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Three years after the publication of the groundbreaking Asian American comics anthology Secret Identities, the same team is back with a new volume�bigger, bolder, and more breathtaking in scope. While the first collection focused on the conventions of superhero comics, this new book expands its horizon to include edgier genres, from hard-boiled pulp to horror, adventure, fa Three years after the publication of the groundbreaking Asian American comics anthology Secret Identities, the same team is back with a new volume�bigger, bolder, and more breathtaking in scope. While the first collection focused on the conventions of superhero comics, this new book expands its horizon to include edgier genres, from hard-boiled pulp to horror, adventure, fantasy, and science fiction. Using this darker range of hues, it seeks to subvert�to shatter�the hidebound stereotypes that have obscured the Asian image since the earliest days of immigration: the stoic brute, the prodigious brain, the exotic temptress, the inscrutable alien, the devious manipulator. The eclectic and impressive lineup of contributors includes leading Asian American comics creators Bernard Chang (Supergirl), Sean Chen (Iron Man), Cliff Chiang (Wonder Woman), Larry Hama (G.I. Joe), Sonny Liew (Malinky Robot), Takeshi Miyazawa (Runaways), Christine Norrie (Hopeless Savages), Greg Pak (The Hulk), G.B. Tran (Vietnamerica), Gene Yang (American Born Chinese), and many others, as well as such film and literary standouts as Tanuj Chopra (Punching at the Sun), Michael Kang (The Motel), Jamie Ford (Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet), Gary Jackson (Missing You, Metropolis), and Bao Phi (Song I Sing). Their original graphic short stories cover topics from ethnic kiddie shows, China’s AIDS policy, and airline security procedures to the untold backstory of Flash Gordon’s nemesis Ming the Merciless and the gritty reality of a day in the life of a young Koreatown gangster. Shattered incorporates thrills, chills, and delights while exposing the hidden issues and vital truths of the nation’s fastest-growing and most dynamic community.


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Three years after the publication of the groundbreaking Asian American comics anthology Secret Identities, the same team is back with a new volume�bigger, bolder, and more breathtaking in scope. While the first collection focused on the conventions of superhero comics, this new book expands its horizon to include edgier genres, from hard-boiled pulp to horror, adventure, fa Three years after the publication of the groundbreaking Asian American comics anthology Secret Identities, the same team is back with a new volume�bigger, bolder, and more breathtaking in scope. While the first collection focused on the conventions of superhero comics, this new book expands its horizon to include edgier genres, from hard-boiled pulp to horror, adventure, fantasy, and science fiction. Using this darker range of hues, it seeks to subvert�to shatter�the hidebound stereotypes that have obscured the Asian image since the earliest days of immigration: the stoic brute, the prodigious brain, the exotic temptress, the inscrutable alien, the devious manipulator. The eclectic and impressive lineup of contributors includes leading Asian American comics creators Bernard Chang (Supergirl), Sean Chen (Iron Man), Cliff Chiang (Wonder Woman), Larry Hama (G.I. Joe), Sonny Liew (Malinky Robot), Takeshi Miyazawa (Runaways), Christine Norrie (Hopeless Savages), Greg Pak (The Hulk), G.B. Tran (Vietnamerica), Gene Yang (American Born Chinese), and many others, as well as such film and literary standouts as Tanuj Chopra (Punching at the Sun), Michael Kang (The Motel), Jamie Ford (Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet), Gary Jackson (Missing You, Metropolis), and Bao Phi (Song I Sing). Their original graphic short stories cover topics from ethnic kiddie shows, China’s AIDS policy, and airline security procedures to the untold backstory of Flash Gordon’s nemesis Ming the Merciless and the gritty reality of a day in the life of a young Koreatown gangster. Shattered incorporates thrills, chills, and delights while exposing the hidden issues and vital truths of the nation’s fastest-growing and most dynamic community.

