ju-jitsu...backfire amusingly, usually because his wife sees right through his feeble attempts to manipulate her. All of that got tires This is a highly competent introduction to the ancient Greek and Roman art of rhetoric -- or, as the author is fond of saying -- verbal ju-jitsu. It's that kind of irritating cheerful trendiness that prevented me from giving the book 5 stars. The author is determined to make the book funny and cute. He tells many stories on himself where his attempts at...verbal ju-jitsu...backfire amusingly, usually because his wife sees right through his feeble attempts to manipulate her. All of that got tiresome pretty quickly, as well as the quotes from Homer Simpson and (even) Stalin. One gets the feeling that he's been unable to get anyone's attention over the years, and so he's used to trying way too hard. He's like one of those people you meet at a party who's a little too lively and who won't stop cracking one-liners. The act wears thin after a while. But still, all of rhetoric is spread out for you 'like a patient etherised upon a table'. If you want to learn it, this is a relatively painless way to do so. Like having an amateur Chris Rock teach you a foreign language.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Don

    If you think of the word argument as a series of logical steps connecting premises to a conclusion, then this is not the book you're looking for. And if you think of arguments as opportunities to work together to discover truth, then this book will likely leave you very disappointed. Let me just share a few of the gems that you can expect from this book: [The happy couples] manipulated one another. That's a good thing. While our culture tends to admire straight shooters, [...] those people rarely If you think of the word argument as a series of logical steps connecting premises to a conclusion, then this is not the book you're looking for. And if you think of arguments as opportunities to work together to discover truth, then this book will likely leave you very disappointed. Let me just share a few of the gems that you can expect from this book: [The happy couples] manipulated one another. That's a good thing. While our culture tends to admire straight shooters, [...] those people rarely get their way in the end. (pg. 16) You need to determine your audience's values and then appear to live up to them. (pg. 60) - If facts work in your favor use them. If they don't (or you don't know them), then... - Redefine the terms instead. If that won't work, accept your opponent's facts and terms but... - Argue that your opponent's argument is less important than it seems. And if even that isn't to your advantage... - Claim the discussion is irrelevant. (pg. 109) [This] angle, for example, is rhetorically wrong only if it fails to persuade. That's because, nonsensical as the argument is logically, it makes emotional sense. [...] So while not a logical argument, it makes a decent pathetic one---provided the [audience] misses the fallacy. (pg. 157) If you think this is good advice, worth learning and following, then you might love this book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Deke

    I couldn't do it. I couldn't finish it, even after slogging through 200 pages. The book is filled with valuable information, but the author's writing style is intolerable. Filled with pop culture references and anecdotes from his family, it's like listening to a guy at a party who is incredibly proud of himself and won't shut up even though no one is laughing at his jokes. For instance... I started leafing through the book, flipped pages, closed it. And then I read the blurb on the back which he I couldn't do it. I couldn't finish it, even after slogging through 200 pages. The book is filled with valuable information, but the author's writing style is intolerable. Filled with pop culture references and anecdotes from his family, it's like listening to a guy at a party who is incredibly proud of himself and won't shut up even though no one is laughing at his jokes. For instance... I started leafing through the book, flipped pages, closed it. And then I read the blurb on the back which he probably wrote; if I'd seen it I would have run screaming: "Written by one of today's most popular language mavens, it's warm, witty, erudite and truly enlightening." That sentence is not warm (it's self-aggrandizing, which leaves me cold), nor erudite (there's no such thing as a language maven, an obviously self-coined phrase which shows neither an understanding of the word maven nor any sense that people can easily measure popularity on the internet making this claim both false and ridiculous), nor enlightening. Actually, I take that back, that sentence is quite enlightening. Run, don't walk, toward actual rhetorical quality.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steven Ackerley

