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Science and Steepleflower: Poetry

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His poetry has been called "desperately beautiful" by Thom Gunn in Agni Review, and "original and fascinating" by John Ashbery. With poems in the leading journals of the day -- American Poetry Review, Grand Street, Conjunctions, The Boston Review, to name just a few -- Gander plumbs the erotic depths of human interaction with the land. The poems in Science Steepleflower te His poetry has been called "desperately beautiful" by Thom Gunn in Agni Review, and "original and fascinating" by John Ashbery. With poems in the leading journals of the day -- American Poetry Review, Grand Street, Conjunctions, The Boston Review, to name just a few -- Gander plumbs the erotic depths of human interaction with the land. The poems in Science Steepleflower test this relationship with what Publisher's Weekly has called "an inbred (and often haunting) spirituality", bringing us to new vistas of linguistic and perceptive grace.


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His poetry has been called "desperately beautiful" by Thom Gunn in Agni Review, and "original and fascinating" by John Ashbery. With poems in the leading journals of the day -- American Poetry Review, Grand Street, Conjunctions, The Boston Review, to name just a few -- Gander plumbs the erotic depths of human interaction with the land. The poems in Science Steepleflower te His poetry has been called "desperately beautiful" by Thom Gunn in Agni Review, and "original and fascinating" by John Ashbery. With poems in the leading journals of the day -- American Poetry Review, Grand Street, Conjunctions, The Boston Review, to name just a few -- Gander plumbs the erotic depths of human interaction with the land. The poems in Science Steepleflower test this relationship with what Publisher's Weekly has called "an inbred (and often haunting) spirituality", bringing us to new vistas of linguistic and perceptive grace.

30 review for Science and Steepleflower: Poetry

  1. 5 out of 5

    Will

    A beautiful, melancholic collection of poems that positively reek of the South, it's like a sensual walk through humid, rotting Southern life. "The / audacious / originality of the ordinary / sometimes suggests an opening, / and to enter is to hear the measure / not of nostalgia but nearness--that fetching / lack of doubt and perspective, a world / zoomed-in close / enough to count black ants / under dog-stunted spirea." A beautiful, melancholic collection of poems that positively reek of the South, it's like a sensual walk through humid, rotting Southern life. "The / audacious / originality of the ordinary / sometimes suggests an opening, / and to enter is to hear the measure / not of nostalgia but nearness--that fetching / lack of doubt and perspective, a world / zoomed-in close / enough to count black ants / under dog-stunted spirea."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    I had to return to this collection several times to master the vocabulary in order to glimpse its deeper insights. I am glad I made the effort. Gander unlocks the beauty of language used by science to describe the earth and what inhabits it, mostly in southern, volcanic, or desert landscapes of America. In this rich vein of language, he reveals much about how we relate to our environment and each other. From one angle, it is a collection of awakening, whether to a day beside a beloved, to trees I had to return to this collection several times to master the vocabulary in order to glimpse its deeper insights. I am glad I made the effort. Gander unlocks the beauty of language used by science to describe the earth and what inhabits it, mostly in southern, volcanic, or desert landscapes of America. In this rich vein of language, he reveals much about how we relate to our environment and each other. From one angle, it is a collection of awakening, whether to a day beside a beloved, to trees jostling for space around a lake, or to the degree of cruelty in the fur trade with indigenous people. It is an extraordinary collection, which one could read again and again and gain another revelation each time.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    For the past few months, I have been taking a bi-monthly trip to Raven Used Books in Cambridge. I spend an hour or so pouring over the poetry section picking up volumes that look interesting. I avoid the stuff I'm most familiar with (unless it is Ted Hughes or Peter Richards), and choose books from poets I've never heard of. This was one of the prizes from a recent trip - and I am very pleased it found it's way into my basket. Science & Steepleflower brims over with lush phrasing. It is easy to g For the past few months, I have been taking a bi-monthly trip to Raven Used Books in Cambridge. I spend an hour or so pouring over the poetry section picking up volumes that look interesting. I avoid the stuff I'm most familiar with (unless it is Ted Hughes or Peter Richards), and choose books from poets I've never heard of. This was one of the prizes from a recent trip - and I am very pleased it found it's way into my basket. Science & Steepleflower brims over with lush phrasing. It is easy to get tangled in the language in a way that is pleasingly exhausting. The language carries you along the river of poems in this book. And like a river, you aren't stepping into the same poem twice. I added this to my re-read list.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bronwen

    Science and Steepleflower overflows with the tactile, the lush, the gritty, the extravagant: the indignity of senility, the window of a burning barn, “the land arborescing,” the public urinal, horseshoes clanging in the distance, “that gorgeous galena ore which is emotion.” Intimate wealth of landscape. I often find it difficult not to skim just a little, but this book holds me to every word and its shape in both mouth and mind.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    heather sent this to me and i dunno if it was her comments on the text, or my mood that afternoon, but yeah, i found it sort of anti-woman. but then, i read an interview with the poet's wife and she said she was having a love affair with the book. i can understand, seeing the book manifest from manuscript to book form would be some sort of experience. but i dunno, maybe i need to take another read. heather sent this to me and i dunno if it was her comments on the text, or my mood that afternoon, but yeah, i found it sort of anti-woman. but then, i read an interview with the poet's wife and she said she was having a love affair with the book. i can understand, seeing the book manifest from manuscript to book form would be some sort of experience. but i dunno, maybe i need to take another read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    my favorite of his

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Field Guide to Southern Virginia!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amish

    Reading again....

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stelle

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

  11. 5 out of 5

    Louise

  12. 5 out of 5

    C

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amber Momoh mcmains

  15. 4 out of 5

    AccidentlyRetro

  16. 4 out of 5

    h

    yes. this.

  17. 5 out of 5

    John Madera

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Parker

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hisham

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  22. 4 out of 5

    John

  23. 4 out of 5

    Calvin Jensen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Mckinney

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nathaniel Klaung

  27. 5 out of 5

    ellery

  28. 4 out of 5

    JSA Lowe

  29. 5 out of 5

    Heather

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shanley Jacobs

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