30 review for Shattered: The Asian American Comics Anthology

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alenka

    Lots of good concepts but many of the stories were too convoluted to really work as short vignettes. Maybe this is a me problem but sci fi and fantasy stories don't work when they're super short but need some world building/fake science creating. Also the story that followed through the collection didn't work for me mostly because if the problems previously stated but also because it was hard to keep track of characters when we meet them briefly and then abruptly jumped to several entirely diffe Lots of good concepts but many of the stories were too convoluted to really work as short vignettes. Maybe this is a me problem but sci fi and fantasy stories don't work when they're super short but need some world building/fake science creating. Also the story that followed through the collection didn't work for me mostly because if the problems previously stated but also because it was hard to keep track of characters when we meet them briefly and then abruptly jumped to several entirely different stories. This really works as an introduction to a slew of talented creators; you can read through and then check out the other works of folks you liked. Anthologies are tough!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Han

    A lot of the Goodreads reviews I read about this book before I dove in complained about the way this book is structured. Ignore those. If you've ever read an anthology before, that's what this is, and it says so in the title. There's also an overarching story that appears as several installments in the anthology. It's great. Ignore the haters. I love everything this collection does with typical tropes used to depict people of Asian descent in comics and other media. The subversion is so creative A lot of the Goodreads reviews I read about this book before I dove in complained about the way this book is structured. Ignore those. If you've ever read an anthology before, that's what this is, and it says so in the title. There's also an overarching story that appears as several installments in the anthology. It's great. Ignore the haters. I love everything this collection does with typical tropes used to depict people of Asian descent in comics and other media. The subversion is so creative. Some stories are stronger than others, but all are at least worth reading.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    Black and White and Yellow All Over Asian Americans are no strangers to comics. Head to Comic-Con and you’ll see many Asian American fans. But we aren’t just relegated to the masked and costumed otaku (crazed anime or manga addict) that make up the ranks of comic book fandom, we are also the creators. Many of the tables and booths at these conventions are populated by Asian Americans. And while Asian Americans have a big presence in the mainstream comics industry, there is still a dearth of main Black and White and Yellow All Over Asian Americans are no strangers to comics. Head to Comic-Con and you’ll see many Asian American fans. But we aren’t just relegated to the masked and costumed otaku (crazed anime or manga addict) that make up the ranks of comic book fandom, we are also the creators. Many of the tables and booths at these conventions are populated by Asian Americans. And while Asian Americans have a big presence in the mainstream comics industry, there is still a dearth of main characters that look like us between those pages. The Alternative Press Expo, Comic-Con’s cooler indie cousin, fares a little better as the artists who exhibit there are in the independent, alternative, and self-published comics scene. But what would it look like if Asian Americans ruled the comics industry, mainstream or otherwise? Jeff Yang, Parry Shen, Keith Chow, and Jerry Ma asked themselves that same question. They saw that despite the prevalence of Asian American writers and artists in the mainstream comics industry, a void in representation exists. So they produced and edited Secret Identities: The Asian American Superhero Anthology in 2009 which put Asian faces and stories into the superhero genre. Their latest book in the Secret Identities series, Shattered: The Asian American Comics Anthology, is more ambitious and broader in scope. In Shattered, the many contributors to the book attempt to smash the stereotypes mainstream media have continually perpetuated. Chapters are divided by what they’ve identified as the five main stereotypes that have hounded Asian Americans in this country -- the brute, the temptress, the brain, the alien, and the manipulator. In the Prologue, these demons are released in gold-rush era United States and stories developed by the four editors launch each chapter. While there are plenty of good vs. evil stories here, this book is full of three-dimensional characters. The contributing artists and writers demonstrate the complicated borders that vilified people inhabit, and they question the idea of who the villains and who the heroes really are. To read the rest of this review go to Hyphen. I learned Cup O'Noodles was changed to Cup Noodles in 1993 and in Japan you can get flavors like European Cheese Curry, Hot Caribbean Seafood, and Bacon Soy Sauce.