    Can I give ZERO stars? One of only three books I have thrown to the floor in disgust and have no intention or desire to ever go back to it. The writer comes across as patronising and smug, and he appears to love footnotes so much he actually sticks them in amongst the text in little, annoying box-outs. The only funny bits in this supposedly humorous book are the Simpson's quotes, so go watch Homer instead. Can I give ZERO stars? One of only three books I have thrown to the floor in disgust and have no intention or desire to ever go back to it. The writer comes across as patronising and smug, and he appears to love footnotes so much he actually sticks them in amongst the text in little, annoying box-outs. The only funny bits in this supposedly humorous book are the Simpson's quotes, so go watch Homer instead.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    In his book Thank You for Arguing Jay Heinrichs teaches readers about the art of argument. He details the tools and techniques necessary for persuasion, and branches out into the overall importance of rhetoric in contemporary society and in our daily lives. Thank You for Arguing served as a great guide to the many terms, tips, and tricks of argument. Heinrichs keeps his tone light to avoid boring his readers, and even points out how he utilizes rhetoric in his own writing throughout the book. Whi In his book Thank You for Arguing Jay Heinrichs teaches readers about the art of argument. He details the tools and techniques necessary for persuasion, and branches out into the overall importance of rhetoric in contemporary society and in our daily lives. Thank You for Arguing served as a great guide to the many terms, tips, and tricks of argument. Heinrichs keeps his tone light to avoid boring his readers, and even points out how he utilizes rhetoric in his own writing throughout the book. While some of my peers thought that his voice verged on cheesiness, to me it had the right amount of jocularity to balance out the dryness of some of the material. He maintained a sophisticated writing style, too, and his expertise and the amount of research he conducted for the publishing of this book is made clear. I can see why the English teachers at my school would have students read Thank You for Arguing before taking AP English Language - it introduces terms such as ethos, pathos, and logos, and shares techniques for argument such as utilizing the future tense. Recommended to those who wish to learn how to be more persuasive and to those who want to win more arguments. *cross-posted on my blog, the quiet voice.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    The very best college class I took was Dr. Bertonasco's rhetoric class. Dr. B was a stern taskmaster and a hard grader-- and I learned so much about polishing self-expression and about analyzing other's expressed opinions. Valuable lessons for the academic life and for real life. I hoped to find a book that would return me to that classroom and help me recall the skills I so appreciated. This book is not that one. This book is less about the well-reasoned argument than about clobbering anyone who The very best college class I took was Dr. Bertonasco's rhetoric class. Dr. B was a stern taskmaster and a hard grader-- and I learned so much about polishing self-expression and about analyzing other's expressed opinions. Valuable lessons for the academic life and for real life. I hoped to find a book that would return me to that classroom and help me recall the skills I so appreciated. This book is not that one. This book is less about the well-reasoned argument than about clobbering anyone who disagrees with you by any means possible, including falsification. In theory, the variety of contemporary sources cited by the author should help the reader to analyze such tricks when, say, politicians employ them-- but Heinrichs doesn't choose his examples for their rhetorical brilliance or their rhetorical speciousness: he chooses them for what I will call "the har-de-har/elbow-in-the-ribs factor." As others have noted, his smart-aleck persona does not make for pleasant companionship. I read only two chapters, flipped through the remaining pages, and put the book in the big bag to be donated to the SPCA thrift store. I guess that means it's really a dog.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Karen Chung

    A modern primer on how to become more persuasive through the art of rhetoric. It's good, quite comprehensive, and useful, but it felt to me like the writer was trying a bit too hard to be witty and entertaining – almost to the point of being what my British friend would call "twee", or too cutesy. And it's long. But worth reading. I got through it fairly quickly using text-to-speech with Alex. I learned about this volume from my favorite Mandarin morning radio program, "UFO Breakfast" with Tang X A modern primer on how to become more persuasive through the art of rhetoric. It's good, quite comprehensive, and useful, but it felt to me like the writer was trying a bit too hard to be witty and entertaining – almost to the point of being what my British friend would call "twee", or too cutesy. And it's long. But worth reading. I got through it fairly quickly using text-to-speech with Alex. I learned about this volume from my favorite Mandarin morning radio program, "UFO Breakfast" with Tang Xianglong.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Angela Blount

    3.5 Stars An accessible intro to the Greco-Roman art of rhetoric. (Suggested Honest Subtitle: Using “verbal ju-jitsu” to get your way.) The author endeavors to teach readers the difference between fighting and arguing—and in this I believe he succeeds. If little else is accomplished, readers should walk away with a solid grasp on the three primary avenues of persuasion: Ethos (ethical appeal/credibility), Pathos (emotional appeal), and Logos (logic)… as well as some idea of which would be most ef 3.5 Stars An accessible intro to the Greco-Roman art of rhetoric. (Suggested Honest Subtitle: Using “verbal ju-jitsu” to get your way.) The author endeavors to teach readers the difference between fighting and arguing—and in this I believe he succeeds. If little else is accomplished, readers should walk away with a solid grasp on the three primary avenues of persuasion: Ethos (ethical appeal/credibility), Pathos (emotional appeal), and Logos (logic)… as well as some idea of which would be most effective and in what sort of timing. The author also skirts a line between self-depreciating humor and a sort of vague smugness—which some readers may find off-putting rather than amusing. This reader was continually back-and-forth on how to take Heinrichs style. I could appreciate his insistence on raising his children to comprehend rhetoric and resist the siren call of advertisement… but his flippancy toward certain kinds of social exploitation danced a bit too close to sociopathy for my comfort. Personal Note: It was interesting how many of these rhetoric principles I recognized--but purely on an instinctual level. I can recall being annoyed at a very young age when sensing someone was using one of them to manipulate me. (Er...sorry..."persuade" me.) >.> The book is chock full of the author’s familial anecdotes and “relevant” pop-culture examples—which may or may not work for some readers, but arguably should hold the attention of most. (Pun intended.) It should be no surprise that Chapter 10 was far and above my favorite chapter--devoted to the persuasive power of humor in its many forms. Favorite Quotes: (Borrowed from other sources.) *“A person’s life persuades better than his word,” said one of Aristotle’s contemporaries. *“OSCAR WILDE: Work is the curse of the drinking classes.”

  11. 5 out of 5

    Franky

    For being a book about argument, this book is quite uneven and wildly unfocused. The author seems to have a haphazard approach to explaining various points of argument and rhetoric and jumps all around in his discussion. Just when he is coming to a point, he ventures off and gets sidetracked on something else. For that reason, it was really hard to get into this book. Additionally, the examples and analogies he uses for appeals or persuasive strategies are either repetitive or overly simplistic For being a book about argument, this book is quite uneven and wildly unfocused. The author seems to have a haphazard approach to explaining various points of argument and rhetoric and jumps all around in his discussion. Just when he is coming to a point, he ventures off and gets sidetracked on something else. For that reason, it was really hard to get into this book. Additionally, the examples and analogies he uses for appeals or persuasive strategies are either repetitive or overly simplistic in nature. He basically tries to use his family as a way to illustrate means of being persuasive, but goes to that well way too often. And sometimes the logic is a bit head-scratching as well. It also didn’t help that the author’s tone is a mixture of smart allecky and slightly annoying. His own sense of audience is way off kilter or something, and I think I put the book down several times just because of that. One minute he is using “nefarious” in a sentence, and the next minute trying to crack a joke. Complaints aside, there a few nuggets of rhetorical wisdom contained in Thank You For Arguing. Some of the bits on capturing your audience’s attention, for example, were helpful. However, you have to wade through quite a bit to find many of those said nuggets. I would call this rhetoric light, as in half the depth of a book about rhetoric, and not as insightful. While there are some points of insight, there are far better books about argument and rhetoric out there.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Excellent book! For those of us who took literature instead of rhetoric in college (ehem, yeah), it's a great intro to the mysterious dark art. Heinrichs humorously illuminates the nuts and bolts of argument, the art of persuading an audience to change its mind or mood or to get it to act. He gets you to remove yourself from argument and become a third party observer. What are the speaker's goals? What does he want me to think or do about something? Is he appealing to my feelings, logic, or his Excellent book! For those of us who took literature instead of rhetoric in college (ehem, yeah), it's a great intro to the mysterious dark art. Heinrichs humorously illuminates the nuts and bolts of argument, the art of persuading an audience to change its mind or mood or to get it to act. He gets you to remove yourself from argument and become a third party observer. What are the speaker's goals? What does he want me to think or do about something? Is he appealing to my feelings, logic, or his character? What tense is he speaking in? Despite all the useful tools to building speeches or active listening, I found Heinrichs argument for argument the most compelling aspect of the book. He successfully persuaded me (pointing out all the techniques he's using along the way in sidebars) that the art of persuasion has been largely lost among the American masses when it was once at the forefront of education. Most of us pass off the skill to lawyers or political parties leaving us vulnerable to manipulation. This book will help you organize your thoughts, effectively analyze arguments used to persuade you to do or think something, and give you a good laugh along the way.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nguyễn Trung