  4. 4 out of 5

    April eclecticbookworm

    Some good some so-so :) I'm glad I just read the first volume. Some good some so-so :) I'm glad I just read the first volume.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Law

    I wish that there was a note, either at the beginning or the end, that some of the stories are part of an overall narrative arc. I didn't get that until the last story, when I realized that I'd seen at least one character in an earlier story. The strongest comics are the ones that aren't part of that narrative. I particularly liked Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew's Shadow Hero, Howard Wong's Master Tortoise and Master Hare, and Daniel Jai Lee's Tokyo Rose. I wish that there was a note, either at the beginning or the end, that some of the stories are part of an overall narrative arc. I didn't get that until the last story, when I realized that I'd seen at least one character in an earlier story. The strongest comics are the ones that aren't part of that narrative. I particularly liked Gene Luen Yang and Sonny Liew's Shadow Hero, Howard Wong's Master Tortoise and Master Hare, and Daniel Jai Lee's Tokyo Rose.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Yue

    Other than the first comics anthology in this series, Secret Identities, it's quite rare to find another Asian American directed graphic novel. While the multiplicity of narratives arc seems a bit confusing at first, a quick glance at the introduction solves all that. Hyper-reading might benefit the diverse mediums within the novel. Other than the first comics anthology in this series, Secret Identities, it's quite rare to find another Asian American directed graphic novel. While the multiplicity of narratives arc seems a bit confusing at first, a quick glance at the introduction solves all that. Hyper-reading might benefit the diverse mediums within the novel.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emilia P

    This anthology was trying to do wayyyy too much at once -- having an ongoing super-hero-kind-of story while also featuring other single-episode superheroey stories and personal narratives and social commentary and none of the art was particularly fantastic and sighhhh. I guess there's something to be said for its indieness, but its ambitions were a bit too outsized for me. Alas. This anthology was trying to do wayyyy too much at once -- having an ongoing super-hero-kind-of story while also featuring other single-episode superheroey stories and personal narratives and social commentary and none of the art was particularly fantastic and sighhhh. I guess there's something to be said for its indieness, but its ambitions were a bit too outsized for me. Alas.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Raymond Nakamura

    I liked the one with the "Ethnic Foods" arguing about the pros and cons of being in a separate aisle versus being assimilated and I supposed that relates to the premise of this book of having Asian related stories, of the super heroic variety. Sometimes I had trouble following what was going on. Either the jumps were too large or I am not used to the style. I liked the one with the "Ethnic Foods" arguing about the pros and cons of being in a separate aisle versus being assimilated and I supposed that relates to the premise of this book of having Asian related stories, of the super heroic variety. Sometimes I had trouble following what was going on. Either the jumps were too large or I am not used to the style.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Mishap

    I'm generally supportive of these collections and was encouraged to see the overarching theme to this was combating stereotypes about people of Asian descent. Still, despite some gems, this was an over-all middle-of-the road effort. Comic aficionados should jump on board. I'm generally supportive of these collections and was encouraged to see the overarching theme to this was combating stereotypes about people of Asian descent. Still, despite some gems, this was an over-all middle-of-the road effort. Comic aficionados should jump on board.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Roby

    I'm generally a fan of comics anthologies, and I applaud the concept behind this one, but the writing and art was really lacking in most of the stories. Many appeared to be rush jobs - perhaps there was a tight deadline. I'd love to see this redone better. I'm generally a fan of comics anthologies, and I applaud the concept behind this one, but the writing and art was really lacking in most of the stories. Many appeared to be rush jobs - perhaps there was a tight deadline. I'd love to see this redone better.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Gordon

    An interesting compilation of short graphic stories focusing on stories of Asian super heroes. Some delightful up-and-coming artists featured, and many solid vignettes!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

    Reminiscent of American Born Chinese but not as cohesive, which I suppose isn't surprising considering it has multiple contributors. Enjoyed some comics more than others. 3.5 stars. Reminiscent of American Born Chinese but not as cohesive, which I suppose isn't surprising considering it has multiple contributors. Enjoyed some comics more than others. 3.5 stars.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Candice M (tinylibrarian)

    Reviewed for Booklist Reviewed for Booklist

  14. 4 out of 5

    David

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mia

  16. 4 out of 5

    Eljee

  17. 4 out of 5

    Librariman

  18. 4 out of 5

    Monica Noé

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ernest

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alvina

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nayla

  23. 4 out of 5

    David Skies

  24. 5 out of 5

    Frankie Bennett

  25. 4 out of 5

    Serena Chalaka

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  27. 5 out of 5

    Afrah

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sayuri

  29. 5 out of 5

    Thad

  30. 5 out of 5

    amy boese

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