    The first half was frankly quite tedious and confusing, with the author jumping back and forth between concepts instead of laying out information in an orderly and systematic way. The small information boxes popping everywhere served more as a distraction, providing rather minimal value for the damage they cause to the reading flow (well, to be fair you can skip them entirely, but duh). However, things picked up in the later half, starting from Advanced Offense. Here the author provided interest The first half was frankly quite tedious and confusing, with the author jumping back and forth between concepts instead of laying out information in an orderly and systematic way. The small information boxes popping everywhere served more as a distraction, providing rather minimal value for the damage they cause to the reading flow (well, to be fair you can skip them entirely, but duh). However, things picked up in the later half, starting from Advanced Offense. Here the author provided interesting and thought-provoking ideas and tips in a more focused and easier to digest fashion. The final chapter on using rhetoric to move toward a wiser and more agreeable country was rather persuasive and did let me to seriously consider the proposal. The appendix at the back also served as a good summary and may be useful for future reference. All in all a decent book, if only it was half the page count and a bit more coherent.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Thank You for Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson can Teach Us about the Art of Persuasion is available in e-book and paperback. It is written for teens and adults who are interested in learning the skill of debate and is recommended reading in some AP English classes. In Thank You for Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson can Teach Us the author Jay Heinrichs teaches readers how to win arguments and get what your point across. Some topics discussed are:  Set Your G Thank You for Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson can Teach Us about the Art of Persuasion is available in e-book and paperback. It is written for teens and adults who are interested in learning the skill of debate and is recommended reading in some AP English classes. In Thank You for Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson can Teach Us the author Jay Heinrichs teaches readers how to win arguments and get what your point across. Some topics discussed are:  Set Your Goals  Control the Tense  Soften Them Up  Get Them to Like You  Make Them Listen  And much more! Thank You for Arguing: What Aristotle, Lincoln, and Homer Simpson can Teach Us is relevant as it teaches through both written word and boxed footnotes teens and adults “code” language to appeal to specific groups and an eye-opening assortment of popular-culture dodges—including the Yoda Technique, the Belushi Paradigm, and the Eddie Haskell Ploy. A good, humor-filled book for any lover of language books or anyone who just wants to win a lot more arguments on the page, at the podium, or with a friend.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Buddy

    I started reading this while browsing in a bookstore on Saturday (I’m a nerd), and I haven’t wanted to set it down since. The subject matter is fascinating, and the author’s expertise and wit had me hooked the entire time. It helped me see the intent behind a lot of seemingly innocuous cultural messages. Even more, though, it helped me see the rhetorical pitfalls of many of the groups I identify with. In an increasingly polarized world where we can’t agree on facts, I think we can agree that we’ I started reading this while browsing in a bookstore on Saturday (I’m a nerd), and I haven’t wanted to set it down since. The subject matter is fascinating, and the author’s expertise and wit had me hooked the entire time. It helped me see the intent behind a lot of seemingly innocuous cultural messages. Even more, though, it helped me see the rhetorical pitfalls of many of the groups I identify with. In an increasingly polarized world where we can’t agree on facts, I think we can agree that we’d at least like to know how to talk to each other.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Blaine Duncan

    While it took me a while to read this (and it's not longer than any average book), I am glad that I read it. The information I gleaned about rhetoric and argument--written in a fun, interesting manner--made it worth the time. I don't know that I would recommend this one to just anyone, though. While it took me a while to read this (and it's not longer than any average book), I am glad that I read it. The information I gleaned about rhetoric and argument--written in a fun, interesting manner--made it worth the time. I don't know that I would recommend this one to just anyone, though.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Will

    Winning arguments is an odd book, really. I read it expecting to be blown away due to some of the Amazon reviews, and also as I'd read Sam Leith's book "Are you talking to me", which is a very good primer in this forgotten art - and I thought it would be on the same lines. Unfortunately it isn't. This book misses, and misses large. It may be because its a bit too American for my tastes, focusing as it does on the mannerisms, patterns of speech, and politics of contemporary America in its anecdote Winning arguments is an odd book, really. I read it expecting to be blown away due to some of the Amazon reviews, and also as I'd read Sam Leith's book "Are you talking to me", which is a very good primer in this forgotten art - and I thought it would be on the same lines. Unfortunately it isn't. This book misses, and misses large. It may be because its a bit too American for my tastes, focusing as it does on the mannerisms, patterns of speech, and politics of contemporary America in its anecdotes. But Heinrichs also fills it full of Anecdotes about the banality of his family life, which were interesting in the beginning, but downright tedious by the end. In fact I ended up feeling that significant portions of the middle of the book were simply filler. For instance, Heinrichs repeatedly coins his own terms and applies them to tropes, idioms, and figures of speech. One of these is the "Eddie Haskell Ploy". Unlikely to stick, I think, and hardly informative on the subject of rhetoric. This gets us into the meat of the issue - the book is supposed to be (and largely is) about Rhetoric. Rhetoric deals with the art of persuasion. Why then, has the book changed its name from "Thank you for arguing" to "Winning Arguments" since its first publication? Why does the author find it necessary to point out, repeatedly and repetitively, the ways he's supposedly persuading you throughout the book? Why is there so much annotation in the margins (I find this wildly distracting, interrupting the flow and aesthetic of any book - but hey, maybe that's just me) The final stick in the craw came for me in the last chapter, where Heinrichs uses his mastery of argument to discuss why a book club should be encouraged to read - you guessed it - his own book. For me, that utterly fails to persuade. That isn't to say there isn't some gold here. There is. I particularly enjoyed reading about the following, which I will be applying in the future: Five cannons of oratory: Invention Arrangement Introduction Narration Proof Refutation Conclusion Style Memory Delivery The Art Of Concession - Concession, then reframing the issue to suit your own Make your way seem the most medium The reluctant conclusion The self sacrificial persuasion Aristotle on virtue: A state of character, concerned with choice, lying in a mean. Empathy tactics: Dubitatio, talking softly and rising to a crescendo etc. Finally, using the future tense as a persuasive means towards a best decision [favouring you] . "who cares if I'm a thief and drug addict, the question is how we're better going to redistribute wealth in the years to come", etc.... I found all of the above very useful. This from someone who has had no conscious training in Rhetoric, yet just finds it very interesting. (Thanks for introducing me to it, Zen and the art of Motorcycle Maintenance!) So in conclusion, or peroration, as Cicero would have me say: Heinrichs has some useful points, but its style is poor (perhaps he has forgotten this cannon of oratory), and this serves to make the book very weak indeed. I'd much rather recommend Sam Leith's book, "Are you talking to me" which is far more interesting, less condescending. He also sounds very nice in recent pieces on the radio too. If you want to know more about rhetoric, start there. If you want to listen to some "rhetoric" (in the pejorative sense), start here. I know which I'd rather do.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ivan Lozano

    Rhetoric has earned a bad name in past years. Deservedly so, no? After all it's how dirty politicians and vicious salesmen trick us into doing their will right? Well, not so. This book picks up rhetoric from the dumps, gives it a shower and a shave and shows us the other side of rhetoric; the one that helps us get the best result out of every argument, that teaches us how to explain ourselves clearly and empathically and, perhaps most important of all, provides the perfect vaccine for the shady u Rhetoric has earned a bad name in past years. Deservedly so, no? After all it's how dirty politicians and vicious salesmen trick us into doing their will right? Well, not so. This book picks up rhetoric from the dumps, gives it a shower and a shave and shows us the other side of rhetoric; the one that helps us get the best result out of every argument, that teaches us how to explain ourselves clearly and empathically and, perhaps most important of all, provides the perfect vaccine for the shady uses of rhetoric. See, rhetoric is both the sword and the shield and this book leaves you well prepared for war, or the next dinner table discussion. It's a very information-dense book, which is the reason it took me 18 months to finish. It's best enjoyed in short doses, leaving some time to let your brain soak in the knowledge. Even so, the book is not daunting in its language. The author takes you through the basics of rhetoric in a modern, colloquial and conversational way, full of anecdotes and examples rooted in history and popular culture. This is a book I'll be using for reference a lot in the future and it made me abuse Kindle's highlight function to where there's barely a page without a highlight or ten. I recommend this book for everyone and has made me a firm believer that we should teach our youth about rhetoric. For far too long we have let this most noble and social art on the hands of those who seek to abuse it. It's time we learned to fight back.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rae

    Read this review and others on my blog: https://thriftybibliophile.com Thank You for Arguing provides a detailed look at the art of rhetoric. The book is full of wit, tips, and funny anecdotes, which all help demonstrate and illustrate arguing strategies. I wanted to like Thank You for Arguing more than I did. I like the subject and the premise, but the author’s style grated on my nerves. I thought I would enjoy his wit, sarcasm, and stories, but the amount of actual content in the book is slim co Read this review and others on my blog: https://thriftybibliophile.com Thank You for Arguing provides a detailed look at the art of rhetoric. The book is full of wit, tips, and funny anecdotes, which all help demonstrate and illustrate arguing strategies. I wanted to like Thank You for Arguing more than I did. I like the subject and the premise, but the author’s style grated on my nerves. I thought I would enjoy his wit, sarcasm, and stories, but the amount of actual content in the book is slim compared to the amount of filler junk. He also abuses text boxes. Sometimes two pages would have over six additional text boxes–asides with additional information. Most of these asides were not value-added, and about halfway through the book, I stopped reading them all together. The real content in the book is good. Clearly Heinrichs’ knows his subject well, and I did take away several tips that I plan on using in future arguments. On the plus side, as a student I probably would have enjoyed this book more than a standard textbook. As an adult with a full-time job, I found the book’s style tiresome. Note: I received this book from Blogging for Books in exchange for this review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Patterson

    This is perhaps the most interesting child-rearing book I've ever read. Why? Because you learn how to teach your children to debate with you. The title, "Thank You for Arguing", is slightly misleading, because the author, Jay Heinrichs, is attempting to dissuade people from the common reaction of blind arguing. Instead, Heinrichs wants people to learn how to debate again, how to listen to each other's statements and respond accordingly. Personally, I learned a lot about debate, and how to presen This is perhaps the most interesting child-rearing book I've ever read. Why? Because you learn how to teach your children to debate with you. The title, "Thank You for Arguing", is slightly misleading, because the author, Jay Heinrichs, is attempting to dissuade people from the common reaction of blind arguing. Instead, Heinrichs wants people to learn how to debate again, how to listen to each other's statements and respond accordingly. Personally, I learned a lot about debate, and how to present your point. I found myself slightly surprised at the multitude of situations in which Heinrichs' advice works, from dealings with my kids' schools to business meetings to family events. Everywhere you can converse with someone else, you can use this book. I even taught my children how to use some of the debating methods. I wondered if they really listened, when my daughter asked for dessert one night. I almost said, "no" when she stated (in a calm voice), "Mom, I ate all of my fruit and vegetables at dinner. I eat nutritiously every day, so a dessert every once in a while will not adversely affect my diet." I agreed, and she got dessert.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cherie

    This was a really great read and it has changed the way I hear every conversation. I am interested in reading more of the author's recommended reads on rhetoric. However, I was a bit disappointed that there were some spelling and grammar errors near the end - it was like the editors got a bit tired near the end and missed out these obvious errors like "How media help your message" on page 237. But, other than that and one other spelling error, I thought that it was a great book - I loved the con This was a really great read and it has changed the way I hear every conversation. I am interested in reading more of the author's recommended reads on rhetoric. However, I was a bit disappointed that there were some spelling and grammar errors near the end - it was like the editors got a bit tired near the end and missed out these obvious errors like "How media help your message" on page 237. But, other than that and one other spelling error, I thought that it was a great book - I loved the conversational style, which made me feel more connected to the topics and made it seem more relevant, and I also appreciated how there were so many anecdotes and dialogues which helped to make all the rhetoric techniques make more sense in an everyday way. The persuasion alerts also showed how the techniques can be used and detected in writing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    TJ Wilson

    The sidebars are a little much. Too many sidebars make for too much disjointedness. I don't do well when people I'm conversing with have side conversations. Don't do it with writing![return][return]On the whole, the examples (good for people who know 90s culture and movies, otherwise...) and terms are all in here. It's a little hard to digest. Took me a good two weeks to slog through it. But there are some interesting bits in here.[return][return]I applaud the author's call to inculcate everyone The sidebars are a little much. Too many sidebars make for too much disjointedness. I don't do well when people I'm conversing with have side conversations. Don't do it with writing![return][return]On the whole, the examples (good for people who know 90s culture and movies, otherwise...) and terms are all in here. It's a little hard to digest. Took me a good two weeks to slog through it. But there are some interesting bits in here.[return][return]I applaud the author's call to inculcate everyone in rhetoric, the good and the bad, but I do not applaud the author condoning the use of manipulative rhetoric with the ignorant. I think that the author forgets, even though he acknowledges this with other fallacies, that any sort of trickery can always backfire. And then there goes that *ethos*. Poof.

  23. 5 out of 5

    F

    My boyfriend gave me this book because it's a rhetoric book, and being that I majored in Rhetoric in college, he thought I'd enjoy it. Overall, I enjoyed reading it. The chapters follow a format that I would have benefitted from during study sessions during my introductory days in the department. A good, but selectively incomplete foundation for argument, the book provides quality information but failed to keep my attention. When I read parts of the book aloud to my boyfriend, I could see him gr My boyfriend gave me this book because it's a rhetoric book, and being that I majored in Rhetoric in college, he thought I'd enjoy it. Overall, I enjoyed reading it. The chapters follow a format that I would have benefitted from during study sessions during my introductory days in the department. A good, but selectively incomplete foundation for argument, the book provides quality information but failed to keep my attention. When I read parts of the book aloud to my boyfriend, I could see him growing bored and annoyed. Oh, and if you're looking for any sort of story (in the manner that Sophie's World turns introductory philosophy into a tale of a young girl), you're barking up the wrong tree.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Martin Beamer

    I agree with much of what the author said. The underlying importance and necessity of rhetoric for society to flourish is right on. There is so much to enjoy from this book that will help anyone become a better communicator. However, as someone who has taught rhetoric to high schoolers for seven years, I have to say that I believe his philosophy is all wrong. He came across as a modern day sophist - persuasion over truth. Rhetoric doesn’t begin with how to persuade. Rhetoric begins with what is T I agree with much of what the author said. The underlying importance and necessity of rhetoric for society to flourish is right on. There is so much to enjoy from this book that will help anyone become a better communicator. However, as someone who has taught rhetoric to high schoolers for seven years, I have to say that I believe his philosophy is all wrong. He came across as a modern day sophist - persuasion over truth. Rhetoric doesn’t begin with how to persuade. Rhetoric begins with what is Truth; what is Good; what is Beautiful. Truth had little place in this book. Students of rhetoric must be taught to seek truth first, persuasion second. After reading I can’t imagine Socrates, Aristotle, Cicero, or Quintillion would have approved.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    This book really opened my eyes to rhetoric-it is the art of persuasion. The book takes you through an in depth analysis of the topic and applies each persuasive skill to a real life application. The book challenged me to think about persuasion in totally new ways. Rhetoric once was the main focus of liberal education. Our founders were well versed in it as well. Some of its morally questionable aspects perplexed me and forced me to reassess my position. It's really worth the read (and if you're This book really opened my eyes to rhetoric-it is the art of persuasion. The book takes you through an in depth analysis of the topic and applies each persuasive skill to a real life application. The book challenged me to think about persuasion in totally new ways. Rhetoric once was the main focus of liberal education. Our founders were well versed in it as well. Some of its morally questionable aspects perplexed me and forced me to reassess my position. It's really worth the read (and if you're in AP English its mandantory anyway) if you want to sharpen the tools in your persuasive tool kit.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lyndon Bailey

    Started what will not probably be a lifelong interest in Rhetoric, and opens the eyes to the rhetorical tricks on ALL sides of political divides. I would give partial support to his vision of an argument culture made better by self conscious persuaders but with some caveats. I don't think amping up manipulation is the key to a bright and beautiful future. Ultimately the occasional sleazy remark or sneak peak of values from the author that were reminiscent of a character off of Madmen didnt endea Started what will not probably be a lifelong interest in Rhetoric, and opens the eyes to the rhetorical tricks on ALL sides of political divides. I would give partial support to his vision of an argument culture made better by self conscious persuaders but with some caveats. I don't think amping up manipulation is the key to a bright and beautiful future. Ultimately the occasional sleazy remark or sneak peak of values from the author that were reminiscent of a character off of Madmen didnt endear me, but there is a lot of genuine humour and the author flagging his own rhetorical gambits was a nice touch. Nice weapon in the old arsenal, but I didn't bite on the ideological message 100%.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Bright

    **Marked as read at 51%** Due to constantly being behind all year long on my reading challenge and not being able to catch up, I am going to mark this book as read. I cannot give it a fair rating because I did not complete it yet. My teacher said we will continue reading it throughout the school year, but who knows if/when we will ever finish reading it. I am just going to mark this as read because I have read half of it and did all the reading for this that was required of me (and also mainly be **Marked as read at 51%** Due to constantly being behind all year long on my reading challenge and not being able to catch up, I am going to mark this book as read. I cannot give it a fair rating because I did not complete it yet. My teacher said we will continue reading it throughout the school year, but who knows if/when we will ever finish reading it. I am just going to mark this as read because I have read half of it and did all the reading for this that was required of me (and also mainly because I just need to get caught up on my reading challenge!!)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Janice

    As a teacher of high school rhetoric I found this a great book that explains the classical art of persuasion. He uses many great examples from history, his personal experience, politics, television and other things in our culture. He has a funny sense of humor and gets his point across well. It is well organized and he uses sideboards to give other facts or definitions which were helpful. I will recommend this to those who know nothing about rhetoric and also to my students.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Elisabeth

    A book full of the theory and application of rhetoric. It is interesting to just listen to it but one can learn a lot by taking it slow and using it more as a textbook for how to win arguments, present ideas and win people over to your side of understanding. Motivational to learn more about the history of rhetoric and how to start out by applying it to everyday life.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Bogner

    I read this for one of my classes. The author gives some interesting tips on being an effective speaker/writer, but unfortunately, his manipulative tactics and inappropriate remarks kept me from enjoying it.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.